Main Guestbook


Name: David G Watson
Email:DGWATSONRPH@prodigy.net
Date: Friday, May 29, 1998 at 16:16:42
Comments:
I had a heel spur and cured it with the Thera-wedge. If you want relief and not surgery, call me at Watson Pharmacy, Abilene, TX 1-800-7327416

Name: Sandy
Email:sl13mike@pixi.com
Date: Wednesday, May 27, 1998 at 02:19:36
Comments:
I should have tried looking for this site sooner. There are some great tips that I want to try. I've had PF for about a year. I took 3 cortisone shots and that didn't help. My orthopedist sent me to a specialist and he told me to stretch and not go barefoot at home. I have a pair of Mephistos that I love and will buy more when I can afford them but now that I've seen so many recommendations for Birkenstocks, I'm going to try them. I know that I'm supposed to lay off of impact exercise but I need to lose the weight so I use the stationary bike and can walk about ten minutes on the treadmill without pain. The postings I've read have really helped.

Name: marc
Email:vhammee@tornado.be
Date: Wednesday, May 20, 1998 at 05:26:11
Comments:
I am a GP in Belgium. I treat my patients with soft laser treatment and have good results. Usually after a few treatments, the pain is gone. Of course you have to treat the etiological factors such as obesity etc but the pain reacts very good to soft laser therapy. Greetings

Name: Thomas
Email:ta5898
Date: Friday, May 15, 1998 at 12:55:39
Comments:
I suffer from p.f. in both feet. This a.m., I had deep-tissue massage performed on my left foot, which has been killing me since yesterday. It provided some (very) temporary relief; apparently, for this to be really effective, it has to be done on both feet, and the relief isn't going to take place overnight. Is there anybody out there who knows of some- one with experience providing deep-tissue massage to sufferers of p.f., in the New York City area? (The guy who helped this a.m. can't see me again for a week, and I need help now!) Your response is much appreciated; just e-mail me, if possible, at ta5898.

Name: Belva
Email:mclamb@budget.net
Date: Thursday, May 14, 1998 at 22:36:00
Comments:
This question is for gerry. What exactly are the Footmaxx and is there a company address we can write to or do you have to get them through a doctor. Can you give us more information on this? Thanks. Belva

Name: Lisa Burton
Email:queenalice@cheerful.com
Date: Wednesday, May 13, 1998 at 11:54:39
Comments:
As a polio survivor with severely retro-flexed arches on both feet, I have had PF off and on in both feet for as long as I can remember. The condition is aggravated by the fact that muscle weakness in the front of my ankle causes me to use my big toe to lift my right foot. I'm delighted to find all of this information and will be putting as much of it as possible to use ASAP. I would add that I have had good results from using white willow bark capsules for pain and inflamation -- the commercial preparations irritate my stomach no matter how I take them. My current flare-up is the direct result of trying to get settled into my new apartment, and going barefoot to do it. My first goal is going to be looking into Birkenstocks -- anything that gets that many good reviews has to help a little. Thanks, all!

Name: gerry dearie
Email:gadearie@aol.com
Date: Wednesday, May 13, 1998 at 11:43:43
Comments:
I am a success case! After battling PF for over two years I have had healing with Footmaxx orthotics. I had tried every conservative method around: taping, orthotics, ultrsound, physical therapy, massage, icing, complete rest, stretching, accupuncture, anti inflamatory drugs, herbs, magnetic shoe pads etc etc. I found immediate relief from the taping and orthotics but never complete healing. Then I decided to get some smaller orthotics for dressier shoes and my podiatrist said she was working with a new company and fitted me for the Footmaxx. They are computer generated by stepping on a sensetised mat and they have been the answer to all my prayers. After a break in period I began walking slowly and only every other day progressing to evey day for one hour and remaining injury free. I am so thrilled and being able to do all the things I live for and had to give up and also excited about losing the 40lbs I gained while injured. Be patient with yourself and keep trying different methods, I know every one is different. I still take very good care of my feet by never going bare foot either wearing my birkenstock sandals at home or my orthotics in shoes. I knew that surgery was not an option for me if I was to return to my previous very athletic condition. I believe that surgery for PF is experimental and I am glad I followed my instincts and did not accept that as an option. Don't dispair, there are success, I am one.

Name: Jay in AZ
Date: Tuesday, May 12, 1998 at 15:40:35
Comments:
I had success with an inexpensive (< $10) foot massager after ~ 14 months of pf in one foot. The massager is a small frame with wooden rollers to move your foot over. I used it in the evening while watching TV, in both the arch and heel areas. The heel was fairly sensitive at first. I am now pain free.

Name: Annette
Date: Tuesday, May 12, 1998 at 07:55:55
Comments:
Irene, I would suggest you try glucosamine, chondroitin, and zinc, magnesium and calcium supplements. Try 1500 mg (500 mg 3 X day) glucosamine to start, one chondroitin tablet daily. I'm not sure of dose. You can get the 3 minerals in one tablet. I was like you. Nothing much helped, only I didn't have it as long as you. These supplements have really helped, but it takes time. I have been on them 3 months and am still slowly improving. I did see some improvement after a few weeks. They are not cheap but worth a try.

Name: Irene in TX
Email:svfh26b@prodigy.com
Date: Monday, May 11, 1998 at 12:51:15
Comments:
Heretofore a lurker, I finally decided to sign this guestbook. Iíve had pf for three decades, all my adult life. Since I havenít found anything thatís helped, Iíve felt I had little to add to this discussion. I have pain in my entire arch any time I am walking, standing, or even sitting with pressure on my feet. Itís in both feet, and itís not worse in the morning. The problem started in both feet at exactly the same time, during a period of extended walking on cement in flat sandles. (Who knew?) This occurred when I was in my early 20ís, and the problem has steadily worsened since then, a pattern which makes me fear the future. I now sit or use a wheelchair virtually all the time. I do stand to shower and can walk short distances, mainly inside my apartment. Iíve had enough custom and over-the-counter orthotics to sink a ship. Iíve had oral anti-inflammatories, cortisone shots, DMSO, tarsal tunnel release surgery, lots of PT with stretching, strengthening, ice, ultrasound. My most recent failed therapy was prolotherapy (also called sclerotherapy or reconstructive therapy). I wear Feathersprings, which help only a little. They donít give enough support on the outer edges of my feet, so I also tape a wad of tissues to the outer rims when I wear the Feathersprings. If I wear them for too long, they seem to actually aggravate the fascia or heel spur and make the problem worse. Stretching and massage help a little, only temporarily. Basically I am completely disabled. Iíve read over and over "never go barefoot", but I havenít found a shoe or support that I can wear for very long. Iíve seen podiatrists, neurologists, orthopedists, osteopaths, rheumatologists, you name it. I havenít had the plantar fascia release. The tarsal tunnel release left my foot stiffer, and I believe it aggravated the condition, so Iím afraid to have another surgery. Greetings to my fellow sufferers. Iím always open to suggestion. Irene in TX

Name: Barry A. Bertani
Email:babertan@phnx.uswest.net
Date: Thursday, May 7, 1998 at 21:59:46
Comments:
is this guest book any good. all i see is posts with no replies.

Name: Barry A. Bertani
Email:babertan@phnx.uswest.net
Date: Thursday, May 7, 1998 at 21:57:49
Comments:
started having heal pain after rope jumping. i do not think i have pf as there is no pain under my foot. it feels like my heel bone is bruised. pressure on the heel is somewhat painful and there has been no improvement after i stopped rope jumping a couple of months ago. previously no problems with heel pain. when i press directly on the back of my heel i feel tenderness and pain. there is absolutely no pain under my heel or arch. any ideas what this could be. the best way to describe this is it feels like a bone bruise that is not getting any better.

Name: Susanne Andersen - Denmark
Email:yde.and@get2net.dk
Date: Wednesday, May 6, 1998 at 13:02:25
Comments:
Thank you to all of you - I have now a lot of pages to read and I hope, that I can finde something that can help the pain I have in my right foot. I have had plantar fasciitis for about 6 months, and my doctor canīt help me - "buy som runningshoes - he says". He had heard about Viscolas Relievers Insoles - but you canīt buy them in Denmark. Thanks to internet, I have found a company in USA and Iīm going to order a pair. Maybe this guestbook can give me some other "good ideas"? People without PB just canīt understand how painfull it is. They should try to have a thumbtack in the heel.

Name: Belva
Email:mclamb@budget.net
Date: Sunday, May 3, 1998 at 10:41:29
Comments:
This post is in answer to Rhiannon's latest request. Yes, now that my foot is feeling better (due to stretching, ionphothesis, physical therapy, and orthothics plus good shoes and Birks around the house) the pain moved up my leg. At first it was on the inside of the knee. My physical therapist was working on two of the feet joints and now was working also on the knee, as she feels that the feet problem was partially caused by a rotated lower leg bone as well as my having pronated to compensate for being born supranating (not sure of spelling?). However, it has now moved up my leg into my hip (which I broke in a horse accident 9 years ago.) I haven't gotten to see her as she is gone for two weeks. However, as soon as I find out more info from her, I will post again with info. Everyone hang in there. Belva

Name: Ellen Stilwell
Email:durango@mindspring.com
Date: Tuesday, April 28, 1998 at 15:52:06
Comments:
I have been having severe pain in my heels for 3 months now, only to get worse. No one was taking me seriously. It is like walking on knives thru my heels. Sometimes, it is so bad, that I cry through the pain, and actually cannot even walk. I mostly limp now. I had talked to my doctor about it 2 months ago, and he dismissed my foot pain as being my weight. Today, I went to see him, and he now thinks its heel spurs. He wants me to try heel cups and some kind of padding (he wrote it down for me). If in a week, no relief, he will x-ray my feet. It scares me because I'm only 34, and it hurts too bad to walk sometimes. I feel like I'm 80. At least my husband and my doctor are taking me seriously now. I'm so glad to have found this site, and know that I'm not alone. Thanks for letting me vent.

Name: John W. Reed
Email:johnwmreed@worldnet.att.net
Date: Monday, April 27, 1998 at 18:12:51
Comments:
This is a copy of a message I sent to the Strassburg Sock people: "Hi! I have been using the Strassburg Sock for about 6 weeks with terrific success. I have had Plantar faciitis for about 9 months and now it is nearly gone. The sock plus exercise routine worked great.! Having said this, I want to tell you that I have had to modify the sock to make it work. The problem is that you set the tension and go to sleep only to wake up and find the tension is gone. The sock creeps (i.e., stretches slowly) which relieves the tension in the strap. Consequently, I had to reset the tension 3 or 4 times during the night. My ad hoc solution was to add another velcro strap at the ankle. By tightening this strap securely around the ankle it restrains the sock to stretch only between the toe and the ankle, rather than between the toe and the knee (which is a much longer distance). Hence the stretching length is shorter. Usually I only have to reset the tension once during the night. A much better design would be to run the tension strap all the way from the inside of the knee, down the calf and around the bottom of the foot to the toe - with extra length, of course, so it can be run through the D-ring at the knee for tensioning. You cannot sew it to the sock because people have different lower leg lengths. The solution is to guide the strap between the inner knee and the toe through several loops (like belt loops on your pants!) These loops would be sewed to the sock. This would keep all the tension in the strap (which has very little stretch), not in the sock (which stretches a lot). I hope this is useful to you. If you have any questions write me an e-mail message. For me this sock was a medical miracle."

Name: William Ferguson
Email:WilliamHF@worldnet.att.net
Date: Saturday, April 25, 1998 at 09:12:38
Comments:
In order to better understand the condition called plantar fasciitis, one should have a basic understanding of the anatomy concerned. While I can NOT vouch for the accuracy of the drawings of foot anatomy shown online at the following website/URL, they appear to be instructive and possibly helpful to some plantar fasciitis sufferers. http://www.footsupport.com/info/anatomy.html If you know of a web site which has CLEARER, better drawings or photographs, please post it to Scott Roberts' site. Cordially William

Name: barbara
Email:barbntux
Date: Saturday, April 25, 1998 at 06:24:50
Comments:
GREAT TO REALIZE IAM NOT ALONE!

Name: William H. Ferguson
Email:WilliamHF@worldnet.att.net
Date: Friday, April 24, 1998 at 21:57:01
Comments:
Plantar fasciitis and Medical Literature Searching Since some of us are hoping that there have been studies done on outcomes achieved with various treatment modalities in the condition, Plantar Fasciitis, I am offering these web resources as possible places to search for papers dealing with such treatments. We are lookingfor objective, reputable, juried reports which have been published in established and conventional medical journals. (I have NOT made such a search.) This first site provides links to many other medical literature search sites. While I only give URLís for three of the sites, many other sites are referenced within this URLís pages. (Journal of the American Medical Association, British Lancet, and many others). I highly recommend investigating this site to any Plantar Fasciitis sufferer. http://www.webcom.com/mjljweb/jrnlclb/links.html National Library of Medicine The National Library of Medicine provides access to a number of databases and systems, including MEDLARS (Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System) which, itself, includes MEDLINE. These databases can be accessed via the GRATEFUL MED SYSTEM Hereís the URL: http://igm.nlm.nih.gov/ Internet Grateful Med is now free (as of June 26, 1997). ēAnother system for medical literature searching, also from the National Library of Medicine and available on the World Wide Web at no cost, is PUBMED. Hereís the URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/PubMed/ Another worthwhile site is PaperChase. Here's the URL: http://www.paperchase.com/ "PaperChase was developed at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, a major teaching hospital of the Harvard Medical School. It was the first service that permitted end-users to perform computerized retrieval of biomedical literature. In 1984, PaperChase was made available commercially. Now used throughout the world, PaperChase is available via local dialup, telnet, and the world wide web." Should you employ one or several of these links, please post any successful finds of general interest to this thread. Perhaps we can build a library of legitimate Plantar Fasciitis papers. Hoping this will be of some help to fellow sufferers, Cordial regards to all William WilliamHF@worldnet.att.net

Name: john holt
Email:jholt@cei.net
Date: Friday, April 24, 1998 at 16:50:04
Comments:
visited with my doctor this pm and thought i would explain the procedure he uses for PF. he is an orthopedic surgeon with a fellowship in foot and ankle surgery. he trained under a dr. baxter in houston who apparently is a well known orthopedic surgeon who has operated on such people as carl lewis the famous runner. dr baxter developed the following procedure and it is apparently in common use among many orthopedic surgeons. a traditional incision is made forward of the heel (not thu a scope) a small triangular wedge of fascia is removed which is over a small nerve (baxter's nerve) that runs across the foot at this point. the doctor removes any muscle or other tissue that may entrap this nerve. the fascia that ran across the nerve has been removed so it cannot press on it. about a 30 minute outpatient procedure with 3 week of no pressure on the foot and then into a walking shoe with light pressure.

Name: John Holt
Email:jholt@cei.net
Date: Friday, April 24, 1998 at 09:48:47
Comments:
as a long time fellow PF sufferer i wonder what the success rate for PF surgery is for conventional and eds surgery? reading all the post you would think it is not good however we probably have 90% post by folks with failed surgery or those who cannot get pf under control so any data we surmise from the post would be eschewed. i have heard poditrist talk in the 85% range for success. my ortho talks in the 70% range for success. surely there is some reliable data out there from some associations,hmo's, etc. i find it amazing that the treatment,post recovery treatment, and approach to surgery can be so different. it is no wonder that we all seem to wonder in the dark on how to treat ourselves or whether to have or not to have surgery and what results to expect.

Name: Rhiannon
Email:rhiannon@netgate.net
Date: Wednesday, April 22, 1998 at 16:54:10
Comments:
Hi folks, Back again! Still tromping around in my new shoes. But I have a question for you. Anybody have some inner calf and knee pain related to PF? When my foot hurts (I have PF in the ball of my foot) I end up walking on the outside edge of my foot. So as not to stretch the fasciia. Well.. after a while I get what feels like a big knot on the inside of my knee. I'm assuming it's from compensating and I'll ask my doctor when I go back and see her in about a week but in the meantime, I'd love to hear other experiences.

Name: Dana Zucker
Email:m-zucker@cougarnet.netexp.net
Date: Friday, April 17, 1998 at 20:29:13
Comments:
Thanks to those who encouraged me to stick with the Birkenstocks despite an uncomfortable start. I now wear them almost everywhere and can actually walk for a couple of hours without being in a great deal of pain.

Name: Diane R.
Email:insty@win.bright.net
Date: Sunday, April 12, 1998 at 16:54:41
Comments:
More news on the Birks ... While on vacation I came across a great Birkenstock store similar to the experience mentioned by Riannon below. The owner was extremely helpful and I now know alot more about Birks than previously ... and found I was actually wearing the wrong width for my feet. They do come in Regular and Narrow in most styles except the waterproof Birkies are only in Regulars at this point. The Tatami line have a very pronounced arch and if you have a higher than usual arch this is for you. It was not for me even though it looked at first as if I might be a candidate for them. After standing in them for about a half hour in his store, I decided they were not as comfortable as I first thought. What really helped me most was getting the narrow footbed in the Arizona. He also had a really "cute" shoe called a "Granada" with a double strap slip on sandal look that is almost dressy. I was so happy with them I went back and got a second pair! Everyone who sees them on me is astounded that they have a Birk footbed! Another really nice looking one - but with a back strap is the Bali. Both have Arizona type beds. Some people have complained that the arch is not right for them on Birks - maybe you tried the Tatami or need a different style. They have some "toe thong" styles that a friend got because she has bunions along with her PF. Said they are doing great for her. I have been a 100% Birkie since May '97 and am now pain free (after previously 4 bad yrs. and nothing seemed to help) No surgery for me, just the Birks. I can now do malls, exploring old houses and model home tours which I love, moderate hiking trails and lots of fun things again. Hope this helps some of you, too. Best from MN, Diane R.

Name: Rhiannon
Email:rhiannon@netgate.net
Date: Sunday, April 12, 1998 at 02:55:36
Comments:
Greetings Fellow Sufferers, I am a dancer and was recently diagnosed with PF. Lucky me, I kinda need my feet. This has been happening on and off since the initial injury back when I was 16 years old from walking -everywhere-. (Only I didn't know what it was then) Finally bothered me enough to see a doctor. She has me on lots of advil, calf stretches twice a day, had to get shoes with some sort of support (bye bye cute, cheap girlie shoes). And of course, I am not to walk barefoot anywhere under any circumstances. Not even from the bedroom to the kitchen. Just got some Rockport boots and they're great. My Doc Martens were too small with the Spenco insert in and rubbed the top of my foot raw. And I also want to recommend the Tatami line of Birkenstocks. They have a higher than normal arch support and you can -really- feel the difference. I tried on both the regular and the Tatami line today. If you are near San Francisco, please go to the Birkenstock store at Union Square (42 Stockton Street) and see the manager, Bodhi. (pronounced Bo-dee) I just bought the Oder style Birks in the Tatami line today and he was SO helpful. He held the shoes when I called in the morning and then since they were closed tomorrow (Easter) he kept the store open late for me so I could drive 45 min up to SF and get them today. He was very understanding and patient while I explained my condition, hemmed and hawed over 5 different styles of shoes and finally purchased only one. He even offered to find out if they could adjust the straps on the Isis style so that it would fit better around my ankle. And all with a fabulous sense of humor and friendly demeanor. So go see him! Or mail order your shoes from there.. they are wonderful. Tell him Shanna with the red hair sent you. Standard disclaimers apply, of course. Anywho... good luck to all of you with your condition. I'm glad this guestbook/forum is here. Nice to know I'm not alone.

Name: Lynn
Date: Saturday, April 11, 1998 at 23:10:44
Comments:
This is in response to the query about Mephisto shoes. I have two pair, and gradually hope to get more, when I can afford them. Make sure you get the "Mobil" line of the Mephistos as they have wonderful arch support. You can use your own orthotics in the shoes, but I find that isn't necessary for me. (And I have an amazingly high arch -- the chiropodist was even impressed!!) These shoes have made a wonderful difference to me. I bought mine in Toronto. Anyway, the USA address is: Mephisto -- 1037 Segovia Circle, Placentia, CA, 92870. Tel. 714.632.2570.

Name: William Ferguson
Email:WilliamHF@worldnet.att.net
Date: Saturday, April 11, 1998 at 00:36:36
Comments:
Can someone tell me about "Mephisto" shoes? Where see? Where buy? Phone? Website? Scott suggested that they may be as good or better than Birkenstock shoes, but I haven't been able to uncover information concerning them. Has anyone devised a "foot board" such as I've seen in use installed on hospital beds? The idea is to keep the plane of the sole of the foot at right angles to the line of the extended leg. Someone suggested trying to achieve the same result with a pillow but that seems too soft to me. How would one attach a board across an ordinary bed? Is there some commercial equivalent of a "foot board?" Thank you William

Name: Debra Lane
Email:zemaprince @ aol.com
Date: Friday, April 10, 1998 at 09:59:43
Comments:
I am looking for someone that has had a partial rupture of the PF and what they are now expirencing. I have tried to go back and teach aerobics but have continial flare-ups with pain. It has been one year from the time of rupture. I get so discouraged at times. Now my L PF is streched to the max and my Dr. is concerned that the L might let go. The funny thing is I do not feel pain in the PF which is good...except it is so tight. I have been using aromatherapy oils and massage to help both feet, but this is not covered by my insurance and gets to be expensive. I would love to hear from anyone who might help.

Name: Joyce Banttari
Email:jbanttar@arrowhead.lib.mn.us
Date: Thursday, April 9, 1998 at 13:08:12
Comments:
Dear friends with pain... For 9 months I suffered ... could hardly walk and tried many of the things I learned about from this site. My thanks to you all for sharing, you were so important to me! For the past two months my pain has come under control as I now have stiffness only in the morning and after being on my feet for more than a couple of hours. Let me share with you what has helped me: 1. The Birkenstock shoe inserts...these are about $45 and can be placed in my shoes (with laces) 2. The Dansko clogs for when I want to look a little dressed up. 3. Swim areobics 3x week for 90 min. I wear an aqua sock with my custom orthodics inside (they are plastic) 4. Following a low carb diet which limits my carbs to 30 grams a day. This has been the most important change in my life! I have read: Protein Power by Drs. Eades, The New Diet Revolution by Dr. Atkins, The Carbohydrate Addict's _?__by Drs. Heller. Basically inside of a couple of months the inflamation in my body has gone, I have lost 20 pounds without feeling deprived or hungry at any time. What I have cut out is: all sugars, and starches including flour, potatoes, rice, pasta, peas, corn, etc. This means no bread or rolls. (Your favorite foods, right?) My sugar cravings took a few days to subside but since then I've had no trouble. I feel great with blood pressure and sugar count finally normal and the PF so much better. If you need to lose weight, this is a wonderful new way of eating that is so easy to do. Get the Atkins or Eades book (both available in paperback) and check out this WEB site: www.lowcarb.org Best of luck to you all!

Name: Stephanie Crocker
Email:Stephanie.Crocker@gov.ab.ca
Date: Friday, April 3, 1998 at 13:02:34
Comments:
Hi everyone; I have been suffering with PF for the last year. Only recently, I started to really have serious problems, I was diagnosed correctly with PF and was given bad advice by a physiotherapist. I was sent to a so-called orthodics specialist and was given the wrong kind of orthodics. This alleviated the pain for a while but then it made it worse. I am at home now and cannot do much of anything. I am in constant pain and am waiting to go to an excellent clinic here in Edmonton for help. My life has changed very drastically and I often I am depressed and finding it very hard to look on the bright side. I look forward to the day that I can walk for longer than a block and not suffer for days afterwards. I was very happy to find this site and know that I am not the only one who feels robbed and frustrated by this condition.

Name: John Ferraro
Date: Sunday, March 29, 1998 at 10:47:20
Comments:
I had been suffering from PF for three years. The methods of treatment included rest,stretching,ice,therapy, injections, taping and two sets of custom made orthotics. All these things helped but the heel pain was still there. Three months ago I met DR. Merrell Cook, who has selling foot orthotics, these orthotics were unlike any other I'd seen or felt before.I purchased a pair and after two weeks my heel pain was gone! If anyone would like the number : DR. MERRELL H. COOK Westminster CA. 714 896-8786

Name: Tom Niermann
Date: Friday, March 20, 1998 at 09:16:56
Comments:
I am healed! After 1 1/2 years of trying everything in the book from gimmicks to Podiatrists, I want to share what finally worked. The simple combination of calf stretching 3 times a day, for 2 - 3 months (and for the rest of your life), persisting that my Podiatrist prescribe highly customized orthodics from a local shop (the commercial lab orthodics that you usually get caused more pain than they helped), and beign faithful about wearing them. I hope this message helps someone else. Good Luck!

Name: Sallie Adams
Email:sallie.adams@mci.com
Date: Tuesday, March 17, 1998 at 19:11:26
Comments:
I have been suffering from PF problems for 6 months. Still looking for solution that will help me. At the suggestion of a friend, I am trying the Step Stretch by Prism Technologies 1-800-432-8722. She swears by it. Great forum. Very informative.

Name: Tere
Email:homewest@sunset.net
Date: Sunday, March 15, 1998 at 23:01:31
Comments:
Help ! ! ! After suffering for about 4 years total both before and after the surgery on my left foot. My right foot is now in the same shape. I cannot afford the time off nor the pain involved int he traditional surgery like I had before. However I am interested in the EPF. I have blocked this pain out for so many years that I just can't do it that well anymore with the Right Foot. I was totally surprised at how many of us there are. Surely there must be a solution for us. Please give me your opinions on the EPF Surgery. Sounds Too good to be true by Dr. Barrett. Actually walking on the foot the next day. I am thinking If I have the surgery done now, I can stave off some of the pain. I must decide now as I will be losing my Insurance Coverage in July, 1998. I am open to suggestions. Thanks in Advance.

Name: Lynn
Date: Sunday, March 8, 1998 at 21:50:05
Comments:
The Internet is certainly a wonderful thing. I have learned a lot from this site that has really helped me. I have been suffering since August, with almost no improvement at all, until I found this site. What have I learned that my chiropodist did not tell me? 1) Elevate your foot. I put a pillow in my bed at night and rest my afflicted foot on it. 2) Ice. Ice. Ice. I filled a plastic pop bottle with water and froze it. In the evening, I roll my foot over it, and apply mild pressure at the painful points. Wear socks!! 3) Massage. Several times a day, especially when the pain is bad, I gently massage the whole foot, with emphasis on the heel and arch. Take your time with this one. 4) Stretches. I stretch my calves on an angle board, and that seems to help. I also flex my feet often throughout the day, and always several times before I get out of bed. 5) Proper shoes. The heels should be elevated slightly. I have orthotics, and I can't say they've done a lot for me. The best thing was a pair of Finn Comfort shoes that I wear at work. Of course, they are expensive, but after 6 months of agony ...... 6) Never, ever, go barefoot. I have my Clark's sandals that I wear at home, even in the middle of the night when I get out of bed. My next step is to lose about 50 pounds. That will be the hardest of all. These have really helped me. I actually have some almost pain-free days. My major accomplishment was walking on the treadmill for 20 minutes yesterday!!! A month ago I couldn't walk 50 feet without suffering. I use the orthotics in a pair of good running shoes. No surgery and no injections!!!! Those messages come across pretty loud and clear from other sufferers.

Name: Eliza White
Email:elizaw@earthlink.net
Date: Friday, March 6, 1998 at 13:24:48
Comments:
I've had PF in both feet for almost 2 months now (so painful, I had to be carried to the doctor!)from runnning and step aerobics. I was in training for the NYC marathon and was told by my podistrist i could not run or do any sort of impact exercise for at least 6 months. Needless to say I am very frustrated. My heels hurt the most in the early morning and late evening. I have found a little relief doing the following things: swimming, ultrasound therpay, taking naxopren, icing and elevating my feet, wearing saucony grid sneakers with spenco inserts and stretching my calves. Though I was skeptical, I tried reflexology and found that it was initially painful, but seemed to loosen up the heel and felt better later. Any other suggestions are welcome.

Name: Annette Gernaey
Date: Tuesday, February 24, 1998 at 07:48:38
Comments:
I have been taking glucosamine and chondroitin for about 3 weeks and have seen some inprovement in pain, not only in my feet, but knees etc. I am still reserving judgement as they say it takes 6-8 weeks to feel the full effect. As these supplements seem to help some people I wonder if some of our foot pain is due to more than PF. I am still experimenting with various shoe supports, inserts etc. They all don't help much. I'm trying to find ones that I can at least tolerate and that don't make the pain worse. Not much luck so far.

Name: Harry
Email:mrtzara@aol.com
Date: Monday, February 23, 1998 at 16:20:34
Comments:
This is so distressing! I've had this problem for about a year or so, off and on, and it's become steadily worse during the past couple of months. I appear to have PF in both feet. I've been using the Scholl's heel cups in both shoes, and, while they helped a lot for a couple of weeks, now the effect seems to be lessened. I've also gained about 30 or more pounds in the past 2 years, so I think that's the culprit. Working on losing the weight, but it's hell trying to do aerobic exercise with PF!

Name: Shaira
Email:sgoldst@hotmail.com
Date: Monday, February 23, 1998 at 14:56:27
Comments:
Sorry! Forgot to add that I have Spenco heel supports (which include an arch support) in my New Balance walking shoes (the only pair of shoes I can wear!). On the Spenco Heel Supports box it says "for Plantar Fasciitis" in case anyone is confused. Hope we all get better some day!

Name: Shaira
Email:sgoldst@hotmail.com
Date: Monday, February 23, 1998 at 14:50:44
Comments:
I bought a Footsoother massager from The Sharper Image for about $200. It's definitely worth it. In the middle there's a "shiatsu" massage (for one foot only). It definitely relieves the pain a lot. I'm also taking Glucosamine & Chondroitin (and Calcium)everyday, when I miss a day I feel it and the pf is worse. I looked at the Dr. Scholl's foot massager with heat on the web thru this site and it does look good, esp. for those who do not want to spend $200. I personally think the Glucosamine & Chondroitin do the best job, and I would definitely recommend getting a foot massager to everyone on this site!

Name: JOE SIMMONS
Email:jsimmons@beaulib.dtx.net
Date: Friday, February 20, 1998 at 03:14:32
Comments:
I HAD EPF BOTH FEET ON OCTOBER 8, THE RIGHT FOOT IN ERROR. NURSE PICKED UP WRONG FOOT FOR SURGERY. I HAVE TERRIBLE PAIN IN BOTH FEET NOW. NEED TO KNOW WHAT HAPPENS TO FOOT WHEN YOU HAVE EPF ON GOOD FOOT. THANKS

Name: Don Fraley
Email:fraledd@valunet.com
Date: Thursday, February 19, 1998 at 17:48:46
Comments:
February 18, 1998 I have been suffering from PF now for about two years. When I first started getting treatment, my left foot was the worst. I took 3 shots of cortizone and the pain pretty much went away. Started taking cortizone in the right foot and after 8 shots, I got no relief. Finally agreed to getting surgery in which they scraped the spur off the bottom of my heal and releived the plantar facia. Missed one week of work. My work, tennis, golf all are very strenuous on my feet. I was operated on on Nov 20, 1997 and waited for five weeks before trying to play some tennis. Played 3 hard sets and was completely set back. Rested for another five weeks. Played tennis another two days and am back to being as sore as I was before surgery. I am now trying as much rest as possible, stretching, icing about three times a week. I hope this all works, as this is killing me not to be able to do the things I love to do. Will post later.

Name: Belva
Email:mclamb@budget.net
Date: Thursday, February 19, 1998 at 16:46:59
Comments:
Hello other PF sufferers. I found this page about a month after I was diagnosed with PF. It has been one of the most helpful things. Woke up at Thanksgiving and could not put my left foot on the ground! Ouch! I did not know it, but I had been having symptoms for a while--like my feet aching when I got up from being in the recliner grading papers (I teach and am on my feet all day on concrete.) After hobling around on a crutch for a month, my other foot started to get it. Education would help people discover this earlier, when it is maybe more treatable. But all of you know that, yes? As far as what has helped: (1) Anti-inflammatories only seem to help when it is bad and my feet are throbbing. So I take them only at that point. (2) Stretching, stretching, stretching. Besides the regular leg in front and bend knees stretch, my physical therapist has me take a 2 x 4 to school and hang my heels off of it to stretch the heel cord out any time I can. I do this at home on a brick, also. (3) NEVER go barefoot. NEVER. My Birkenstocks are wonderful around the house. However, because I pronate, I have to have more support at school. So I bought a good, comfortable, ankle high support shoe. I wear my orthotics in them when I am out. (4) Ice seems to help if I have had a bad day and my feet are sore. (5) Resting my feet help, but is not very practical with my lifestyle. I DO try to sit down and put my feet up some during breaks between classes. I only walk around the classroom. I miss being able to walk anywhere and take hikes. (6) Ultrasound with cortisone cream in physical therapy soothed, but did not help. The iontophoresis (using electrodes to get anti-inflammatory into the foot) helped the most as far as PT is concerned. My present therapist believes my PF comes from an old broken hip injury and a broken leg injury that are causing my bones and muscles to twist, thereby twisting my foot muscles, also. I haven't and don't want to take cortisone shots. My podiatrist supports this and is working around it. I have not tried accupuncture (it is too expensive and not covered by insurance), but I have tried cranio-sacral massage. Can't tell if it is helping yet. This is SUCH a FRUSTRATING problem. Yes, it would be good to have a chat room for us all. Well, I feel rather long winded, so I will stop here and check in again later. Thanks for starting this Web site.


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