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Message Number 259732
Re: Plantar Fasciitis & Topaz View Thread
Posted by Debra on 8/15/09 at 18:06

It has been eight weeks since my PRP injection and my heel pain is still significant and in addition, I have pain at the site of injection. My doctor told me that some people need a second injection but I don't think I am going to take that rist since I actually seem to be worse. I am getting orthotics this week. Hopefully, they will offer some relief. I had high hopes for this procedure but unfortunately it didn't work for me.

Result number: 1

Message Number 258925

Re: Plantar Fasciitis & Topaz View Thread
Posted by debra on 7/17/09 at 22:39

I have been diagnosed with plantar fasciitis. I broke my foot last year and clomped around in a cast (mostly bearing the weight on my heel for 8 weeks). After the cast came off, the pain in my heal started and got worse and worse. I was diagnosed by two orthopedic surgeons (L.A. Sports Medicine and Kerlan Jobe) where I received two cortisone injections and 6 months of PT. After no relief was found I went to a podiatrist who told me about the injection. The crutches were to alleviate any weight bearing and allow the foot to heal. The pain from the prp was significant but short (none afterwards). The cost was $250 for the prp kit. My insurance paid the remainder of office visit, etc.

Result number: 2

Message Number 258922

Re: Plantar Fasciitis & Topaz View Thread
Posted by Dr. Ed on 7/17/09 at 21:24

Debra:

Is the 70 percent success rate you speak of specifically for plantar fasciitis or plantar fasciosis? Crutches? The Topaz procedure does not require one to be on crutches. Platelet rich plasma injections appear to have promise but have been popularized as a 'magic bullet' for a large number of musculoskeletal conditions. The downside appears to be small. Is your insurance carrier willing to pay for the PRP? If not, what is the cost? Do you have plantar fasciosis?

Perhaps Drs. DSW and Z will comment here. We have focused on treatments more specifically targeted for fasciosis/fasciitis on this site to date.

Dr. Ed

Result number: 3

Message Number 258919

Re: Plantar Fasciitis & Topaz View Thread
Posted by debra on 7/17/09 at 18:26

I haven't heard anyone write about the platelet rich plasma injection
(prp) which I recently had after trying all other avenues (p.t., cortisone, etc.) My doctor told me that this is a step to try and less invasive than, topaz. It's a procedure where they draw a patients own blood, spin it to enrich the platelets (healing part of blood) and inject it into the fascia while observing with ultra-sound. Takes only a few minutes. In a walking boot and crutches for two weeks so that the foot rests/heals. I hope it works. I have heard the success rate is about 70% and is not very expensive. There is alot of info on web.

Result number: 4

Message Number 258888

Re: Itchy heel problem View Thread
Posted by debraw on 7/15/09 at 22:44

I am so thankful to Tom for starting this post. I have had itchy heel for years. It always gets much worse in the summer after wearing tennis shoes and socks. I would always keep the dry skin buffed off and put the anti-fungal stuff on, but it still drove me nuts at night. So I followed Tom's advise to the letter, but added one thing. I bought a heel cup that was like a sock, but only for your heel. Then I put white vinegar on a cotton round and inserted on my heel area. I did this for 3 days and then left off for a full day. Even though I had thought my heel was buffed down, I was wrong. My entire heel came off in several large pieces of skin. Then I started a prescription anti-fungal twice a day. I even scrub my feet every night with scrubbing bubbles and spray the shower as suggested. I feel like a normal woman again and can now wear sandles without wondering who is looking at my bad foot.

Result number: 5

Message Number 258753

Re: continous pain View Thread
Posted by debra f. on 7/09/09 at 00:25

thanks for responding. I have tried to get a job where I am not on my feet but there is nothing out there. Where I live unemployment is almost 12%. I am going to school to get a degree as a medical assistant where I would be running a doctor office or working in a hospital office.I tried to get disablity and was told I could work so they wouldn't give it to me. I was out on workers comp. for a year 2 times but the benefits ran out.I am kinda stuck between a rock and hard place. I have to work because I have to be able to pay my rent and bills and yet I am in so much pain that I would welcome having my feet taken off just to stop it. I can so relate to how you feel about the surgery and being tired of limping. Since I have it in both feet it's like which side do I limp on. ha ha. Be real careful of the surgery. I have had it in both of feet. The pain of recovery is almost as bad as the pain I have had since. I will never, never, never go through that again. See several doc. and be sure before you do it.Good luck to you I will be praying for you.

Result number: 6

Message Number 258701

Re: plantar fasciitis pain and diagnosis View Thread
Posted by debra f. on 7/07/09 at 18:38

I had the surgery and it made it worse. It's not the doc's fault it's just that it was worse then anyone thought. the surgery is very, very painful so be sure before you commit to it. I am still in extreme pain and it won't be getting better. I have to work at a job where I am on my feet and running around so by the end of the day you can guess the pain I'm in. Remember 85% still leaves 15% chance of not working. Get another opinion if you don't trust your doctor. It is not like an emergency so you have time. After all you have had this for 20 years so another month is not going to make any difference right. Good luck to you.

Result number: 7

Message Number 258700

continous pain View Thread
Posted by debra f. on 7/07/09 at 18:26

I have had plantar fasciitis for over 7 years. I have had every treatment known, including surgery in both feet. It has gotten worse. I have a job where I have to be on my feet as a sales person in a department store. I am in extreme pain and having to take a lot pain medication. I am awaken many times every night with bad spasms in my feet that take a while to go away. I have several questions:
1. Is there anything that I can do to ease the pain during the day. I have good shoes, cannot wear inserts it makes it worse, and cannot take pain medication during the day.
2. Is there anything I can do to ease the pain faster after work.

I have also noticed that I am experiencing a lot of pain in the top of my ankle and the last 3 toes on each foot. I have a problem with anything touching them such as blankets when I am having spasms.

I am on several types of pain medication, spasm medication, and anti-inflammatorys.

I welcome any advice. thank you.

Result number: 8

Message Number 254375

Re: New York Senator View Thread
Posted by Rick R on 1/26/09 at 14:41

It's an interesting turn of events. I don't know much about Hildebrand but it would appear she's a moderate or at least averages out to one. I don't think her early learning curve with the scrutiny of national politics was the issue. I think she's got too much natural strength to run off at the first warm sensation. She may have never wanted it that badly and did like any good job seeker; keep herself in the driver seat until certain she wanted to walk away.

Rick

Result number: 9

Message Number 254272

New York Senator View Thread
Posted by john h on 1/23/09 at 13:23

The NY Governor has appointed a NY Representative Hildebrand as the new Senator. I know nothing about her but I think this is a better choice than C. Kennedy as Rep Hildebrand has experience in politics and in government.

Kennedy backing out is sort of a mystery. I thought she was a lock but i guess all these questions she has been asked and her very unprofessional answers gave her pause to reconsider. What ever the reason it makes sense that someone with at least some experience was appointed. I bet the Governor was under enormous pressure to appoint her as the Kennedy's carry a big stick in national and local politics.

Result number: 10
Searching file 24

Message Number 245551

Nerve damage from tarsal tunnel release surgery View Thread
Posted by Debra M on 4/07/08 at 07:50

I wanted to know what is the probability of having nerve damage to the right median and lateral plantar nerve after having a tarsal tunnel release done. I had this surgery done almost 2 years ago and I am still numb in this area.

Result number: 11

Message Number 245550

Nerve damage from tarsal tunnel release surgery View Thread
Posted by Debra M on 4/07/08 at 07:48

I wanted to know what is the probability of having nerve damage to the right median and lateral plantar nerve after having a tarsal tunnel release done. I had this surgery done almost 2 years ago and I am still numb in this area.

Result number: 12

Message Number 245549

Nerve damage from tarsal tunnel release surgery View Thread
Posted by Debra M on 4/07/08 at 07:47

I wanted to know what is the probability of having nerve damage to the right median and lateral plantar nerve after having a tarsal tunnel release done. I had this surgery done almost 2 years ago and I am still numb in this area.

Result number: 13
Searching file 23

Message Number 235077

Re: anyone... someone...this is my big reach out to the people at heelspurs.com View Thread
Posted by Kevin L on 8/28/07 at 17:48

Dr DSW
Below are all the Podiatry providers that take my insurance within 30 miles of my zip 11223 (Brooklyn NY) In alphabetical order…then with detailed info address…etc etc..
A
Abady, Robert, DPM 1
Abeles, Jay, DPM 11
Abrahamson, Hal, DPM 11
Alfieri, Donna M., DPM 1
Alongi, Maryanne, DPM 11
Amante, Gregory, DPM 5
Amato, Richard, DPM 11
Amico, Susan G., DPM 5
Archer, Jean V., DPM 5
Aronica, Frank R., DPM 5
Asaro, Carlo S., DPM 1
Assini, Joseph, DPM 5
Axman, Wayne R., DPM 11
B
Babayev, Emil, DPM 5
Bagner, Jerome E., DPM 11
Baird, William T., DPM 5
Balboa, Henry M., DPM 11
Barbaro, Thomas, DPM 11
Bar-David, Tzvi, DPM 1
Barkoff, Matthew W., DPM 11
Barkoff, Steven L., DPM 5
Barlizo, Sharon R., DPM 1
Barone, Salvatore A., DPM 5
Barragan, Juan C., DPM 1
Bartol, David M., DPM 5
Bass, Elliot L., DPM 5
Bass, Fara D., DPM 5
Bautista, Debbie P., MD 1
Bayerbach, Frank, DPM 1
Becker, Jack S., DPM 11
Bell, Burt L., DPM 5
Bendeth, Marc L., DPM 11
Benzakein, Ralph, DPM 5
Berlin, Kim, DPM 11
Bienenfeld, Jay D., DPM 5
Biller, Bob S., DPM 11
Bilotti, Mary A., DPM 11
Birch, Gregory M., DPM 5
Bover, Elina, DPM 5
Braun, Suzanne G., DPM 5
Breitman, Debra, DPM 11
Breth, Evan G., DPM 5
Bubbers, Linda A., DPM 11
Buenahora, Joseph A., DPM 11
Burzotta, John L., DPM 11
Bushansky, Abe A., DPM 1, 5
Butters, Marva, DPM 5
Butts, Bryon G., DPM 1
Buxbaum, Frederick D., DPM 5
Buzermanis, Steven Z., DPM 5
C
Caimano, Francis X., DPM 11
Campbell, Andrew, DPM 1
Campbell, Douglas E., DPM 5
Caprioli, Russell, DPM 11
Caprioni, Enrico P., DPM 5
Carlton, Lawrence S., DPM 5
Castillo, Dennis E., DPM 5
Catanese, Dominic J., DPM 1
Charlot, Giznola J., DPM 1, 5
Cheng, Tung W., DPM 6
Chernick, Stephen B., DPM 11
Chionis, Anthony, DPM 1
Chopra, Jaideep, DPM 1, 6
Cicio, Gary, DPM 6
Ciment, Avraham Y., DPM 1
Cohen, Greg E., DPM 6
Cohen, Richard B., DPM 6
Cohen, Robert J., DPM 1, 11
D
Dacher, Jeffrey, DPM 6
D'Amato, Theodore A., DPM 6
D'Angelo, Nicholas A., DPM 6
Daniel, Lawrence B., DPM 6
Davies, Daniel A., DPM 11
Davies, Gregory F., DPM 11
De Bello, John A., DPM 1
DeCicco, John J., DPM 11
DeLeon, Jose L., DPM 1
Dellolio, Joseph A., DPM 1
DeMeo, James R., DPM 6
Dennis, Lester N., DPM 6
DeSantos, Pasquale, DPM 6
Dhandari, Angeleta, DPM 1
Dharia, Sumit S., DPM 6
Dixit, Chaitanya V., DPM 6
Donovan, Glenn J., DPM 6
Dorazi, Stephen T., DPM 6
Dubov, Spencer F., DPM 11
E
Edelstein, Michael C., DPM 1
Ehrlich, Josh C., DPM 6
Einhorn, Jill L., DPM 6
Elsinger, Elisabeth C., DPM 1
F
Fagen, Leonard, DPM 6
Falcone, Jeffrey J., DPM 6
Feldman, Gary B., DPM 11
Ficke, Henry, DPM 6
Finkelstein, Barry I., DPM 1
Fiorenza, Dominic, DPM 11
Fox, Corey, DPM 11
Fox, Roberta A., DPM 11
Frankel, Bruce, DPM 1
Freiser, Mark A., DPM 1
Fridman, Robert, DPM 1
Friedlander, Bruce W., DPM 6
Fuchs, David B., DPM 11
G
Ganjian, Afshin, DPM 6
Garcia, Sandra P., DPM 1
Garofalo, Alfred A., DPM 6
Garofalo, Gail F., DPM 11
Gasparini, Mark C., DPM 11
Gaudino, Salvatore C., DPM 2, 6
Geiger, Arthur, DPM 6
George, Thomas, DPM 2, 6, 11
Gertsik, Vladimir V., DPM 6
Gervasio, Joseph, DPM 11
Giammarino, Philip A., DPM 6
Ginsberg, Steven E., DPM 2
Giordano, Richard S., DPM 2
Gitlin, David, DPM 2
Glockenberg, Aaron, DPM 2, 6
Goez, Emilio A., DPM 2, 11
Goldenberg, Perry Z., DPM 2
Goldman, Gershon A., DPM 6
Goldstein, Harold L., DPM 2
Goldstein, Israel, DPM 7
Golub, Cary M., DPM 12
Gonzalez, Ivan, DPM 7
Goodman, Warren J., DPM 7
Gottlieb, Robert J., DPM 12
Gramuglia, Vincent J., DPM 2
Greenbaum, Bruce R., DPM 7
Greenbaum, Mitchell A., DPM 12
Greiff, Lance, DPM 2, 12
Grossman, Myles, DPM 12
Guberman, Ronald M., DPM 7
Gutierrez, David, DPM 2
Gventer, Mark, DPM 7
H
Habib, Henry, DPM 7
Harris, Carl F., DPM 2
Heller, David P., DPM 7
Herbert, Scott E., DPM 12
Herman, Craig P., DPM 2, 7
Hershey, Paul E., DPM 12
Herzberg, Abraham, DPM 12
Hickey, John, DPM 12
Honore, Lesly S., DPM 12
Horl, Lawrence, DPM 12
Horowitz, Mitchell L., DPM 7, 12
I
Iorio, Anthony R., DPM 2
Irwin, Robert A., DPM 12
Isaacson, Ernest, DPM 2
Ivanovs, Ray, DPM 7
J
Jackalone, John A., DPM 12
Jacobs, Louis W., DPM 2
Jarbath, John A., DPM 7, 12
Joshi, Pradip M., DPM 2
Jusma, Francoise D., DPM 7
K
Kaiser, Craig A., DPM 7
Kapadwala, Imtiyaz I., DPM 7
Karpe, David E., DPM 12
Kashefsky, Helene P., DPM 12
Kasminoff, June G., DPM 12
Katz, Alex S., DPM 7
Katzman, Barry, DPM 7
Kessler, Howard N., DPM 12
Kisberg, Stephen, DPM 12
Kitton, Stuart E., DPM 12
Klein, Michael S., DPM 12
Klirsfeld, Jeffrey S., DPM 12
Knobel, Jeffrey, DPM 7
Kohn, Arlene F., DPM 12
Kolberg, John J., DPM 2, 12
Koslow, Paul M., DPM 12
Kumrah, Praveen, DPM 2
L
Lafferty, William A., DPM 7
Lai, Katherine M., DPM 2
Landau, Laurence D., DPM 12
Landy, Robert J., DPM 2, 12
LaRocca, Albert, DPM 12
Larsen, Joseph A., DPM 12
LaSalle, Michael, DPM 2
Lepore, Frank L., DPM 7
Levine, Stanley, DPM 12
Levitsky, David A., DPM 12
Levitz, Steven J., DPM 7
Levy, Brian K., DPM 7
Levy, Denise A., DPM 2
Levy, Paul J., DPM 2
Liswood, Paul J., DPM 7
Livingston, Douglas W., DPM 12
Livingston, Leon B., DPM 13
Livingston, Michael D., DPM 13
Locastro, Robert M., DPM 2
Lok, Jonat, DPM 2
Lopiano, Steven N., DPM 2
Losyev, Sergey, DPM 7
Lucido, Jeffrey V., DPM 7
Lynn, Brian P., DPM 2, 13
M
Mahgerefteh, David, DPM 7, 13
Makower, Bryan L., DPM 7
Mandato, Mark, DPM 7
Mantzoukas, Argirios, DPM 7
Marcelonis, Debra A., DPM 7
Marchese, Nicholas A., DPM 13
Marville, Jillion, MD 3, 7
Masani, Farhan, DPM 13
Matthews, Frederick, DPM 8
McElgun, Terence M., DPM 13
Mckay, Douglas J., DPM 8
Mcshane, William J., DPM 13
Meliso, Vincent D., DPM 8
Meller, Edward P., DPM 8
Meshnick, Joel A., DPM 8, 13
Micallef, Joseph, DPM 8, 13
Moazen, Ali, DPM 13
Mollica, Peter W., DPM 8
Mollica, Raymond J., DPM 8
Montag, Richard M., DPM 13
Montalvo, Luis, DPM 8
Morreale, Edward, DPM 8
N
Nachmann, Dennis S., DPM 3
Naik, Hetal B., DPM 8
Nekritin, Vadim, DPM 8
Nester, Elizabeth M., DPM 13
Nester, Matthew J., DPM 13
Newmark, Alan J., DPM 8
Nezaria, Yehuda, DPM 13
Novofastovsky, Raisa, DPM 8
O
Odinsky, Michael E., DPM 8
Odinsky, Wayne Z., DPM 13
Oliva, Imelda A., DPM 3, 8
Orlando, Anthony, DPM 8
Oropall, Robert, DPM 3
Owusu, Stephen E., DPM 8
P
Pace, George N., DPM 8
Pace, John F., DPM 8
Pannell, Richard, DPM 3
Papa, Philip M., DPM 8
Passik, Arthur L., DPM 8
Pawson, John F., DPM 8
Pecora, Maria, DPM 8
Pedro, Helder F., DPM 8, 13
Perez, Walter H., DPM 8
Peterson, Donald T., DPM 13
Pierre, Nadja M., DPM 8
Pierre, Nedjie, DPM 9
Plotka, Steven D., DPM 3
Posner, Jonathan, DPM 3
Prince, Steven L., DPM 9, 13
Purvin, Jay M., DPM 13
R
Rabiei, Payman, DPM 9
Radler, Bruce L., DPM 9
Rampino, Robert, DPM 3
Ransom, Sherry M., DPM 3
Raskin, Simon, DPM 9
Reifer, Howard J., DPM 9
Richardson, Hugh L., DPM 13
Richman, Tara, DPM 3
Romano, Constance A., DPM 9
Rosen, Alan J., DPM 9
Ross, Charles F., DPM 3
S
Saadvandi, Terence M., DPM 9
Sande, Hervey, DPM 9
Scheiner, David M., DPM 9
Schikman, Lana, DPM 9
Schneidermesser, Susan G., DPM 9
Schulman, Leonard B., DPM 3
Scotti, Lorenzo, DPM 3
Shapiro, Eugene, DPM 9
Shechter, David Z., DPM 9
Shechter, Stuart B., DPM 9
Sherman, Gary, DPM 9
Silberstein, Jeffrey, DPM 9
Silverstein, Alan B., DPM 9
Snyder, Robert S., DPM 3
Spector, Donald, DPM 3
Spellman, Dean S., DPM 3
Spielfogel, William D., DPM 9
Spilken, Terry, DPM 3
Spindler, Harlan, DPM 9
Stanimirov, Catherine, DPM 9
Steiner, Richard M., DPM 3, 9
Stern, Stuart M., DPM 3
Strassman, David, DPM 3
Strassman, Lawrence, DPM 3
Stuto, Joseph C., DPM 9
T
Tabari, Issac, DPM 3
Tajerstein, Alan R., DPM 9
Tanenbaum, Mark, DPM 9
Tartack, Ira, DPM 9
Tavroff, Clifford D., DPM 9
Thompson, Michael, DPM 3
Trepal, Michael J., DPM 9
Trivlis, Maryann Z., DPM 9
U
Unger, Leslie M., DPM 9
V
Vader, Bonnie, DPM 9
Velasco, Debra, DPM 3
Vincetic, Anto, DPM 3
Vitale, Thomas, DPM 3
W
Waiss, Samuel M., DPM 9
Wallach, Jacob B., DPM 9
Walter, Eric G., DPM 3
Wexler, Craig, DPM 3
Winston, Wayne, DPM 4
Wolstein, Lewis, DPM 4
Wolstein, Peter D., DPM 4
Woltman, Robert T., DPM 4, 10
Z
Zonenashvili, Merabi, DPM 10
Zwiebel, Neil S., DPM 10

PODIATRY
Abady, Robert, DPM
181172P
731 White Plains Rd
Bronx, NY 10473
(718) 589-8324
181173P
Burnside Medical Center
165 E Burnside Ave
Bronx, NY 10453
(718) 563-0003
St Barnabas Hospital
Alfieri, Donna M., DPM
37006P
4206 Barnes Ave
Bronx, NY 10466
(718) 325-6487
Mount Vernon Hospital, Our
Lady of Mercy Medical Center
Asaro, Carlo S., DPM
37182P
1400 Pelham Pkwy S
Bronx, NY 10461
(718) 918-7224
50629P
3424 Kossuth Ave
Bronx, NY 10467
(718) 519-3589
Jacobi Medical Center, North
Central Bronx Hospital
Speaks Italian
Bar-David, Tzvi, DPM
36919P
3616 Henry Hudson Pkwy E
Bronx, NY 10463
(718) 548-5757
Columbia-Presbyterian
Medical Center
Speaks HebrewSpanish
Barlizo, Sharon R., DPM
357781P
HHC-Lincoln M&MH Center
234 E 149th St
Bronx, NY 10451
(718) 579-4900
Lincoln Medical & Mental
Health Center, Metropolitan
Hospital Center
Speaks FrenchSpanish
Barragan, Juan C., DPM
36954P
St. John's Medical Center
1561 Westchester Ave
Bronx, NY 10472
(718) 328-6200
Speaks Spanish
Bautista, Debbie P., MD
301273P
St. Barn Ambulatory Care
4487 3rd Ave
Bronx, NY 10457
(718) 960-1780
301276P
Union Comm Hlth Ctr
2021 Grand Concourse
Bronx, NY 10453
(718) 960-3933
348297P
CCDC/Burnside Med Ctr
731 White Plains Rd
Bronx, NY 10473
(718) 589-8324
Our Lady of Mercy Medical
Center, St Barnabas Hospital
Bayerbach, Frank, DPM
216992P
Mercy Community Care
4234 Bronx Blvd
Bronx, NY 10466
(347) 341-4300
39016P
Metropolitan Podiatry Ass
667 E 233rd St
Bronx, NY 10466
(718) 430-6066
M1246P
2371 Arthur Ave
Bronx, NY 10458
(718) 364-6199
Brunswick General Hospital,
Brunswick Hospital Center, Inc,
Good Samaritan Hospital,
Good Samaritan Hospital (West
Islip)
Speaks
SpanishGermanItalian
Bushansky, Abe A., DPM
368478P
1715 University Ave
Bronx, NY 10453
(718) 960-5616
368491P
1963 Grand Concourse
Bronx, NY 10453
(718) 294-5000
Brooklyn Hospital Center
(Downtown Campus), Interfaith
Medical Center, Parkway
Hospital
Butts, Bryon G., DPM
349336P
421 E 149th St
Bronx, NY 10455
(718) 401-3668
The Mount Sinai Hospital of
Queens
Speaks Spanish
Campbell, Andrew, DPM
36957P
St. Barnabas Hospital
4422 3rd Ave
Bronx, NY 10457
(718) 960-9000
56967P
Union Community Health Ct
260 E 188 St
Bronx, NY 10458
(718) 220-2020
56970P
St. Barnabas Ambulatory C
4487 3rd Ave
Bronx, NY 10457
(718) 960-1780
56972P
Bronx Park Medical Pavill
2016 Bronxdale Ave
Bronx, NY 10462
(718) 863-8695
St Barnabas Hospital
Catanese, Dominic J., DPM
37141P
Orthopedic Surgery Dept.
1695 Eastchester Rd
Bronx, NY 10461
(718) 405-8430
Albert Einstein College of
Medicine, Community Hospital
at Dobbs Ferry, Montefiore
Med Ctr (Henry & Lucy Moses
Div), SAINT MARYS
HOSPITAL
Charlot, Giznola J., DPM
357878P
HHC-Jacobi Medical Center
1400 Pelham Pkwy S
Bronx, NY 10461
(718) 918-6610
357880P
HHC-North Central Bx Hosp
3424 Kossuth Ave
Bronx, NY 10467
(718) 519-2108
Jacobi Medical Center, Kings
County Hospital Center, North
Central Bronx Hospital
Chionis, Anthony, DPM
54771P
1725 Edison Ave
Bronx, NY 10461
(718) 892-5542
Parkway Hospital, St John's
Episcopal Hospital - Far
Rockaway
Speaks Greek, Modern
(1453-)
Chopra, Jaideep, DPM
284748P
NY Westchester Square Med
2475 Saint Raymonds Ave
Bronx, NY 10461
(718) 792-1100
Staten Island University
Hosp-North, University
Hospital of Brooklyn
Speaks Hindi
Ciment, Avraham Y., DPM
351611P
Soundview Healthcare ntwk
731 White Plains Rd
Bronx, NY 10473
(718) 589-8324
351618P
Diallo Medical Center
1760 Westchester Ave
Bronx, NY 10472
(718) 892-8474
351623P
Jessica Guzman Med Ctr
616 Castle Hill Ave
Bronx, NY 10473
(718) 239-9013
351628P
Burnside Medical Center
165 E Burnside Ave
Bronx, NY 10453
(718) 563-0003
Our Lady of Mercy Medical
Center, St Barnabas Hospital,
Westchester Medical Center
Speaks Hebrew
Cohen, Robert J., DPM
M4190P
140-1 Elgar Pl
Bronx, NY 10475
(718) 671-0400
Our Lady of Mercy Medical
Center, Parkway Hospital
Speaks French
De Bello, John A., DPM
289396P
New York Foot Care Srvc
3635 E Tremont Ave
Bronx, NY 10465
(718) 409-0400
3114603P
New York Foot Care Svc
421 E 149th St
Bronx, NY 10455
(718) 365-6363
36995P
New York Foot Care Svc
3201 Grand Concourse
Bronx, NY 10468
(718) 365-6363
Montefiore Med Ctr (Henry &
Lucy Moses Div), Mount Sinai
Hospital of Queens, North
Shore University Hospital, Our
Lady of Mercy Medical Center,
Parkway Hospital
Speaks Spanish
DeLeon, Jose L., DPM
179943P
625 E Fordham Rd
Bronx, NY 10458
(718) 933-1900
37252P
2111 Williamsbridge Rd
Bronx, NY 10461
(718) 828-6060
Our Lady of Mercy Medical
Center
Speaks Spanish
Dellolio, Joseph A., DPM
38329P
4362 White Plains Rd
Bronx, NY 10466
(718) 994-7054
Montefiore Med Ctr (Jack D
Weiler Hosp of A Einst), Our
Lady of Mercy Medical Center,
Westchester Medical Center
Speaks Spanish
Dhandari, Angeleta, DPM
116473P
North Central Bronx Hosp
3424 Kossuth Ave
Bronx, NY 10467
(718) 519-3589
116482P
Jacobi Medical Center
1400 Pelham Pkwy S
Bronx, NY 10461
(718) 918-5700
Jacobi Medical Center, North
Central Bronx Hospital
Edelstein, Michael C., DPM
178750P
3224 Grand Concourse
Bronx, NY 10458
(718) 561-0041
Our Lady of Mercy Medical
Center
Speaks Spanish
Elsinger, Elisabeth C.,
DPM
37257P
MAP-Dept of Ortho Sgy
3400 Bainbridge Ave
Bronx, NY 10467
(718) 920-2060
Montefiore Med Ctr (Henry &
Lucy Moses Div)
Speaks German
Finkelstein, Barry I.,
DPM
169233P
3327 Bainbridge Ave
Bronx, NY 10467
(718) 881-7990
194335P
NY Podiatry & Foot Surg
2425 Eastchester Rd
Bronx, NY 10469
(718) 881-7990
227755P
Wilson Orthopedics
75 E Gun Hill Rd
Bronx, NY 10467
(718) 798-1000
Montefiore Med Ctr (Jack D
Weiler Hosp of A Einst), United
Hospital Medical Center (NY)
Speaks HebrewYiddish
Frankel, Bruce, DPM
200374P
Lincoln Medical & Mental
234 E 149th St
Bronx, NY 10451
(718) 579-4900
Lincoln Medical & Mental
Health Center
Freiser, Mark A., DPM
36628P
Bronx Footcare
421 E 149th St
Bronx, NY 10455
(718) 292-5045
New York Westchester Square
Medical Center, Our Lady of
Mercy Medical Center, St
Barnabas Hospital
Speaks SpanishFrench
Fridman, Robert, DPM
351650P
3616 Henry Hudson Pkwy
Bronx, NY 10463
(718) 548-5757
Columbia-Presbyterian
Medical Center
Garcia, Sandra P., DPM
353857P
Happy Feet
953 Southern Blvd
Bronx, NY 10459
(718) 542-0472
Board Certified
Male Female
Wheelchair Accessible
353859P
Uptown Healthcare Mgmt In
930 E Tremont Ave
Bronx, NY 10460
(718) 860-1111
Forest Hills Hospital
Speaks Spanish
Gaudino, Salvatore C.,
DPM
37096P
71 Metropolitan Oval
Bronx, NY 10462
(718) 829-6436
Mount Sinai Medical Center,
Parkway Hospital, Queens
Hospital Center
George, Thomas, DPM
197631P
3219 E Tremont Ave
Bronx, NY 10461
(718) 792-8115
Hempstead General Hospital
Med Ctr., New York
Westchester Square Medical
Center
Ginsberg, Steven E., DPM
132102P
2391 Arthur Ave
Bronx, NY 10458
(718) 365-4141
SVCMC-St Marys Hospital
Brooklyn, St Joseph's Hospital
Division, CMC
Giordano, Richard S.,
DPM
36494P
1217 Castle Hill Ave
Bronx, NY 10462
(718) 828-6982
Northern Westchester Hospital
Center, Our Lady of Mercy
Medical Center
Gitlin, David, DPM
379153P
HHC-Lincoln M&MH Center
234 E 149th St
Bronx, NY 10451
(718) 579-4900
Metropolitan Hospital Center
Glockenberg, Aaron,
DPM
201399P
Lincoln Med & Mental Hlth
234 E 149th St
Bronx, NY 10451
(718) 579-4900
276540P
2445 Arthur Ave
Bronx, NY 10458
(718) 733-1999
Kings County Hospital Center,
Lincoln Medical & Mental
Health Center, Our Lady of
Mercy Medical Center, St
Barnabas Hospital, Union
Hospital of the Bronx (closed)
Speaks PolishHebrew
Goez, Emilio A., DPM
301254P
Union Comm Hlth Ctr
2021 Grand Concourse
Bronx, NY 10453
(718) 960-3933
301255P
St Barn Ambulatory Care
4487 3rd Ave
Bronx, NY 10457
(718) 960-1780
371846P
St. Barnabas Hospital
4422 3rd Ave
Bronx, NY 10457
(718) 960-6105
51028P
Bronx Park Med Pavilion
2016 Bronxdale Ave
Bronx, NY 10462
(718) 863-8695
Nassau University Medical
Center, Saint Catharines
General Hospital, St Barnabas
Hospital
Speaks Spanish
Goldenberg, Perry Z.,
DPM
231271P
3250 3rd Ave
Bronx, NY 10456
(718) 328-3668
St Barnabas Hospital
Goldstein, Harold L.,
DPM
187909P
2016 Bronxdale Ave
Bronx, NY 10462
(718) 863-8695
37017P
St. Barnabas Hospital
4422 3rd Ave
Bronx, NY 10457
(718) 960-6105
371962P
St Barnabas Ambulatory C
4487 3rd Ave
Bronx, NY 10457
(718) 960-6488
371965P
Union Community Health Ct
2021 Grand Concourse
Bronx, NY 10453
(718) 960-3933
371966P
Union Community Health Ct
260 E 188th St
Bronx, NY 10458
(718) 220-2020
St Barnabas Hospital, United
Hospital Medical Center (NY),
White Plains Hospital Center
Speaks SpanishItalian
Gramuglia, Vincent J.,
DPM
216990P
Mercy Community Care
4234 Bronx Blvd
Bronx, NY 10466
(347) 341-4300
49500P
AllMed Medical & Rehab
4377 Bronx Blvd
Bronx, NY 10466
(718) 325-0700
49501P
Metropolitan Podiatry Ass
667 E 233rd St
Bronx, NY 10466
(718) 430-6066
M1576P
3795 E Tremont Ave
Bronx, NY 10465
(718) 828-3333
New York Westchester Square
Medical Center, Our Lady of
Mercy Medical Center
Speaks SpanishItalian
Greiff, Lance, DPM
354487P
3333 Henry Hudson Pkwy
Bronx, NY 10463
(718) 601-2100
Brooklyn Hospital Center
(Downtown Campus), New
York Flushing Hospital &
Medical Center, Parkway
Hospital
Gutierrez, David, DPM
M1570P
2100 Bartow Ave
Bronx, NY 10475
(718) 320-0200
Our Lady of Mercy Medical
Center
Speaks Spanish
Harris, Carl F., DPM
201401P
Lincoln Med & Mental Hlth
234 E 149th St
Bronx, NY 10451
(718) 579-4900
Harlem Hospital Center,
Lincoln Medical & Mental
Health Center
Herman, Craig P., DPM
227774P
Advanced Foot Care
3396 E Tremont Ave
Bronx, NY 10461
(718) 409-2121
300046P
Bronx Health Center
975 Westchester Ave
Bronx, NY 10459
(718) 991-9250
New York Westchester Square
Medical Center, Our Lady of
Mercy Medical Center
Speaks Spanish
Iorio, Anthony R., DPM
357778P
HHC-Lincoln M&MH Center
234 E 149th St
Bronx, NY 10451
(718) 579-4900
Lincoln Medical & Mental
Health Center, Metropolitan
Hospital Center
Isaacson, Ernest, DPM
341669P
Parkchester Family Foot
1340 Metropolitan Ave
Bronx, NY 10462
(718) 863-3338
Beth Israel Medical Center
(Petrie Campus), Our Lady of
Mercy Medical Center
Speaks Hebrew
Jacobs, Louis W., DPM
36524P
4240 Hutchinson River Pkwy
E
Bronx, NY 10475
(718) 671-2233
Speaks SpanishHungarian
Joshi, Pradip M., DPM
36975P
1963A Daly Ave
Bronx, NY 10460
(718) 617-6141
39978P
1650 Selwyn Ave
Bronx, NY 10457
(718) 590-1800
Bronx-Lebanon Hospital
Center - Fulton Division, Our
Lady of Mercy Medical Center
Speaks Spanish
Kolberg, John J., DPM
351082P
1387 Grand Concourse
Bronx, NY 10452
(718) 992-9918
New Island Hospital
Speaks Spanish
Kumrah, Praveen, DPM
187664P
2015 Grand Concourse
Bronx, NY 10453
(718) 299-7295
214484P
Uptown HealthCare Mgmt
1778 Jerome Ave
Bronx, NY 10453
(718) 764-1661
221984P
1807 Randall Ave
Bronx, NY 10473
(718) 617-2468
New York Westchester Square
Me, Our Lady of Mercy
Medical Center
Speaks HindiPunjabi
LaSalle, Michael, DPM
200845P
Lincoln Medical & Mental
234 E 149th St
Bronx, NY 10451
(718) 579-4900
Lincoln Medical & Mental
Health Center
Lai, Katherine M., DPM
37068P
Center for Podiatric Care
1500 Astor Ave
Bronx, NY 10469
(718) 882-6881
Beth Israel Medical Center
(Petrie Campus), Mount Sinai
Medical Center, Our Lady of
Mercy Medical Center
Landy, Robert J., DPM
37072P
1340 Metropolitan Ave
Bronx, NY 10462
(718) 863-3338
Massapequa General Hospital,
Our Lady of Mercy Medical
Center, Parkway Hospital,
Southside Hospital, Winthrop
University Hospital
Speaks Spanish
Levy, Denise A., DPM
141439P
Hyperbaric Unit
111 E 210th St
Bronx, NY 10467
(718) 920-6655
Montefiore Med Ctr (Henry &
Lucy Moses Div)
Speaks Spanish
Levy, Paul J., DPM
169192P
2545 Wallace Ave
Bronx, NY 10467
(718) 231-2500
36736P
2539 Fish Ave
Bronx, NY 10469
(718) 231-2500
Brooklyn Hospital Center
(Downtown Campus), Our Lady
of Mercy Medical Center
Speaks Spanish
Locastro, Robert M.,
DPM
124212P
731 White Plains Rd
Bronx, NY 10473
(718) 893-7773
Southside Hospital, St
Barnabas Hospital, St
Catherine of Siena, St
Catherine of Sienna Medical
Center
Lok, Jonat, DPM
227010P
East Tremont Medical Ctr
930 E Tremont Ave
Bronx, NY 10460
(718) 860-1111
New York Downtown Hospital
(Beekman), Our Lady of Mercy
Medical Center
Lopiano, Steven N., DPM
36777P
3108 Kingsbridge Ave
Bronx, NY 10463
(718) 548-1102
Our Lady of Mercy Medical
Center
Speaks SpanishItalian
Board Certified
Male Female
Wheelchair Accessible
Lynn, Brian P., DPM
38157P
Ctr for Ortho Specialty
1695 Eastchester Rd
Bronx, NY 10461
(718) 405-8430
38159P
MAP - Dept. of Ortho Surg
3400 Bainbridge Ave
Bronx, NY 10467
(718) 920-2060
Long Island Jewish Medical
Center, Montefiore Med Ctr
(Henry & Lucy Moses Div)
Speaks Spanish
Marville, Jillion, MD
179966P
Morris Heights Hlth Ctr
625 E 137th St
Bronx, NY 10454
(718) 401-6578
49882P
Morris Heights Hlth Cntr
85 W Burnside Ave
Bronx, NY 10453
(718) 716-4400
Nachmann, Dennis S.,
DPM
188735P
Urgent Foot Care,PC
3594 E Tremont Ave
Bronx, NY 10465
(718) 597-5800
37260P
Urgent Foot Care PC
3058 E Tremont Ave
Bronx, NY 10461
(718) 409-0500
37261P
1216 Beach Ave
Bronx, NY 10472
(718) 597-1107
40448P
326 E 204th St
Bronx, NY 10467
(718) 655-3410
53065P
1387 Grand Concourse
Bronx, NY 10452
(718) 992-9918
Bronx-Lebanon Hospital
Center - Fulton Division,
Montefiore Med Ctr (Jack D
Weiler Hosp of A Einst), New
York Westchester Square
Medical Center, Our Lady of
Mercy Medical Center
Speaks Spanish
Oliva, Imelda A., DPM
357238P
HHC Morrisania D & T Ctr
1225 Gerard Ave
Bronx, NY 10452
(718) 960-2781
357786P
HHC-Lincoln M&MH Center
234 E 149th St
Bronx, NY 10451
(718) 579-4900
Kings County Hospital Center,
Metropolitan Hospital Center,
Morrisania Hospital
Speaks TagalogSpanish
Oropall, Robert, DPM
142725P
Metropolitan Podiatry Ass
667 E 233rd St
Bronx, NY 10466
(718) 430-6066
18943P
820 Lydig Ave
Bronx, NY 10462
(718) 792-5900
New York Westchester Square
Medical Center, Our Lady of
Mercy Medical Center
Speaks German
Pannell, Richard, DPM
288046P
HHC-Morrisania D &TC
1225 Gerard Ave
Bronx, NY 10452
(718) 960-2781
Harlem Hospital Center,
Metropolitan Hospital Center
Plotka, Steven D., DPM
200379P
HHC Lincoln Hospital
234 E 149th St
Bronx, NY 10451
(718) 579-4900
Lincoln Medical & Mental
Health Center, Mount Sinai
Medical Center, Raritan Bay
Medcal Center, Robert Wood
Johnson University Hosp.
Speaks Spanish
Posner, Jonathan, DPM
105432P
Jonathan Posner, DPM
360 E 193rd St
Bronx, NY 10458
(718) 933-2400
105434P
Jonathan Posner, DPM
1621 Eastchester Rd
Bronx, NY 10461
(718) 405-8040
143124P
MMG - CHCC
305 E 161st St
Bronx, NY 10451
(718) 579-2500
P0052P
2532 Grand Concourse
Bronx, NY 10458
(718) 960-1500
Montefiore Med Ctr (Henry &
Lucy Moses Div)
Rampino, Robert, DPM
157922P
North Central Bronx Hosp
3424 Kossuth Ave
Bronx, NY 10467
(718) 519-3630
157925P
Jacobi Medical Center
1400 Pelham Pkwy S
Bronx, NY 10461
(718) 918-5700
Coney Island Hospital
Ransom, Sherry M., DPM
198963P
Derm & Surgery Associates
3620 E Tremont Ave
Bronx, NY 10465
(718) 792-4700
Mount Vernon Hospital
Richman, Tara, DPM
364345P
Tej Podiatric Group P.C.
1963-A Daly Ave
Bronx, NY 10460
(718) 617-6141
Bronx-Lebanon Hospital
Center - Fulton Division
Ross, Charles F., DPM
3113966P
HHC-Lincoln Med & Mntl HC
234 E 149th St
Bronx, NY 10451
(718) 579-4900
Lincoln Medical & Mental
Health Center, Metropolitan
Hospital Center
Schulman, Leonard B.,
DPM
36464P
MMC-Family Care Center
3444 Kossuth Ave
Bronx, NY 10467
(718) 920-2273
Montefiore Med Ctr (Henry &
Lucy Moses Div)
Scotti, Lorenzo, DPM
36715P
North Central Bronx Hosp
3424 Kossuth Ave
Bronx, NY 10467
(718) 519-3589
51545P
Jacobi Medical Center
1400 Pelham Pkwy S
Bronx, NY 10461
(718) 918-7224
Coney Island Hospital, Jacobi
Medical Center, North Central
Bronx Hospital
Speaks ItalianSpanish
Snyder, Robert S., DPM
46604P
3867 E Tremont Ave
Bronx, NY 10465
(718) 792-8790
Forest Hills Hospital, Parkway
Hospital
Speaks Spanish
Spector, Donald, DPM
36812P
Cambridge Podiatry Center
259 W 231st St
Bronx, NY 10463
(718) 548-3080
St Joseph's Medical
Center-Yonkers
Spellman, Dean S., DPM
381596P
Middletown Podiatry Assoc
1200 Waters Pl
Bronx, NY 10461
(718) 863-5511
New York Westchester Square
Medical Center
Spilken, Terry, DPM
200471P
HHC Lincoln Hospital
234 E 149th St
Bronx, NY 10451
(718) 579-4900
Lincoln Medical & Mental
Health Center
Steiner, Richard M., DPM
188831P
3530 Henry Hudson Pkwy E
Bronx, NY 10463
(718) 548-3550
379697P
Kingsbridge Community Med
170 W 233rd St
Bronx, NY 10463
(718) 543-0700
SVCMC-St Vincents Manhattan
Stern, Stuart M., DPM
36652P
Morris Park Podiatry
1015 Morris Park Ave
Bronx, NY 10462
(718) 863-3737
New Island Hospital, Plainview
Hospital, Syosset Hospital
Strassman, David, DPM
349822P
MMC - Dept of Surgery
111 E 210th St
Bronx, NY 10467
(718) 920-6603
Montefiore Med Ctr (Jack D
Weiler Hosp of A Einst), New
York Methodist Hospital, New
York Westchester Square
Medical Center
Strassman, Lawrence,
DPM
358330P
MMC - Eastern Vascular
1825 Eastchester Rd
Bronx, NY 10461
(718) 792-8115
Montefiore Med Ctr (Jack D
Weiler Hosp of A Einst), New
York Westchester Square
Medical Center
Tabari, Issac, DPM
208998P
108 E 183rd St
Bronx, NY 10453
(718) 295-4600
Lutheran Medical Center,
Nassau University Medical
Center
Speaks FARSI,
EASTERNPersian
Thompson, Michael, DPM
36705P
2574 Frisby Ave
Bronx, NY 10461
(718) 892-8382
Brooklyn Hospital Center
(Downtown Campus), Our Lady
of Mercy Medical Center
Velasco, Debra, DPM
201409P
HHC Lincoln Hospital
234 E 149th St
Bronx, NY 10451
(718) 579-4900
214314P
Segundo Ruiz Belvis DTC
545 E 142nd St
Bronx, NY 10454
(718) 579-4000
288345P
HHC-Morrisania D &TC
1225 Gerard Ave
Bronx, NY 10452
(718) 960-2781
Lincoln Medical & Mental
Health Center, Metropolitan
Hospital Center
Speaks Spanish
Vincetic, Anto, DPM
231369P
3635 E Tremont Ave
Bronx, NY 10465
(718) 409-0400
Montefiore Med Ctr (Henry &
Lucy Moses Div), Mount
Vernon Hospital
Speaks Croatian
Vitale, Thomas, DPM
201089P
HHC Lincoln Hospital
234 E 149th St
Bronx, NY 10451
(718) 579-4900
Lincoln Medical & Mental
Health Center
Walter, Eric G., DPM
142727P
Metropolitan Podiatry Ass
667 E 233rd St
Bronx, NY 10466
(718) 430-6066
357174P
1619 Pelham Pkwy N
Bronx, NY 10469
(718) 665-3410
36967P
Bronx Foot Rehab Assoc.
326 E 204th St
Bronx, NY 10467
(718) 655-3410
New York Westchester Square
Medical Center, Our Lady of
Mercy Medical Center, SJRH -
St Johns Division, St Barnabas
Hospital
Speaks German
Specialist
Board Certified
Male Female
Wheelchair Accessible
PODIATRY (Continued)
Wexler, Craig, DPM
36647P
2391 Arthur Ave
Bronx, NY 10458
(718) 365-4141
Newton Memorial Hospital,
Our Lady of Mercy Medical
Center
Winston, Wayne, DPM
359588P
Signature Health Center
220 E 161st St
Bronx, NY 10451
(718) 537-1100
Forest Hills Hospital
Wolstein, Lewis, DPM
42408P
100-1 De Kruif Pl
Bronx, NY 10475
(718) 671-7226
New York Westchester Square
Medical Center, United
Hospital Medical Center (NY),
White Plains Hospital Center
Speaks Spanish
Wolstein, Peter D., DPM
19917P
1340 Metropolitan Ave
Bronx, NY 10462
(718) 863-3338
Speaks SpanishTagalog
Woltman, Robert T., DPM
174899P
1488 Metropolitan Ave
Bronx, NY 10462
(718) 823-6239
174900P
Wellness Medical Asso
1180 Morris Park Ave
Bronx, NY 10461
(718) 863-8465
Long Island Jewish Medical
Center, New York Westchester
Square Me, Peninsula Hospital
Center
Board Certified
Male Female
Wheelchair Accessible
PODIATRY
Amante, Gregory, DPM
199177P
2601 Ocean Pkwy
Brooklyn, NY 11235
(718) 616-4331
Coney Island Hospital
Speaks Spanish
Amico, Susan G., DPM
184838P
SL Quality Care Diagnosti
9708 Seaview Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11236
(718) 444-0520
184843P
SL Quality Care Diagnosti
1902 86th St
Brooklyn, NY 11214
(718) 621-9400
184852P
SL Quality Care Diagnosti
1220 Avenue P
Brooklyn, NY 11229
(718) 376-1004
49812P
9731 4th Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11209
(718) 836-1800
SVCMC-St Vincents Staten
Island, Staten Island University
Hosp-North, Victory Memorial
Hospital
Speaks ItalianSpanish
Archer, Jean V., DPM
105663P
Brookdale Family Care Ctr
2554 Linden Blvd
Brooklyn, NY 11208
(718) 240-8600
40532P
Jamaica Hosp Medical Ctr
3080 Atlantic Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11208
(718) 647-0240
Jamaica Hospital
Speaks Spanish
Aronica, Frank R., DPM
36667P
20 Plaza St E
Brooklyn, NY 11238
(718) 638-6387
Catholic Medical Center (NY),
Long Island College Hospital
Speaks SpanishItalian
Assini, Joseph, DPM
36727P
8616 3rd Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11209
(718) 948-3838
Doctors Hosp. of Staten Island,
Lutheran Medical Center,
Staten Island University
Hosp-North, Victory Memorial
Hospital
Speaks Italian
Babayev, Emil, DPM
224479P
Perloff Medical PC
2626 E 14th St
Brooklyn, NY 11235
(718) 368-2626
37241P
Professional Medical Plaz
2269 Ocean Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11229
(718) 339-8200
46696P
421 Ocean Pkwy
Brooklyn, NY 11218
(718) 287-4200
Lutheran Medical Center, New
York Methodist Hospital
Speaks Russian
Baird, William T., DPM
37008P
Plaza Foot Care, PC
5412 Kings Plz Mall
Brooklyn, NY 11234
(718) 377-1212
Peninsula Hospital Center
Speaks
SpanishFrenchRussian
Barkoff, Steven L., DPM
36921P
248 Roebling St
Brooklyn, NY 11211
(718) 599-0505
Brooklyn Hospital Center
(Downtown Campus), New
York Methodist Hospital
Speaks Spanish
Barone, Salvatore A.,
DPM
36884P
1601 Voorhies Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11235
(718) 646-5553
Lutheran Medical Center
Speaks SpanishGerman
Bartol, David M., DPM
139333P
North Star Orthopedics
1408 Ocean Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11230
(718) 338-0909
59239P
North Star Orthopedics
2615 E 16th St
Brooklyn, NY 11235
(718) 745-8787
59240P
North Star Orthopedics
26 Court St
Brooklyn, NY 11242
(718) 935-0311
M6958P
1000 Church Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11218
(718) 826-4000
M6958P
740 64th St
Brooklyn, NY 11220
(718) 439-2000
Parkway Hospital
Bass, Elliot L., DPM
36493P
2381 E 29th St
Brooklyn, NY 11229
(718) 743-1400
49605P
Elliot L Bass, MD
2 W End Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11235
(718) 743-2900
Bass, Fara D., DPM
50123P
2 W End Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11235
(718) 743-1400
M100
2381 E 29th St
Brooklyn, NY 11229
(718) 743-1400
New York Methodist Hospital
Speaks Yiddish
Bell, Burt L., DPM
105602P
7608 20th Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11214
(718) 837-8003
113259P
3065 Brighton 5Th St
Brooklyn, NY 11235
(718) 332-2722
New York Community Hospital
of Brooklyn
Benzakein, Ralph, DPM
36761P
2241 Ocean Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11229
(718) 998-1375
New York Community Hospital
of Brooklyn
Speaks
ArabicHebrewRussianSpani
sh
Bienenfeld, Jay D., DPM
47072P
165 Taylor St
Brooklyn, NY 11211
(718) 599-0753
Peninsula Hospital Center
Speaks
SpanishHebrewYiddish
Birch, Gregory M., DPM
36595P
6419 Bay Pkwy
Brooklyn, NY 11204
(718) 232-6737
Staten Island University
Hosp-North
Bover, Elina, DPM
353725P
A. Amerimed Physician P.C
1655 E 13th St
Brooklyn, NY 11229
(718) 339-3100
353726P
A. Amerimed Physician P.C
1100 Coney Island Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11230
(718) 434-7533
New York Methodist Hospital
Speaks AbkhazianAfam
(Oromo)
Braun, Suzanne G., DPM
142989P
2171 Nostrand Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11210
(718) 758-8920
359508P
710 Parkside Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11226
(718) 270-2075
University Hospital of Brooklyn
Speaks SpanishItalian
Breth, Evan G., DPM
49200P
Evan G. Breth, DPM
2352 Ralph Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11234
(718) 251-0200
M1550P
263 7th Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11215
(718) 369-8080
M1551P
United Medical Assoc
9001 3rd Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11209
(718) 748-2900
M1552P
7124 18th Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11204
(718) 234-3333
Lutheran Medical Center, New
York Methodist Hospital
Bushansky, Abe A., DPM
231380P
734 Pennsylvania Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11207
(718) 493-5986
37057P
711 Eastern Pkwy
Brooklyn, NY 11213
(718) 493-5986
Brooklyn Hospital Center
(Downtown Campus), Interfaith
Medical Center, Parkway
Hospital
Butters, Marva, DPM
343047P
158 Clarkson Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11226
(718) 783-4780
Brooklyn Hospital Center
(Downtown Campus), Kings
County Hospital Center
Buxbaum, Frederick D.,
DPM
36540P
1501 W 6th St
Brooklyn, NY 11204
(718) 837-0442
New York Community Hospital
of Brooklyn, New York
Methodist Hospital, Parkway
Hospital
Buzermanis, Steven Z.,
DPM
57282P
1230 Neptune Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11224
(718) 615-3200
57282P
3245 Nostrand Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11229
(718) 615-3777
57282P
345 Schermerhorn St
Brooklyn, NY 11217
(718) 858-6300
Campbell, Douglas E.,
DPM
37122P
MAIMONDES MED CTR
BROOKLYN, NY 11219
(718) 283-7593
54942P
4801 Fort Hamilton Pkwy
Brooklyn, NY 11219
(718) 853-7469
54944P
241 Willoughby St
Brooklyn, NY 11201
(718) 853-7469
Maimonides Medical Center
Caprioni, Enrico P., DPM
163554P
326 7th St
Brooklyn, NY 11215
(718) 369-7192
New York Methodist Hospital
Speaks ItalianSpanish
Carlton, Lawrence S.,
DPM
36731P
1981 Flatbush Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11234
(718) 338-8715
Brooklyn Hospital Center
(Downtown Campus)
Castillo, Dennis E., DPM
0X190P
345 Clinton Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11238
(718) 783-7300
105747P
450 Clarkson Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11203
(718) 783-7300
376722P
SUNY Downstate Med Ctr
840 Lefferts Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11203
(718) 783-7300
376724P
SUNY Downstate Med Ctr
445 Lenox Rd
Brooklyn, NY 11203
(718) 783-7300
Brooklyn Hospital Center
(Downtown Campus), Interfaith
Medical Center, Kingsbrook
Jewish Medical Center,
University Hospital of Brooklyn
Speaks Spanish
Board Certified
Male Female
Wheelchair Accessible
)
Charlot, Giznola J., DPM
358034P
HHC-Kings County Hospital
451 Clarkson Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11203
(718) 245-3325
Jacobi Medical Center, Kings
County Hospital Center, North
Central Bronx Hospital
Cheng, Tung W., DPM
36670P
299 Livingston St
Brooklyn, NY 11217
(718) 624-2150
Speaks Chinese
Chopra, Jaideep, DPM
283717P
Medical Office
462 Ocean Pkwy
Brooklyn, NY 11218
(718) 856-6010
284749P
1324 Bergen St
Brooklyn, NY 11213
(718) 774-5224
362592P
710 Parkside Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11226
(718) 270-2045
363451P
University Phys of Bklyn
450 Clarkson Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11203
(718) 270-2045
Staten Island University
Hosp-North, University
Hospital of Brooklyn
Speaks Hindi
Cicio, Gary, DPM
36673P
142 Joralemon St
Brooklyn, NY 11201
(718) 624-3003
Beth Israel Med Ctr (Kings
Hwy Division), Long Island
College Hospital, New York
Downtown Hospital (Beekman)
Cohen, Greg E., DPM
168309P
142 Joralemon St
Brooklyn, NY 11201
(718) 624-3003
Cabrini Medical Center, Long
Island College Hospital
Cohen, Richard B., DPM
36732P
1331 E 16th St
Brooklyn, NY 11230
(718) 375-3400
Brooklyn Hospital Center
(Downtown Campus)
D'Amato, Theodore A.,
DPM
369717P
9731 4th Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11209
(718) 745-3177
Staten Island University
Hosp-North, Victory Memorial
Hospital
D'Angelo, Nicholas A.,
DPM
M1613P
6511 20th Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11204
(718) 837-7300
New York Methodist Hospital
Speaks Italian
Dacher, Jeffrey, DPM
36847P
3901 Nostrand Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11235
(718) 648-9104
Woodhull Medical & Mental
Health Ctr
Speaks Yiddish
Daniel, Lawrence B.,
DPM
10292P
2832 Linden Blvd
Brooklyn, NY 11208
(718) 240-2000
58558P
Lawrence B. Daniel, DPM
1576 E 66th St
Brooklyn, NY 11234
(718) 241-3803
Brooklyn Hospital Center
(Downtown Campus),
Montefiore Med Ctr (Henry &
Lucy Moses Div), Montefiore
Med Ctr (Jack D Weiler Hosp
of A Einst)
DeMeo, James R., DPM
169482P
1545 Atlantic Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11213
(718) 613-4856
Cabrini Medical Center,
Interfaith Medical Center,
Mount Vernon Hospital, SJRH -
St Johns Division
DeSantos, Pasquale, DPM
371165P
HHC-Coney Island Hospital
2601 Ocean Pkwy
Brooklyn, NY 11235
(718) 616-4331
Coney Island Hospital
Speaks ItalianSpanish
Dennis, Lester N., DPM
50225P
746 Manhattan Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11222
(718) 389-4404
Catholic Medical Center (NY),
New York Flushing Hospital &
Medical Center, New York
Hospital Medical Center of
Queens, St Joseph's Hospital
Division, CMC, United
Hospital Medical Center (NY),
Wyckoff Heights Medical
Center
Dharia, Sumit S., DPM
349314P
552 Saint Marks Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11238
(516) 359-3339
Speaks Gujarati
Dixit, Chaitanya V., DPM
229092P
NY Medical Associates
98 Avenue U
Brooklyn, NY 11223
(718) 372-0500
39505P
1700 Flatbush Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11210
(718) 692-1120
M1245P
2235 W 9th St
Brooklyn, NY 11223
(718) 372-0400
Jamaica Hospital, New York
Methodist Hospital, Our Lady
of Mercy Medical Center
Speaks SpanishHindiItalian
Donovan, Glenn J., DPM
348058P
HHC-Coney Island Hospital
2601 Ocean Pkwy
Brooklyn, NY 11235
(718) 616-4331
Coney Island Hospital
Dorazi, Stephen T., DPM
144643P
374 Stockholm St
Brooklyn, NY 11237
(718) 963-7233
Franklin Hospital, New York
Hospital Medical Center of
Queens, New York United
Hospital Medic, Sound Shore
Medical Center of Westchester,
Wyckoff Heights Medical
Center
Speaks Spanish
Ehrlich, Josh C., DPM
341691P
Astrocare Medical Center
1669 Bedford Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11225
(718) 467-7200
36823P
1651 Coney Island Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11230
(718) 382-2221
49886P
1535 51st St
Brooklyn, NY 11219
(718) 436-8886
Maimonides Medical Center,
Staten Island University
Hosp-North
Speaks
HebrewYiddishRussian
Einhorn, Jill L., DPM
36976P
2616 Avenue U
Brooklyn, NY 11229
(718) 891-2706
Beth Israel Med Ctr (Kings
Hwy Division), Maimonides
Medical Center
Fagen, Leonard, DPM
36474P
1390 Pennsylvania Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11239
(718) 642-2088
Brookdale Hospital Medical
Center
Speaks Spanish
Falcone, Jeffrey J., DPM
168454P
8012 3rd Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11209
(718) 745-5600
New York Methodist Hospital
Ficke, Henry, DPM
177873P
2875 W 8th St
Brooklyn, NY 11224
(718) 266-3131
288626P
444 Avenue X, Ste 1E
Brooklyn, NY 11223
(718) 375-1616
288630P
2015 Bath Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11214
(718) 375-1616
Long Beach Memorial Hospital
Speaks
GermanItalianSpanish
Friedlander, Bruce W.,
DPM
229664P
567 9th St
Brooklyn, NY 11215
(718) 840-0220
Long Island College Hospital
Speaks SpanishFrench
Ganjian, Afshin, DPM
37177P
146 Sheridan Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11208
(718) 235-6100
Coney Island Hospital, St
Joseph's Hospital Division,
CMC
Speaks
PersianSpanishRussianItalia
n
Garofalo, Alfred A.,
DPM
226023P
Woodhull Med & Ment HC
760 Broadway
Brooklyn, NY 11206
(718) 388-5889
Bellevue Hospital Center,
Gouverneur Hospital, Woodhull
Medical & Mental Health Ctr
Gaudino, Salvatore C.,
DPM
114762P
Boro Medical, PC
540 Atlantic Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11217
(718) 855-4900
37094P
Bensonhurst Fam. Foot Ctr
7819 18th Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11214
(718) 234-7054
51018P
Bensonhurst Family Foot
420 74th St
Brooklyn, NY 11209
(718) 836-1017
Mount Sinai Medical Center,
Parkway Hospital, Queens
Hospital Center
Geiger, Arthur, DPM
52948P
Kings County Hospital Ctr
451 Clarkson Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11203
(718) 245-3325
Kings County Hospital Center
George, Thomas, DPM
197909P
888 Fountain Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11208
(718) 235-0574
Hempstead General Hospital
Med Ctr., New York
Westchester Square Medical
Center
Gertsik, Vladimir V., DPM
193957P
Gertsik Podiatry< PC
415 Ocean View Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11235
(718) 934-4842
New York Methodist Hospital
Speaks Russian
Giammarino, Philip A.,
DPM
149919P
2601 Ocean Pkwy
Brooklyn, NY 11235
(718) 616-4331
199181P
HHC-Sheepshead Bay Ctr
3121 Ocean Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11235
(718) 646-9190
36584P
8607 21st Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11214
(718) 266-1986
Coney Island Hospital,
Lutheran Medical Center
Speaks SpanishItalian
Glockenberg, Aaron,
DPM
36620P
Kings County Hospital Ctr
451 Clarkson Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11203
(718) 245-3325
Kings County Hospital Center,
Lincoln Medical & Mental
Health Center, Our Lady of
Mercy Medical Center, St
Barnabas Hospital, Union
Hospital of the Bronx (closed)
Speaks PolishHebrew
Board Certified
Male Female
Wheelchair Accessible
Goldman, Gershon A.,
DPM
372901P
Fayn Medical PC
1517 Voorhies Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11235
(718) 648-2491
Forest Hills Hospital, Parkway
Hospital
Speaks
HebrewFrenchYiddishSpanis
h
Goldstein, Israel, DPM
169498P
Ezra Medical Center
571 McDonald Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11218
(718) 686-7600
228018P
468 Ocean Pkwy
Brooklyn, NY 11218
(718) 693-0578
Speaks
YiddishRussianRomanianHe
brew
Gonzalez, Ivan, DPM
137870P
East New York D & TC
2094 Pitkin Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11207
(718) 240-0400
Brooklyn Hospital Center
(Downtown Campus), Kings
County Hospital Center, St
Joseph's Hospital Division,
CMC, University Hospital of
Brooklyn
Speaks
SpanishFrenchPortugueseIt
alian
Goodman, Warren J., DPM
213648P
Kings Highway Podiatry
380 Avenue U
Brooklyn, NY 11223
(718) 376-3077
Victory Memorial Hospital
Speaks FrenchSpanish
Greenbaum, Bruce R.,
DPM
P0058P
3000 Ocean Pkwy
Brooklyn, NY 11235
(718) 265-2600
Staten Island University
Hosp-North, Staten Island
University Hosp-South
Guberman, Ronald M.,
DPM
144825P
Wound Healing & Hyperbar
374 Stockholm St
Brooklyn, NY 11237
(718) 381-8402
FLUSHING HOSPITAL
MEDICAL CENTER, Franklin
Hospital, Jackson Heights
Hospital Division (closed),
Sound Shore Medical Center of
Westchester, Wyckoff Heights
Medical Center
Speaks Spanish
Gventer, Mark, DPM
49889P
434 3rd St
Brooklyn, NY 11215
(718) 499-7583
New York Community Hospital
of Brooklyn
Speaks RussianSpanish
Habib, Henry, DPM
44484P
8000 4th Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11209
(718) 833-8136
SVCMC-St Vincents Manhattan
Speaks ItalianArabic
Heller, David P., DPM
36550P
843 Utica Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11203
(718) 345-8923
49818P
2124 Knapp St
Brooklyn, NY 11229
(718) 743-4121
Interfaith Medical Center
Herman, Craig P., DPM
363912P
94-98 Manhattan Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11206
(718) 388-0390
New York Westchester Square
Medical Center, Our Lady of
Mercy Medical Center
Speaks Spanish
Horowitz, Mitchell L.,
DPM
123582P
Quality Health Center Inc
138 Division Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11211
(718) 387-2408
Ivanovs, Ray, DPM
226092P
Woodhull Med & Ment HC
760 Broadway
Brooklyn, NY 11206
(718) 388-5889
Woodhull Medical & Mental
Health Ctr
Jarbath, John A., DPM
155825P
2051 Flatbush Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11234
(718) 677-1000
Forest Hills Hospital, New York
Hospital Medical Center of
Queens, Parkway Hospital,
Peninsula Hospital Center
Speaks FrenchCreoles and
pidgins, French-based
(Other)
Jusma, Francoise D., DPM
221129P
Cumberland D & T Ctr
100 N Portland Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11205
(718) 260-7500
221130P
Woodhull Med & Ment HC
760 Broadway
Brooklyn, NY 11206
(718) 388-5889
M4204P
100 Parkside Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11226
(718) 940-5288
Brooklyn Hospital Center
(Downtown Campus), Woodhull
Medical & Mental Health Ctr
Speaks FrenchCreoles and
pidgins, French-based
(Other)
Kaiser, Craig A., DPM
361854P
1220 Avenue P
Brooklyn, NY 11229
(718) 376-1004
361888P
19-02 86th St
Brooklyn, NY 11214
(718) 621-9400
361892P
9708 Seaview Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11236
(718) 444-0520
37134P
465 Ocean Pkwy
Brooklyn, NY 11218
(718) 941-3796
Maimonides Medical Center,
New York Methodist Hospital
Kapadwala, Imtiyaz I.,
DPM
37207P
220 A. Saint Nicholas Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11237
(718) 418-8540
50700P
2848 Church Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11226
(718) 703-3000
Kingsbrook Jewish Medical
Center, Wyckoff Heights
Medical Center
Speaks UrduHindi
Katz, Alex S., DPM
291819P
2797 Ocean Pkwy
Brooklyn, NY 11235
(718) 615-4444
New York Community Hospital
of Brooklyn
Speaks
RussianHebrewSpanish
Katzman, Barry, DPM
M0791P
233 Nostrand Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11205
(718) 826-5900
New York Flushing Hospital &
Medical Center, New York
Hospital Medical Center of
Queens, Parkway Hospital
Speaks Spanish
Knobel, Jeffrey, DPM
M4199P
1636 E 14th St
Brooklyn, NY 11229
(718) 336-1800
M4200P
662 Bedford Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11211
(718) 336-1800
Beth Israel Medical Center
(Petrie Campus), Brookdale
Hospital Medical Center,
Jamaica Hospital
Speaks RussianYiddish
Lafferty, William A., DPM
355861P
858 Schenectady Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11203
(718) 604-5574
SVCMC-St Vincents Staten
Island, Staten Island University
Hosp-North
Lepore, Frank L., DPM
194379P
349 Henry St
Brooklyn, NY 11201
(718) 780-8104
Catholic Medical Center (NY),
Long Island College Hospital,
Wyckoff Heights Medical
Center
Speaks ItalianSpanish
Levitz, Steven J., DPM
371880P
3010 Avenue L
Brooklyn, NY 11210
(718) 258-1820
Brooklyn Hospital Center
(Downtown Campus), Wyckoff
Heights Medical Center
Levy, Brian K., DPM
109695P
1390 Pennsylvania Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11239
(718) 642-2088
Brookdale Hospital Medical
Center, Kingsbrook Jewish
Medical Center
Speaks Spanish
Liswood, Paul J., DPM
37131P
Comprehensive Podiatry Sv
7212 4th Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11209
(718) 745-0256
53864P
506 6th St
Brooklyn, NY 11215
(718) 780-5850
Lutheran Medical Center, New
York Methodist Hospital
Speaks RussianSpanish
Losyev, Sergey, DPM
173305P
2005 Ocean Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11230
(718) 645-4324
Lutheran Medical Center
Speaks Russian
Lucido, Jeffrey V., DPM
36833P
441 77th St
Brooklyn, NY 11209
(718) 745-3800
54176P
150 55th St
Brooklyn, NY 11220
(718) 630-7095
Doctors Hosp. of Staten Island,
Lutheran Medical Center
Speaks ItalianSpanish
Mahgerefteh, David, DPM
349781P
4405 16th Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11204
(718) 633-8662
Parkway Hospital
Speaks Yiddish
Makower, Bryan L., DPM
100861P
Downstate Foot &Ankle Pod
121 Dekalb Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11201
(718) 250-8753
101467P
176 Fenimore St
Brooklyn, NY 11225
(718) 940-0400
36786P
100 Parkside Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11226
(718) 768-1906
54693P
Downstate Foot & Ankle Po
322 Linden Blvd
Brooklyn, NY 11226
(718) 768-1906
Brooklyn Hospital Center
(Downtown Campus), New
York Methodist Hospital
Speaks SpanishFrench
Mandato, Mark, DPM
298290P
HHC-Kings County Hospital
451 Clarkson Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11203
(718) 245-3325
Kings County Hospital Center,
Metropolitan Hospital Center
Mantzoukas, Argirios,
DPM
221092P
HHC-Coney Island Hospital
2601 Ocean Pkwy
Brooklyn, NY 11235
(718) 616-4331
Coney Island Hospital
Speaks Greek, Modern
(1453-)
Marcelonis, Debra A.,
DPM
173195P
465 New Lots Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11207
(718) 240-8900
Jamaica Hospital
Board Certified
Male Female
Wheelchair Accessible
PODIATRY (Continued)
Marville, Jillion, MD
49868P
353 Empire Blvd
Brooklyn, NY 11225
(718) 221-9244
Matthews, Frederick, DPM
302146P
Frederick Matthew DPM
1641 Bergen St
Brooklyn, NY 11213
(718) 778-2938
Interfaith Medical Center
Speaks Spanish
Mckay, Douglas J., DPM
54837P
1704 Mermaid Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11224
(718) 265-0900
Staten Island University
Hosp-North
Meliso, Vincent D., DPM
212393P
1029 Manhattan Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11222
(718) 383-3377
37004P
Lorimer Foot Care
411 Graham Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11211
(718) 383-2518
New York Methodist Hospital
Speaks Italian
Meller, Edward P., DPM
112287P
Ambulatory Care Clinic
1 Brookdale Plz
Brooklyn, NY 11212
(718) 240-5045
112288P
Urban Strategies
1873 Eastern Pkwy
Brooklyn, NY 11233
(718) 240-8700
Jamaica Hospital, St Joseph's
Hospital Division, CMC
Meshnick, Joel A., DPM
105804P
Kings Country Medical Doc
2705 Mermaid Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11224
(718) 265-2222
191516P
2876 W 27th St
Brooklyn, NY 11224
(718) 265-2222
57875P
ODA Primary Health Care
14-16 Heyward St
Brooklyn, NY 11211
(718) 260-4600
Lutheran Medical Center,
Staten Island University
Hosp-North
Micallef, Joseph, DPM
106156P
1095 Flatbush Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11226
(718) 240-8800
Brookdale Hospital Medical
Center, Forest Hills Hospital,
Jamaica Hospital, New York
Hospital Medical Center of
Queens
Mollica, Peter W., DPM
36634P
8223 14th Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11228
(718) 875-9357
36635P
410 Clinton St
Brooklyn, NY 11231
(718) 875-9357
36636P
585 Schenectady Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11203
(718) 604-5481
Interfaith Medical Center,
Kingsbrook Jewish Medical
Center, New York Methodist
Hospital
Speaks Italian
Mollica, Raymond J.,
DPM
36621P
8223 14th Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11228
(718) 236-2871
50026P
Raymond J Mollica, MD
410 Clinton St
Brooklyn, NY 11231
(718) 875-1105
Catholic Medical Center (NY),
Kingsbrook Jewish Medical
Center, Lutheran Medical
Center, New York Methodist
Hospital
Montalvo, Luis, DPM
37021P
7523 Fort Hamilton Pkwy
Brooklyn, NY 11228
(718) 745-7266
Lutheran Medical Center,
Wyckoff Heights Medical
Center
Speaks Spanish
Morreale, Edward, DPM
0X185P
736 Ocean Pkwy
Brooklyn, NY 11230
(718) 437-9343
SVCMC-St Vincents Manhattan
Speaks ItalianSpanish
Naik, Hetal B., DPM
113873P
Lafayette Med Office PC
468 Lafayette Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11205
(718) 399-6234
145498P
1417 Foster Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11230
(718) 421-6300
37256P
121 Dekalb Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11201
(718) 250-8753
Brooklyn Hospital Center
(Downtown Campus), Lutheran
Medical Center, Maimonides
Medical Center
Speaks
HindiGujaratiSpanishUrdu
Nekritin, Vadim, DPM
294087P
2306 Avenue U
Brooklyn, NY 11229
(718) 769-8210
St John's Episcopal Hospital
Speaks Russian
Newmark, Alan J., DPM
36637P
34 Plaza St E
Brooklyn, NY 11238
(718) 857-9004
54470P
372 Kingston Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11213
(718) 604-0675
Brooklyn Hospital Center
(Downtown Campus)
Speaks
SpanishHebrewFrench
Novofastovsky, Raisa, DPM
214483P
1812 Quentin Rd
Brooklyn, NY 11229
(718) 382-1773
37025P
3066 Brighton 6
Brooklyn, NY 11235
(718) 382-1773
37026P
8622 Bay Pkwy
Brooklyn, NY 11214
(718) 333-2121
51725P
All Medical Care L.L.P.
8622 Bay Pkwy
Brooklyn, NY 11214
(718) 333-2121
Lutheran Medical Center, New
York Community Hospital of
Brooklyn
Speaks Russian
Odinsky, Michael E.,
DPM
P0019P
200 Montague St
Brooklyn, NY 11201
(718) 422-8000
P0019P
546 Eastern Pkwy
Brooklyn, NY 11225
(718) 604-4800
Oliva, Imelda A., DPM
139001P
Kings County Hospital Ctr
451 Clarkson Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11203
(718) 245-3325
Kings County Hospital Center,
Metropolitan Hospital Center,
Morrisania Hospital
Speaks TagalogSpanish
Orlando, Anthony, DPM
371187P
HHC-Coney Island Hospital
2601 Ocean Pkwy
Brooklyn, NY 11235
(718) 616-4331
Coney Island Hospital, Forest
Hills Hospital, Lutheran
Medical Center, North Shore
University Hospital
Owusu, Stephen E., DPM
208624P
434 Rockaway Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11212
(718) 346-2628
37081P
Mount Zion Podiatry,PC
106 Pennsylvania Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11207
(718) 385-2085
Jamaica Hospital, St Joseph's
Hospital Division, CMC
Pace, George N., DPM
373411P
Manhattan Footcare
133 Smith St
Brooklyn, NY 11201
(718) 330-1117
Cabrini Medical Center, Long
Island College Hospital, New
York Downtown Hospital, New
York Downtown Hospital
(Beekman)
Speaks Spanish
Pace, John F., DPM
45625P
John F. Pace, MD
398 Court St
Brooklyn, NY 11231
(718) 834-0909
Long Island College Hospital,
SVCMC-Bayley Seton
Papa, Philip M., DPM
141176P
Coney Island Hospital
2601 Ocean Pkwy
Brooklyn, NY 11235
(718) 616-4331
Coney Island Hospital
Passik, Arthur L., DPM
45847P
2601 Ocean Pkwy
Brooklyn, NY 11235
(718) 616-4331
Coney Island Hospital,
Massapequa General Hospital,
Plainview Hospital, Syosset
Hospital
Speaks SpanishItalianGreek,
Modern (1453-)
Pawson, John F., DPM
134403P
9229 Flatlands Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11236
(718) 257-1444
202015P
Bay Park Medical, PC
6403 18th Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11204
(718) 621-0800
New York Community Hospital
of Brooklyn
Speaks
SpanishRussianChineseHeb
rew
Pecora, Maria, DPM
40587P
3245 Nostrand Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11229
(718) 615-3777
Forest Hills Hospital, Jamaica
Hospital, New York Hospital
Medical Center of Queens, St
Joseph's Hospital, St Joseph's
Hospital Division, CMC
Speaks Spanish
Pedro, Helder F., DPM
339019P
Family Physician FHC
5616 6th Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11220
(718) 439-5440
339024P
Caribbean American FHC
3414 Church Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11203
(718) 940-9425
54244P
Sunset Park Family Health
150 55th St
Brooklyn, NY 11220
(718) 630-7208
Long Island Jewish Medical
Center, Lutheran Medical
Center
Perez, Walter H., DPM
114659P
Advanced Walkin Foot CAre
2146 Beverley Rd
Brooklyn, NY 11226
(718) 675-1100
216489P
2919 Avenue T
Brooklyn, NY 11229
(718) 336-4390
38123P
Advanced WalkIn Foot Care
1214 Coney Island Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11230
(718) 677-7700
Brooklyn Hospital Center
(Downtown Campus), Interfaith
Medical Center, Jamaica
Hospital
Speaks
SpanishRussianTurkish
Pierre, Nadja M., DPM
225911P
Woodhull Med & Ment HC
760 Broadway
Brooklyn, NY 11206
(718) 388-5889
Brooklyn Hospital Center
(Downtown Campus), Woodhull
Medical & Mental Health Ctr
Speaks French
Pierre, Nedjie, DPM
145469P
552 Saint Marks Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11238
(718) 398-8700
37250P
3400 Snyder Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11203
(718) 693-4060
37251P
The Brooklyn Hospital Cen
121 Dekalb Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11201
(718) 488-3708
Brooklyn Hospital Center
(Downtown Campus)
Speaks FrenchCreoles and
pidgins, French-based
(Other)
Prince, Steven L., DPM
125224P
JHMC DTC - East New York
3080 Atlantic Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11208
(718) 647-0240
Jamaica Hospital, V A Hospital
- St. Albans
Rabiei, Payman, DPM
214667P
Metropolitan Foot Care PC
94-13 Flatlands Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11236
(718) 649-6464
58033P
Metropolitan Foot Care PC
3309 Church Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11203
(718) 209-0013
Kingsbrook Jewish Medical
Center, Long Island Jewish
Medical Center, Parkway
Hospital
Speaks HebrewPersian
Radler, Bruce L., DPM
36518P
6416 17th Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11204
(718) 236-2821
Staten Island University
Hosp-North
Raskin, Simon, DPM
377535P
Simon Raskin, DPM, P.C.
1409 Gravesend Neck Rd
Brooklyn, NY 11229
(718) 332-7771
Reifer, Howard J., DPM
152842P
1670 E 17th St
Brooklyn, NY 11229
(718) 382-9200
174814P
2433 86th St
Brooklyn, NY 11214
(917) 974-8726
174816P
3059 Brighton 13Th St
Brooklyn, NY 11235
(917) 974-8726
198147P
Quentin Medical, PC
280 Quentin Rd
Brooklyn, NY 11223
(718) 336-4499
217778P
157 York St
Brooklyn, NY 11201
(718) 222-0333
Brooklyn Hospital Center
(Downtown Campus), Kings
County Hospital Center
Speaks Spanish
Romano, Constance A.,
DPM
36902P
386 Graham Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11211
(718) 389-9870
Cabrini Medical Center,
Interfaith Medical Center
Speaks Italian
Rosen, Alan J., DPM
36933P
5402 Flatlands Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11234
(718) 444-3338
Brookdale Hospital Medical
Center
Saadvandi, Terence M.,
DPM
349531P
Physicare Multi Services
150 55th St
Brooklyn, NY 11220
(718) 253-3900
349532P
Nostrand Community Medica
220 13th St
Brooklyn, NY 11215
(718) 769-4988
349533P
Brighton Community Medica
9000 Shore Rd
Brooklyn, NY 11209
(718) 646-5500
Lutheran Medical Center
Speaks Arabic
Sande, Hervey, DPM
52950P
Kings County Hospital Ctr
451 Clarkson Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11203
(718) 245-3325
Kings County Hospital Center
Scheiner, David M., DPM
208600P
Good Health Medical, P.C.
3019 Brighton 1St St
Brooklyn, NY 11235
(718) 743-9700
Brunswick Hospital Center Inc,
South Nassau Comm. Hospital,
South Nassau Communities
Hosp., South Nassau
Communities Hospital,
Winthrop University Hospital
Speaks RussianSpanish
Schikman, Lana, DPM
359328P
Kingsbrook Jewish Med Ctr
585 Schenectady Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11203
(718) 604-5388
Kingsbrook Jewish Medical
Center
Speaks Russian
Schneidermesser, Susan
G., DPM
37048P
18 Prospect Park W
Brooklyn, NY 11215
(718) 398-7593
37049P
894 Eastern Pkwy
Brooklyn, NY 11213
(718) 778-7311
Kingsbrook Jewish Medical
Center
Speaks Spanish
Shapiro, Eugene, DPM
36841P
301 Ocean View Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11235
(718) 332-2582
New York Community Hospital
of Brooklyn
Speaks Russian
Shechter, David Z., DPM
49893P
3066 Brighton 6Th St
Brooklyn, NY 11235
(718) 743-0111
New York Hospital Medical
Center of Queens, St Joseph's
Hospital Division, CMC,
Wyckoff Heights Medical
Center
Shechter, Stuart B., DPM
49678P
Stuart B Shechter, MD
3066 Brighton 6Th St
Brooklyn, NY 11235
(718) 743-0111
Island Medical Center (NY)_
Sherman, Gary, DPM
M4643P
7902 Bay Pkwy
Brooklyn, NY 11214
(718) 236-7520
Maimonides Medical Center,
New York Downtown Hospital
(Beekman), SVCMC-St Vincents
Staten Island
Silberstein, Jeffrey, DPM
36639P
1367 51st St
Brooklyn, NY 11219
(718) 438-4305
Speaks YiddishSpanish
Silverstein, Alan B., DPM
36642P
1185 Dean St
Brooklyn, NY 11216
(718) 774-2740
Interfaith Medical Center
Spielfogel, William D.,
DPM
36935P
Hamilton Podiatry PC
369 93rd St
Brooklyn, NY 11209
(718) 680-6276
Columbia-Presbyterian
Medical Center
Spindler, Harlan, DPM
36541P
5412 Kings Plz
Brooklyn, NY 11234
(718) 377-1212
Peninsula Hospital Center,
Wyckoff Heights Medical
Center
Speaks
FrenchRussianSpanish
Stanimirov, Catherine,
DPM
112328P
2601 Ocean Pkwy
Brooklyn, NY 11235
(718) 616-4331
137433P
Ida G Irael Comm Hlth Ctr
2201 Neptune Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11224
(718) 946-3400
Coney Island Hospital
Speaks Spanish
Steiner, Richard M., DPM
101731P
2811 Ocean Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11229
(718) 648-5609
SVCMC-St Vincents Manhattan
Stuto, Joseph C., DPM
36813P
100 Remsen St
Brooklyn, NY 11201
(718) 624-7537
Brooklyn Hospital Center
(Downtown Campus), Long
Island College Hospital, New
York Community Hospital of
Brooklyn
Tajerstein, Alan R., DPM
36951P
1335 54th St
Brooklyn, NY 11219
(718) 972-5000
Brooklyn Hospital Center
(Downtown Campus)
Speaks YiddishHebrew
Tanenbaum, Mark, DPM
36644P
1648 E 14th St
Brooklyn, NY 11229
(718) 627-0585
Tartack, Ira, DPM
187670P
Coney Island Hospital
2601 Ocean Pkwy
Brooklyn, NY 11235
(718) 616-4331
New York Community Hospital
of Brooklyn, Our Lady of Mercy
Medical Center
Speaks
ItalianSpanishRussian
Tavroff, Clifford D., DPM
P0038P
233 Nostrand Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11205
(718) 826-5900
Trepal, Michael J., DPM
183218P
115 Henry St
Brooklyn, NY 11201
(718) 624-8022
Long Island College Hospital,
Metropolitan Hospital Center,
New York Downtown Hospital
(Beekman), SVCMC-St Vincents
Manhattan
Trivlis, Maryann Z., DPM
216717P
248 Avenue P
Brooklyn, NY 11204
(718) 945-0770
Brooklyn Hospital Center
(Downtown Campus)
Speaks Greek, Modern
(1453-)
Unger, Leslie M., DPM
36470P
1405 46th St
Brooklyn, NY 11219
(718) 438-8717
49514P
Lesie M Unger, MD
2315 Mermaid Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11224
(718) 373-1820
Maimonides Medical Center
Speaks SpanishYiddish
Vader, Bonnie, DPM
36966P
621 Amboy St
Brooklyn, NY 11212
(718) 345-2935
Brookdale Hospital Medical
Center, Forest Hills Hospital
Speaks Spanish
Waiss, Samuel M., DPM
351219P
2223 Coney Island Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11223
(718) 375-6096
New York Community Hospital
of Brooklyn
Speaks HebrewYiddish
Board Certified
Male Female
Wheelchair Accessible
PODIATRY (Continued)
Wallach, Jacob B., DPM
15739P
2108 Avenue P
Brooklyn, NY 11229
(718) 951-6399
Maimonides Medical Center
Woltman, Robert T., DPM
205506P
Lyudmila Cavalier Physici
9014 Flatlands Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11236
(718) 209-5353
Long Island Jewish Medical
Center, New York Westchester
Square Me, Peninsula Hospital
Center
Zonenashvili, Merabi,
DPM
293458P
201 Kings Hwy
Brooklyn, NY 11223
(718) 621-1811
Staten Island University
Hosp-North
Speaks
RussianGeorgianSpanish
Zwiebel, Neil S., DPM
363102P
420 Fulton St
Brooklyn, NY 11201
(718) 797-3668
Cabrini Medical Center, Long
Island College Hospital
Kings
PODIATRY
Abeles, Jay, DPM
36958P
4136 Hicksville Rd
Bethpage, NY 11714
(516) 796-2900
Massapequa General Hospital,
New Island Hospital, Syosset
Hospital
Abrahamson, Hal, DPM
54152P
100 Manetto Hill Rd
Plainview, NY 11803
(516) 822-9595
Catholic Medical Center (NY),
Forest Hills Hospital
Speaks Hebrew
Alongi, Maryanne, DPM
36724P
226 7th St
Garden City, NY 11530
(516) 248-9680
Franklin Hospital ,
Massapequa General Hospital,
New Island Hospital
Amato, Richard, DPM
343044P
R.A. Podiatry, P.C.
2116 Merrick Ave
Merrick, NY 11566
(516) 378-9191
New Island Hospital
Axman, Wayne R., DPM
179959P
70 Maple Ave
Rockville Centre, NY 11570
(516) 536-3336
182388P
1420 Broadway
Hewlett, NY 11557
(516) 374-8600
Long Beach Memorial
Hospital, Long Island Jewish
Medical Center, Mount Sinai
Hospital, Mount Sinai of
Queens, New York Hospital
Medical, South Nassau
Communities Hospital
Speaks SpanishGreek,
Modern (1453-)
Bagner, Jerome E., DPM
36499P
30 Hempstead Ave
Rockville Centre, NY 11570
(516) 764-6800
49647P
165 N Village Ave
Rockville Centre, NY 11570
(516) 746-6800
New Island Hospital
Speaks
YiddishItalianJapaneseSpani
sh
Balboa, Henry M., DPM
36506P
100 Manetto Hill Rd
Plainview, NY 11803
(516) 822-9595
Forest Hills Hospital, New
Island Hospital, Syosset
Hospital
Barbaro, Thomas, DPM
36883P
706 Jericho Tpke
New Hyde Park, NY 11040
(516) 326-7979
Long Island Jewish Medical
Center, North Shore University
Hospital
Speaks Italian
Barkoff, Matthew W.,
DPM
36920P
2900 Hempstead Tpke
Levittown, NY 11756
(516) 579-2800
Glen Cove Hospital, New
Island Hospital, North Shore
University Hospital, Plainview
Hospital, Syosset Hospital
Speaks Spanish
Becker, Jack S., DPM
36551P
178 E Rockaway Rd
Hewlett, NY 11557
(516) 596-1700
49835P
Jack S Becker, MD
3000 Hempstead Tpke
Levittown, NY 11756
(516) 579-1700
Franklin Hospital, Franklin
Hospital , Nassau University
Medical Center, South Nassau
Communities Hosp., South
Nassau Communities Hospital
Bendeth, Marc L., DPM
36520P
1226 W Broadway
Hewlett, NY 11557
(516) 374-4444
Berlin, Kim, DPM
36650P
830 Atlantic Ave
Baldwin, NY 11510
(516) 623-4580
Long Beach Memorial
Hospital, South Nassau
Communities Hospital
Speaks Spanish
Biller, Bob S., DPM
M1057P
756 E Park Ave
Long Beach, NY 11561
(516) 432-7470
LONG BEACH MEMORIAL
MEDICAL CENTER, SAINT
JOHNS EPISCOPAL
HOSPITAL-SOUTH SHORE
Bilotti, Mary A., DPM
169106P
Long Island Podiatry Grp
2001 Marcus Ave
New Hyde Park, NY 11042
(516) 327-0074
M0911P
Long Island Podiatry Grp
375 N Central Ave
Valley Stream, NY 11580
(516) 825-4070
Franklin Hospital , Long Island
Jewish Medical Center
Speaks Spanish
Breitman, Debra, DPM
36886P
250 Broadway
Lawrence, NY 11559
(516) 239-4700
Peninsula Hospital Center, St
John's Episcopal Hospital, St
John's Episcopal Hospital -
Far Rockaway
Speaks Spanish
Bubbers, Linda A., DPM
36627P
Sunrise Foot Care
4880 Sunrise Highway
Massapequa Park, NY 11762
(516) 795-6255
Syosset Hospital
Speaks Spanish
Buenahora, Joseph A.,
DPM
M2238P
477 Newbridge Rd
East Meadow, NY 11554
(516) 679-1338
Brunswick General Hospital,
Brunswick Hospital Center Inc,
New Island Hospital, Plainview
Hospital, Syosset Hospital,
Wyckoff Heights Medical
Center
Speaks SpanishYiddish
Burzotta, John L., DPM
36762P
2419 Jericho Tpke
Garden City Park, NY 11040
(516) 294-9540
50161P
Pro Health Care
2800 Marcus Ave
Garden City Park, NY 11042
(516) 622-6040
Long Island Jewish Medical
Center, North Shore University
Hospital
Speaks Italian
Caimano, Francis X.,
DPM
300372P
Francis X Caimano
495 S Broadway
Hicksville, NY 11801
(914) 555-1212
P0014P
350 S Broadway
Hicksville, NY 11801
(516) 938-0100
Syosset Hospital
Speaks Spanish
Caprioli, Russell, DPM
359698P
1999 Marcus Ave
New Hyde Park, NY 11042
(516) 555-1212
36764P
Long Island Podiatry Grp
2001 Marcus Ave
New Hyde Park, NY 11042
(516) 327-0074
Franklin Hospital, Franklin
Hospital , Long Beach
Memorial Hospital, Long
Island Jewish Medical Center
Speaks ItalianSpanish
Chernick, Stephen B.,
DPM
50872P
175 Fulton Ave
Hempstead, NY 11550
(516) 489-2261
Parkway Hospital, St John's
Episcopal Hospital - Far
Rockaway
Speaks SpanishHebrew
Cohen, Robert J., DPM
36557P
72 Covert Ave
Garden City, NY 11530
(516) 354-7222
Our Lady of Mercy Medical
Center, Parkway Hospital
Speaks French
Davies, Daniel A., DPM
36889P
6 Scranton Ave
Lynbrook, NY 11563
(516) 596-0022
Cabrini Medical Center, Good
Samaritan Hospital, Good
Samaritan Hospital (West Islip)
Speaks Italian
Davies, Gregory F., DPM
36657P
Syosset Medical Building
175 Jericho Tpke
Syosset, NY 11791
(516) 496-7676
Glen Cove Hospital, North
Shore University Hospital,
Plainview Hospital, Syosset
Hospital
Speaks Spanish
DeCicco, John J., DPM
36618P
875 Old Country Rd
Plainview, NY 11803
(516) 681-8866
New Island Hospital, Plainview
Hospital, Syosset Hospital
Speaks SpanishGreek,
Modern (1453-)Italian
Dubov, Spencer F., DPM
383227P
New Island Hospital
4295 Hempstead Tpke
Bethpage, NY 11714
(631) 858-0011
Mary Immaculate Hospital,
Massapequa General Hospital
Inc., NY Hospital Medical
Center of Queens, Plainview
Hospital
Speaks
YiddishSpanishItalian
Feldman, Gary B., DPM
36826P
5 Sunrise Plz
Valley Stream, NY 11580
(516) 825-6825
St Joseph's Hospital Division,
CMC
Fiorenza, Dominic, DPM
P0048P
350 S Broadway
Hicksville, NY 11801
(516) 938-0100
Fox, Corey, DPM
37000P
Massapequa Podiatry Assoc
4160 Merrick Rd
Massapequa, NY 11758
(516) 541-9000
Brunswick General Hospital,
Brunswick Hospital Center Inc,
New Island Hospital, Plainview
Hospital, Syosset Hospital
Speaks
SpanishTagalogItalian
Fox, Roberta A., DPM
37003P
410 Lakeville Rd
New Hyde Park, NY 11042
(516) 488-5050
Long Island Jewish Medical
Center
Fuchs, David B., DPM
36704P
855 Cynthia Dr
East Meadow, NY 11554
(516) 292-2372
New Island Hospital, Syosset
Hospital
Garofalo, Gail F., DPM
37140P
NS Podiatric Med & Surger
410 Lakeville Rd
New Hyde Park, NY 11042
(516) 326-4709
Long Island Jewish Medical
Center, St Catherine of Siena,
St Catherine of Sienna Medical
Center, Winthrop University
Hospital, Winthrop-University
Hospital
Gasparini, Mark C., DPM
337162P
119 New York Ave
Massapequa, NY 11758
(516) 804-9038
Speaks Italian
George, Thomas, DPM
141475P
1029 Bellmore Rd
North Bellmore, NY 11710
(516) 679-4636
Hempstead General Hospital
Med Ctr., New York
Westchester Square Medical
Center
Gervasio, Joseph, DPM
36653P
1000 Park Blvd
Massapequa Park, NY 11762
(516) 799-0550
36654P
156 Post Ave
Westbury, NY 11590
(516) 334-8208
Massapequa General Hospital,
Massapequa General Hospital
Inc., New Island Hospital,
Plainview Hospital, Southside
Hospital
Goez, Emilio A., DPM
51027P
Long Island Foot Care
294 W Merrick Rd
Freeport, NY 11520
(516) 378-8383
Nassau University Medical
Center, Saint Catharines
General Hospital, St Barnabas
Hospital
Speaks Spanish
Golub, Cary M., DPM
37076P
854 E Broadway
Long Beach, NY 11561
(516) 889-2200
Long Beach Medical Center,
South Nassau Communities
Hospital
Speaks Hebrew
Gottlieb, Robert J., DPM
36579P
188 W Main St
Oyster Bay, NY 11771
(516) 922-0502
Glen Cove Hospital, Good
Samaritan Hospital (West Islip)
Speaks Spanish
Greenbaum, Mitchell A.,
DPM
36924P
111 Mineola Ave
Roslyn Heights, NY 11577
(516) 484-1444
36925P
525 Woodbury Rd
Plainview, NY 11803
(516) 433-3353
Glen Cove Hospital, Long
Island Jewish Medical Center,
New Island Hospital, North
Shore University Hospital,
Plainview Hospital, Syosset
Hospital
Speaks Spanish
Greiff, Lance, DPM
36988P
29 Barstow Rd
Great Neck, NY 11021
(516) 829-1028
Brooklyn Hospital Center
(Downtown Campus), New
York Flushing Hospital &
Medical Center, Parkway
Hospital
Grossman, Myles, DPM
36831P
2174 Hewlett Ave
Merrick, NY 11566
(516) 379-2560
41745P
156 Post Ave
Westbury, NY 11590
(516) 334-8208
New Island Hospital, Plainview
Hospital
Speaks SpanishHebrew
Herbert, Scott E., DPM
284145P
49 Church St
Freeport, NY 11520
(516) 378-0184
St Catherine of Siena
Hershey, Paul E., DPM
36462P
2110 Northern Blvd
Manhasset, NY 11030
(516) 627-5775
Long Island Jewish Medical
Center, Saint Francis Hospital -
Bronx
Speaks SpanishYiddish
Herzberg, Abraham, DPM
54315P
300 Franklin Ave
Valley Stream, NY 11580
(516) 561-1617
54316P
833 Northern Blvd
Great Neck, NY 11021
(516) 622-7900
Franklin Hospital, Jamaica
Hospital
Speaks Yiddish
Hickey, John, DPM
M4002P
2870 Hempstead Tpke
Levittown, NY 11756
(516) 735-4545
New Island Hospital, Plainview
Hospital, Syosset Hospital
Honore, Lesly S., DPM
132409P
Podiatry Services of New
905 Uniondale Ave
Uniondale, NY 11553
(516) 565-5666
132410P
981 Rosedale Rd
Valley Stream, NY 11581
(516) 295-6307
Cabrini Medical Center, Mercy
Medical Center,
Winthrop-University Hospital
Speaks
SpanishFrenchCreoles and
pidgins (Other)
Horl, Lawrence, DPM
36912P
61 N Park Ave
Rockville Centre, NY 11570
(516) 766-5550
Forest Hills Hospital,
Hempstead General Hospital
Med Ctr., Mercy Medical
Center, Peninsula Hospital
Center, South Nassau
Communities Hospital, St
John's Episcopal Hospital -
Far Rockaway
Speaks Spanish
Horowitz, Mitchell L.,
DPM
M2025P
2720 Jerusalem Ave
North Bellmore, NY 11710
(516) 679-2720
Irwin, Robert A., DPM
37172P
143 Merrick Ave
Merrick, NY 11566
(516) 623-2800
NY Hospital Medical Center of
Queens, New Island Hospital,
New York Hospital Medical
Center of Queens, Syosset
Hospital
Speaks SpanishItalianGreek,
Modern (1453-)
Jackalone, John A., DPM
277559P
Podiatry Offices
4295 Hempstead Tpke
Bethpage, NY 11714
(516) 579-3500
Catholic Medical Center (NY),
Forest Hills Hospital, Long
Beach Memorial Hospital, St
Vincents Medical Center Of
New York
Speaks Spanish
Jarbath, John A., DPM
155828P
50 Hempstead Ave
Lynbrook, NY 11563
(516) 599-0302
Forest Hills Hospital, New York
Hospital Medical Center of
Queens, Parkway Hospital,
Peninsula Hospital Center
Speaks FrenchCreoles and
pidgins, French-based
(Other)
Karpe, David E., DPM
160781P
Howard Kessler & Assoc PC
200 N Village Ave
Rockville Centre, NY 11570
(516) 764-0434
Franklin Hospital, Franklin
Hospital , Peninsula Hospital
Center, South Nassau Comm.
Hospital, South Nassau
Communities Hosp.
Speaks Spanish
Kashefsky, Helene P., DPM
37071P
2201 Hempstead Tpke
East Meadow, NY 11554
(516) 572-0123
Nassau University Medical
Center
Speaks Spanish
Kasminoff, June G.,
DPM
37044P
666 Old Bethpage Rd
Old Bethpage, NY 11804
(516) 777-3668
Massapequa General Hospital,
New Island Hospital, Syosset
Hospital
Kessler, Howard N., DPM
36570P
200 N Village Ave
Rockville Centre, NY 11570
(516) 764-0434
Franklin Hospital, Franklin
Hospital , Mercy Medical
Center, Nassau University
Medical Center, South Nassau
Communities Hosp., South
Nassau Communities Hospital
Kisberg, Stephen, DPM
36519P
11 Franklin Pl
Woodmere, NY 11598
(516) 295-2121
St John's Episcopal Hospital -
Far Rockaway
Kitton, Stuart E., DPM
36573P
41 Woods Dr
Roslyn, NY 11576
(516) 626-3999
MEADOWLANDS HOSPITAL
MEDICAL CENTER, Mount
Sinai Medical Center,
SVCMC-St Vincents
Manhattan, The Mount Sinai
Hospital of Queens
Speaks Spanish
Klein, Michael S., DPM
36893P
East Norwich Podiatry
898 Oyster Bay Rd
East Norwich, NY 11732
(516) 624-2101
36894P
Oceanside Podiatry
3105 Lawson Blvd
Oceanside, NY 11572
(516) 766-8500
Glen Cove Hospital, Long
Beach Memorial Hospital,
Syosset Hospital
Klirsfeld, Jeffrey S.,
DPM
36857P
2870 Hempstead Tpke
Levittown, NY 11756
(516) 731-3300
Massapequa General Hospital,
New Island Hospital, Syosset
Hospital
Speaks Spanish
Kohn, Arlene F., DPM
37113P
Family Footcare
120 Bethpage Rd
Hicksville, NY 11801
(516) 938-6000
Mercy Medical Center, New
Island Hospital, Syosset
Hospital
Speaks Spanish
Kolberg, John J., DPM
37222P
320 Post Ave
Westbury, NY 11590
(516) 338-8802
New Island Hospital
Speaks Spanish
Koslow, Paul M., DPM
50912P
Great Neck Podiatry Asso
29 Barstow Rd
Great Neck, NY 11021
(516) 829-1028
Maimonides Medical Center,
New York Hospital Medical
Center of Queens, New York
Methodist Hospital
LaRocca, Albert, DPM
36594P
2 Raemar Ct
Bethpage, NY 11714
(516) 935-0111
New Island Hospital
Speaks ItalianGerman
Landau, Laurence D., DPM
193059P
86 George St
Roslyn Heights, NY 11577
(516) 731-1900
38312P
160 Hicksville Rd
Bethpage, NY 11714
(516) 731-1900
New Island Hospital, Plainview
Hospital
Landy, Robert J., DPM
123448P
120 Bethpage Rd
Hicksville, NY 11801
(516) 827-4500
123481P
530 Hicksville Rd
Bethpage, NY 11714
(516) 937-5000
Massapequa General Hospital,
Our Lady of Mercy Medical
Center, Parkway Hospital,
Southside Hospital, Winthrop
University Hospital
Speaks Spanish
Larsen, Joseph A., DPM
50624P
National Foot Care
2419 Jericho Tpke
Garden City Park, NY 11040
(516) 294-9540
North Shore University
Hospital
Levine, Stanley, DPM
36477P
4725 Merrick Rd
Massapequa, NY 11758
(516) 799-8545
Brunswick General Hospital,
Brunswick Hospital Center Inc,
Hempstead General Hospital
Med Ctr., Massapequa General
Hospital, New Island Hospital,
Syosset Hospital
Speaks
SpanishGermanItalian
Levitsky, David A., DPM
301933P
161 Orchard St
Plainview, NY 11803
(516) 822-9666
Board Certified
Male Female
Wheelchair Accessible
Livingston, Douglas W.,
DPM
37180P
Livingston Foot Care Spec
1685 Newbridge Rd
North Bellmore, NY 11710
(516) 826-0103
Brunswick Hospital Center Inc,
Massapequa General Hospital
Inc., Nassau University Medical
Center, New Island Hospital,
Plainview Hospital, Syosset
Hospital
Livingston, Leon B., DPM
36486P
Livingston Foot Care Spec
1685 Newbridge Rd
North Bellmore, NY 11710
(516) 826-0103
New Island Hospital, Plainview
Hospital, Syosset Hospital
Livingston, Michael D.,
DPM
37064P
Livingston Foot Care Spec
1685 Newbridge Rd
Bellmore, NY 11710
(516) 826-0103
Brunswick Hospital Center Inc,
Nassau University Medical
Center, New Island Hospital,
Plainview Hospital, Syosset
Hospital
Lynn, Brian P., DPM
108081P
Comprehensive Podiatric
2110 Northern Blvd
Manhasset, NY 11030
(516) 627-5775
355143P
Comprehensive Podiatric
935 Northern Blvd
Great Neck, NY 11021
(516) 627-5775
Long Island Jewish Medical
Center, Montefiore Med Ctr
(Henry & Lucy Moses Div)
Speaks Spanish
Mahgerefteh, David, DPM
349786P
230 Middle Neck Rd
Great Neck, NY 11021
(516) 829-2560
Parkway Hospital
Speaks Yiddish
Marchese, Nicholas A.,
DPM
359291P
1000 Park Blvd
Massapequa Park, NY 11762
(516) 799-0550
New Island Hospital, Southside
Hospital
Masani, Farhan, DPM
37069P
530 Old Country Rd
Westbury, NY 11590
(516) 334-7642
Nassau University Medical
Center, Syosset Hospital,
Wyckoff Heights Medical
Center
Speaks
SpanishFrenchHindiUrdu
McElgun, Terence M.,
DPM
36861P
520 Franklin Ave
Garden City, NY 11530
(516) 746-4732
36862P
1135 N Broadway
Massapequa, NY 11758
(516) 756-0091
380037P
N. Shore Hosp., Plainview
888 Old Country Rd
Plainview, NY 11803
(516) 796-1313
New Island Hospital, Plainview
Hospital, Syosset Hospital
Speaks SpanishItalian
Mcshane, William J., DPM
36802P
Harbor Podiatry PC
131 Main St
East Rockaway, NY 11518
(516) 593-2233
36803P
54 Main St
Hempstead, NY 11550
(516) 538-4531
Franklin Hospital, Island
Medical Center (NY)_
Meshnick, Joel A., DPM
139939P
2574 Hewlett Ln
Bellmore, NY 11710
(516) 781-5440
Lutheran Medical Center,
Staten Island University
Hosp-North
Micallef, Joseph, DPM
36900P
101st Avenue Foot Care PC
287 Northern Blvd
Great Neck, NY 11021
(516) 773-4001
Brookdale Hospital Medical
Center, Forest Hills Hospital,
Jamaica Hospital, New York
Hospital Medical Center of
Queens
Moazen, Ali, DPM
P0033P
226 Clinton St
Hempstead, NY 11550
(516) 483-2020
Speaks Persian
Montag, Richard M.,
DPM
36509P
528 Bellmore Ave
East Meadow, NY 11554
(516) 483-7386
Island Medical Center (NY)_,
Plainview Hospital, Syosset
Hospital
Speaks Spanish
Nester, Elizabeth M., DPM
37243P
3 Walnut Rd
Glen Cove, NY 11542
(516) 674-9661
37244P
Nester Podiatry Associate
267 Lincoln Blvd
Long Beach, NY 11561
(516) 889-0969
57655P
East Coast Podiatry PLLC
680 Merrick Rd
Baldwin, NY 11510
(516) 889-0969
Glen Cove Hospital, Long
Beach Medical Center
Speaks Spanish
Nester, Matthew J., DPM
211451P
Nester Poadiatry Assoc
3227 Long Beach Rd
Oceanside, NY 11572
(516) 431-1600
50871P
Nester Podiatry Asso.
3 Walnut Rd
Glen Cove, NY 11542
(516) 674-9661
Long Beach Medical Center,
Long Beach Memorial
Hospital, St John's Episcopal
Hospital, St John's Episcopal
Hospital - Far Rockaway
Speaks Spanish
Nezaria, Yehuda, DPM
37236P
7 Franklin Ave
Lynbrook, NY 11563
(516) 887-2820
49675P
2053 Bellmore Ave
Bellmore, NY 11710
(516) 887-2820
Franklin Hospital, Franklin
Hospital , Huntington Hospital
Speaks Hebrew
Odinsky, Wayne Z., DPM
P0034P
2035 Lakeville Rd
New Hyde Park, NY 11040
(718) 343-0600
New York Hospital Medical
Center of Queens, Parkway
Hospital, Rockaway Beach
Hospital (closed)
Pedro, Helder F., DPM
54241P
Helder F. Pedro, DPM
1 Willow Pl
Albertson, NY 11507
(516) 621-3721
Long Island Jewish Medical
Center, Lutheran Medical
Center
Peterson, Donald T.,
DPM
36931P
8029 Jericho Tpke
Woodbury, NY 11797
(516) 496-0900
Plainview Hospital, Syosset
Hospital
Prince, Steven L., DPM
124780P
78 Marina Rd
Island Park, NY 11558
(516) 432-1332
Jamaica Hospital, V A Hospital
- St. Albans
Purvin, Jay M., DPM
36608P
467 Merrick Ave
East Meadow, NY 11554
(516) 489-1950
New Island Hospital, Plainview
Hospital
Richardson, Hugh L., DPM
195855P
L.I. Podiatric Grp
2001 Marcus Ave
New Hyde Park, NY 11042
(516) 327-0074
195856P
L.I. Podiatric Grp
375 N Central Ave
Valley Stream, NY 11580
(516) 825-4070
363220P
1999 Marcus Ave
New Hyde Park, NY 11042
(516) 555-1212
Franklin Hospital, Franklin
Hospital , Long Island Jewish
Medical Center, Long Island
Jewish, Manhasset (closed)
Speaks Spanish
Bronx Kings Nassau

Result number: 14
Searching file 22

Message Number 226249

p.f. pain View Thread
Posted by debra f. on 3/29/07 at 22:51

HELP. I have p.f. in both feet. I had surgery to relieve the pain with no luck. I have had Ostotron, splints, boots, psycial theapthy(3 times), costrone shots, and finally surgery. I am now undergoing p.t. for the 3rd time with no success. I have a great doctor but I am hoping that you may have some new advise I can take to him.
The surgery consisted of removing bone spurs, detacting the p.f., and nerve work. I am experiencing throbbing, burning, and stabbing pain if i walk for any distance. I feel like I am walking on very sharp rocks. I am awoken every night with burning pain in the heel and pad of both feet. I have to take a pain pill and soma to stop it and allow me to go back to sleep. If I thought having my feet cut off would help I would more likely do it. But I really don't want to consider it. I am on soma, vicidain, glabtin,ibuprofen. PLEASE HELP I AM GETTING REALLY SCARED AND DESPRATE.

Result number: 15

Message Number 226248

Re: failure of plantar fascittis surgery View Thread
Posted by debra f. on 3/29/07 at 22:39

I had surgery on both my feet and I also have had no relief. I am now undergoing p.t. and it is getting worse. I wish i had better news for you but I can only tell you the truth. I have ungone every treatment that is availble and once i finish with p.t. in two weeks my doctor is out of options. My only advise is read everything you can on p.f. so you at least will know what to expect. Was your surgery the nightmare mine was? Man talk about pain. It wouldn't be so bad if it had at least worked. Let me know if your doctor comes up with any other ideas. I have tried Ostatron, p.t.(3 times), boots, splints, cortosine shots, shoe inserts, and finally surgery. I wish you the best of luck in getting relief. When your feet hurt everythings hurts. ha, ha.

Result number: 16

Message Number 225567

physcial theaphy View Thread
Posted by debra f. on 3/20/07 at 16:00

I have had all the treatments for this and none have helped. I had surgery in both of my feet last year. I have just started P.T. for the second time. I am experiencing a lot of pain in both of my feet. Has anyone had any luck with P.T.? MY job is the type that I have to be on my feet a lot and by the time I get off of work I am in major pain. I have been doing the exercises they (p.t.)want me to do with even more pain. I am out of ideas and hope. Any ideas would be greatly appreicated.

Result number: 17

Message Number 221736

Re: Anyone have nerve damage after foot surgery? View Thread
Posted by debra g. on 2/07/07 at 00:16

I had surgery on both feet in Sept. and Oct. I am still having sereve pain and have been told that i have nerve damage. does anyone have any advice on what to do now. I have gone through p.t., shots, osatron treatment, splints, the boot,and of course surgery. My doc wants to restart p.t. with electric shock. not looking forward to that.

Result number: 18
Searching file 21

Message Number 215407

Re: DRX9000 sounds great, but our local doc seems fishy... View Thread
Posted by Dr. James Martin on 11/11/06 at 16:09

Melissa,

Our office has between 400-500 inquiries about our program every month. We are booked for new patient consultations usually 2-3 months out.

Yes, my staff may or may not let you know that when you call for an appointment. They do have people call to cancel or reschedule and create open spots for consultations and my staff is kind enough to look for those instead of scheduling you 3 months out.

We are the largest provider of non surgical spinal decompression in northern california north of sacramento and have been doing this procedure for 2 years.

Our program is not for everybody. Only those who are looking for a very experienced doctor who has a complete and effective program. (Not just a doctor who just got one a couple months ago, and has very little experience. Experience makes a big difference)

I am sorry your husband felt any kind of pressure in my office, but I can't leave open spots on our machine if you can't make up your mind.

We don't force anyone to do anything, we only present the oppportunity to get some help from an experienced physician. Treatment slots go very fast in my office. Other doctors may have no patients, and you can think about your decision for weeks, just not in my office.

If you would like to go to a clinic with a serious condition and be able to get right in and take as much time as you want to make your decision, maybe you should go to a doctor that has only had the technology for a couple months, has no patients and really needs your business.

Yes, I will admit, am a little confident about our program.
"Cocky" as a description, since you never even met me, my staff or even stepped foot inside my office seems a little out of line.

The following are a few of the many testimonials we receive from our patients (and no not everyone gets better;86% or so do):

Testimonial #1
“I had excruciating back pain and pain down both legs to my feet. I had been suffering for 2 years. I tried everything. I now look forward to every day and I’m even back on the golf course. If you’re thinking about spinal decompression, don’t wait, Do it Now!!

Doug Brooks
Redding, California

Testimonial#2
“I had lower back pain and sciatica pain that was progressively becoming worse.

I have had this problem for 40 years, but much worse for the past year. I tried chiropractic, acupuncture, physical therapy, heat, ice and exercise.

After decompression, my pain is considerably less. It’s not debilitating any more. If you ask me if I would recommend spinal decompression, the answer is Yes!
Bill Colvin
Chico,California

Testimonial #3
“I had excruciating back pain and was worried I would need surgery. “I have had this problem for three months. I tried acupuncture, acupressure, chiropractic, and pain medications.

Dr. Martin and the DRX 9000 have given me my life back. I couldn’t walk and was in excruciating pain. I was afraid I would need surgery. Not only was I afraid – but I had heard surgery had a poor success rate.

I now have no pain and I have my mobility back. My fear is gone and now I can get back to my busy life and family.
Thank you Dr. Martin and the girls! You guys are the very best.

Bonnie Salmon – Owner Scooters Café
Oroville, California

Testimonial #4
“I had lower back pain and leg numbness so bad I could not sleep properly.

“I have had this pain for 5 years. I tried chiropractic for my problem and when that did not help I went to a neurosurgeon.

It’s wonderful to be able to sleep all night without pain and to stand straight and walk without both legs going numb.
If you are in pain or considering back surgery for disc problems, definitely give DRX 9000 spinal decompression a try.
Marcia Penick – Retired
Chico, California

Testimonial #5
“I literally had to crawl to the bathroom and I cried out in pain just to get dressed.

“I have had extreme back pain for 15 years and tried everything under the sun: chiropractors, back specialists, world renowned doctors. They all said the same thing, spinal degeneration and the only hope was risky back surgery that could lead to paralysis.

My children are 9,4, and 2 and up until now, I have never been able to pick up any one of them to hold without the real fear of being in bed for days with pain.

Because of Dr. Martin, I can pick up my children for the first time. My wife has rarely seen me laugh due to the pain.

Did Dr. Martin change my life? Yes! He gave me the life that I have always wanted to have; the ability to pick up my children and spend time with my wife without constant back pain. I am now free from my mental prison and feel as if I have been given a new life.

I am the ultimate cynic. I am a “born again” believer that some doctors actually can perform what seems like a miracle.

Philipe Rorive – Chef
Chico, California

Testimonial #6

“My back pain got so bad, I couldn’t sleep, sit or stand without pain.

“I have had this problem for 25+ years. I tried 5 different chiropractors, acupuncture, and other therapies.

As I said when I came to Dr. Martin, there was no position I could get in to relieve the pain and for the first time ever, my left thigh became numb. This was very upsetting to me, for I could see that in a very short time I wouldn’t be able to do my job.

Thanks to Dr. Martin, my numbness is gone as is my back pain. Thank God for this treatment!!

Ron Holt
Chico, California

Testimonial #7
I had no where else to go. They said they couldn’t help me at the spinal surgery center in Mountain View in the bay area. Then I saw your ad. I called because I needed something. I was pretty skeptical of the claims you made, but after going through the program, Let’s just say you gave me a new lease on life.” I would have to say if you are considering spinal decompression, go for it.

George Oreggia – Farmer
Orland, California
Testimonial #8
I was having leg pain and it was affecting my ability to work and stand. Spinal Decompression has definitely helped me, I’d say I am 95% better after going through the program.

Oliver Conoly - Maintenance
Oroville, California

Testimonial #9

“I had serious back pain. I was taking several pain medications when I started the program.

After the 5th treatment, I woke up feeling thirty five again!

It was amazing. I am now off all pain drugs and am totally pain free.

John Marek – Pet Care
Chico, California

Testimonial #10
I had severe back pain and losing ability to function.

My problem started 13 years ago and it got severe In the last 2 months or so.

After the first treatment on the drx 9000, the numbness in my left leg and foot went away. Also the stabbing sensation in my spine isn’t as severe as it was.

My life is changing because of Dr. Martin. I’m excited about my future and getting my complete life back!!

Burna McClelland- Rancher
Paynes Creek, Ca

Testimonial #11
“I was at the end of my rope. I have tried every modality available for my low back pain to no avail.

Even being on many medications, including morphine daily. I was still in excruciating pain. Dr. Martin was my last resort before undergoing global back surgery.

I have had back pain for 16 years with sciatica in both legs and was almost totally disabled and not able to do much.

If you are a candidate for this procedure, do it! It has really helped me get my life back.

Dr. Martin and his staff are very knowledgeable, friendly and understanding. It is a joy to come into the office for my treatments.

Debra Felice – Retired
Chico, Ca
Testimonial#12
“I heard about spinal decompression on the radio.

I had back pain for 3 or 4 years and tried different back therapies and back surgery.

Spinal decompression has helped me even after back surgery and I sleep better at night.

If someone has back problems, they should try spinal decompression.”

Rick Wright – Farmer
Chico, California


Result number: 19

Message Number 214666

Re: Kerry Attends Soldiers Funerals. Bush has never attended a fallen hero's funeral. View Thread
Posted by larrym on 10/31/06 at 19:29

BOSTON -- The mother of a local Marine who was killed in Iraq spoke out Tuesday about the comments that Sen. John Kerry made about U.S. troops and education.

NewsCenter 5's Jim Boyd reported Tuesday that while talking to a group of students in California, Kerry urged them to study hard or else they can "get stuck in Iraq."

"I am very disturbed. I am very insulted and very sad that he doesn't understand how highly educated and well trained our military men and women are," said Debra Booth, whose son was killed in Iraq.


Second Lt. Joshua Booth died on Oct. 17. His mother said that what makes Kerry's words so offensive is that they come one day after Kerry called the family to offer condolences.

"We did appreciate the call. I am appreciative of anyone who reaches out to me and to then turn around and say something that is so totally incorrect," Booth said.

As to whether Kerry should apologize, Booth said that Kerry needs to do more to make amends.

"In addition to apologizing, he needs to learn a little bit about what our men and women in the military are actually made up of," Booth said. "We don't want to send that kind of signal, that you only go into the military if you are not good at anything."

Result number: 20

Message Number 214429

Re: heel pain and numbness View Thread
Posted by debra B on 10/28/06 at 04:10

I recently had heel numbness,Iwas tested for diabetes with a good blood sugar reading.I CAN NOT UNDERSTAND WHAT IS RESPONSIBLE FOR THIS.
i do have a heel spur in that heel.
Debra.

Result number: 21
Searching file 20
Searching file 19

Message Number 197010

Re: View Thread
Posted by Dr. R on 4/06/06 at 08:44

Question for Dr. Z:
Is debra ashcroft a partner at Excellence?

Result number: 22

Message Number 194015

Increased pain after ECSW View Thread
Posted by Debra on 2/22/06 at 21:57

Hi Doctor:

I was originally diagnosed with Plantar Fascitis 4 yrs. ago. It eventually went away with the use of orthodics and I've used them and only wore birkenstock shoes since. 6 months ago the pain came back, I then received cortisone shots but did not get any relief. I underwent ECSW therapy 3 wks. ago. The pain has gotton much worse and I have not had any relief. My podiatrist prescribed a ski boot and I started physical therapy. I am in constant pain. Fortunately I can walk with the boot, but I have been on pain meds to attempt to get some sort of relief. It almost feels like a nerve pain in addition to the nagging ache in my heel; this nerve pain or ache I am feeling is in my leg, and my ankle. I have been trying to research what could have happened to me since my treatment but I have been unsuccesful in coming up with anything. I opted for this ECSW therapy in lieu of surgery because it seemed the safer of the two choices, now I am not so sure. Any info you could give me would be appreciated. Thank you.

Debra

Result number: 23
Searching file 18

Message Number 187293

Re: Finally Found Relief after 3 Years!!!! View Thread
Posted by Monte on 11/14/05 at 08:13

Debra
Can you provide his contact information?
thanks
Monte

Result number: 24

Message Number 186883

Re: Extracorporeal Shock Wave View Thread
Posted by Jen R on 11/07/05 at 12:04

Debra W,

I'm no expert...and have failed ESWT (so far)...but to my knowledge the ESWT procedure has a very good chance of totally eliminating your problem (depending on your diagnosis of course) with the pain not returning. Also, to say that ESWT is experimental is really bogus. It's being done all over the country with great success. YOu really need to talk to Dr. Zuckerman...if you need the info fast...I'd recommend you call him at 1-800-eswt-usa. I'm sure he'll be glad to help you. Tell him I referred you.
Jen R

Result number: 25

Message Number 186867

Re: Extracorporeal Shock Wave View Thread
Posted by Debra W. on 11/07/05 at 10:04

Do you know a time period for recurrence, as in months or years? I am going in front of a medical revue board today to plead my case to have this procedure done, they say its experimental and the problem will just recur.


Thank you

Result number: 26

Message Number 186849

Extracorporeal Shock Wave View Thread
Posted by Debra W. on 11/06/05 at 18:43

I know the success rate of the procedure, what is the time frame before the heel pain/bone spurs can reappear? 6-8months 1-2years 8-10years? Pleas info me. thanks


vernwarn at msn.com

Result number: 27

Message Number 186198

Re: antibiotic (quinolone) and tendons View Thread
Posted by d fuller on 10/30/05 at 01:19

This is a list of citations begining in 1965 to date that deal with this "rare" adverse event. I present this not as an argumentative rebuttal but as proofs regarding my previous post. One would think if indeed this was a rare occurence we would not read medical journal articles concerning it each and every year for forty years. Nor does this list inlcude all such citations, only those readily available to the average person. Of special interest is the statements made at the 62 Meeting of the Anti-Infective Drugs Advisory Committee (circa 1994)where quinolone induced joint destruction (requiring complete joint replacement) is discussed as well as irreversible tendon and ligament damage. You will find that towards the end of this response. We find the same documentation when it comes to peripherial neuropathy as well which was first reported in association with Nalidixic Acid in the mid sixties.

1965

1. DE VRIES AC.
[SPONTANEOUS RUPTURE OF THE ACHILLES TENDON]
Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 1965 Jan 2;109:59-60. Dutch. No abstract available.
PMID: 14284979 [PubMed - OLDMEDLINE for Pre1966]

2. CROZZOLI NR, MANCA M.
[SUBCUTANEOUS RUPTURE OF THE ACHILLES TENDON. CONSIDERATIONS ON OUR CASE
HISTORIES]
Minerva Ortop. 1965 Jan-Feb;16:21-9. Italian. No abstract available.
PMID: 14303636 [PubMed - OLDMEDLINE for Pre1966]

3. VON GRAFFENRIED, ENGELER V, HEIM U.
[SUBCUTANEOUS RUPTURE OF THE ACHILLES TENDON]
Helv Chir Acta. 1965 Jan;32:253-6. German. No abstract available.
PMID: 14290218 [PubMed - OLDMEDLINE for Pre1966]


1969

1. Rosolleck H.
[Subcutaneous achilles tendon rupture]
Monatsschr Unfallheilkd Versicher Versorg Verkehrsmed. 1969 Dec;72(12):544-7.
German. No abstract available.
PMID: 4248859 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


1971

1. Auquier L, Siaud JR.
[Nodular tendinitis of the Achilles tendon]
Rev Rhum Mal Osteoartic. 1971 May;38(5):373-81. French. No abstract available.
PMID: 5092370 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

2. Krahl H, Langhoff J.
[Degenerative tendon changes following local application of corticoids]
Z Orthop Ihre Grenzgeb. 1971 Jul;109(3):501-11. German. No abstract available.
PMID: 4254811 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


1972

1. Nalidixic Acid arthralgia
Bailey et al (CMA Journal 1972; 107 601-605)

2. Dupuis PR, Uhthoff HK.
In vivo study of the effects of a synthetic steroid, betamethasone (16B methyl-9X fluoroprednisolone) on the calcaneal tendon in rabbits Union Med Can. 1972 Sep;101(9):1763-7. French. No abstract available.
PMID: 5075006 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


1976

1. Jouirland JP Les ruptures tendineusues. Le tendon normal et patholoqique
Seminar de Monte Carlo 13-14 February 1976


1980

1. Mason JO, Meagher DJ, Sheehan B, O'Doherty CK.
The management of supraspinatus tendinitis in general practice.
Ir Med J. 1980 Jan;73(1):23-40. No abstract available.
PMID: 7380640 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


1981

1. Jensen KE.
[Bilateral rupture of the Achilles tendon]
Ugeskr Laeger. 1981 Jul 6;143(28):1768. Danish. No abstract available.
PMID: 7292758 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


1982

1. Fink RJ, Corn RC.
Fracture of an ossified Achilles tendon.
Clin Orthop. 1982 Sep;(169):148-50. No abstract available.
PMID: 6809391 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

2. Cetti R, Christensen SE.
[Rupture of the Achilles tendon after local steroid injection]
Ugeskr Laeger. 1982 May 10;144(19):1392. Danish. No abstract available.
PMID: 7135524 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

3. Chechick A, Amit Y, Israeli A, Horoszowski H.
Recurrent rupture of the achilles tendon induced by corticosteroid injection.
Br J Sports Med. 1982 Jun;16(2):89-90. No abstract available.
PMID: 7104562 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

4. Newmark H 3rd, Olken SM, Mellon WS Jr, Malhotra AK, Halls J
A new finding in the radiographic diagnosis of achilles tendon rupture.
Skeletal Radiol. 1982;8(3):223-4. No abstract available.
PMID: 7112151 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


1983

1. Norfloxacin induced rheumatic disease
Bailey et al (NZ Med J 1983; 96; 590)

2. Kleinman M, Gross AE.
Achilles tendon rupture following steroid injection. Report of three cases.
J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1983 Dec;65(9):1345-7. No abstract available.
PMID: 6197416 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


1984

1. Chamot AM, Gobelet C.
[Achilles tendinitis: a pathology of confines]
Rev Med Suisse Romande. 1984 Oct;104(10):783-7. French. No abstract available.
PMID: 6515224 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


1985

1. Between 1985 and July 1992 100 cases of tendon disorders had been identified in France
Kessler et al (HRG Publication 1399, August 1. 1996)

2. Jones JG.
Achilles tendon rupture following steroid injection.
J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1985 Jan;67(1):170. No abstract available.
PMID: 3968099 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

3. 100 reported tendinopathies 1985-1992 France
In France, between 1985 and 1992, 100 patients who were being managed with fluoroquinolones had tendon disorders, which included thirty-one ruptures (Royer, R. J.; Pierfitte, C.; and Netter, P.: Features of tendon disorders with fluoroquinolones. Therapie, 49: 75-76, 1994.)
http://www.studiomedico.it/allegati/achille.pdf


1987

1. Ciprofloxacin an update on clinical experience
Areieri et al (Am J of Med 1987 82 381-386)

2. 93 ruptures, 103 tendinopathies, 20 tenasynovitis, 1987-1997
Source: http://www.sma.org/smj1999/junesmj99/harrell.pdf


1988

1. McEwan SR, Davey PG. Ciprofloxacin and tenosynovitis. Lancet 1988; 2: 900.

2. Adverse effects of fluoroquinolones
Halkin et al (Rev Infect Dis 1988 10 258-261)

3. Ciprofloxacin and tenosynovitis
McEwan et al ( Lancet 1988 15 900)

4. Tendon disorders attributed to fluoroquinolones; a study on 42 spontaneous reports in the period 1988-1998
Van Der Linden et al (American College of Rheumatology; Arthritis Care and Research 45; 2001 pages


1989

1. Adverse reactions during clinical trials and post marketing surveillance
Janknegt et al (Pharm Weekbl Sci 1989 11(4) 124-127)

2. Arthritis induced by norfloxacin
Jeandel et al (J Rheumatol 1989 16 560-561)

3. Schumacher HR Jr, Michaels R.
Recurrent tendinitis and achilles tendon nodule with positively birefringent crystals in a patient with hyperlipoproteinemia.
J Rheumatol. 1989 Oct;16(10):1387-9.
PMID: 2810266 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


1990

1. Histologic and Histochemical Changes in Articular Cartilages of Immature Beagle Dogs Dosed with Difloxacin, a Fluoroquinolone
J.E. Kurkhardt et al (Vet Pathol 27;162-170, 1990)


1991

1. Rheumatolgical side effects of quinolones
Ribard et al (Baillere’s Clin Rheumatol 1991 5 175-191)

2. Perrot S, Ziza JM, De Bourran-Cauet G, Desplaces N, Lachand AT.
[A new complication related to quinolones: rupture of Achilles tendon]
Presse Med. 1991 Jul 6-13;20(26):1234. French. No abstract available.
PMID: 1831902 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


1992

1. Seven Achilles tendinitis including three complicated by rupture during fluoroquinolone therapy
Ribard et al (J Rheumatol 1992; 19; 1479-1481)

2. 704 achilles tendinitis, 38 ruptures 1992-1998 Netherlands
Fluoroquinolone use and the change in incidence of tendon rupture in the Netherlands
Van der Linden et al (Pharmacy World and Science vol 23 no 3 2001 pg 89-92)
The cohort included 46 776 users of fluoroquinolones between 1 July 1992 and 30 June 30 1998, of whom 704 had Achilles tendinitis and 38 had Achilles tendon rupture
source: http://bmj.com/cgi/content/full/324/7349/1306

3. 100 reported tendinopathies 1985-1992 France
In France, between 1985 and 1992, 100 patients who were being managed with fluoroquinolones had tendon disorders, which included thirty-one ruptures (Royer, R. J.; Pierfitte, C.; and Netter, P.: Features of tendon disorders with fluoroquinolones. Therapie, 49: 75-76, 1994.)
http://www.studiomedico.it/allegati/achille.pdf

4. Ribard P, Audisio F, Kahn MF, De Bandt M, Jorgensen C, Hayem G, Meyer O, Palazzo E.
Seven Achilles tendinitis including 3 complicated by rupture during fluoroquinolone therapy.
J Rheumatol. 1992 Sep;19(9):1479-81.
PMID: 1433021 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

5. Perrot S, Kaplan G, Ziza JM.
[3 cases of Achilles tendinitis caused by pefloxacin, 2 of them with tendon rupture]
Rev Rhum Mal Osteoartic. 1992 Feb;59(2):162. French. No abstract available.
PMID: 1604233 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

6. Lee WT, Collins JF.
Ciprofloxacin associated bilateral achilles tendon rupture.
Aust N Z J Med. 1992 Oct;22(5):500. No abstract available.
PMID: 1445042 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

7. Blanche P, Sereni D, Sicard D, Christoforov B.
[Achilles tendinitis induced by pefloxacin. Apropos of 2 cases]
Ann Med Interne (Paris). 1992;143(5):348. French. No abstract available.
PMID: 1482040 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

8. Olivieri I, Padula A, Lisanti ME, Braccini G.
Longstanding HLA-B27 associated Achilles tendinitis.
Ann Rheum Dis. 1992 Nov;51(11):1265. No abstract available.
PMID: 1466609 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


1993

1. Spontaneous bilateral rupture of the Achille’s tendon in a renal transplant recipient
Mainard et al (Nephron 1993;65- 491-492)

2. Boulay I, Farge D, Haddad A, Bourrier P, Chanu B, Rouffy J
[Tendinopathy caused by ciprofloxacin with possible partial rupture of Achilles tendon]
Ann Med Interne (Paris). 1993;144(7):493-4. French. No abstract available.
PMID: 8141519 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


1994

1. Royer RJ, Pierfitte C, Netter P.
Features of tendon disorders with fluoroquinolones.
Therapie. 1994 Jan-Feb;49(1):75-6. No abstract available.
PMID: 8091374 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

2. Armengol S, Moreno JA, Xirgu J, Torrabadella P, Tomas R.
[Ciprofloxacin as a cause of a behavior disorder in a patient admitted into intensive care]
Enferm Infecc Microbiol Clin. 1994 May;12(5):271-2. Spanish. No abstract available.
PMID: 8049295 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

3. Donck JB, Segaert MF, Vanrenterghem YF.
Fluoroquinolones and Achilles tendinopathy in renal transplant recipients.
Transplantation. 1994 Sep 27;58(6):736-7. No abstract available.
PMID: 7940700 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

4. Onieal ME.
Achilles injuries.
J Am Acad Nurse Pract. 1994 Mar;6(3):125-6. No abstract available.
PMID: 8003362 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

5. Scioli MW.
Achilles tendinitis.
Orthop Clin North Am. 1994 Jan;25(1):177-82. Review.
PMID: 8290227 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

6. Hernandez MV, Peris P, Sierra J, Collado A, Munoz-Gomez J.
[Tendinitis due to fluoroquinolones. Description of 2 cases]
Med Clin (Barc). 1994 Sep 10;103(7):264-6. Review. Spanish.
PMID: 7934295 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

7. Achilles tenditinis and tendon rupture due to fluoroquinolone therapy
Huston et al (New England Journal of Medicene 1994 331 748)

8. Royer, R. J.; Pierfitte, C.; and Netter, P.: Features of tendon disorders with fluoroquinolones. Therapie, 49: 75-76, 1994.)

9. Dekens-Konter JA, Knol A, Olsson S, Meyboom RH, de Koning GH.
[Tendinitis of the Achilles tendon caused by pefloxacin and other
fluoroquinolone derivatives]
Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 1994 Mar 5;138(10):528-31. Dutch.
PMID: 8139714 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

10. Prantera C, Kohn A, Zannoni F, Spimpolo N, Bonfa M.
Metronidazole plus ciprofloxacin in the treatment of active, refractory Crohn's disease: results of an open study.
J Clin Gastroenterol. 1994 Jul;19(1):79-80. No abstract available.
PMID: 7930441 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

11. Van Linthoudt D, D'Oro A, Ott H.
[What is your diagnosis? Bilateral Achilles tendinitis associated with
quinolone treatment]
Schweiz Rundsch Med Prax. 1994 Feb 22;83(8):201-2. German. No abstract available.
PMID: 8134743 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

12. Kawada A, Hiruma M, Morimoto K, Ishibashi A, Banba H.
Fixed drug eruption induced by ciprofloxacin followed by ofloxacin.
Contact Dermatitis. 1994 Sep;31(3):182-3. No abstract available.
PMID: 7821014 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

13. Guharoy SR.
Serum sickness secondary to ciprofloxacin use.
Vet Hum Toxicol. 1994 Dec;36(6):540-1.
PMID: 7900274 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


1995

1. Hernandez Rodriguez I, Allegue F.
Achilles and suprapatellar tendinitis due to isotretinoin.
J Rheumatol. 1995 Oct;22(10):2009-10. No abstract available.
PMID: 8992016 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

2. Szarfman A, Chen M, Blum MD. More on fluoroquinolone antibiotics and tendon rupture. N Engl J Med 1995; 332: 193[Free Full Text].

3. Magnesium Deficiency Induces Joint Cartilage Lesions in Juvenile Rats which are Identical to Quinolone Induced Arthropathy
Stahlmann et al (Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, Sept., 1995 pg 2013-2018)

4. Crowder SW, Jaffey LH.
Sarcoidosis presenting as Achilles tendinitis.
J R Soc Med. 1995 Jun;88(6):335-6.
PMID: 7629765 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

5. Pierfitte C, Gillet P, Royer RJ
More on fluoroquinolone antibiotics and tendon rupture.
N Engl J Med. 1995 Jan 19;332(3):193. No abstract available.
PMID: 7800022 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

6. Szarfman A, Chen M, Blum MD.
More on fluoroquinolone antibiotics and tendon rupture.
N Engl J Med. 1995 Jan 19;332(3):193. No abstract available.
PMID: 7800023 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

7. Norfloxacin induced arthalgia
Terry et al ( J Rheumatol 1995 22 793-794)

8. Fluoroquinolone Induced Tenosynovitis of the Wrist mimicking de Quervain’s Disease
Gillet et al (British Journal of Rheumatology vol 34 no 6 pg 583-584, Feb 1995)

9. Mirovsky Y, Pollack L, Arlazoroff A, Halperin N.
[Ciprofloxacin-associated bilateral acute achilles tendinitis]
Harefuah. 1995 Dec 1;129(11):470-2, 535. Hebrew.
PMID: 8846955 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]



1996

1. McGarvey WC, Singh D, Trevino SG. Partial Achilles tendon ruptures associated with fluoroquinolone antibiotics: a case report and literature review. Foot Ankle Int 1996; 17: 496-498[ISI][Medline].

2. Pierfitte C, Royer RJ.
Tendon disorders with fluoroquinolones.
Therapie. 1996 Jul-Aug;51(4):419-20. No abstract available.
PMID: 8953821 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

3. Hugo-Persson M.
[Rupture of the Achilles tendon after ciproxine therapy]
Lakartidningen. 1996 Apr 17;93(16):1520. Swedish. No abstract available.
PMID: 8667750 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

4. Therapie 1996; 51: 419-420 Tendon disorders with fluoroquinolones 421 cases have been collected by the Centre de Pharmacovigilance, 340 of tendinitis and 81 cases of tendon rupture.

5. McGarvey WC, Singh D, Trevino SG.
Partial Achilles tendon ruptures associated with fluoroquinolone antibiotics: a
case report and literature review.
Foot Ankle Int. 1996 Aug;17(8):496-8. Review.
PMID: 8863030 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

6. Skovgaard D, Feldt-Rasmussen BF, Nimb L, Hede A, Kjaer M.
[Bilateral Achilles tendon rupture in individuals with renal transplantation]
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Dec 30;159(1):57-8. Danish.
PMID: 9012076 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

7. Jagose JT, McGregor DR, Nind GR, Bailey RR.
Achilles tendon rupture due to ciprofloxacin.
N Z Med J. 1996 Dec 13;109(1035):471-2. No abstract available.
PMID: 9006634 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

8, Ottosson L.
[An unexpected verdict by the HSAN in a case of Achilles tendon rupture]
Lakartidningen. 1996 Dec 18;93(51-52):4712, 4715. Swedish. No abstract available.
PMID: 9011717 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

9. Castagnola C, Suhler A.
[Tendinopathy and fluoroquinolones]
Ann Urol (Paris). 1996;30(3):129-30. French.
PMID: 8766149 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

10. Foot Ankle Int. 1996 Aug;17(8):496-8.
Partial Achilles tendon ruptures associated with fluoroquinolone antibiotics: a case report and literature review.

11. Fluoroquinolone induced arthralgia and Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Loeuille et al (The Journal of Rheumatology volume 23 no 7 , July 1996)

12. Fluoroquinolone Induced Tendinopathy; Report of Six Cases
Zabraniedkl et al (The Journal of Rhuematology 1996; 23; 3)

13. Quinolone induced cartilage lesions are not reversible in rats
Forster et al (Arch Toxicol (1996) 70; 474-481)

14. Maki T, Heinasmaki T, Riutta J, Tikkanen T, Laasonen L, Eklund K.
[Bilateral Achilles tendon rupture caused by oral fluoroquinolones]
Duodecim. 1996;112(19):1818-20. Finnish. No abstract available.
PMID: 10596182 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE

15. ENGLAND
130 reported tendon inflammation or rupture (England, France and Belgium, 1996)
The group cited 130 reports of tendon inflammation or rupture in people who used the prescription drug in England, France and Belgium. The FDA has received at least 52 reports of patients in the U.S. who have suffered tendon damage
(from public citizens 1996 petition)
Szarfman et al. recommended that the labeling on packaging for fluoroquinolone be up-dated to include a warning about the possibility of tendon rupture. In its recommendations on the use of
this class of antibiotics, the British National Formulary
suggested that "at the first sign of pain or inflammation, patients should discontinue the treatment and rest the affected limb until the tendon symptoms have resolved."
British National Formulary. No. 32, p. 259. London, British Medical Association, Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain, 1996.
{Notice how this labeling change has not be altered since 1996 and appears to have been copied word for word in every monograph.}

16. FRANCE
921 reported tendon disorders France
340 reported tendonitis, 81 tendon ruptures 1996, WHO
Adverse drug reactions with fluoroquinolones The French system of drug surveillance has analyzed the reports of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) to fluoroquinolones since they were launched. The frequency of reactions ranges from 1/15000 to 1/208000 case per days of treatment. Cutaneous disorders and tendon disorders dominate in France, whereas cutaneous effects and neuropsychiatric disorders are predominant in the UK; tendon disorders take up only the 5th position. Among the most unexpected ADRs are the following: 1- Shock 2- Acure renal failure Tendon ruptures represent 81 cases for 921 reports of tendon disorders which are related in decreasing order to pefloxacin 1/23130 case per days of treatment, ofloxin, norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin 1/779600 case per days of treatment. Age and corticosteroids increase the risk of tendon rupture. Therapie 1996; 51; 419-420 Tendon disorders with fluoroquinolones 421 cases have been collected by the Centre de Pharmacovigilance: 340 of tendinitis and 81 of tendon rupture. These cases were attributed to Peflacine, Oflocet, Noroxine, Ciflox. Tendinitis was characterized by a bilateral malleolar oedema associated with a sudden pain. Sometimes this oedema evoked phlebitis. The tendon rupture was generally preceded by a tendinitis but in half of the cases it occurred without warning.
Source: http://www.who-umc.org/newsletter/newsltr97_1.html (sic)


1997

1. Australia. The Adverse Drug Reactions Advisory Committee first reported tendinitis in association with fluoroquinolone antibiotics in 1997. The Committee has continued to monitor this adverse reaction, and has now received 60 reports of tendinitis, tensosynovitis and/or tendon rupture in association with these drugs. Ciprofloxacin was most frequently cited (55 reports), as well as norfloxacin (4) and enoxacin (1).
Forty-five reports described tendinitis alone, one report described tensosynovitis, and 14 reports documented tendon tear or rupture. Fifty-five of the 60 reports specified the Achilles tendon, including 20 which described bilateral Achilles tendon damage. All 14 reports of tendon rupture involved the Achilles tendon. The 58 patients ranged in age from 38 to 91 years (median: 69), with no significant difference between those with tendinitis and those with tendon rupture.
The daily doses of ciprofloxacin ranged from 500 mg to 2250 mg, with 46% of patients taking 1500 mg and 46% of patients taking 1000 mg daily. For those who developed tendon rupture, 57% were taking 1500 mg daily. Time to onset varied from within 24 hours after the drug was commenced to 3 months after starting, but the majority of cases of tendinitis occurred within the first week. Time to rupture was longer with a median time of 2-3 weeks. Known risk factors for these reactions include old age, renal dysfunction and concomitant corticosteroid therapy. In the cases reported to the ADRAC, 29 reports documented concomitant corticosteroid use, and in 21 of the other 31 reports the patients were aged 69 years or older. In the reports of tendon rupture, 12 of the 14 described either concomitant steroid use (9) or old age (9).
Prescribers are reminded to be alert for this reaction and to withdraw the fluoroquinolone immediately when symptoms of tendinitis appear in order to reduce the risk of tendon rupture.
[See also Pharmaceuticals Newsletter Nos. 7&8, July&August 1997.]
Tendinitis associated with Fluoroquinolone therapy
(Pharmaceuticals Newsletters Nos 7&8 July & August 1997)
Australia

2. 93 ruptures, 103 tendinopathies, 20 tenasynovitis, 1987-1997
Source: http://www.sma.org/smj1999/junesmj99/harrell.pdf

3. Danesh-Meyer MJ.
Complicated management of a patient with rapidly progressive periodontitis: a case report.
J N Z Soc Periodontol. 1997;(82):25-9. No abstract available.
PMID: 10483437 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

4. Poon CC, Sundaram NA.
Spontaneous bilateral Achilles tendon rupture associated with ciprofloxacin.
Med J Aust. 1997 Jun 16;166(12):665. No abstract available.
PMID: 9216589 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

5. Shinohara YT, Tasker SA, Wallace MR, Couch KE, Olson PE.
What is the risk of Achilles tendon rupture with ciprofloxacin?
J Rheumatol. 1997 Jan;24(1):238-9. No abstract available.
PMID: 9002057 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

6. Movin T, Gad A, Guntner P, Foldhazy Z, Rolf C.
Pathology of the Achilles tendon in association with ciprofloxacin treatment.
Foot Ankle Int. 1997 May;18(5):297-9.
PMID: 9167931 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

7. Tendons and Fluoroquinolones; Unresolved issues
Kahn et al (Rev Rhum [Engl. Ed.] 1997 64(7-9) 437-439)
(Rev Rhum [Ed. Fr.] 1997 64(7-9) 511-513

8. Fluoroquinolones tendinitis update Australia
Tendinitis associated with Fluoroquinolone therapy
(Pharmaceuticals Newsletters Nos 7&8 July & August 1997)

9. Toxic effects of quinolone antibacterial agents on the musculoskeletal system in juvenile rats
Yoko Kashida et al (Toxicologic Pathology vol 25 number 6 pages 635-643 1997)

10. Tendinitis and tendon rupture with fluoroquinolones
ADRAC (The Achilles heel of fluoroquinolones Aust Adv Drug React Bull 1997;16;7, Szarfman et al)

11. Effects of Ciprofloxacin and Ofloxacin on adult human cartilage in vitro
(Antimicrob Agents Chemother 1997, Vol 41; issue 11; pages 2562-2565)

12. Repeated rupture of the extensor tendons of the hand due to fluoroquinolones, Apropos of a case
Levadoux et al (Ann Chir Main Memb Super 1997, vol 16, issue 2, pgs 130-133)

13. Benizeau I, Cambon-Michot C, Daragon A, Voisin L, Mejjad O, Thomine JM, Le Loet X.
Tendinitis of the tibialis anterior with histologic documentation in a patient under fluoroquinolone therapy.
Rev Rhum Engl Ed. 1997 Jun;64(6):432-3. No abstract available.
PMID: 9513620 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


1998

1. Khan KM, Cook JL, Bonar SF, Harcourt PR.
Subcutaneous rupture of the Achilles tendon.
Br J Sports Med. 1998 Jun;32(2):184-5. No abstract available.
PMID: 9631234 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

2. Stafford L, Bertouch J.
Reactive arthritis and ruptured Achilles tendon.
Ann Rheum Dis. 1998 Jan;57(1):61. No abstract available.
PMID: 9536827 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

3. Kahn MF.
Achilles tendinitis and ruptures.
Br J Sports Med. 1998 Sep;32(3):266. No abstract available.
PMID: 9773187 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

4. van der Linden PD, van Puijenbroek EP, Feenstra J, Veld BA, Sturkenboom MC, Herings RM, Leufkens HG, Stricker BH.
Tendon disorders attributed to fluoroquinolones: a study on 42 spontaneous reports in the period 1988 to 1998. Arthritis Rheum. 2001 Jun;45(3):235-9.
PMID: 11409663 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

5. Blanco Andres C, Bravo Toledo R.
[Bilateral tendinitis caused by ciprofloxacin]
Aten Primaria. 1998 Feb 28;21(3):184-5. Spanish. No abstract available.
PMID: 9607242 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

6. Tendon disorders attributed to fluoroquinolones; a study on 42 spontaneous reports in the period 1988-1998
Van Der Linden et al (American College of Rheumatology; Arthritis Care and Research 45; 2001 pages 235-239)

7. Petersen W, Laprell H
[Insidious rupture of the Achilles tendon after ciprofloxacin-induced tendopathy. A case report]
Unfallchirurg. 1998 Sep;101(9):731-4. German.
PMID: 9816984 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

8. Voorn R.
Case report: can sacroiliac joint dysfunction cause chronic Achilles
tendinitis?
J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 1998 Jun;27(6):436-43.
PMID: 9617730 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

9. West MB, Gow P.
Ciprofloxacin, bilateral Achilles tendonitis and unilateral tendon rupture--a case report.
N Z Med J. 1998 Jan 23;111(1058):18-9. No abstract available.
PMID: 9484431 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

10. Gabutti L, Stoller R, Marti HP.
[Fluoroquinolones as etiology of tendinopathy]
Ther Umsch. 1998 Sep;55(9):558-61. German.
PMID: 9789471 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

11. NETHERLANDS
704 achilles tendinitis, 38 ruptures 1992-1998 Netherlands
Fluoroquinolone use and the change in incidence of tendon rupture in the Netherlands
Van der Linden et al (Pharmacy World and Science vol 23 no 3 2001 pg 89-92)
The cohort included 46 776 users of fluoroquinolones between 1 July 1992 and 30 June 30 1998, of whom 704 had Achilles tendinitis and 38 had Achilles tendon rupture
source: http://bmj.com/cgi/content/full/324/7349/1306

12. 42 spontaneous reports 1988-1998
Tendon disorders attributed to fluoroquinolones; a study on 42 spontaneous reports in the period 1988-1998
Van Der Linden et al (American College of Rheumatology; Arthritis Care and Research 45; 2001 pages 235-239) June 2001
http://www.rheumatology.org/arhp/acnr/2001/0106.html


1999

1. Eriksson E.
In vivo microdialysis of painful achilles tendinosis.
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 1999;7(6):339. No abstract available.
PMID: 10639649 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

2. Mousa A, Jones S, Toft A, Perros P.
Spontaneous rupture of Achilles tendon: missed presentation of Cushing's syndrome.
BMJ. 1999 Aug 28;319(7209):560-1. No abstract available.
PMID: 10463901 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

3. Harrell RM.
Fluoroquinolone-induced tendinopathy: what do we know?
South Med J. 1999 Jun;92(6):622-5. Review.
PMID: 10372859 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

4. Gibbon WW, Cooper JR, Radcliffe GS.
Sonographic incidence of tendon microtears in athletes with chronic Achilles tendinosis.
Br J Sports Med. 1999 Apr;33(2):129-30.
PMID: 10205697 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

5. Lewis JR, Gums JG, Dickensheets DL.
Levofloxacin-induced bilateral Achilles tendonitis.
Ann Pharmacother. 1999 Jul-Aug;33(7-8):792-5.
PMID: 10466906 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

6. Zambanini A, Padley S, Cox A, Feher M.
Achilles tendonitis: an unusual complication of amlodipine therapy.
J Hum Hypertens. 1999 Aug;13(8):565-6. No abstract available.
PMID: 10455480 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

7. van der Linden PD, van de Lei J, Nab HW, Knol A, Stricker BH.
Achilles tendinitis associated with fluoroquinolones.
Br J Clin Pharmacol. 1999 Sep;48(3):433-7.
PMID: 10510157 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

8. Van der Linden PD, van de Lei J, Nab HW, Knol A, Stricker BHCh. Achilles tendinitis associated with fluoroquinolones. Br J Clin Pharmacol 1999; 48: 433-437[CrossRef][ISI][Medline].

9. 60 reported tendonitis August 1999
Fluoroquinolones tendinitis update Australia
Tendinitis associated with Fluoroquinolone therapy
(Pharmaceuticals Newsletters Nos 7&8 July & August 1997)
Australia
ADRAC Bulletin, vol 18, No 3, August 1999
Tendinitis and tendon rupture with
fluoroquinolones
The Adverse Drug Reactions Advisory Committee (ADRAC) first reported tendinitis in association with the fluoroquinolone antibiotics in 1997. The Committee has continued to monitor this adverse
reaction, and has now received 60 reports of tendinitis, tenosynovitis and/or tendon rupture in association with these drugs. Most involved was ciprofloxacin (55), but there were also reports with norfloxacin (4) and enoxacin (1). Fortyfive reports described tendinitis alone, one report described tenosynovitis, and 14 reports documented tendon tear or rupture. Fifty five of the 60 reports specified the Achilles tendon, including 20 which described bilateral
Achilles tendon damage. All 14 reports of tendon rupture
involved the Achilles tendon.
Source: http://www.who.int/medicines/library/pnewslet/pndec99.html

10. 421 reported tendon disorders and 81 tendon ruptures 1999
Therapie 1996; 51: 419-420 Tendon disorders with fluoroquinolones 421 cases have been collected by the Centre de Pharmacovigilance, 340 of tendinitis and 81 cases of tendon rupture.

11. Rev Rhum Engl Ed. 1999 Jul-Sep;66(7-9):419-21.
Suspected role of ofloxacin in a case of arthalgia, myalgia, and multiple tendinopathy.

12. Levofloxacin-induced bilateral Achilles tendonitis
Lewis JR, JG Gums, and DL Dickensheets 1999

13. Inhibition of fibroblast metabolism by a fluoroquinolone antibiotic
Williams et al (American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, 1999 Annual meeting, paper number 118, Geb 5, 1999)

14. Levofloxacin induced bilateral achilles tendinitis
Lewis et al (The Annals of Pharmacotherapy 1999 July/August, volume 33 pages 792-795)

15. Fluoroquinolone induced tendinopathy; what do we know?
Harrell et al (South Med J 92(6) 622-625 1999)

16. Ann Pharmacother. 1999 Jul-Aug;33(7-8):792-5.
Levofloxacin-induced bilateral Achilles tendonitis.

17. Schwald N, Debray-Meignan S.
Suspected role of ofloxacin in a case of arthalgia, myalgia, and multiple tendinopathy.
Rev Rhum Engl Ed. 1999 Jul-Sep;66(7-9):419-21.
PMID: 10526383 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


2000

1. Fluoroquinolone induced tendinopathy; also occurring with levofloxacin
Fleisch et al (Infection 28 2000 no 4 pages 256-257)

2. Infection. 2000 Jul-Aug;28(4):256-7.
Fluoroquinolone-induced tendinopathy: also occurring with levofloxacin.

3. Quinolone and Tendon Ruptures
Casperian et al (Southern Medical Journal May 2000 vol 93 no 5 pages 488-491)

4. Evaluation of toxicokinetic variables and arthropathic changes in juvenile rabbits after oral administration of an ivestigational fluoroquinolone, pd 117596
Johnson et al (AJVR vol 61 no 11, pages, 1396-1402, November 2000)

5. Rupture of the patellar ligament one month after treatment with fluoroquinolone
Rev Chir Orthop Reparatrice Appar Mot. 2000 Sep;86(5):495-7.

6. FINLAND
42 reported tendinopathies 2000
Finland:
Register of adverse drug reactions in 2000

7. The majority of ADR reports received among antibacterials concerned levofloxacin, which is a fluoroquinolone antibiotic. Fourteen of the reports were on tendinitis or rupture of the Achilles tendon. Tendinitis caused by fluoroquinolones was discussed in TABU for the first time in 1996. Since then the ADR register has received a total of 42 reports on tendinopathies caused by
fluoroquinolones, over a third of which were ruptures of the tendon.
The use of fluoroquinolones has in-creased by about 75% since 1996. Levofloxacin is responsible for the major part of this increase. It has been marketed in Finland since mid 1998.
source: www.nam.fi/uploads/english/Publications/Tabu/tabu22001_eng.pdf

8. Casado Burgos E, Vinas Ponce G, Lauzurica Valdemoros R, Olive Marques A.
[Levofloxacin-induced tendinitis]
Med Clin (Barc). 2000 Mar 4;114(8):319. Spanish. No abstract available.
PMID: 10774524 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

9. Casparian JM, Luchi M, Moffat RE, Hinthorn D.
Quinolones and tendon ruptures.
South Med J. 2000 May;93(5):488-91. Review.
PMID: 10832946 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

10. Gravlee JR, Hatch RL, Galea AM.
Achilles tendon rupture: a challenging diagnosis.
J Am Board Fam Pract. 2000 Sep-Oct;13(5):371-3. No abstract available.
PMID: 11001009 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

11. Kouvalchouk JF, Hassan E
[Achilles tendon disorders]
Tunis Med. 2000 Jun-Jul;78(6-7):462-7. Review. French. No abstract available.
PMID: 11043038 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

12. Ortiz V, Holgado S, Olive A, Fite E.
Ach illes tendinitis as the presentation form of Lofgren's syndrome.
Clin Rheumatol. 2000;19(2):169-70.
PMID: 10791635 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

13. Vavra-Hadziahmetovic N, Hadziahmetovic Z, Smajlovic F.
Phy sical therapy in conservative (functional) treatment of acute achilles tendon rupture.
Med Arh. 2000;54(2):121-2.
PMID: 10934845 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

14. Martinelli B.
Rupture of the Achilles tendon.
J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2000 Dec;82-A(12):1804. No abstract available.
PMID: 11130653 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


2001

1. Rev Clin Esp. 2001 Sep;201(9):539-40.
Achilles pain and functional impotence in a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with pneumonia. Tendon rupture caused by levofloxacin

2. Pharm World Sci. 2001 Jun;23(3):89-92.
Fluoroquinolone use and the change in incidence of tendon ruptures in the Netherlands.
van der Linden PD, Nab HW, Simonian S, Stricker BH, Leufkens HG, Herings RM.

3. Mennecier D, Thiolet C, Bredin C, Potier V, Vergeau B, Farret O.
[Acute pancreatitis after treatment by levofloxacin and methylprednisolone]
Gastroenterol Clin Biol. 2001 Oct;25(10):921-2. French. No abstract available.
PMID: 11852403 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

4. Csizy M, Hintermann B.
[Rupture of the Achilles tendon after local steroid injection. Case reports and consequences for treatment]
Swiss Surg. 2001;7(4):184-9. German.
PMID: 11515194 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

5. Adverse reactions to fluoroquinolones an overview on mechanistic aspects
De Sarro et al (Current Medicinal Chemistry 2001, 8, 371-384)

6. Fluoroquinolone use and the change in incidence of tendon rupture in the Netherlands
Van der Linden et al (Pharmacy World and Science vol 23 no 3 2001 pg 89-92)

7. Tendon disorders attributed to fluoroquinolones; a study on 42 spontaneous reports in the period 1988-1998
Van Der Linden et al (American College of Rheumatology; Arthritis Care and Research 45; 2001 pages 235-239)

8. 1847 reported tendinopathies December 2001
Tabelle 7
Pharmacovigilance: Meldungen von Tendinopathien im Vergleich zu allen gemeldeten unerwünschten Arzneimittelwirkungen (UAW), Stand 17. Dezember 2001.

9. Meldungen Schweiz (IKS-Datenbank) Welt (WHO-Datenbank)
Tendinopathie alle UAW Tendinopathie alle UAW
Ciprofloxacin 8 (5%) 155 649(2,2%) 29 090
Fleroxacin 9 (1,2 %) 754
Norfloxacin 1 (1%) 91 163 (2,1%) 7536
Ofloxacin 2 (6%) 34 432 (1,8%) 23 990
Levofloxacin 32 (41%) 79 576 (7,8%) 7432
Moxifloxacin 18 (4,5 %) 4030
Source: http://www.saez.ch/pdf/2003/2003-02/2003-02-694.PDF
http://www.saez.ch/pdf/2003/2003-02/2003-02-694.PDF

10. U.S. ARMED FORCES
Spontaneous Ruptures of the Achilles Tendon, US Armed Forces, 1998-2001
Methods. The Defense Medical Surveillance System was searched to identify all incident ambulatory visits of active duty servicemembers with a primary diagnosis of non-traumatic rupture of the achilles tendon (ICD-9- CM code 727.67) and other tendon ruptures (ICD-9- CM codes 727.60-727.66, 727.68-727.69) between January 1998 and May 2001.
The most striking finding of this analysis is the sudden and significant increase in rates of achilles tendon ruptures beginning in calendar year 2000. The increase was manifested across all Services and in most demographic subgroups (table 1). Rates
of non-traumatic ruptures of several other tendons also increased during the period; and increases in ruptures of the rotator cuff were comparable to those of the achilles tendon.
Source: http://amsa.army.mil/1Msmr/2002/v08_n01.pdf

11. Nuno Mateo FJ, Noval Menendez J, Suarez M, Guinea O.
[Achilles pain and functional impotence in a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with pneumonia. Tendon rupture caused by levofloxacin]
Rev Clin Esp. 2001 Sep;201(9):539-40. Spanish. No abstract available.
PMID: 11692412 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

12. Malaguti M, Triolo L, Biagini M.
Ciprofloxacin-associated Achilles tendon rupture in a hemodialysis patient.
J Nephrol. 2001 Sep-Oct;14(5):431-2. No abstract available.
PMID: 11730281 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

13. Butler MW, Griffin JF, Quinlan WR, McDonnell TJ.
Quinolone-associated tendonitis: a potential problem in COPD?
Ir J Med Sci. 2001 Jul-Sep;170(3):198-9.
PMID: 12120977 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

14. Bharani A, Kumar H.
Drug points: Diabetes inspidus induced by ofloxacin.
BMJ. 2001 Sep 8;323(7312):547. No abstract available.
PMID: 11546701 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

15. Toverud EL, Landaas S, Hellebostad M.
Repeated achilles tendinitis after high dose methotrexate.
Med Pediatr Oncol. 2001 Aug;37(2):156. No abstract available.
PMID: 11496361 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

16. Oatridge A, Herlihy AH, Thomas RW, Wallace AL, Curati WL, Hajnal JV, Bydder GM.
Magnetic resonance: magic angle imaging of the Achilles tendon.
Lancet. 2001 Nov 10;358(9293):1610-1.
PMID: 11716890 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

17. Fletcher MD, Warren PJ.
Sural nerve injury associated with neglected tendo Achilles ruptures.
Br J Sports Med. 2001 Apr;35(2):131-2.
PMID: 11273977 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

18. Humble RN, Nugent LL.
Achilles' tendonitis. An overview and reconditioning model.
Clin Podiatr Med Surg. 2001 Apr;18(2):233-54. Review.
PMID: 11417153 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

19. Eriksson E.
Achilles tendon surgery and wound healing.
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2001 Jul;9(4):193. No abstract available.
PMID: 11522072 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

20. Speed CA.
Fortnightly review: Corticosteroid injections in tendon lesions.
BMJ. 2001 Aug 18;323(7309):382-6. No abstract available.
PMID: 11509432 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

21. Van der Linden et al (Pharmacy World and Science vol 23 no 3 2001 pg 89-92)
The cohort included 46 776 users of fluoroquinolones between 1 July 1992 and 30 June 30 1998, of whom 704 had Achilles tendinitis and 38 had Achilles tendon rupture
source: http://bmj.com/cgi/content/full/324/7349/1306


2002

1. Ulreich N, Kainberger F, Huber W, Nehrer S.
[Achilles tendon and sports]
Radiologe. 2002 Oct;42(10):811-7. German.
PMID: 12402109 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

2. Doral MN, Tetik O, Atay OA, Leblebicioglu G, Oznur A.
[Achilles tendon diseases and its management]
Acta Orthop Traumatol Turc. 2002;36 Suppl 1:42-6. Review. Turkish. No abstract available.
PMID: 12510123 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

3. Hersh BL, Heath NS.
Achilles tendon rupture as a result of oral steroid therapy.
J Am Podiatr Med Assoc. 2002 Jun;92(6):355-8.
PMID: 12070236 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

4. [No authors listed]
Side effects of levofloxacin.
Prescrire Int. 2002 Aug;11(60):116-7. No abstract available.
PMID: 12199267 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

5. Hatori M, Matsuda M, Kokubun S.
Ossification of Achilles tendon--report of three cases.
Arch Orthop Trauma Surg. 2002 Sep;122(7):414-7. Epub 2002 May 03.
PMID: 12228804 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

6. Pouzaud F, Rat P, Cambourieu C, Nourry H, Warnet JM.
[Tenotoxic potential of fluoroquinolones in the choice of surgical antibiotic prophylaxis in ophthalmology]
J Fr Ophtalmol. 2002 Nov;25(9):921-6. French.
PMID: 12515937 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

7. Sobel E, Giorgini R, Hilfer J, Rostkowski T.
Ossification of a ruptured achilles tendon: a case report in a diabetic patient.
J Foot Ankle Surg. 2002 Sep-Oct;41(5):330-4.
PMID: 12400718 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

8. Lohrer H, Scholl J, Arentz S.
[Achilles tendinopathy and patellar tendinopathy. Results of radial shockwave therapy in patients with unsuccessfully treated tendinoses] Sportverletz Sportschaden. 2002 Sep;16(3):108-14. German. No abstract available.
PMID: 12382183 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

9. Eriksen HA, Pajala A, Leppilahti J, Risteli J.
Increased content of type III collagen at the rupture site of human Achilles tendon.
J Orthop Res. 2002 Nov;20(6):1352-7.
PMID: 12472252 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

10. Kannus P, Paavola M, Paakkala T, Parkkari J, Jarvinen T, Jarvinen M.
[Pathophysiology of overuse tendon injury]
Radiologe. 2002 Oct;42(10):766-70. German.
PMID: 12402104 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

11. Summers JB.
Importance of an accurate diagnosis for Achilles rupture.
Am Fam Physician. 2002 Nov 15;66(10):1836. No abstract available.
PMID: 12469956 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

12. Ulreich N, Huber W, Nehrer S, Kainberger F.
[High resolution magnetic resonance tomography and ultrasound imaging of the Achilles tendon]
Wien Med Wochenschr Suppl. 2002;(113):39-40. German.
PMID: 12621837 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

13. Dwornik L, Lomasney LM, Demos TC, Lavery LA.
Radiologic case study. Acute Achilles tendon rupture.
Orthopedics. 2002 Nov;25(11):1239, 1318-20. No abstract available.
PMID: 12452339 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

14. Wood ML, Schlessinger S.
Levaquin induced acute tubulointerstitial nephritis--two case reports.
J Miss State Med Assoc. 2002 Apr;43(4):116-7. No abstract available.
PMID: 11989200 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

15. McClelland D, Maffulli N.
Percutaneous repair of ruptured Achilles tendon.
J R Coll Surg Edinb. 2002 Aug;47(4):613-8. Review.
PMID: 12363186 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

16. Eriksson E.
Tendinosis of the patellar and achilles tendon.
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2002 Jan;10(1):1. Epub 2001 Dec 18. No abstract available.
PMID: 11819012 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

17. Bleakney RR, Tallon C, Wong JK, Lim KP, Maffulli N.
Long-term ultrasonographic features of the Achilles tendon after rupture.
Clin J Sport Med. 2002 Sep;12(5):273-8.
PMID: 12394198 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

18. Majewski M, Widmer KH, Steinbruck K.
[Achilles tendon ruptures: 25 year's experience in sport-orthopedic treatment]
Sportverletz Sportschaden. 2002 Dec;16(4):167-73. German.
PMID: 12563559 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

19. Cook JL, Khan KM, Purdam C.
Achilles tendinopathy.
Man Ther. 2002 Aug;7(3):121-30. Review.
PMID: 12372309 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

20. Shukla DD.
Bilateral spontaneous rupture of achilles tendon secondary to limb ischemia: a case report.
J Foot Ankle Surg. 2002 Sep-Oct;41(5):328-9.
PMID: 12400717 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

21. Grechenig W, Clement H, Bratschitsch G, Fankhauser F, Peicha G.
[Ultrasound diagnosis of the Achilles tendon]
Orthopade. 2002 Mar;31(3):319-25. German.
PMID: 12017866 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

22. Mazzone MF, McCue T.
Common conditions of the achilles tendon.
Am Fam Physician. 2002 May 1;65(9):1805-10. Review.
PMID: 12018803 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

23. Schepsis AA, Jones H, Haas AL.
Achilles tendon disorders in athletes.
Am J Sports Med. 2002 Mar-Apr;30(2):287-305. Review.
PMID: 11912103 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

24. Fluoroquinolones and risk of Achilles tendon disorders: case-control study BMJ 2002;324:1306-1307 ( 1 June ) P D van der Linden, researcher a, M C J M Sturkenboom, assistant professor a, R M C Herings, associate professor b, H G M Leufkens, professor b, B H Ch Stricker, professor a.
a Pharmaco-epidemiology Unit, Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics and Internal Medicine, Erasmus Medical Centre Rotterdam, PO Box 1738, 3000 DR Rotterdam, Netherlands, b Department of Pharmaco-epidemiology and Pharmacotherapy, Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands

25. Pai VS, Patel N.
Atypical coronal or sagittal Z ruptures of the achilles tendon: a report of four cases.
J Foot Ankle Surg. 2002 May-Jun;41(3):183-5.
PMID: 12075907 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

26. van der Linden PD, Sturkenboom MC, Herings RM, Leufkens HG, Stricker BH.
Fluoroquinolones and risk of Achilles tendon disorders: case-control study.
BMJ. 2002 Jun 1;324(7349):1306-7. No abstract available.
PMID: 12039823 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

27. Tiling T.
[Is an Achilles tendon rupture without degeneration possible?]
Dtsch Med Wochenschr. 2002 Jun 21;127(25-26):1401. German. No abstract available.
PMID: 12075502 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

28. Med Clin (Barc). 2003 Jan 25;120(2):78-9.
Comment on: Med Clin (Barc). 2002 Jun 8;119(1):38-9.
Levofloxacin and bilateral spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture

29. 4 cases of levaquin induced tendintis (orign spansih)
Mica magazine of Chile Issn0034-9887 versi printed
Rev. m. Chilev.130n.11Santiagonov.2002
Rev Méd Chile 2002; 130: 1277-1281
Associated aquiliana Tendinitis to the levofloxacino use:
communication of four cases
Claudius Hoops And, Claudius Flowers W, Sergio Mezzano A.
Levofloxacin associated Achilles

29. Pedros A, Emilio Gomez J, Angel Navarro L, Tomas A.
[Levofloxacin and acute confusional syndrome]
Med Clin (Barc). 2002 Jun 8;119(1):38-9. Spanish. No abstract available.
PMID: 12062009 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

30. Maffulli N, Kader D.
Tendinopathy of tendo achillis.
J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2002 Jan;84(1):1-8. Review. No abstract available.
PMID: 11837811 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

31. Sidorenko SV, Krivitskaia NS
[Use of ciprofloxacin in sequential antibiotic therapy]
Antibiot Khimioter. 2002;47(7):25-30. Review. Russian. No abstract available.
PMID: 12516193 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

32. Paavola M, Kannus P, Jarvinen TA, Khan K, Jozsa L, Jarvinen M.
Achilles tendinopathy.
J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2002 Nov;84-A(11):2062-76. Review. No abstract available.
PMID: 12429771 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

33. Roberts C, Deliss L.:
Acute rupture of tendo Achillis.
J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2002 May;84(4):620; author reply 620. No abstract available.
PMID: 12043793 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

34. Tumia N, Kader D, Arena B, Maffulli N
Achilles tendinopathy during pregnancy.
Clin J Sport Med. 2002 Jan;12(1):43-5. No abstract available.
PMID: 11854590 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

35. Paffey MD, Faraj AA.
Acute rupture of tendo Achillis.
J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2002 May;84(4):620-1; author reply 621. No abstract available.
PMID: 12043792 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

36. Chhajed PN, Plit ML, Hopkins PM, Malouf MA, Glanville AR.
Achilles tendon disease in lung transplant recipients: association with ciprofloxacin.
Eur Respir J. 2002 Mar;19(3):469-71.
PMID: 11936524 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

37. Greene BL.Physical therapist management of fluoroquinolone-induced Achilles tendinopathy.
Phys Ther. 2002 Dec;82(12):1224-31.
PMID: 12444881 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

38. Breck RW.
"Ciprofloxacin: a warning for clinicians".
Conn Med. 2002 Oct;66(10):635. No abstract available.
PMID: 12448217 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

39. Hufner T, Wohifarth K, Fink M, Thermann H, Rollnik JD.
EMG monitoring during functional non-surgical therapy of Achilles tendon rupture.
Foot Ankle Int. 2002 Jul;23(7):614-8.
PMID: 12146771 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

40. Khurana R, Torzillo PJ, Horsley M, Mahoney J.
Spontaneous bilateral rupture of the Achilles tendon in a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
Respirology. 2002 Jun;7(2):161-3.
PMID: 11985741 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

41. Mert G.
Rupture of the Achilles tendon in athletes: do synthetic grass fields play a part?
J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2002 Feb;84-A(2):320-1. No abstract available.
PMID: 11861742 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

42. Lynch RM
Management of Achilles tendon ruptures.
Am J Sports Med. 2002 Nov-Dec;30(6):917; author reply 917-8. No abstract
available.
PMID: 12435663 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

43. Amendola N.
Surgical treatment of acute rupture of the tendo Achillis led to fewer
reruptures and better patient-generated ratings than did nonsurgical treatment.
J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2002 Feb;84-A(2):324. No abstract available.
PMID: 11861747 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

44. Zwar RB.
Utility of musculoskeletal ultrasound.
Aust Fam Physician. 2002 Jun;31(6):559, 561.
PMID: 12154604 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

45. Cottrell WC, Pearsall AW 4th, Hollis MJ.
Simultaneous tears of the Achilles tendon and medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle.
Orthopedics. 2002 Jun;25(6):685-7. No abstract available.
PMID: 12083581 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


2003

1. Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (2003) 51, 747–748
DOI: 10.1093/jac/dkg081
Advance Access publication 28 January 2003
Correspondence
Spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture in patients
treated with levofloxacin
L. J. Haddow, M. Chandra Sekhar, V. Hajela and
G. Gopal Rao

2. Manoj Kumar RV, Rajasekaran S.
Spontaneous tendon ruptures in alkaptonuria.
J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2003 Aug;85(6):883-6.
PMID: 12931812 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

3. Harris RD, Nindl G, Balcavage WX, Weiner W, Johnson MT.
Use of proteomics methodology to evaluate inflammatory protein expression in tendinitis.
Biomed Sci Instrum. 2003;39:493-9.
PMID: 12724941 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

4. Milgrom C, Finestone A, Zin D, Mandel D, Novack V.
Cold weather training: a risk factor for Achilles paratendinitis among
recruits.
Foot Ankle Int. 2003 May;24(5):398-401.
PMID: 12801195 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

5. Schwalm JD, Lee CH.
Acute hepatitis associated with oral levofloxacin therapy in a hemodialysis patient.
CMAJ. 2003 Apr 1;168(7):847-8.
PMID: 12668542 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

6. Oh YR, Carr-Lopez SM, Probasco JM, Crawley PG.
Levofloxacin-induced autoimmune hemolytic anemia.
Ann Pharmacother. 2003 Jul-Aug;37(7-8):1010-3.
PMID: 12841809 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

7. Bardin L.
Comments on 'Achilles tendinopathy'.
Man Ther. 2003 Aug;8(3):189; author reply 190-1. No abstract available.
PMID: 12909446 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

8. Ackermann PW, Li J, Lundeberg T, Kreicbergs A.
Neuronal plasticity in relation to nociception and healing of rat achilles tendon.
J Orthop Res. 2003 May;21(3):432-41.
PMID: 12706015 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

9. Gotoh M, Higuchi F, Suzuki R, Yamanaka K.
Progression from calcifying tendinitis to rotator cuff tear.
Skeletal Radiol. 2003 Feb;32(2):86-9. Epub 2002 Apr 05.
PMID: 12589487 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

10. Dalal RB, Zenios M.
The flexor hallucis longus tendon transfer for chronic tendo-achilles ruptures revisited. Ann R Coll Surg Engl. 2003 Jul;85(4):283. No abstract available.
PMID: 12908473 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

11. Joseph TA, Defranco MJ, Weiker GG.
Delayed repair of a pectoralis major tendon rupture with allograft: A case report.
J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2003 Jan-Feb;12(1):101-4. No abstract available.
PMID: 12610495 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

12. [No authors listed]
Tendon abnormalities and hypersensitivity of levofloxacin.
Prescrire Int. 2003 Feb;12(63):20. No abstract available.
PMID: 12602391 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

13. Magnusson SP, Beyer N, Abrahamsen H, Aagaard P, Neergaard K, Kjaer M.
Increased cross-sectional area and reduced tensile stress of the Achilles tendon in elderly compared with young women.
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2003 Feb;58(2):123-7.
PMID: 12586849 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

14. Khan KM, Forster BB, Robinson J, Cheong Y, Louis L, Maclean L, Taunton JE.
Are ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging of value in assessment of Achilles tendon disorders? A two year prospective study.
Br J Sports Med. 2003 Apr;37(2):149-53.
PMID: 12663358 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

15. DY, Song JC, Wang CC.
Anaphylactoid reaction to ciprofloxacin.
Ann Pharmacother. 2003 Jul-Aug;37(7-8):1018-23.
PMID: 12841811 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

16. Ying M, Yeung E, Li B, Li W, Lui M, Tsoi CW.
Sonographic evaluation of the size of Achilles tendon: the effect of exercise and dominance of the ankle.
Ultrasound Med Biol. 2003 May;29(5):637-42.
PMID: 12754062 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

17. Cook J, Khan K.
The treatment of resistant, painful tendinopathies results in frustration for athletes and health professionals alike.
Am J Sports Med. 2003 Mar-Apr;31(2):327-8; author reply 328. No abstract available.
PMID: 12642274 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

18. [No authors listed]
Fluoroquinolones in ambulatory ENT and respiratory tract infections: rarely appropriate.
Prescrire Int. 2003 Feb;12(63):26-7.
PMID: 12602405 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

19. Matsumoto F, Trudel G, Uhthoff HK, Backman DS.
Mechanical effects of immobilization on the Achilles' tendon.
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2003 May;84(5):662-7.
PMID: 12736878 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

20. Maffulli N, Kenward MG, Testa V, Capasso G, Regine R, King JB.
Clinical diagnosis of Achilles tendinopathy with tendinosis.
Clin J Sport Med. 2003 Jan;13(1):11-5.
PMID: 12544158 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

21. Forslund C.
BMP treatment for improving tendon repair. Studies on rat and rabbit Achilles tendons.
Acta Orthop Scand Suppl. 2003 Feb;74(308):I, 1-30. No abstract available.
PMID: 12640969 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

22. Cetti R, Junge J, Vyberg M.
Spontaneous rupture of the Achilles tendon is preceded by widespread and bilateral tendon damage and ipsilateral inflammation: a clinical and histopathologic study of 60 patients.
Acta Orthop Scand. 2003 Feb;74(1):78-84.
PMID: 12635798 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

23. Mulvaney S.
Calf muscle therapy for Achilles tendinosis.
Am Fam Physician. 2003 Mar 1;67(5):939; author reply 939-40. No abstract available.
PMID: 12643353 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

24. Khaliq Y, Zhanel GG.
Fluoroquinolone-associated tendinopathy: a critical review of the literature.
Clin Infect Dis. 2003 Jun 1;36(11):1404-10. Epub 2003 May 20. Review.
PMID: 12766835 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

25. Prasad S, Lee A, Clarnette R, Faull R.
Spontaneous, bilateral patellar tendon rupture in a woman with previous Achilles tendon rupture and systemic lupus erythematosus.
Rheumatology (Oxford). 2003 Jul;42(7):905-6. No abstract available.
PMID: 12826711 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

26. Gold L, Igra H.
Levofloxacin-induced tendon rupture: a case report and review of the literature.
J Am Board Fam Pract. 2003 Sep-Oct;16(5):458-60. Review. No abstract available.
PMID: 14645337 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

27. Schindler C, Pittrow D, Kirch W.
Reoccurrence of levofloxacin-induced tendinitis by phenoxymethylpenicillin therapy after 6 months: a rare complication of fluoroquinolone therapy?
Chemotherapy. 2003 May;49(1-2):90-1. No abstract available.
PMID: 12756981 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

28. de La Red G, Mejia JC, Cervera R, Llado A, Mensa J, Font J.
Bilateral Achilles tendinitis with spontaneous rupture induced by levofloxacin in a patient with systemic sclerosis.
Clin Rheumatol. 2003 Oct;22(4-5):367-8. No abstract available.
PMID: 14579169 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

29. Tomas ME, Perez Carreras M, Morillasa JD, Castellano G, Solis JA.
[Rupture of the Achilles' tendon secondary to levofloxacin]
Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2003 Jan;26(1):53-4. Spanish. No abstract available.
PMID: 12525331 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

30. Mathis AS, Chan V, Gryszkiewicz M, Adamson RT, Friedman GS.
Levofloxacin-associated Achilles tendon rupture.
Ann Pharmacother. 2003 Jul-Aug;37(7-8):1014-7.
PMID: 12841810 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

31. Aros C, Flores C, Mezzano S.[Achilles tendinitis associated to levofloxacin: report of 4 cases]
Rev Med Chil. 2002 Nov;130(11):1277-81. Spanish.
PMID: 12587511 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

32. Shah P.[Do tendon lesions occur during quinolone administration?]
Dtsch Med Wochenschr. 2003 Oct 17;128(42):2214. German. No abstract available.
PMID: 14562223 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

33. Melhus A, Apelqvist J, Larsson J, Eneroth M.
Levofloxacin-associated Achilles tendon rupture and tendinopathy.
Scand J Infect Dis. 2003;35(10):768-70.
PMID: 14606622 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

34. Cebrian P, Manjon P, Caba P.
Ultrasonography of non-traumatic rupture of the Achilles tendon secondary to
levofloxacin.
Foot Ankle Int. 2003 Feb;24(2):122-4.
PMID: 12627618 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

35. Bernacer L, Artigues A, Serrano A.
[Levofloxacin and bilateral spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture]
Med Clin (Barc). 2003 Jan 25;120(2):78-9. Spanish. No abstract available.
PMID: 12570920 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

36. Haddow LJ, Chandra Sekhar M, Hajela V, Gopal Rao G.
Spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture in patients treated with levofloxacin.
J Antimicrob Chemother. 2003 Mar;51(3):747-8. No abstract available.
PMID: 12615887 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

37. Othmani S, Battikh R, Ben Abdallah N.
[The myo-tendinopathy caused by levofloxacin]
Therapie. 2003 Sep-Oct;58(5):463-5. French. No abstract available.
PMID: 14682197 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

38. Gutierrez E, Morales E, Garcia Rubiales MA, Valentin MO.
[Levofloxacin and Achilles tendon involvement in hemodialysis patients]
Nefrologia. 2003 Nov-Dec;23(6):558-9. Spanish. No abstract available.
PMID: 15002793 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

40. Spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture in patients treated with levofloxacin
L. J. Haddow, M. Chandra Sekhar, V. Hajela and G. Gopal Rao*
Department of Microbiology, University Hospital Lewisham, Lewisham High Street, London SE13 6LH, UK 2003 The British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy

41. Clinical Infectious Diseases 2003;36:1404-1410
2003 by the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved.
Fluoroquinolone-Associated Tendinopathy: A Critical Review of the Literature
Yasmin Khaliq1 and George G. Zhanel2

42. J Am Podiatr Med Assoc. 2003 Jul-Aug;93(4):333-5.
Fluoroquinolone therapy and Achilles tendon rupture.
Vanek D, Saxena A, Boggs JM.

43. Clin Rheumatol. 2003 Dec;22(6):500-1. Epub 2003 Oct 18.
Ciprofloxacin and Achilles' tendon rupture: a causal relationship.

44. Aten Primaria. 2003 Sep 15;32(4):256
Bilateral Achilles tendinitis as adverse reaction to levofloxacine.

45. Therapie. 2003 Sep-Oct;58(5):463-5.
The myo-tendinopathy caused by levofloxacin

46. Reumatismo. 2003 Oct-Dec;55(4):267-9.
Levofloxacin-induced bilateral rupture of the Achilles tendon: clinical and sonographic findings

47. Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2003 Jan;26(1):53-4.
Rupture of the Achilles' tendon secondary to levofloxacin

48. J Antimicrob Chemother. 2003 Mar;51(3):747-8.
Spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture in patients treated with levofloxacin.

49. Foot Ankle Int. 2003 Feb;24(2):122-4.
Ultrasonography of non-traumatic rupture of the Achilles tendon secondary to levofloxacin.

50. Chemotherapy. 2003 May;49(1-2):90-1.
Reoccurrence of levofloxacin-induced tendinitis by phenoxymethylpenicillin therapy after 6 months: a rare complication of fluoroquinolone therapy?

51. rupture of the Achilles tendon: clinical and sonographic findings]
Reumatismo. 2003 Oct-Dec;55(4):267-9. Italian.
PMID: 14872227 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

52. Ann Pharmacother. 2003 Jul-Aug;37(7-8):1014-7.
Levofloxacin-associated Achilles tendon rupture.

53. Clin Rheumatol. 2003 Oct;22(4-5):367-8.
Bilateral Achilles tendinitis with spontaneous rupture induced by levofloxacin in a patient with systemic sclerosis.

54. Scand J Infect Dis. 2003;35(10):768-70.
Levofloxacin-associated Achilles tendon rupture and tendinopathy.

55. Levofloxacin-associated Achilles tendon rupture and tendinopathy. Scand J Infect Dis 2003;35(10):768-70 (ISSN: 0036-5548) Melhus A; Apelqvist J; Larsson J; Eneroth M Department of Medical Microbiology, Malmo University Hospital, Malmo, Sweden. asa.melhus at mikrobiol.mas.lu.se.

56. Levofloxacin and trovafloxacin inhibition of experimental fracture-healing. Clin Orthop 2003 Sep;(414):95-100 (ISSN: 0009-921X) Perry AC; Prpa B; Rouse MS; Piper KE; Hanssen AD; Steckelberg JM; Patel R Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.

57. Levofloxacin-associated Achilles tendon rupture. Ann Pharmacother 2003 Jul-Aug;37(7-8):1014-7 (ISSN: 1060-0280) Mathis AS; Chan V; Gryszkiewicz M; Adamson RT; Friedman GS Department of Pharmacy Practice and Administration, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ, USA. smathis at sbhcs.com.

58. Richardson LC, Reitman R, Wilson M.
Achilles tendon ruptures: functional outcome of surgical repair with a "pull-out" wire.
Foot Ankle Int. 2003 May;24(5):439-43.
PMID: 12801203 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

59. Ultrasonography of non-traumatic rupture of the Achilles tendon secondary to levofloxacin. Foot Ankle Int 2003 Feb;24(2):122-4 (ISSN: 1071-1007) Cebrian P; Manjon P; Caba P Departamento de Radiodiagnostico, Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain. pcvbb at yahoo.es.

60. J Am Board Fam Pract. 2003 Sep-Oct;16(5):458-60.
Levofloxacin-induced tendon rupture: a case report and review of the literature.


2004

1. Mehra A, Maheshwari R, Case R, Croucher C.
Bilateral simultaneous spontaneous rupture of the Achilles tendon.
Hosp Med. 2004 May;65(5):308-9. No abstract available.
PMID: 15176150 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

2. Vergara Fernandez I.
[Muscle and tendon problems as a side-effect of levofloxacine: review of a case]
Aten Primaria. 2004 Mar 15;33(4):214. Spanish. No abstract available.
PMID: 15023326 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

3. McKinley BT, Oglesby RJ.
A 57-year-old male retired colonel with acute ankle swelling.
Mil Med. 2004 Mar;169(3):254-6. No abstract available.
PMID: 15080249 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

4. Fama U, Irace S, Frati R, de Gado F, Scuderi N.
Is it a real risk to take ciprofloxacin?
Plast Reconstr Surg. 2004 Jul;114(1):267. No abstract available.
PMID: 15220615 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

5. Kahn F, Christensson B.
[A rapid development of Achilles tendon rupture following quinolone treatment]
Lakartidningen. 2004 Jan 15;101(3):190-1. Swedish. No abstract available.
PMID: 14763088 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

6. Long term outcome after Fluoroquinolones tendinopathies
13/01/2004 14:11:07 P-0077
C Guy (1); Y Murat (1); MN Beyens (1); M Ratrema (1); G Mounier (1); M Ollagnier (1); (1) Centre de Pharmacovigilance, Hôpital Bellevue - CHU St-Etienne, Sant-Etienne

7. Levofloxacin-induced bilateral Achilles tendon rupture: a case report and review of the literature. J Orthop Sci 2004;9(2):186-90 (ISSN: 0949-2658) Kowatari K; Nakashima K; Ono A; Yoshihara M; Amano M; Toh S Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Aomori Rosai Hospital, 1 Minamigaoka, Shirogane-machi, Hachinohe 031-8551, Japan.

8. Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2004 Jan;308(1):394-402. Epub 2003 Oct 20. In vitro discrimination of fluoroquinolones toxicity on tendon cells: involvement of oxidative stress.

9. Hosp Med. 2004 May;65(5):308-9.
Bilateral simultaneous spontaneous rupture of the Achilles tendon.
Mehra A, Maheshwari R, Case R, Croucher C.

10. Therapie. 2004 Nov-Dec;59(6):653-5.
Ofloxacin-induced achilles tendinitis in the absence of a predisposition

11. An Med Interna. 2004 Mar;21(3):154.
Achilles bilateral tendonitis and levofloxacin

12. J Orthop Sci. 2004;9(2):186-90.
Levofloxacin-induced bilateral Achilles tendon rupture: a case report and review of the literature.

13. Scand J Infect Dis. 2004;36(4):315-6.
Recurrent tendinitis after treatment with two different fluoroquinolones.

14. Joint Bone Spine. 2004 Nov;71(6):586-7. Related Articles, Links
Rupture of multiple tendons after levofloxacin therapy.
Braun D, Petitpain N, Cosserat F, Loeuille D, Bitar S, Gillet P, Trechot P.
Pneumology Department, Maillot Hospital, 54150 Briey, France.

15. Aten Primaria. 2004 Mar 15;33(4):214.
Muscle and tendon problems as a side-effect of levofloxacine: review of a case

16. Kowatari K, Nakashima K, Ono A, Yoshihara M, Amano M, Toh S.
Levofloxacin-induced bilateral Achilles tendon rupture: a case report and review of the literature.
J Orthop Sci. 2004;9(2):186-90. Review.
PMID: 15045551 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

17. Gomez Rodriguez N, Ibanez Ruan J, Gonzalez Perez M.
[Achilles bilateral tendonitis and levofloxacin]
An Med Interna. 2004 Mar;21(3):154. Spanish. No abstract available.
PMID: 15043504 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

18. Filippucci E, Farina A, Bartolucci F, Spallacci C, Busilacchi P, Grassi W.[Levofloxacin-induced bilateral

19. Burkhardt O, Kohnlein T, Pap T, Welte T.
Recurrent tendinitis after treatment with two different fluoroquinolones.
Scand J Infect Dis. 2004;36(4):315-6.
PMID: 15198194 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


2005

1. Toxicology. 2005 May 9
Fluoroquinolones cause changes in extracellular matrix, signalling proteins, metalloproteinases and caspase-3 in cultured human tendon cells.
Sendzik J, Shakibaei M, Schafer-Korting M, Stahlmann R.

2. Arch Orthop Trauma Surg. 2005 Mar;125(2):124-6. Epub 2005 Jan 12.
Missed Achilles tendon rupture due to oral levofloxacin: surgical treatment and result.

3. An Med Interna. 2005 Jan;22(1):28-30.
Partial bilateral rupture of the Achilles tendon associated to levofloxacin

4. Expert Opin Drug Saf. 2005 Mar;4(2):299-309.
Fluoroquinolones and tendon disorders.
Melhus A.

5. Toxicology. 2005 May 9
Fluoroquinolones cause changes in extracellular matrix, signalling proteins, metalloproteinases and caspase-3 in cultured human tendon cells.
Sendzik J, Shakibaei M, Schafer-Korting M, Stahlmann R.
Institute of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Department of Toxicology, Charite-Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Garystr. 5, 14195 Berlin, Germany; Institute of Anatomy, Department of Cell and Neurobiology, Charite-Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Konigin-Luise-Str. 15, 14195 Berlin, Germany; Musculoskeletal Research Group, Institute of Anatomy, Ludwig-Maximilian-Universitat Munich, Pettenkoferstr. 11, 80336 Munich, Germany.

Additional references:

AUSTRALIA
THE ACHILLES HEEL OF FLUOROQUINOLONES
One of the more unusual adverse reactions known to be associated with the fluoroquinolone antibiotics is the occurrence of tendinitis. This is a serious effect since it may progress to tendon rupture with many weeks of disability as a result. Over 200 cases have been reported in the literature with the majority from France. Most members of the class including ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, ofloxacin, and norfloxacin have been implicated. The Achilles tendon is most often involved.
In Australia, there have been 25 reports of tendinitis in association with fluoroquinolones. Most (22) have been with ciprofloxacin and the other three with norfloxacin. The majority of the patients involved were elderly, ranging in age from 46 to 91 (median 69) years and the sex distribution was equal. For ciprofloxacin, daily dosages ranged from 750 mg to 2250 mg although most (13) patients were taking 1000 mg daily. For norfloxacin, all three patients were taking the usual dose of 800 mg daily. Time to onset ranged from the same day that the drug was commenced (in two patients) to two months although in 13 of the 24 reports which provided the information, the reaction occurred within the first week. Almost all (23) of the reports specified the Achilles tendon as the site of the tendinitis. Tendinitis was described as bilateral in 11 cases. Only 8 patients had recovered at the time the report was submitted and the other patients were being treated with rest and/or physiotherapy. There have been no reports of tendon rupture in Australia although in one severe case, the patient required a plaster cast up to the mid thigh.
A number of risk factors have been identified with regard to this adverse reaction. These include old age, renal dysfunction, and concomitant corticosteroid therapy. Of the patients reported to ADRAC, 72% were older than 60 years. Nine of these patients were taking corticosteroids as were three of the younger patients.
Prescribers are reminded that tendinitis, especially involving the Achilles tendon, is a rare adverse effect of the fluoroquinolones. It is more likely to occur in association with the risk factors referred to above. The antibiotic should be withdrawn immediately to reduce the risk of tendon rupture.


DUTCH
Fluoroquinolones have been associated with tendon disorders, usually during the first month of treatment,1-5 but the epidemiological evidence is scanty. We did a nested case-control study among users of fluoroquinolones in a large UK general practice database to study the association with Achilles tendon disorders.

Participants, methods, and results

We obtained data from the IMS Health database (UK MediPlus), which contains data from general practice on consultations, morbidity, prescriptions, and other interventions in a source population of 1-2 million inhabitants. The base cohort consisted of all patients aged 18 years or over who had received a fluoroquinolone. We excluded people with a history of Achilles tendon disorders, cancer, AIDS, illicit drug use, or alcohol misuse. We identified potential cases by reviewing patient profiles and clinical data and excluded tendon disorders due to direct trauma. We randomly sampled a group of 10 000 control patients from the study cohort.

We defined four categories of exposure to fluoroquinolones: current use, recent use, past use, and no use. We defined current use as when the tendon disorder occurred in the period between the start of the fluoroquinolone treatment and the calculated end date plus 30 days, recent use as when the calculated end date was between 30 and 90 days before the occurrence of the disorder, and past use as when the calculated end date was more than 90 days before the occurrence of the disorder. We used unconditional logistic regression analysis to calculate adjusted relative risks and 95% confidence intervals for Achilles tendon disorders, using the no use group as the reference. We adjusted for age, sex, number of visits to the general practitioner, use of corticosteroid, calendar year, obesity, and history of musculoskeletal disorders.

The cohort included 46 776 users of fluoroquinolones between 1 July 1992 and 30 June 30 1998, of whom 704 had Achilles tendinitis and 38 had Achilles tendon rupture. Four hundred and fifty three (61%) of the cases were women, and the mean age was 56 years. Cases visited the general practitioner significantly more often than did controls (mean 20 v 17). Cases and controls were similar with respect to indications for use of fluoroquinolone. Age, number of visits to the general practitioner in the previous 18 months, gout, obesity, and use of corticosteroid were determinants of Achilles tendon disorders. The adjusted relative risk of Achilles tendon disorders with current use of fluoroquinolones was 1.9 (95% confidence interval 1.3 to 2.6). The risk for recent and past use was similar to that for no use. The relative risk with current use was 3.2 (2.1 to 4.9) among patients aged 60 and over and 0.9 (0.5 to 1.6) among patients aged under 60 (table). In patients aged 60 or over, concurrent use of corticosteroids and fluoroquinolones increased the risk to 6.2 (3.0 to 12.8).

Relative risk of Achilles tendon disorders associated with use of fluoroquinolones according to age
Current exposure to fluoroquinolones increases the risk of Achilles tendon disorders. This finding is in agreement with a smaller study, in which we found an association between tendinitis and fluoroquinolones.5 Our results indicate that this adverse effect is relatively rare, with an overall excess risk of 3.2 cases per 1000 patient years. The effect seems to be restricted to people aged 60 or over, and within this group concomitant use of corticosteroids increased the risk substantially. The proportion of Achilles tendon disorders among patients with both risk factors that is attributable to their interaction was 87%. Although the mechanism is unknown, the sudden onset of some tendinopathies, occasionally after a single dose of a fluoroquinolone, suggests a direct toxic effect on collagen fibres. Prescribers should be aware of this risk, especially in elderly people taking corticosteroids.

Acknowledgments
We acknowledge the cooperation of IMS Health United Kingdom.
Contributors: PDvdL, MCJMS, and BHChS formulated the design of the study. PDvdL carried out the analyses. PDvdL, MCJMS, and BHChS wrote the paper, and RMCH and HGML edited it. BHChS and HGML are guarantors for the paper.

Funding:
Dutch Inspectorate for Health Care.

Competing interests:
MCJMS is a consultant for Lundbeck (France) and Beaufour (UK) and has previously been a consultant for Pfizer (USA), Roche (Switzerland), and Novartis Consumerhealth (Switzerland). MCJMS is responsible for research conducted with the integrated primary care information database in the Netherlands, which is supported by project specific grants from GlaxoSmithKline, AstraZeneca, Merck Sharp & Dohme, Pharmacia & Upjohn, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Eli Lilly, Wyeth, and Yamanouchi. MCJMS has conducted research projects on use of antibiotics for Merck & Co (USA) and Bayer (Italy).

This is far from being an all inclusive list of such medical journal entries and other such main stream documentation. Starting in 1965 and ending in 2005, almost forty years worth of such reports and the treating physician as well as the patient have no prior knowledge concerning such events. This defies logic but sadly enough this is the true state of affairs. In spite of the overwhelming evidence presented at that 62 Meeting of the Anti-Infective Drugs Advisory Committee that the fluoroquinolones cause irreversible joint damage in the pediatric population the FDA has recently added the use of Ciprofloxacin in the pediatric population, treating children as young as one years of age.

Numerous studies have indicated that such use in a pediatric patient runs the risk of crippling the child for life. Yet additional clinical trials continue aided and abetted by the FDA, for other drugs in this class other than Ciprofloxacin. A disaster that is detailed within the 62nd meeting of the Anti-Infective Drugs Advisory Committee where it was so eloquently stated:

"…when we talk about the issue of arthropathy that potentially includes a number of things, ranging from simple effusion, for instance, of a knee joint, which might rapidly resolve after the conclusion of therapy, to a more permanent disability. .." (sic)

"…in September of 1997 there is now a ciprofloxacin suspension which is available, and although it continues to have the same warning statements about arthropathy in juvenile animals and the potential concern in pediatric populations, obviously, the issue of off label use will extend over to pediatric populations in this formulation…."(sic)

"…An important safety question is, what adverse events should be monitored, and Doctor Goldberger alluded to this earlier. This is some of the examples I present. One is permanent lameness, reversible lameness, joint effusion, joint pain, and even latent articular disease or damage that may occur months or years following drug exposure, and there may be others…."(sic)

"…And, data submitted to the Agency, as well as data from the scientific literature, indicate that these lesions don't appear to be reversible…"(sic)

"…Doctor Stahlmann in Berlin is working on an idea that it may be an effect between the endocrines, the magnesium and the matrix and the quinolone. And that data is just coming out now. But as to the exact mechanism, I think you're right. I don't think we have a handle, as far as I know, on the exact mechanism. If there's anybody else that does, I'd sure like to hear it…"(sic)

"… Relating your personal experience, I was wondering about the potential for a delayed effect that in fact one might have a patient who had some histologic changes that would not be manifest clinically for many years. Is that a potential?" (sic)

"… I think it is a potential…"(sic)

"… In trying to assess toxicity with a very sensitive assay, obviously you've got tissue that you can look at in your animal models. There is some human data that were collected by Doctor Urs Schaad using MRI scanning in children and I'm wondering if you can correlate some of your histopathologic findings with MR in the animal model to give us an idea of how sensitive it would be sort of as a follow-up to Doctor Klein's question is the MR something that will be able to predict long-term outcomes, even if there are no clinical symptoms during therapy…."(sic)

"… That I don't know. I'll just be perfectly frank. I don't know. But on the slides I've seen from the animals from the chronic study, the repaired articular cartilage that is there is principally fibrocartilage yet it will provide the same joint margin and it has a calcified base and when we stain it with safrain O screen there's no proteoglycans there so it's going to make it an extremely chondromalaistic area and beyond the one year I can't tell you what the results will be…"(sic)

"…Anyway, it was by a group in Vienna where they looked at the articular cartilage of postmortem specimens of articular cartilage from kids with cystic fibrosis that had been on quinolones for a period of time and they found that there was damage in the chondrocytes…."(sic)

"…There were no deaths reported in U.S. pediatric zero to 18 year old cases where a flouroquinolone was reported as the suspect drug. However, there are eight deaths in the whole cohort of suspect and concomitant flouroquinolone drug reports in the system. Five of these deaths reported ciprofloxacin as a concomitant drug and not the suspect drug. These five were U.S. cases with ages ranging from seven months to six years. The remaining three deaths were all foreign, all 18 year old patients with either ofloxacin or norfloxacin reported as the suspect drug…."(sic)

"…There are 14 reports of arthropathy or arthralgia in the pediatric zero to 18 year old flouroquinolone reports. One report of a 14 year old girl had both ofloxacin and lomefloxacin as the suspect drug so there is an extra count because of the two flouroquinolones on this one report. This particular report indicates that a pediatric orthopedic surgeon diagnosed femoral anteversion as the cause for the girl's arthralgia, therefore you see it listed twice, and not the flouroquinolones. Most of the reports indicated that either an involved knee or elbow with or without other joints was involved…."(sic)

"…One interesting case which is not included on this slide for arthralgias was a 15 year old boy who received ofloxacin IV for an emergency appendectomy and had not grown more than his 70 inches in height over the last year. The 15th percentile for height for a 15 year old boy however is 66.5 inches and the expected growth rate is about two inches per year…"(sic)

"…Three patients had their seizure after the first dose of flouroquinolone, one on ciprofloxacin and the other two on ofloxacin, one of which had received ofloxacin several months earlier…"(sic)

"…The 15 psychiatric reports are a loose grouping of reports which include events ranging from euphoria to psychosis. The ages range from five to 18 years with the median at 15 years. There were two suicide attempts, one on ofloxacin and the other on norfloxacin, three reports of hallucination, one each on ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin and norfloxacin, and one report of aggressive behavior with confusion in a patient who had a psychiatric history and was on norfloxacin. The seven cases of photosensitivity were reported with lomefloxacin with one case on ciprofloxacin and two cases on ofloxacin. …"(sic)

"…I will mention that there were 152 U.S. cases aged zero to 18 years in the U.S. AERS system suspect flouroquinolones in the WHO line listing. The country with the most pediatric reports in the WHO foreign reports is the United Kingdom with 177 reports followed by Germany with 72 and France with 71. The rest of the countries had 20 or fewer reports…."(sic)

"…And with regards to muscular-skeletal events, 21 percent of the patients had an event in ciprofloxacin…"(sic)

"…We have focused our analysis on joint disorders and pefloxacin. 79 cases were reported and consist mainly of arthralgia. I don't know the pronunciation of hydrarthrosis -- 49 persons. It involved the knee in 52 cases, the wrist in 20 cases, the elbow in 20 cases, the shoulder in 6 cases, the ankle in 5 cases, and the hip once. It is associated with a functional discomfort in all cases, and when the duration of this discomfort is known, it can persist more than one month in 61 percent of these cases. But the outcome was favorable in 58 cases without discontinuation in two cases. …"(sic)

"…There have been sequelae in three cases with knee effusions persisting one year later in one case with discomfort following 8 months later in the second case. The third case is articular. It is a 17-year-old patient who experienced arthropathy and the drug was not suspected and the treatment was continued two following months. It leads to destructive arthropathy of the knees and the hip and prothesis was performed three years later. He was treated for a cerebral abscess. The outcome was unknown in 18 cases. In 9 cases, there was no follow-up. In the 9 last cases, we had a follow-up three months later and patients were not -- were still with disabilities and after we have no evolution…." (sic)

"… It is my understanding that one of the children had a joint replacement, is that correct?"

" Pardon me?"

" One of the children with the complications had an artificial joint replacement?"

"Yes."

"…If an irreversible cartilaginous lesion can occur, it is very likely that is going to cause problems down the line and we can't even anticipate what they are like…" (sic)


Again I state that this is for your reference & review and being made in support of my oppossing opinion that such occurences are not rare. I also take exception to the statement made that there is some kind of obligation to report such events. There is not. Such reports are done strictly on a voluntary basis and no law mandates that this be done by the treating physician. The medwatch program is voluntary and less that 3% of such events are ever reported to the FDA. A full 97% of such events never make it to the FDA. When reviewing the medwatch data base for the fluoroquinolones, joint, tendon and cartilage damage are all the top three events being reported, more so than any other adr.

In addition when a physician fails to recognize such an event it is doubtful that it would be reported. The NUMBER ONE complaint of those who have suffered such an event is the fact that the treating physician DENIES that it could possibly be the result of fluoroquinolone therapy. Any number of the tens of thousands of such victims I have discussed this issue with have reported that their physician REFUSED to make such a report, REFUSED to review the citations brought to them by their patients, and instructed their patients to stay off the internet. Even when such documentation was presented to the drug reps via pharmacafe those posting such information were ridiculed and harassed. This is not a situation I find condusive to accurate reporting of such events. It is a situation that results in false and misleading information being available to both the patient and the physician, while the true state of affairs is swept under the carpet.

Result number: 28
Searching file 17

Message Number 178274

Re: Complete list of ESWT research- the rest View Thread
Posted by Ed Davis, DPM on 7/12/05 at 20:45

List of publications from ismst.com website, July, 2005
Author Title Year Publisher
Ackaert KS, Schröder FH Effects of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) on renal tissue. 1989 Urological Research, 17: 3-7
Alvarez R. Preliminary results on the safety and efficacy of the OssaTron for treatment of plantar fasciitis. 2002 Foot Ankle Int 2002;23:197-203
Amelio E, Cugola L Acute and chronic tendon pathology in athlete 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:81
Amini A, Hafez M, Zhou S, Garcia E, Coombs R Shockwave Treatment for Chronic Non-union 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 159-164
Ammendolia A, Perticone L, Milano C Chronic shoulder articular pain: treatment by extracorporeal shockwaves 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:19
Ape A, Bosco V, Buselli P, Coco V, Gerardi A, Saggini R A retrospective, multi-centre experience report of shock wave therapy on epicondylitis 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:35-36
Apfel RE Acoustic cavitation. 1981 Methods of experimental physics, vol. 19, P. Edmonds ed., Academic Press New York: 355-411
Arbeitsgruppe "Orthopädische Stosswellenbehandlungen" Standortbestimmung 1995 Chaussy C, Eisenberger F, Jocham D, Wilbert D (Hrsg), Die Stosswelle - Forschung und Klinik, Attempto Verlag, Tübingen: 137-142
Arbeitsgruppe "Technische Entwicklungen" Standortbestimmung 1995 Chaussy C, Eisenberger F, Jocham D, Wilbert D (Hrsg), Die Stosswelle - Forschung und Klinik, Attempto Verlag, Tübingen: 15-20
Assenza, Buselli P, Chiacchio C, Pozzolini M, Scrocca M, Saggini R A retrospective, multi-centre experience report of shock wave therapy on rotator cuff tendonitis with calcific deposit 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:25
Auersperg V, Labek G, Böhler N Correlations Between Length of History and Outcome 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 37-42
Augat P, Claes L, Suger G In vivo effects of shock waves on the healing of fractured bone. 1995 Clin. Biomechan., 10: 374-378
Baloglu I, Aydinok H, Lök V Our results of the ossatherapy for treatment of pseudoathrosis 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:56
Baloglu I, Lök V Shockwave Therapy for Plantar Fasciitis 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 51-52
Bao S, Thrall BD, Miller DL Transfection of a reporter plasmid into cultured cells by sonoporation in vitro. 1997 Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 23: 953-959
Baumann J, Baumann J Treatment of neuromuscular dysfunction in children with spastic cerebral palsy by extracorporeal unfocused shock waves. 1997 Siebert W, Buch M (Hrsg), Extracorporal shock waves in orthopaedics, Springer Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg New York: 231-239
Beg M, Melikyan E, Yang X, Bainbridge L Shockwave Treatment for Intractable Tennis Elbow 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 81-90
Begg C, Cho M, Eastwood S Improving the quality of reporting of randomized controlled trials: the CONSORT statement. 1996 JAMA 1996; 276:637-639
Benson K, Hartz AJ A comparison of observational studies and randomized, controlled trials. 2000 N Engl J Med 2000; 342: 1878-1886
Betz U, Heine J, Riedel C, Rompe J D, Schöllner C The value of Cervical Spinal Manipulative Therapy Combined with Low Energy Shockwaves for Chronic Tennis Elbow 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 123-130
Boxberg W, Perlick L, Giebel G Stosswellenbehandlung bei therapieresistenten Weichteilschmerzen. 1996 Chirurg, 67: 1174-1178
Boyer MI, Hastings H Lateral tennis elbow: Is there any science out there? 1999 J Shoulder Elbow Surg 1999; 8:481-491
Braun W, Claes L, Rüter A, Paschke D Untersuchung zur Wirksamkeit von Stosswellen auf die Festigkeit des Verbundes von Knochen und Polymethylmetacrylat. 1991 Experimentelle Orthopädie, 130: 236
Braun W, Claes L, Rüter A, Paschke D Effects of extracorporeal shock waves on the stability of the interface between bone and polymethylmethacrylate: an in vitro study on human femoral segments. 1992 Clin. Biomechan., 7: 47-54
Braun W, Rüter A Frakturheilung: Morphologische und physiologische Gesichtspunkte. 1996 Unfallchirurg, 99: 59-67
Brendel W, Delius M, Goetz A Effect of shock waves on the microvasculature. 1987 Prog. Appl. Microcirculation, 12: 41-50
Brocai DRC, Lukoschek M, Hartmann M, Loew M Biometrische Planung klinisch-orthopadischer Studien. Der optimale Stichprobenumfang. 1998 Orthopäde 1998; 27:301-304
Brunner W, Thüringer R, Ascher G, Maluche C, Kellner F, Neuking A, Solleder A, Schmidt-Hoensdorf F, Vetter K High energy shock waves for pain management in orthopedics - a two year foolow-up in 899 cases 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:75
Brunner W, Thüringer R, Ascher G, Neuking A, Flesch A, Solleder A, Schmidt-Höhnsdorff F, Bärtel B Die extrakorporelle Stosswellentherapie in der Orthopädie - Drei-Monats-Ergebnisse in 443 Fällen. 1997 Orthopädische Praxis, 7: 461-464
Brümmer F, Brenner J, Bräuner T, Hülser D Effect of shock waves on suspended and immobilized L1210 cells. 1989 Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 15: 229-239
Brümmer F, Bräuner T, Hülser D Biological effects of shock waves. 1990 World Journal of Urology, 8: 224-232
Brümmer F, Suhr D, Hülser D Sensitivity of normal and malignant cells to shock waves. 1992 Stone Disease, 4: 243-248
Bräuner T, Brümmer F, Hülser DF Histopathology of shock wave treated tumor cells suspensions and multicell tumor spheroids. 1989 Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 15: 451-460
Buch M Shock wave therapy of heel spur. 1997 Orthopaedic Product News, July/Aug./Sep.: 28-30
Buch M Prospektiver Vergleich der hochenergetischen Stoßwellentherapie sowie des Needling bei der Tendinosis calcarea der Schulter 2001 Siebert W, Buch M (Hrsg), Extrakorporale Stoßwellentherapie in der Orthopädie - Grundlagen und Anwendung, Ecomed Verlagsgesellschaft, Germany: 127-136
Buch M, Fleming L, Theodore G, Amendola A, Bachmann C, Zingas C. Resultate einer prospektiven placebokontrollierten randomisierten doppelblinden Multicenterstudie zur Evaluation der Effektivität und Sicherheit der Stoßwellentherapie bei plantarer Fasciitis. 2001 Vortrag, Symposium Muskuloskeletale Stoßwellentherapie, Mainz
Buch M, Knorr U, Fleming L, Theodore G, Amendola A, Bachmann C et al Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in plantar fasciitis: a review. 2002 Orthopaede 2002;31:637-644
Buch M, Knorr U, Siebert W E Chronic plantar fasciitis treated by ESWT 2000 Minimally Invasive Therapy & Allied Technologies, Isis Medical Media, Volume 9, Number 3/4 August 2000: 310 (Abstract 7)
Buch M, Schlangmann B, Träger D, Siebert W Prospektiver Vergleich der niedrig- und hochenergetischen Stosswellentherapie und Needling bei der Behandlung der Tendinosis calcarea der Schulter. 1997 45. Jahrestagung der Vereinigung Süddeutscher Orthopäden, Abstractband: 101-102
Buch M, Siebert W Shockwave Treatment for Heel Pain Syndrome - a Prospective Investigation 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 73-77
Burger C, Tsironis K, Helling HJ, Prokop A, Rehm KE Die extrakorporale Stosswellentherapie bei Ansatztendopathien der Schulter, des Ellenbogens und der Ferse - vorläufige Ergebnisse einer prospektiven Kölner Studie. 1996 45. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Orthopädenvereinigung e.V. User Meeting Ossatron, Wiesbaden
Buselli P, Saggini R ESWT in ossificans myositis 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:83
Bürger R, Witzsch U, Haist J, Grebe P, Hohenfellner R Die extrakorporale Stosswellentherapie (ESWT) - eine neue Möglichkeit der Behandlung von Pseudarthrosen. 1993 Chaussy C, Eisenberger F, Jocham D, Wilbert D (Hrsg), Stosswellenlithotripsie - Aspekte und Prognosen, Attempto Verlag, Tübingen: 127-130
Bürger R, Witzsch U, Haist J, Karnofsky V Extrakorporale Stosswellenbehandlung bei Pseudarthrose und aseptischer Knochennekrose. 1991 Urologe A, 30: 48
Bürger R, Witzsch U, Haist J, Karnofsky V, Hohenfellner R Extracorporeal shock wave therapy of pseudo-arthrosis and aseptic osteonecrosis. 1991 Endourology, 5, Suppl. 1: 48
Bürger R, Witzsch U, Haist J, Karnovsky V, Ahlers J, Hohenfellner R Extracorporeal shock wave therapy of pseudo-arthrosis. 1992 Urology, 147: 48 ff
Bödekker I, Haake M Die extrakorporale Stosswellentherapie zur Behandlung der Epicondylitis humeri radialis. Ein aktueller Überblick. 2000 Orthopäde 2000; 29:463-469
Bödekker R, Schafer H, Haake M Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in the treatment of plantar fasciitis – a biometrical review. 2001 Clin Rheumatol 2001; 20:324-330
Chaussy C, Eisenberger F, Wanner K, Forssmann F, Hepp W, Schmiedt E, Brendel W The use of shock waves for the destruction of renal calculi without direct contact. 1976 Urol Res 1976; 4:181-188
Chen H, Chen L, Huang T Treatment of painfull heel syndrome with shock waves 2001 Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, 387: 41-46
Chen H, Chen L, Huang T Treatment of painful heel syndrome with shock waves 2001 Clin Orthop 2001; 387: 41-46
Child SZ, Hartman C, Schery LA, Carstensen EL Lung damage from exposure to pulsed ultrasound. 1990 Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 16: 817-825
Church C A theoretical study of cavitation generated by an extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter. 1989 Acoustic Society of America, 86: 215-227
Coleman AJ, Saunders JE A review of the physical properties and biological effects of the high amplitude acoustic fields usedr in extracorporeal lithotripsy. 1993 Ultrasonics, 31: 75-89
Coleman AJ, Saunders JE A survey of the acoustic output of commercial extracorporeal shock wave lithotripters. 1989 Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 15: 213-227
Coleman AJ, Saunders JE, Crum LA, Dyson M Acoustic cavitation generated by an extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter. 1987 Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 13: 69 ff
Concato J, Shah N, Jorwitz RI Randomized, controlled trials, observational studies, and the hierarchy of research. 2000 N Engl J Med 2000; 342: 1887-189
Corrado B, Russo S, Gigliotti S, De Durante C, Canero R Shockwave Treatment for Non-unions of the Carpal Scaphoid 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 187-194
Cosentino R, de Stefano R, Frati E, Manca S, Tofi C, Falsetti P, Linari S, Morfini M, Rossi-Ferrini P, Marcolongo R Safety and efficacy of extracorporeal shock wave therapy in the treatment of painful non articular rheumatism of patients with hemophilia 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:86
Cozzolino F, Corrado B, Izzo M, Borrelli M, Russo S, Gigliotti S, de Durante C Axial external fixation plus high energy shock waves in the treatment of unstable leg non union 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:61
Crawford F, Atkins D, Edward J Interventions for treating plantar heel pain (Cochrane Review) 2000 Cochrane Library, Issue 3. Oxford: Update Software, 2000
Crowther M. A prospective randomised study comparing shockwave therapy and steroid injection in the treatment of 'tennis elbow' 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:34
Crum L Tensile strength of water. 1979 Nature, 278: 148-149
Crum L Acoustic cavitation. 1982 Proceedings of the 1982 IEEE ultrasonics Symposium, IEEE, New York: 1-11
Cugola L, Amelio E Long bone non-union: treatment by extracorporeal shock wave (ESW) 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:59Dahm K Stosswellentherapie bei schmerzhaftem Fersensporn: Nachuntersuchungen bei 362 Patienten. 1997 2. Radevormwalder ESWT-Symosium, Radevormwald: 8-9
Dahmen GP, Franke R, Gonchars V, Poppe K, Lentrodt S, Lichtenberger S, Jost S, Montigel J, Nam VC, Dahmen G Die Behandlung knochennaher Weichteilschmerzen mit extrakorporaler Stosswellentherapie (ESWT) - Indikation, Technik und bisherige Ergebnisse. 1995 Chaussy C, Eisenberger F, Jocham D, Wilbert D (Hrsg), Die Stosswelle - Forschung und Klinik, Attempto Verlag, Tübingen: 175-186
Dahmen GP, Meiss L, Nam VC, Skruodies B Extrakorporale Stoßwellentherapie (ESWT) im knochennahen Weichteilbereich an der Schulter 1992 Extracta Orthopaedica 1992; 15:25-28
Dahmen GP, Nam VC, Meiss L Extrakorporale Stosswellentherapie zur Behandlung von knochennahen Weichteilschmerzen: Indikation, Technik und vorläufige Ergebnisse. 1993 Chaussy C, Eisenberger F, Jocham D, Wilbert D (Hrsg), Stosswellenlithotripsie - Aspekte und Prognosen, Attempto Verlag, Tübingen: 143-148
Davis PF, Severud E, Baxter DE Painful heel syndrome: results of nonoperative treatment. 1994 Foot Ankle Int 1994;15:531-5
de Durante C, Russo S, Gigliotti S, Corrado B The Treatment of Shoulder Periarticular Calcification 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 143-144
de Durante C, Russo S, Gigliotti S, Pecoraro C The treatment of shoulder periarticular calcifications by shock waves 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:23
de Maio M, Paine R, Mangine RE, Drez D Plantar fasciitis. 1993 Orthopedics 1993;16: 1153-63
de Oya R, Sanchez Benitez Soto J, Garcia Munilla M Extracorporeal shock waves in the treatment of tendinitis of shoulder 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:13
de Pretto M, Dalla Valle I, Ferrari G, Pacetti A Follow-up and evaluation of heterotopic ossifications treated with shockwave therapy 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:85
de Pretto M, Guerra L, Pozzolini M, Zucchetti R, Saggini R A retrospective multi-centre experience report of shock wave therapy on achilles tendonitis 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:45-46
Delius M Minimal static excess pressure minimizes the effect of extracorporeal shock waves on cells and reduces it on gallstones. 1997 Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 23: 611-617
Delius M Experimentelle Stosswellenlithotripsie - aktuelle Entwicklungen. 1995 Chaussy C, Eisenberger F, Jocham D, Wilbert D (Hrsg), Die Stosswelle - Forschung und Klinik, Attempto Verlag, Tübingen: 3-9
Delius M Biologische Wirkung von Stosswellen - mehr als "nur" Steinzertrümmerung? 1995 Zentralblatt Chirurgie, 120: 259-273
Delius M Medical applications and bioeffects of extracorporal shock waves. 1994 Shock waves, 4: 55-72
Delius M Bioeffects of shock waves: in vivo and in vitro actions 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:9
Delius M, Denk R, Berding C, Liebich H, Jordan M, Brendel W Biological effects of shock waves: cavitation by shock waves in piglet liver. 1990 Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 16: 467-472
Delius M, Draenert K Einfluß hochenergetischer Stosswellen auf Knochen, Wirkung von Stosswellen auf Knochen. 1997 Siebert W, Buch M (Hrsg), Stosswellenanwendung am Knochen - Klinische und experimentelle Erfahrungen, Dr. Kovac, Hamburg: 10-11
Delius M, Draenert K, Al Diek Y, Draenert Y Biological effect of shock waves: in vivo effect of high energy pulses on rabbit bone. 1995 Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 21: 1219-1225
Delius M, Draenert K, Draenert Y, Börner M Effects of extracorporeal shock waves on bone: a review of shock wave expiriments and the mechanism of shock wave action. 1997 Siebert W, Buch M (Hrsg), Extracorporeal shock waves in orthopaedics, Springer Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg New York: 91-107
Delius M, Enders G, Heine G, Stark J, Remberger K, Brendel W Biological effects of shock waves: lung hemorrhage by shock waves in dogs - pressure dependence. 1987 Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 13: 61-67
Delius M, Enders G, Xuan Z, Liebich H, Brendel B Biological effects of shock waves: kidney damage by shock waves in dogs - dose dependence. 1988 Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 14: 117-122
Delius M, Hoffmann E, Steinbeck G, Conzen P Biological effects of shock waves: induction of arrhythmia in piglet hearts. 1994 Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 20: 279-285
Delius M, Jordan M, Eizenhoefer H, Marlinghaus E, Heine G, Liebich H, Brendel W Biological effects of shock waves: kidney hemorrhage by shock waves in dogs - administration rate dependence. 1988 Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 14: 689-694
Delius M, Jordan M, Liebich H, Brendel W Biological effects of shock waves: effect of shock waves on the liver and gallbladder wall of dogs - administration rate dependence. 1990 Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 16: 459-466
Delius M, Weiss N, Gambihler S, Goetz A, Brendel W Tumor therapy with shock waves requires modified lithotripter shock waves 1989 Naturwissenschaften, 76: 573-574
Delius M, Überle F, Eisenmenger W Extracorporeal shock waves act by shock wave gas bubble interaction. 1998 Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 24: 1055-1059
Dellian M, Walenta S, Gamarra F, Kuhnle G, Mueller-Klieser W, Goetz A Ischemia and loss of ATP in tumors following treatment with focused high energy shock waves. 1993 British Journal of Cancer, 68: 26-31
di Silverio F, Galluci M, Gambardella P, Alp G, Benedetti R, La Mancusa R, Pulcinelli FM, Romiti R, Gazzangia PP Blood cellolar and biochemical changes after extracorporeal shock wave in lithotripsy. 1990 Urological Research, 18: 49 ff
Dieppe P, Chard J, Tallon D, Egger M Funding clinical research. 1999 Lancet 1999; 353:1626-1629
Diesch R, Haupt G Anwendung der hochenergetischen extrakorporalen Stosswellentherapie bei Pseudarthrosen. 1997 Siebert W, Buch M (Hrsg), Stosswellenanwendung am Knochen - Klinische und experimentelle Erfahrungen, Dr. Kovac, Hamburg: 63-64
Diesch R, Haupt G Use of extracorporeal shock waves in the treatment of pseudarthrosis. 1991 Chaussy C, Eisenberger F, Jocham D, Wilbert D (Hrsg), High energey shock waves in medicine, Thieme Verlag, Stuttgart: 136-139
Diesch R, Haupt G Extracorporeal shock wave treatment of pseudarthrosis, tendinosis calcarea of the shoulder and calcaneal spur. 1997 Siebert W, Buch M (Hrsg), Extracorporeal shock waves in orthopaedics, Springer Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg New York: 131-135
Diesch R, Straub T, Penninger E, Frolich T, Scholl J Conventional Versus Ballistic Shockwave Treatment for Calcaneal Spur 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 71-72
Duarte LR The stimulation of bone growth by ultrasound. 1983 Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, 101: 153 ff
Dyson M, Brookes M Stimulation of bone repair by ultrasound. 1983 Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, Suppl 2: 61 ff
Eichenblat M Experience with two different types of shockwave therapy for chronic calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder and chronic heel syndrome 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:71
Eisenmenger W Experimentelle Bestimmung der Stossfrontdicke aus dem akustischen Frequenzspektrum elektromagnetisch erzeugter Stosswellen in Flüssigkeiten bei einem Stossdruckbereich von 10 atm bis 10 atm. 1964 Acustica, 14: 188-204
Ekkernkamp A Extrakorporale Stosswellen. 1998 Deutsches Ärzteblatt, 95: B-1403
Ekkernkamp A Die Wirkung extrakorporaler Stosswellen auf die Frakturheilung. 1992 Habilitationsschrift, Ruhr-Universität, Bochum
Ekkernkamp A, Bosse A, Haupt G, Pommer A Der Einfluß der extrakorporalen Stosswellen auf die standardisierte Tibiafraktur am Schaf. 1992 Ittel TH, Sieberth HG, Matthiaß HH (Hrsg), Aktuelle Aspekte der Osteologie, Springer Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg New York: 307-310
Ekkernkamp A, Haupt G, Knopf HJ, Püllenberg P, Muhr, Senge T Effects of extracorporeal shock waves on standardized fractures in sheeps. 1991 Urology, 145: 257 ff
Feigl T, Schneider T, Riedlinger R, Löhr M, Hahn EG, Ell C Beschallung von humanen Pankreaskarzinomzellen mit hochenergetischem gepulsten Ultraschall. 1992 Med. Tech., 3: 139-143
Ferrari G, lo Prete F, de Pretto M, Pacetti A Use of imaging for heterotopic ossifications evaluation 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:84
Folberth W, Krause H, Reuner T Stosswellenmesstechnik in der Lithotripsie: Historie und Ausblick. 1995 Chaussy C, Eisenberger F, Jocham D, Wilbert D (Hrsg), Die Stosswelle - Forschung und Klinik, Attempto Verlag, Tübingen: 45-50
Forriol F, Solchaga L, Moreno JL, Canadell J The effects os shock waves on mature and healing cortical bone. 1994 International Orthopaedics, 18: 325-329
Fritze J Extrakorporale Stoßwellentherapie in orthopädischer Indikation: Eine ausgewählte Übersicht. 1998 Versicherungsmedizin 1998; 50: 180-183
Fukada E, Yasuda I On the piezoelectric effect of bone. 1957 Phys. Soc. Japan, 12: 1158-1162
Fuson RL, Sherman M, Van Fleet J, Wendt, T The conduct of orthopaedic clinical trials. 1997 J Bone Joint Surg 1997; 79-A: 1089-1098



Feigl T, Schneider T, Riedlinger R, Löhr M, Hahn EG, Ell C Beschallung von humanen Pankreaskarzinomzellen mit hochenergetischem gepulsten Ultraschall. 1992 Med. Tech., 3: 139-143
Ferrari G, lo Prete F, de Pretto M, Pacetti A Use of imaging for heterotopic ossifications evaluation 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:84
Folberth W, Krause H, Reuner T Stosswellenmesstechnik in der Lithotripsie: Historie und Ausblick. 1995 Chaussy C, Eisenberger F, Jocham D, Wilbert D (Hrsg), Die Stosswelle - Forschung und Klinik, Attempto Verlag, Tübingen: 45-50
Forriol F, Solchaga L, Moreno JL, Canadell J The effects os shock waves on mature and healing cortical bone. 1994 International Orthopaedics, 18: 325-329
Fritze J Extrakorporale Stoßwellentherapie in orthopädischer Indikation: Eine ausgewählte Übersicht. 1998 Versicherungsmedizin 1998; 50: 180-183
Fukada E, Yasuda I On the piezoelectric effect of bone. 1957 Phys. Soc. Japan, 12: 1158-1162
Fuson RL, Sherman M, Van Fleet J, Wendt, T The conduct of orthopaedic clinical trials. 1997 J Bone Joint Surg 1997; 79-A: 1089-1098


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Galasso O, de Durante C, Russo S, Gigliotti S, Corrado B Chronic achilloynia. Treatment with extracorporeal shock waves 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:43
Gambihler S, Delius M In vitro interaction of lithotripter shock waves and cytotoxic drugs. 1992 British Journal of Cancer, 66: 69-73
Gambihler S, Delius M, Ellwart JW Permeabilization of the plasma membrane of L1210 mouse leukemia cells using lithotripter shock waves. 1994 Membr. Biol., 141: 267-275
Gambihler S, Delius M, Ellwart JW Transient increase in membrane permeability of L1210 cells upon exposure to lithotripter shock waves in vitro. 1992 Naturwissenschaften, 79: 328-329
Gebhart C, Widhalm R The Biological Effects of Shockwave Treatment 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 11-12
Gerdesmeyer L ESWT bei Tendinosis calcarea – Ergebnisse der prospektiven placebokontrollierten Multicenterstudie der DGOOC. 2001 Vortrag, Arbeitskreis Stoßwellentherapie, Berlin, 2001
Gerdesmeyer L, Bachfischer K, Hauschild M Overview of Calcifying Tendonitis of the Shoulder Treated with Shockwave Treatment 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 151-156
Gerdesmeyer L, Hasse A, Engel A, Bachfischer K, Rechl H Der Einfluß extrakorporaler Stoßwellen auf die Osteoinduktion nach Radiatio 2001 Siebert W, Buch M (Hrsg), Extrakorporale Stoßwellentherapie in der Orthopädie - Grundlagen und Anwendung, Ecomed Verlagsgesellschaft, Germany: 13-22
Gerdesmeyer L, Hauschild M, Bachfischer K The change of clinical outcome of tendinitis calcarea after ESWT in course of time 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:28
Gerdesmeyer L, Russlies M, Peters P, Gradinger R Die hochenergetische ESWT zur Behandlung der Tendinosis calcarea. 1997 46. Jahrestagung Norddeutsche Orthopädenvereinigung, Kurzreferate: 14
Galasso O, de Durante C, Russo S, Gigliotti S, Corrado B Chronic achilloynia. Treatment with extracorporeal shock waves 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:43
Gambihler S, Delius M In vitro interaction of lithotripter shock waves and cytotoxic drugs. 1992 British Journal of Cancer, 66: 69-73
Gambihler S, Delius M, Ellwart JW Permeabilization of the plasma membrane of L1210 mouse leukemia cells using lithotripter shock waves. 1994 Membr. Biol., 141: 267-275
Gambihler S, Delius M, Ellwart JW Transient increase in membrane permeability of L1210 cells upon exposure to lithotripter shock waves in vitro. 1992 Naturwissenschaften, 79: 328-329
Gebhart C, Widhalm R The Biological Effects of Shockwave Treatment 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 11-12
Gerdesmeyer L ESWT bei Tendinosis calcarea – Ergebnisse der prospektiven placebokontrollierten Multicenterstudie der DGOOC. 2001 Vortrag, Arbeitskreis Stoßwellentherapie, Berlin, 2001
Gerdesmeyer L, Bachfischer K, Hauschild M Overview of Calcifying Tendonitis of the Shoulder Treated with Shockwave Treatment 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 151-156
Gerdesmeyer L, Hasse A, Engel A, Bachfischer K, Rechl H Der Einfluß extrakorporaler Stoßwellen auf die Osteoinduktion nach Radiatio 2001 Siebert W, Buch M (Hrsg), Extrakorporale Stoßwellentherapie in der Orthopädie - Grundlagen und Anwendung, Ecomed Verlagsgesellschaft, Germany: 13-22
Gerdesmeyer L, Hauschild M, Bachfischer K The change of clinical outcome of tendinitis calcarea after ESWT in course of time 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:28
Gerdesmeyer L, Russlies M, Peters P, Gradinger R Die hochenergetische ESWT zur Behandlung der Tendinosis calcarea. 1997 46. Jahrestagung Norddeutsche Orthopädenvereinigung, Kurzreferate: 14
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Haake M, Böddeker IR, Decker T, Buch M, Vogel M, Labek G, Maier M, Loew M, Maier-Boerries O, Fischer J, Betthäuser A, Rehack HC, Kanovsky W, Müller I, Gerdesmeyer L, Rompe JD Efficacy of Extracorporal Shockwave Therapy (ESWT) in patients with lateral epicondylitis - A placebo controlled multicenter trial. 2001 4th International Congress of the ISMST, Berlin, 2001
Haake M, Böddeker IR, Decker T, Buch M, Vogel M, Labek G, Maier M, Loew M, Maier-Boerries OM, Fischer J, Betthäuser A, Rehack HC, Kanovsky W, Müller I, Gerdesmeyer L, Rompe JD Side effects of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy (ESWT) in the treatment of tennis elbow. 2002 Arch Orthop Traum Surg 2002
Haake M, Deike B, Thon A, Schmitt J Exact focusing of extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy for calcifying tendinopathy. 2002 Clin Orthop 2002
Haake M, Deike B, Thon A, Schmitt J. Importance of accurately focussing of extracorporeal shock waves (ESWT) in the treatment of calcifying tendinitis - A prospective randomised study. 2001 Biomed Tech 2001; 45: 69-74
Haake M, Jensen K, Prinz H, Willenberg T Design einer Multizenterstudie zum Wirksamkeitsnachweis der Extrakorporalen Stosswellentherapie (ESTW) bei Epicondylitis humeri radialis. 2000 Z Orthop Ihre Grenzgeb 2000; 138:99-103
Haake M, Rautmann M, Griss P Therapieergebnisse und Kostenanalyse der Extrakorporalen Stoßwellentherapie bei Tendinitis calcarea und Supraspinatussehnensyndrom. 1998 Orthop Praxis 1998;34: 110-113
Haake M, Rautmann M, Wirth T Assessment of treatment costs of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy (ESWT) - Comparison of ESWT and surgical treatment in shoulder diseases 2001 Int J Tech Ass Health Care 2001; 17: 612-617
Haake M, Rautmann M, Wirth T Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy versus surgical treatment in calcifying ttttrendinitis and non calcifying tendinitis of the supraspinatus muscle. 2001 Eur J Orthop Surg Traumatol 2001; 11: 21-24
Haake M, Sattler A, Gross MW, Schmitt J, Hildebrandt R, Müller HH Vergleich der Extrakorporalen Stoßwellentherapie mit der Röntgenreizbestrahlung beim Supraspinatussehnensyndrom – ein prospektiver randomisierter einfachblinder Parallelgruppenvergleich 2001 Z Orthop Ihre Grenzgeb 2001; 139: 397-402
Haist J Die Osteorestauration via Stosswellen-Anwendung. Eine neue Möglichkeit zur Therapie der gestörten knöchernen Konsolidierung. 1995 Chaussy C, Eisenberger F, Jocham D, Wilbert D (Hrsg), Die Stosswelle - Forschung und Klinik, Attempto Verlag, Tübingen: 157-161 Haist J Osteorestoration via shock wave application. A new possibility of treating disturbed bone union. 1997 Siebert W, Buch M (Hrsg), Extracorporeal shock waves in orthopaedics, Springer Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg New York: 119-129
Haist J Einsatzmöglichkeiten der analgetisch wirksamen extrakorporalen Stosswellentherapie an der Schulter. 1995 Orthopädische Praxis, 9: 591-593
Haist J Shockwave Treatment for Radial and Ulnar Epicondylitis 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 115-113
Haist J Shockwave Therapy for Pseudarthroses 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 195-196
Haist J Shockwave Treatment of Dupuytren's Contracture and Ledderhose's Contraction 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 253-254
Haist J, Reichel W, Bürger R, Witzsch U Einsatz der extrakorporalen Stosswelle bei der osteosynthetisch versorgten Pseudarthrose - eine experimentelle Studie. 1993 Orthopädische Praxis, 5: 345-346
Haist J, Reichel W, Witzsch U, Bürger R Die extrakorporale Stosswellenbehandlung der gestörten Frakturheilung - eine Alternative zu operativen Verfahren ? 1993 Orthopädische Praxis, 29: 842-844
Haist J, Steeger von Keitz D Die Stosswellentherapie (ESWT) der Epicondylopathia radialis et ulnaris. Ein neues Behandlungskonzept knochennaher Weichteilschmerzen. 1994 Orthopädie Mitteilungen, 173
Haist J, Steeger von Keitz D Stosswellentherapie knochennaher Weichteilschmerzen - ein neues Behandlungskonzept. 1995 Chaussy C, Eisenberger F, Jocham D, Wilbert D (Hrsg), Die Stosswelle - Forschung und Klinik, Attempto Verlag, Tübingen: 162-165
Haist J, Steeger von Keitz D, Mohr G, Schulze G, Weber F The orthopaedic shock wave therapy in the treatment of chronic insertion tendopathy and tendinosis calcarea. 1997 Siebert W, Buch M (Hrsg), Extracorporeal shock waves in orthopaedics, Springer Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg New York: 159-163
Haist J, Steeger von Keitz D, Witzsch U, Bürger R, Haist U The extracorporeal shockwave therapy in the treatment of disturbed bone union. 1992 7th International Conference on Biomedical Engineering, December 2.- 4.1992, Singapore: 222-224
Haist J, Steeger von Keitzr D Shock wave therapy in the treatment of near to bone soft tissue pain in sportsmen. 1996 International Journal of Sports Medicine, 17: 79-81
Hammer DS, Rupp S, Ensslin S, Kohn D, Seil R Extracorporal shock wave therapy in patients with tennis elbow and painful heel. 2000 Arch Orthop Trauma Surg 2000; 120:304-7
Hammer DS, Rupp S, Kreutz A, Pape D, Kohn D, Seil R Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) in patients with chronic proximal plantar fasciitis. 2002 Foot Ankle Int 2002;23:309-13
Hasegawa S, Kato K, Takashi M, Zhu Y, Obata K, Miyake K S100a0 protein as a marker for tissue damage related to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. 1993 Eur. Urology, 24: 393-396
Haupt G Stosswellen in der Orthopädie. 1997 Urologe A, 36, Nr.3: 233-238
Haupt G Use of extracorporeal shock waves in the treatment of pseudarthrosis, tendopathy and other orthopaedic diseases. 1997 Urology, 158: 4-11
Haupt G, Diesch R, Straub T, Penninger E, Fröhlich T, Scholl J, Löhrer H, Senge T Ballistic Shockwave Treatment 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 271-272
Haupt G, Ekkernkamp A, Püllenberg A, Senge T Einfluß extrakorporal erzeugter Stosswellen auf standardisierte Tibiafrakturen im Schafmodell. 1992 Urologe A, 31: A 43ff
Haupt G, Haupt A, Ekkernkamp A, Gerety B, Chvapil M Influence of shock waves on fracture healing. 1992 Urology, 39: 529-532
Haist J, Steeger von Keitz D, Witzsch U, Bürger R, Haist U The extracorporeal shockwave therapy in the treatment of disturbed bone union. 1992 7th International Conference on Biomedical Engineering, December 2.- 4.1992, Singapore: 222-224
Haist J, Steeger von Keitzr D Shock wave therapy in the treatment of near to bone soft tissue pain in sportsmen. 1996 International Journal of Sports Medicine, 17: 79-81
Hammer DS, Rupp S, Ensslin S, Kohn D, Seil R Extracorporal shock wave therapy in patients with tennis elbow and painful heel. 2000 Arch Orthop Trauma Surg 2000; 120:304-7
Hammer DS, Rupp S, Kreutz A, Pape D, Kohn D, Seil R Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) in patients with chronic proximal plantar fasciitis. 2002 Foot Ankle Int 2002;23:309-13
Hasegawa S, Kato K, Takashi M, Zhu Y, Obata K, Miyake K S100a0 protein as a marker for tissue damage related to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. 1993 Eur. Urology, 24: 393-396
Haupt G Stosswellen in der Orthopädie. 1997 Urologe A, 36, Nr.3: 233-238
Haupt G Use of extracorporeal shock waves in the treatment of pseudarthrosis, tendopathy and other orthopaedic diseases. 1997 Urology, 158: 4-11
Haupt G, Diesch R, Straub T, Penninger E, Fröhlich T, Scholl J, Löhrer H, Senge T Ballistic Shockwave Treatment 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 271-272
Haupt G, Ekkernkamp A, Püllenberg A, Senge T Einfluß extrakorporal erzeugter Stosswellen auf standardisierte Tibiafrakturen im Schafmodell. 1992 Urologe A, 31: A 43ff
Haupt G, Haupt A, Ekkernkamp A, Gerety B, Chvapil M Influence of shock waves on fracture healing. 1992 Urology, 39: 529-532
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Haupt G, Katzmeier P Anwendung der hochenergetischen Stosswellen-therapie bei Pseudarthrosen, Tendinosis calcarea der Schulter und Ansatztendinosen (Fersensporn, Epiconylitis). 1995 Chaussy C, Eisenberger F, Jocham D, Wilbert D (Hrsg), Die Stosswelle - Forschung und Klinik, Attempto Verlag, Tübingen: 143-146
Hearnden A, Flannary MC A prospective, blinded randomised control trial assessing the use of different energy extracorporeal shock wave therapy for calcifying tendonitis 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:16
Heckman JD, Ryaby JP, McCabe J, Frey JJ, Kilcoyne RF Accleration of tibial fracture-healing by non-invasive low-intensity pulsed ultrasound. 1994 Bone Joint Surgery (Am), 76: 26-34
Heidersdorf S, Lauber S, Lauber H, Hötzinger H, Ludwig J, Dreisliker U Rädel R Osteochondritis Dissecans 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 255-264
Heinrichs W, Witzsch U, Bürger R Extrakorporale Stosswellentherapie (ESWT) von Pseudarthrosen. 1993 Anaesthesist, 42: 361-364
Helbig K, Herbert C, Schostok T, Brown M, Thiele R Correlations between the duration of pain and the success of shock wave therapy 2001 Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, 387: 68-71
Helbig K, Schostok T, Brown M, Herbert C, Thiele R Correlations Between Duration of Pain and Success 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 43-48
Heller KD, Niethard FU Der Einsatz der extrakorporalen Stoßwellentherapie in der Orthopädie – eine Metaanalyse 1998 Orthop Ihre Grenzgeb 1998; 136:390-401
Herbert C, Thiele R, Hartmann T, Helbig K Musculoskeletal shock wave therapy for the treatment of tendinosis calcarea, follow-up of 1483 patients between 1995 and 1998 (4 years) 2000 Minimally Invasive Therapy & Allied Technologies, Isis Medical Media, Volume 9, Number 3/4 August 2000: 322 (Abstract 28)
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Hötzinger H, Rädel R, Lauber S, Lauber H, Platzek P, Ludwig J MRI-Guided Shockwaves for Multiple Stress Fractures of the Tibia 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 165-168
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Johannes EJ, Sukul Kaulesar DMKS, Mature E, Schutte HE High energy shock waves for the treatment of nonunions - experiments in dog. 1994 Surg. Research, 57: 246-252
Jurgowski W, Loew M, Cotta H, Staehler G Extracorporeal shock wave treatment of calcareous tendinitis of the shoulder. 1993 Endourology, 7, Suppl. 1: 193
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Karpman R, Magee F, Gruen T, Mobley M The Lithotriptor and its potential use in the revision of total hip arthroplasty 2001 Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, 387: 4-7
Kawahara K, Koba M The effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in chronic hemodialysis patients 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:93
Ko J, Chen H, Chen L Treatment of lateral epicondylitis of the elbow with shock waves 2001 Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, 387: 60-67
Koeweiden E, Chin A Paw E Promising results of ESWT for tennis elbow 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:33
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Krischek O, Hopf C, Nafe B, Rompe JD Shock-wave therapy for tennis and golfer`s elbow. 1999 Arch Orthop Trauma Surg 1999; 119: 62-66
Krischek O, Rompe JD, Herbsthofer B, Nafe B Symptomatische niedrig-energetische Stosswellentherapie bei Fersenschmerzen und radiologisch nachweisbarem plantarem Fersensporn. 1998 Orthopädie, 136: 169-174
Krischek O, Rompe JD, Hopf C, Stratmann M, Vogel J, Nafe B Ist die extrakorporelle Stosswellentherapie bei Epicondylitis humeri ulnaris indiziert? Kurzfristige Ergebnisse einer vergleichenden, prospektiven Studie. 1997 Orthopädische Praxis, 7: 465-469
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Kuderna H, Schaden W, Sailler A, Fischer A, Kölpl C, Hagmüller V Comparison of 30 tibial non-unions: costs of surgical treatment versus costs of extracorporeal shockwave therapy 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:65-66
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Kusnierczak D, Brocai DRC, Vettel U, Loew M The influence of extrycorporeal shock wave application (ESWA) on the biological behaviour of bone cells in vitro 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:100
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la Bruna SC, Tedeschi C, Camurri GB Shock waves therapy for a rehablitation program 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:74
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Larini P, Marcato C, Ugolotti U, Meneghetti S, Paroli C, Mazzucchi A, Cavatorta S Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in paraosteoarthropathy (POA). Preliminary results 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:76
Lauber S, Lauber HJ, Ludwig J, Hötzinger H, Rädel R, Dreisilker U MRI controlled results of extracorporeal shockwave therapy in adult osteonecrosis of the femoral head 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:91
Lauber S, Ludwig J, Hötzinger H, Dreisilker U, Rädel R, Platzek P MRI after Shockwave Treatment for Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 241-247
Lauber S, Ludwig J, Lauber H, Hötzinger B, Dreisilker U, Rädel R Die ESWT-Behandlung der Hüftkopfnekrose und der Osteochondrosis dissecans 2001 Siebert W, Buch M (Hrsg), Extrakorporale Stoßwellentherapie in der Orthopädie - Grundlagen und Anwendung, Ecomed Verlagsgesellschaft, Germany: 161-192
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Lehmkühler K, Köhnke W, Wrede A Focus Positioning 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 33-34
Levitt R, Alvarez R, Ogden JA The FDA Studies of Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy for Lateral Epicondylitis and Heel Pain Syndrome 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 107-110
Levitt R, Ogden JA, Selesnick H FDA study for chronic lateral epicondylitis 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:39
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Loew M Die Wirkung extrakorporal erzeugter hoch-energetischer Stosswellen auf den klinischen, röntgenologischen und histologischen Verlauf der Tendinosis calcarea der Schulter - eine klinische und experimentelle Studie. 1994 Habilitationsschrift, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg
Loew M, Daecke W, Kusnierczak D, Rahmanzadeh M, Ewerbeck V Extracorporal shock wave application – an effective treatment for patients with chronic and therapy-resistant calcifying tendinitis? 1999 Bone Joint Surg 1999 ; 81-B:863-867
Loew M, Jurgowski W Erste Erfahrungen mit der extrakorporalen Stosswellen-Lithotripsie in der Behandlung der Tendinosis calcarea der Schulter. 1993 Orthopädie, 131: 470-473
Loew M, Jurgowski W Erste Erfahrungen mit der Extrakorporalen Stosswellen-Lithotripsie (ESWL) in der Behandlung der Tendinosis calcarea der Schulter. 1993 Orthop Ihre Grenzgeb 1993; 131:470-473
Loew M, Jurgowski W, Mau HC, Perlick L, Kuszniercak D Die Wirkung extrakorporal erzeugter hochenergetischer Stosswellen auf den klinischen, röntgenologischen und histologischen Verlauf der Tendinosis calcarea der Schulter - eine prospektive Studie. 1995 Chaussy C, Eisenberger F, Jocham D, Wilbert D (Hrsg), Die Stosswelle - Forschung und Klinik, Attempto Verlag, Tübingen: 153-156
Loew M, Jurgowski W, Mau HC, Thomsen M Treatment of calcifying tendinitis of rotator cuff by extracorporeal shock waves: a preliminary report. 1995 Shoulder Elbow Surg 1995; 4:101-106
Loew M, Jurgowski W, Thomsen M Die Wirkung extrakorporaler Stosswellen auf die Tendinosis calcarea der Schulter. 1995 Urologe A, 34: 49-53
Loew M, Jurgowski W, Thomsen M, Cotta H Extracorporale Stosswellenbehandlung bei chronischer Tendinitis calcarea der Schulter 1994 Orthopädie Mitteilungen
Loew M, Nitschmann R Shock wave application in heel spur syndrome. 1995 3. Münchener Symposium für Fußchirurgie, München


Loew M, Rompe JD Stosswellenbehandlung bei orthopädischen Erkrankungen. 1998 Grifka J (Hrsg), Bücherei des Orthopäden, Band 71, Enke, Stuttgart
Lohse-Busch H, Kraemer M, Reime U The use of extracorporeal shock wave fronts for treatment of muscle dysfunction of various etiologies: an overview of first results. 1997 Siebert W, Buch M (Hrsg), Extracorporeal shock waves in orthopaedics, Springer Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg New York: 215-230
Lohse-Busch H, Kraemer M, Reime U Pilotuntersuchung zur Wirkung von niederenergetischen, extrakorporalen Stosswellen auf Muskelfunktionsstörungen bei spastischen Bewegungsstörungen von Kindern. 1997 Schmerz, 11, Nr. 2: 108-112
Ludwig J, Hötzinger H, Lauber S, Trenkel I Pre- and post shockwave therapy (SWT) MRI evaluation of artificial calcifications of the supraspinate tendon in pig shoulders 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:94
Ludwig J, Lauber S, Lauber H, Dreisilker U, Rädel R, Hötzinger H High-energy shock wave treatment of femoral head necrosis in adults 2001 Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, 387: 119-126
Lüssenhop S, Hahn M, Seemann S, Meiss L Einfluß der Stosswelle auf Epiphysenfugen. 1997 Siebert W, Buch M (Hrsg), Stosswellenanwendung am Knochen - Klinische und experimentelle Erfahrungen, Dr. Kovac, Hamburg: 12-13
Lüssenhop S, Seemann D, Hahn M, Meiss L The influence of shock waves on epiphysal growth plates: first results of an in-vivo study with rabbits. 1997 Siebert W, Buch M (Hrsg), Extracorporeal shock waves in orthopaedics, Springer Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg New York: 109-118
Lök V, Baloglu I, Aydinok H Experience of Shockwaves for Non-unions in Izmir 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 185-186


Maier M Gibt es magnetresonanztomographische Veränderungen nach Stosswellenbehandlung bei Tendinitis calcarea ? 1997 Orthopädie, 2: 20-21
Maier M, Dürr HR, Kohler S, Staupendahl D, Pfahler M, Refior HJ, Meier M Analgetische Wirkung niederenergetischer extrakorporaler Stosswellen bei Tendinosis calcarea, Epikondylitis humeri radialis und Plantarfasziitis. 2000 Orthop Ihre Grenzgeb 2000; 138:34-8
Maier M, Dürr HR, Staupendahl D, Refior HJ Einfluß des Koppelmediums auf den Applikationsschmerz bei der ESWT des Stütz- und Bewegungsapparates 2001 Siebert W, Buch M (Hrsg), Extrakorporale Stoßwellentherapie in der Orthopädie - Grundlagen und Anwendung, Ecomed Verlagsgesellschaft, Germany: 227-234
Maier M, Schnarkowski P, Pfahler M, Refior H Kernspintomographische Veränderungen der Schulterregion nach Stosswellentherapie bei Tendinosis calcarea. 1997 45. Jahrestagung der Vereinigung Süddeutscher Orthopäden, Abstractband: 101
Maier M, Stabler A, Lienemann A, Kohler S, Feitenhansl A, Dürr HR, Pfahler M, Refior HJ Shockwave application in calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder - prediction of outcome by imaging. 2000 Arch Orthop Trauma Surg 2000; 120:493-8
Maier M, Steinborn M, Staebler A, Koehler S, Pfahler M, Dürr HR, Refior HJ Extracorporeal shock wave application for chronic plantar fasciitis – prediction of outcome by imaging? 2000 Rheumatol 2000; 27:2455-246
Marchetti I, Carnevali R, Russo N Our experience with ESW: first review of the cases 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:73
May TC, Krause WR, Preslar AJ, Smith MJV, Beaudoin AJ Use of high energy shock waves for bone cement removal. 1990 Arthroplasty, 01: 19-27
McCullough DL, Yeaman LD, Bo WJ, Assimos DG, Kroovant RL, Griffin AS, Furr EG Effects of shock waves on the rat ovary. 1989 Urology, 141: 666-669
Melegati G, Tornese D, Bandi M, Cappadonia C L'utilizzo della terapia con onde d'urto extracorporee nella sindrome da conflitto acromion-omerale: studio prospettico controllato 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:17-18
Neuland HG The treatment of complaints caused py playing golf using ESWT 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:78
Niethard FU Wissenschaftlichkeit und Wirtschaftlichkeit in Orthopädie und Physiotherapie - Editorial. 1997 Orthopädie, 135:1-2
Niethard FU Qualitätssicherung - Editorial 1997 Orthopädie, 135: 93-94
Nigrisoli M, Bosco V Non-unions-treatment and results 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:57
Nigrisoli M, Bosco V, Sisca G Shockwave Treatment for Knee and Achilles Tendinopathies 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 249-251
O'Brien WD, Zachary JF Rabbit and pig lung damage comparison from exposure to continuous wave 30 kHz ultrasound. 1996 Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 22: 345-354
Ogden JA, Alvarez R, Levitt R, Cross GL Chronic heel pain: results of FDA shockwave study 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:51
Ogden JA, Alvarez R, Levitt R, Cross GL, Marlow M Shock wave therapy for chronic proximal plantar fasciitis 2001 Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, 387: 47-59
Ogden JA, Alvarez R, Levitt R, Marlow M Shock Wave Therapy (Orthotripsy®) in Musculoskeletal Disorders 2001 Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, 387: 22-40
Ogden JA, Tóth-Kischkat A, Schultheiss R Principles of Shock Wave Therapy 2001 Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, 387: 8-17
Oosterhof G, Cornel EB, Smits GA, Debruyne F, Schalken J The influence of high energy shock waves on the development of metastases. 1996 Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 22: 339-344
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Peers K, Onkelinx L, Brys P, Lysens R ESWT for calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff: one year foolow-up and outcome comparison with surgery 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:15
Peers K, van den Eeede E, Brys P, Bellemans J, Lysens R Cross sectional functional outcome comparison of ESWT versus surgery for chronic patellar tendinopathy 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:42
Perlick L, Boxberg W, Giebel G Hochenergetische Stosswellenbehandlung des schmerzhaften Fersensporns. 1998 Unfallchirurg 1998; 101:914-918
Perlick L, Gassel F, Zander D, Schmitt O, Wallny T. Vergleich der Ergebnisse der mittelenergetischen ESWT und der operativen Therapie in der Technik nach Mittelmeier bei der therapieresistenten Epicondylitis humeri radialis 1999 Orthop Ihre Grenzgeb 1999; 137: 316-321
Perlick L, Wallny T Die ESWT der Tendinosis calcarea. Untersuchungen zur Desintegrationswirkung von Stoßwellen auf ein standardisiertes Kalkdepot im Tiermodell 2001 Siebert W, Buch M (Hrsg), Extrakorporale Stoßwellentherapie in der Orthopädie - Grundlagen und Anwendung, Ecomed Verlagsgesellschaft, Germany: 149-160
Perren SM Aktivierung der Knochenbildung durch Stosswellentherapie in der Frakturbehandlung. 1993 AO Forschungsinstitut, Davos
Philipp A, Delius M, Scheffzyk C, Vogel A, Lauterborn W Interaction of lithotripter-generated shock waves with air bubbles. 1993 Acoustic Society of America, 93: 2496-2509
Pigozzi F, Giombini A, Parisis A, Casciello G, Di Salvo V, Santori N, Mariani PP The application of shock wave therapy in the treatment of resistant chronic painful shoulder. 2000 Sports Med Phys Fitness 2000; 40:356-361
Polak HJ Ergebnis der Literaturrecherche der MDK-Gemeinschaft zur ESWT mit orthopädischen Indikationen. 1997 Siebert W, Buch M (Hrsg), Stosswellenanwendung am Knochen - Klinische und experimentelle Erfahrungen, Dr. Kovac, Hamburg: 66-68
Prat F, Sibille A, Luccioni C, Pansu D, Chapelon J, Beaumatin J, Ponchon T, Cathignol D Increased chemocytotoxicity to colon cancer cells by shock wave induced cavitation. 1994 Gastroenterology, 106: 937-944


Randazzo RF, Chaussy C, Fuchs GJ, Lovrekovich H, de Kernion JB The in vitro and in vivo effects of extracorporeal shock waves on malignant cells. 1988 Urological Research, 16: 419-426
Richter D, Ekkernkamp A Klinischer Einsatz der Stosswellentherapie in der Unfallchirurgie. 1997 Siebert W, Buch M (Hrsg), Stosswellenanwendung am Knochen - Klinische und experimentelle Erfahrungen, Dr. Kovac, Hamburg: 12-13
Richter D, Ekkernkamp A, Muhr G Die extrakorporale Stosswellentherapie - ein alternatives Konzept zur Behandlung der Epicondylitis humeri radialis ? 1995 Orthopäde, 24: 303-306
Rodríguez de Oya R, Sánchez Benitez de Soto J, Garcia Munilla M Shockwave Treatment for Chronic Non-unions 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 169-172
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Rompe JD Tierexperimentelle und klinische Ergebnisse der Stosswellentherapie am Knochen. 1997 Siebert W, Buch M (Hrsg), Stosswellenanwendung am Knochen - Klinische und experimentelle Erfahrungen, Dr. Kovac, Hamburg: 38-39
Rompe JD Extrakorporale Stosswellentherapie - Grundlagen, Indikation, Anwendung. 1997 Chapman & Hall GmbH, London Glasgow Weinheim New York Tokio Melbourne Madras
Rompe JD Stosswellentherapie: therapeutische Wirkung bei spekulativem Mechanismus. 1996 Orthopädie, 134: 13-19
Rompe JD Die Auswirkung extrakorporaler Stosswellen unterschiedlicher Energiedichten auf knochennahes Sehnengewebe - tierexperimentelle und klinische Studien. 1996 Habilitationsschrift, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz
Rompe JD Overview of Tennis Elbow Treated with Shockwaves 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 131-135


Rompe JD, Bohl J, Riehle HM, Schwitalle M, Krischek O Überprüfung der Läsionsgefahr des Nervus ischiadicus des Kaninchens durch die Applikation niedrig- und mittelenergetischer extrakorporaler Stosswellen. 1998 Zeitschrift für Orthopädie, 136: 407-411
Rompe JD, Burger R, Hopf C, Eysel P. Shoulder function after extracorporeal shock wave therapy for calcific tendinitis. 1998 Shoulder Elbow Surg 1998; 7: 505-509
Rompe JD, Decking J, Schoellner C, Nafe B Shock wave application for chronic plantar fasciitis in running athletes – a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. 2001 Persönliche Mitteilung, 2001
Rompe JD, Eysel P, Hopf C, Vogel J, Küllmer K Extrakorporale Stosswellenapplikation bei gestörter Knochenheilung - eine kritische Bestandsaufnahme. 1997 Unfallchirurg, 100: 845-849
Rompe JD, Eysel P, Küllmer K, Vogel J, Kirkpatrick CJ, Bürger R, Nafe B, Heine J Extrakorporale Stosswellentherapie in der Orthopädie - aktueller Stand. 1996 Orthopädische Praxis, 8: 558-561
Rompe JD, Hopf C, Eysel P, Heine J, Witzsch U, Nafe B Extrakorporale Stosswellentherapie des therapieresistenten Tennisellenbogens - erste Ergebnisse von 150 Patienten. 1995 Chaussy C, Eisenberger F, Jocham D, Wilbert D (Hrsg), Die Stosswelle - Forschung und Klinik, Attempto Verlag, Tübingen: 147-152
Rompe JD, Hopf C, Küllmer K, Heine J, Bürger R Analgesic effect of extracorporeal shock-wave therapy on chronic tennis elbow. 1996 Bone Joint Surgery, 78 B: 233-237
Rompe JD, Hopf C, Küllmer K, Heine J, Bürger R, Nafe B Low-energy extracorporeal shock wave therapy for persistent tennis elbow. 1996 International Orthopaedics, 20: 23-27
Rompe JD, Hopf C, Küllmer K, Witzsch U, Nafe B Extrakorporale Stosswellentherapie der Epicondylopathia humeri radialis - ein alternatives Behandlungskonzept. 1996 Orthopädie, 134: 63-66
Rompe JD, Hopf C, Nafe B, Bürger R Low-energy extracorporeal shock wave therapy for painfull heel: a prospektiv controled single-blind study. 1996 Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, 115: 75-79


Rompe JD, Hopf C, Rumler F 2 Jahre extrakorporelle Stosswellentherapie (ESWT) in der Orthopädie - Indikationen und Resultate ? 1994 Orthopädie Mitteilungen, 173
Rompe JD, Kirkpatrick CJ, Küllmer K, Schwitalle M, Krischek O Dose-related effects of shock waves on rabbit tendo Achillis. 1998 Bone Joint Surgery 80 B: 546-552
Rompe JD, Küllmer K, Eysel P, Riehle HM, Bürger R, Nafe B Niedrigenergetische extrakorporale Stosswellentherapie beim plantaren Fersensporn. 1996 Orthopädische Praxis, 4: 271-275
Rompe JD, Küllmer K, Riehle HM, Herbsthofer B, Eckardt A, Bürger R, Nafe B, Eysel P Effektiveness of low-energy extracorporeal shock waves for chronic plantar fasciitis. 1996 Foot Ankle Surgery, 2 : 215-221
Rompe JD, Küllmer K, Vogel J, Eckardt A, Wahlmann U, Eysel P, Hopf C, Kirkpatrick CJ, Bürger R, Nafe B Extrakorporale Stosswellentherapie - experimentelle Grundlagen, klinischer Einsatz. 1997 Orthopäde, 26: 215-228
Rompe JD, Riedel C, Betz U, Fink C Chronic lateral epicondylitis of the elbow (tennis elbow) – Prospective comparison of low-energy shock wave therapy with low-energy shock wave therapy plus manual therapy of the cervical spine. 2001 Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2001; 82: 578-582
Rompe JD, Rosendahl T, Schöllner C, Theis C High-energy extracorporeal shock wave treatment of nonunions 2001 Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, 387: 102-111
Rompe JD, Rumler F, Hopf C, Eysler P Shoulder function after extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) for calcifying tendinitis. 1997 Shoulder and Elbow Surgery
Rompe JD, Rumler F, Hopf C, Nafe B, Heine J Extracorporeal shock wave therapy for calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder. 1995 Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, 321: 196-201
Rompe JD, Schoellner C, Nafe B Evaluation of low-energy extracorporeal shock-wave application for treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis 2002 Bone Joint Surg [Am] 2002;84:335-41

Result number: 29

Message Number 177900

Re: ESWT View Thread
Posted by Ed Davis, DPM on 7/06/05 at 01:01

Here is a partial list of research -- the www.asmst.org site is still under construction (by the way United may be hiring techs and sales reps).
ps. I have only gotten up to "k" on the researchers list:


Author Title Year Publisher
Ackaert KS, Schröder FH Effects of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) on renal tissue. 1989 Urological Research, 17: 3-7
Alvarez R. Preliminary results on the safety and efficacy of the OssaTron for treatment of plantar fasciitis. 2002 Foot Ankle Int 2002;23:197-203
Amelio E, Cugola L Acute and chronic tendon pathology in athlete 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:81
Amini A, Hafez M, Zhou S, Garcia E, Coombs R Shockwave Treatment for Chronic Non-union 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 159-164
Ammendolia A, Perticone L, Milano C Chronic shoulder articular pain: treatment by extracorporeal shockwaves 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:19
Ape A, Bosco V, Buselli P, Coco V, Gerardi A, Saggini R A retrospective, multi-centre experience report of shock wave therapy on epicondylitis 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:35-36
Apfel RE Acoustic cavitation. 1981 Methods of experimental physics, vol. 19, P. Edmonds ed., Academic Press New York: 355-411
Arbeitsgruppe "Orthopädische Stosswellenbehandlungen" Standortbestimmung 1995 Chaussy C, Eisenberger F, Jocham D, Wilbert D (Hrsg), Die Stosswelle - Forschung und Klinik, Attempto Verlag, Tübingen: 137-142
Arbeitsgruppe "Technische Entwicklungen" Standortbestimmung 1995 Chaussy C, Eisenberger F, Jocham D, Wilbert D (Hrsg), Die Stosswelle - Forschung und Klinik, Attempto Verlag, Tübingen: 15-20
Assenza, Buselli P, Chiacchio C, Pozzolini M, Scrocca M, Saggini R A retrospective, multi-centre experience report of shock wave therapy on rotator cuff tendonitis with calcific deposit 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:25
Auersperg V, Labek G, Böhler N Correlations Between Length of History and Outcome 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 37-42
Augat P, Claes L, Suger G In vivo effects of shock waves on the healing of fractured bone. 1995 Clin. Biomechan., 10: 374-378
Baloglu I, Aydinok H, Lök V Our results of the ossatherapy for treatment of pseudoathrosis 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:56
Baloglu I, Lök V Shockwave Therapy for Plantar Fasciitis 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 51-52
Bao S, Thrall BD, Miller DL Transfection of a reporter plasmid into cultured cells by sonoporation in vitro. 1997 Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 23: 953-959
Baumann J, Baumann J Treatment of neuromuscular dysfunction in children with spastic cerebral palsy by extracorporeal unfocused shock waves. 1997 Siebert W, Buch M (Hrsg), Extracorporal shock waves in orthopaedics, Springer Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg New York: 231-239
Beg M, Melikyan E, Yang X, Bainbridge L Shockwave Treatment for Intractable Tennis Elbow 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 81-90
Begg C, Cho M, Eastwood S Improving the quality of reporting of randomized controlled trials: the CONSORT statement. 1996 JAMA 1996; 276:637-639
Benson K, Hartz AJ A comparison of observational studies and randomized, controlled trials. 2000 N Engl J Med 2000; 342: 1878-1886
Betz U, Heine J, Riedel C, Rompe J D, Schöllner C The value of Cervical Spinal Manipulative Therapy Combined with Low Energy Shockwaves for Chronic Tennis Elbow 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 123-130
Boxberg W, Perlick L, Giebel G Stosswellenbehandlung bei therapieresistenten Weichteilschmerzen. 1996 Chirurg, 67: 1174-1178
Boyer MI, Hastings H Lateral tennis elbow: Is there any science out there? 1999 J Shoulder Elbow Surg 1999; 8:481-491
Braun W, Claes L, Rüter A, Paschke D Untersuchung zur Wirksamkeit von Stosswellen auf die Festigkeit des Verbundes von Knochen und Polymethylmetacrylat. 1991 Experimentelle Orthopädie, 130: 236
Braun W, Claes L, Rüter A, Paschke D Effects of extracorporeal shock waves on the stability of the interface between bone and polymethylmethacrylate: an in vitro study on human femoral segments. 1992 Clin. Biomechan., 7: 47-54
Braun W, Rüter A Frakturheilung: Morphologische und physiologische Gesichtspunkte. 1996 Unfallchirurg, 99: 59-67
Brendel W, Delius M, Goetz A Effect of shock waves on the microvasculature. 1987 Prog. Appl. Microcirculation, 12: 41-50
Brocai DRC, Lukoschek M, Hartmann M, Loew M Biometrische Planung klinisch-orthopadischer Studien. Der optimale Stichprobenumfang. 1998 Orthopäde 1998; 27:301-304
Brunner W, Thüringer R, Ascher G, Maluche C, Kellner F, Neuking A, Solleder A, Schmidt-Hoensdorf F, Vetter K High energy shock waves for pain management in orthopedics - a two year foolow-up in 899 cases 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:75
Brunner W, Thüringer R, Ascher G, Neuking A, Flesch A, Solleder A, Schmidt-Höhnsdorff F, Bärtel B Die extrakorporelle Stosswellentherapie in der Orthopädie - Drei-Monats-Ergebnisse in 443 Fällen. 1997 Orthopädische Praxis, 7: 461-464
Brümmer F, Brenner J, Bräuner T, Hülser D Effect of shock waves on suspended and immobilized L1210 cells. 1989 Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 15: 229-239
Brümmer F, Bräuner T, Hülser D Biological effects of shock waves. 1990 World Journal of Urology, 8: 224-232
Brümmer F, Suhr D, Hülser D Sensitivity of normal and malignant cells to shock waves. 1992 Stone Disease, 4: 243-248
Bräuner T, Brümmer F, Hülser DF Histopathology of shock wave treated tumor cells suspensions and multicell tumor spheroids. 1989 Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 15: 451-460
Buch M Shock wave therapy of heel spur. 1997 Orthopaedic Product News, July/Aug./Sep.: 28-30
Buch M Prospektiver Vergleich der hochenergetischen Stoßwellentherapie sowie des Needling bei der Tendinosis calcarea der Schulter 2001 Siebert W, Buch M (Hrsg), Extrakorporale Stoßwellentherapie in der Orthopädie - Grundlagen und Anwendung, Ecomed Verlagsgesellschaft, Germany: 127-136
Buch M, Fleming L, Theodore G, Amendola A, Bachmann C, Zingas C. Resultate einer prospektiven placebokontrollierten randomisierten doppelblinden Multicenterstudie zur Evaluation der Effektivität und Sicherheit der Stoßwellentherapie bei plantarer Fasciitis. 2001 Vortrag, Symposium Muskuloskeletale Stoßwellentherapie, Mainz
Buch M, Knorr U, Fleming L, Theodore G, Amendola A, Bachmann C et al Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in plantar fasciitis: a review. 2002 Orthopaede 2002;31:637-644
Buch M, Knorr U, Siebert W E Chronic plantar fasciitis treated by ESWT 2000 Minimally Invasive Therapy & Allied Technologies, Isis Medical Media, Volume 9, Number 3/4 August 2000: 310 (Abstract 7)
Buch M, Schlangmann B, Träger D, Siebert W Prospektiver Vergleich der niedrig- und hochenergetischen Stosswellentherapie und Needling bei der Behandlung der Tendinosis calcarea der Schulter. 1997 45. Jahrestagung der Vereinigung Süddeutscher Orthopäden, Abstractband: 101-102
Buch M, Siebert W Shockwave Treatment for Heel Pain Syndrome - a Prospective Investigation 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 73-77
Burger C, Tsironis K, Helling HJ, Prokop A, Rehm KE Die extrakorporale Stosswellentherapie bei Ansatztendopathien der Schulter, des Ellenbogens und der Ferse - vorläufige Ergebnisse einer prospektiven Kölner Studie. 1996 45. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Orthopädenvereinigung e.V. User Meeting Ossatron, Wiesbaden
Buselli P, Saggini R ESWT in ossificans myositis 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:83
Bürger R, Witzsch U, Haist J, Grebe P, Hohenfellner R Die extrakorporale Stosswellentherapie (ESWT) - eine neue Möglichkeit der Behandlung von Pseudarthrosen. 1993 Chaussy C, Eisenberger F, Jocham D, Wilbert D (Hrsg), Stosswellenlithotripsie - Aspekte und Prognosen, Attempto Verlag, Tübingen: 127-130
Bürger R, Witzsch U, Haist J, Karnofsky V Extrakorporale Stosswellenbehandlung bei Pseudarthrose und aseptischer Knochennekrose. 1991 Urologe A, 30: 48
Bürger R, Witzsch U, Haist J, Karnofsky V, Hohenfellner R Extracorporeal shock wave therapy of pseudo-arthrosis and aseptic osteonecrosis. 1991 Endourology, 5, Suppl. 1: 48
Bürger R, Witzsch U, Haist J, Karnovsky V, Ahlers J, Hohenfellner R Extracorporeal shock wave therapy of pseudo-arthrosis. 1992 Urology, 147: 48 ff
Bödekker I, Haake M Die extrakorporale Stosswellentherapie zur Behandlung der Epicondylitis humeri radialis. Ein aktueller Überblick. 2000 Orthopäde 2000; 29:463-469
Bödekker R, Schafer H, Haake M Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in the treatment of plantar fasciitis – a biometrical review. 2001 Clin Rheumatol 2001; 20:324-330
Chaussy C, Eisenberger F, Wanner K, Forssmann F, Hepp W, Schmiedt E, Brendel W The use of shock waves for the destruction of renal calculi without direct contact. 1976 Urol Res 1976; 4:181-188
Chen H, Chen L, Huang T Treatment of painfull heel syndrome with shock waves 2001 Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, 387: 41-46
Chen H, Chen L, Huang T Treatment of painful heel syndrome with shock waves 2001 Clin Orthop 2001; 387: 41-46
Child SZ, Hartman C, Schery LA, Carstensen EL Lung damage from exposure to pulsed ultrasound. 1990 Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 16: 817-825
Church C A theoretical study of cavitation generated by an extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter. 1989 Acoustic Society of America, 86: 215-227
Coleman AJ, Saunders JE A review of the physical properties and biological effects of the high amplitude acoustic fields usedr in extracorporeal lithotripsy. 1993 Ultrasonics, 31: 75-89
Coleman AJ, Saunders JE A survey of the acoustic output of commercial extracorporeal shock wave lithotripters. 1989 Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 15: 213-227
Coleman AJ, Saunders JE, Crum LA, Dyson M Acoustic cavitation generated by an extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter. 1987 Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 13: 69 ff
Concato J, Shah N, Jorwitz RI Randomized, controlled trials, observational studies, and the hierarchy of research. 2000 N Engl J Med 2000; 342: 1887-189
Corrado B, Russo S, Gigliotti S, De Durante C, Canero R Shockwave Treatment for Non-unions of the Carpal Scaphoid 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 187-194
Cosentino R, de Stefano R, Frati E, Manca S, Tofi C, Falsetti P, Linari S, Morfini M, Rossi-Ferrini P, Marcolongo R Safety and efficacy of extracorporeal shock wave therapy in the treatment of painful non articular rheumatism of patients with hemophilia 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:86
Cozzolino F, Corrado B, Izzo M, Borrelli M, Russo S, Gigliotti S, de Durante C Axial external fixation plus high energy shock waves in the treatment of unstable leg non union 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:61
Crawford F, Atkins D, Edward J Interventions for treating plantar heel pain (Cochrane Review) 2000 Cochrane Library, Issue 3. Oxford: Update Software, 2000
Crowther M. A prospective randomised study comparing shockwave therapy and steroid injection in the treatment of 'tennis elbow' 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:34
Crum L Tensile strength of water. 1979 Nature, 278: 148-149
Crum L Acoustic cavitation. 1982 Proceedings of the 1982 IEEE ultrasonics Symposium, IEEE, New York: 1-11
Cugola L, Amelio E Long bone non-union: treatment by extracorporeal shock wave (ESW) 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:59Dahm K Stosswellentherapie bei schmerzhaftem Fersensporn: Nachuntersuchungen bei 362 Patienten. 1997 2. Radevormwalder ESWT-Symosium, Radevormwald: 8-9
Dahmen GP, Franke R, Gonchars V, Poppe K, Lentrodt S, Lichtenberger S, Jost S, Montigel J, Nam VC, Dahmen G Die Behandlung knochennaher Weichteilschmerzen mit extrakorporaler Stosswellentherapie (ESWT) - Indikation, Technik und bisherige Ergebnisse. 1995 Chaussy C, Eisenberger F, Jocham D, Wilbert D (Hrsg), Die Stosswelle - Forschung und Klinik, Attempto Verlag, Tübingen: 175-186
Dahmen GP, Meiss L, Nam VC, Skruodies B Extrakorporale Stoßwellentherapie (ESWT) im knochennahen Weichteilbereich an der Schulter 1992 Extracta Orthopaedica 1992; 15:25-28
Dahmen GP, Nam VC, Meiss L Extrakorporale Stosswellentherapie zur Behandlung von knochennahen Weichteilschmerzen: Indikation, Technik und vorläufige Ergebnisse. 1993 Chaussy C, Eisenberger F, Jocham D, Wilbert D (Hrsg), Stosswellenlithotripsie - Aspekte und Prognosen, Attempto Verlag, Tübingen: 143-148
Davis PF, Severud E, Baxter DE Painful heel syndrome: results of nonoperative treatment. 1994 Foot Ankle Int 1994;15:531-5
de Durante C, Russo S, Gigliotti S, Corrado B The Treatment of Shoulder Periarticular Calcification 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 143-144
de Durante C, Russo S, Gigliotti S, Pecoraro C The treatment of shoulder periarticular calcifications by shock waves 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:23
de Maio M, Paine R, Mangine RE, Drez D Plantar fasciitis. 1993 Orthopedics 1993;16: 1153-63
de Oya R, Sanchez Benitez Soto J, Garcia Munilla M Extracorporeal shock waves in the treatment of tendinitis of shoulder 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:13
de Pretto M, Dalla Valle I, Ferrari G, Pacetti A Follow-up and evaluation of heterotopic ossifications treated with shockwave therapy 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:85
de Pretto M, Guerra L, Pozzolini M, Zucchetti R, Saggini R A retrospective multi-centre experience report of shock wave therapy on achilles tendonitis 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:45-46
Delius M Minimal static excess pressure minimizes the effect of extracorporeal shock waves on cells and reduces it on gallstones. 1997 Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 23: 611-617
Delius M Experimentelle Stosswellenlithotripsie - aktuelle Entwicklungen. 1995 Chaussy C, Eisenberger F, Jocham D, Wilbert D (Hrsg), Die Stosswelle - Forschung und Klinik, Attempto Verlag, Tübingen: 3-9
Delius M Biologische Wirkung von Stosswellen - mehr als "nur" Steinzertrümmerung? 1995 Zentralblatt Chirurgie, 120: 259-273
Delius M Medical applications and bioeffects of extracorporal shock waves. 1994 Shock waves, 4: 55-72
Delius M Bioeffects of shock waves: in vivo and in vitro actions 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:9
Delius M, Denk R, Berding C, Liebich H, Jordan M, Brendel W Biological effects of shock waves: cavitation by shock waves in piglet liver. 1990 Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 16: 467-472
Delius M, Draenert K Einfluß hochenergetischer Stosswellen auf Knochen, Wirkung von Stosswellen auf Knochen. 1997 Siebert W, Buch M (Hrsg), Stosswellenanwendung am Knochen - Klinische und experimentelle Erfahrungen, Dr. Kovac, Hamburg: 10-11
Delius M, Draenert K, Al Diek Y, Draenert Y Biological effect of shock waves: in vivo effect of high energy pulses on rabbit bone. 1995 Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 21: 1219-1225
Delius M, Draenert K, Draenert Y, Börner M Effects of extracorporeal shock waves on bone: a review of shock wave expiriments and the mechanism of shock wave action. 1997 Siebert W, Buch M (Hrsg), Extracorporeal shock waves in orthopaedics, Springer Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg New York: 91-107
Delius M, Enders G, Heine G, Stark J, Remberger K, Brendel W Biological effects of shock waves: lung hemorrhage by shock waves in dogs - pressure dependence. 1987 Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 13: 61-67
Delius M, Enders G, Xuan Z, Liebich H, Brendel B Biological effects of shock waves: kidney damage by shock waves in dogs - dose dependence. 1988 Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 14: 117-122
Delius M, Hoffmann E, Steinbeck G, Conzen P Biological effects of shock waves: induction of arrhythmia in piglet hearts. 1994 Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 20: 279-285
Delius M, Jordan M, Eizenhoefer H, Marlinghaus E, Heine G, Liebich H, Brendel W Biological effects of shock waves: kidney hemorrhage by shock waves in dogs - administration rate dependence. 1988 Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 14: 689-694
Delius M, Jordan M, Liebich H, Brendel W Biological effects of shock waves: effect of shock waves on the liver and gallbladder wall of dogs - administration rate dependence. 1990 Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 16: 459-466
Delius M, Weiss N, Gambihler S, Goetz A, Brendel W Tumor therapy with shock waves requires modified lithotripter shock waves 1989 Naturwissenschaften, 76: 573-574
Delius M, Überle F, Eisenmenger W Extracorporeal shock waves act by shock wave gas bubble interaction. 1998 Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 24: 1055-1059
Dellian M, Walenta S, Gamarra F, Kuhnle G, Mueller-Klieser W, Goetz A Ischemia and loss of ATP in tumors following treatment with focused high energy shock waves. 1993 British Journal of Cancer, 68: 26-31
di Silverio F, Galluci M, Gambardella P, Alp G, Benedetti R, La Mancusa R, Pulcinelli FM, Romiti R, Gazzangia PP Blood cellolar and biochemical changes after extracorporeal shock wave in lithotripsy. 1990 Urological Research, 18: 49 ff
Dieppe P, Chard J, Tallon D, Egger M Funding clinical research. 1999 Lancet 1999; 353:1626-1629
Diesch R, Haupt G Anwendung der hochenergetischen extrakorporalen Stosswellentherapie bei Pseudarthrosen. 1997 Siebert W, Buch M (Hrsg), Stosswellenanwendung am Knochen - Klinische und experimentelle Erfahrungen, Dr. Kovac, Hamburg: 63-64
Diesch R, Haupt G Use of extracorporeal shock waves in the treatment of pseudarthrosis. 1991 Chaussy C, Eisenberger F, Jocham D, Wilbert D (Hrsg), High energey shock waves in medicine, Thieme Verlag, Stuttgart: 136-139
Diesch R, Haupt G Extracorporeal shock wave treatment of pseudarthrosis, tendinosis calcarea of the shoulder and calcaneal spur. 1997 Siebert W, Buch M (Hrsg), Extracorporeal shock waves in orthopaedics, Springer Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg New York: 131-135
Diesch R, Straub T, Penninger E, Frolich T, Scholl J Conventional Versus Ballistic Shockwave Treatment for Calcaneal Spur 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 71-72
Duarte LR The stimulation of bone growth by ultrasound. 1983 Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, 101: 153 ff
Dyson M, Brookes M Stimulation of bone repair by ultrasound. 1983 Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, Suppl 2: 61 ff
Eichenblat M Experience with two different types of shockwave therapy for chronic calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder and chronic heel syndrome 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:71
Eisenmenger W Experimentelle Bestimmung der Stossfrontdicke aus dem akustischen Frequenzspektrum elektromagnetisch erzeugter Stosswellen in Flüssigkeiten bei einem Stossdruckbereich von 10 atm bis 10 atm. 1964 Acustica, 14: 188-204
Ekkernkamp A Extrakorporale Stosswellen. 1998 Deutsches Ärzteblatt, 95: B-1403
Ekkernkamp A Die Wirkung extrakorporaler Stosswellen auf die Frakturheilung. 1992 Habilitationsschrift, Ruhr-Universität, Bochum
Ekkernkamp A, Bosse A, Haupt G, Pommer A Der Einfluß der extrakorporalen Stosswellen auf die standardisierte Tibiafraktur am Schaf. 1992 Ittel TH, Sieberth HG, Matthiaß HH (Hrsg), Aktuelle Aspekte der Osteologie, Springer Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg New York: 307-310
Ekkernkamp A, Haupt G, Knopf HJ, Püllenberg P, Muhr, Senge T Effects of extracorporeal shock waves on standardized fractures in sheeps. 1991 Urology, 145: 257 ff
Feigl T, Schneider T, Riedlinger R, Löhr M, Hahn EG, Ell C Beschallung von humanen Pankreaskarzinomzellen mit hochenergetischem gepulsten Ultraschall. 1992 Med. Tech., 3: 139-143
Ferrari G, lo Prete F, de Pretto M, Pacetti A Use of imaging for heterotopic ossifications evaluation 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:84
Folberth W, Krause H, Reuner T Stosswellenmesstechnik in der Lithotripsie: Historie und Ausblick. 1995 Chaussy C, Eisenberger F, Jocham D, Wilbert D (Hrsg), Die Stosswelle - Forschung und Klinik, Attempto Verlag, Tübingen: 45-50
Forriol F, Solchaga L, Moreno JL, Canadell J The effects os shock waves on mature and healing cortical bone. 1994 International Orthopaedics, 18: 325-329
Fritze J Extrakorporale Stoßwellentherapie in orthopädischer Indikation: Eine ausgewählte Übersicht. 1998 Versicherungsmedizin 1998; 50: 180-183
Fukada E, Yasuda I On the piezoelectric effect of bone. 1957 Phys. Soc. Japan, 12: 1158-1162
Fuson RL, Sherman M, Van Fleet J, Wendt, T The conduct of orthopaedic clinical trials. 1997 J Bone Joint Surg 1997; 79-A: 1089-1098



To sort a column, just click on any of the column heading. Sites: 1

Author Title Year Publisher
Feigl T, Schneider T, Riedlinger R, Löhr M, Hahn EG, Ell C Beschallung von humanen Pankreaskarzinomzellen mit hochenergetischem gepulsten Ultraschall. 1992 Med. Tech., 3: 139-143
Ferrari G, lo Prete F, de Pretto M, Pacetti A Use of imaging for heterotopic ossifications evaluation 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:84
Folberth W, Krause H, Reuner T Stosswellenmesstechnik in der Lithotripsie: Historie und Ausblick. 1995 Chaussy C, Eisenberger F, Jocham D, Wilbert D (Hrsg), Die Stosswelle - Forschung und Klinik, Attempto Verlag, Tübingen: 45-50
Forriol F, Solchaga L, Moreno JL, Canadell J The effects os shock waves on mature and healing cortical bone. 1994 International Orthopaedics, 18: 325-329
Fritze J Extrakorporale Stoßwellentherapie in orthopädischer Indikation: Eine ausgewählte Übersicht. 1998 Versicherungsmedizin 1998; 50: 180-183
Fukada E, Yasuda I On the piezoelectric effect of bone. 1957 Phys. Soc. Japan, 12: 1158-1162
Fuson RL, Sherman M, Van Fleet J, Wendt, T The conduct of orthopaedic clinical trials. 1997 J Bone Joint Surg 1997; 79-A: 1089-1098



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Galasso O, de Durante C, Russo S, Gigliotti S, Corrado B Chronic achilloynia. Treatment with extracorporeal shock waves 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:43
Gambihler S, Delius M In vitro interaction of lithotripter shock waves and cytotoxic drugs. 1992 British Journal of Cancer, 66: 69-73
Gambihler S, Delius M, Ellwart JW Permeabilization of the plasma membrane of L1210 mouse leukemia cells using lithotripter shock waves. 1994 Membr. Biol., 141: 267-275
Gambihler S, Delius M, Ellwart JW Transient increase in membrane permeability of L1210 cells upon exposure to lithotripter shock waves in vitro. 1992 Naturwissenschaften, 79: 328-329
Gebhart C, Widhalm R The Biological Effects of Shockwave Treatment 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 11-12
Gerdesmeyer L ESWT bei Tendinosis calcarea – Ergebnisse der prospektiven placebokontrollierten Multicenterstudie der DGOOC. 2001 Vortrag, Arbeitskreis Stoßwellentherapie, Berlin, 2001
Gerdesmeyer L, Bachfischer K, Hauschild M Overview of Calcifying Tendonitis of the Shoulder Treated with Shockwave Treatment 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 151-156
Gerdesmeyer L, Hasse A, Engel A, Bachfischer K, Rechl H Der Einfluß extrakorporaler Stoßwellen auf die Osteoinduktion nach Radiatio 2001 Siebert W, Buch M (Hrsg), Extrakorporale Stoßwellentherapie in der Orthopädie - Grundlagen und Anwendung, Ecomed Verlagsgesellschaft, Germany: 13-22
Gerdesmeyer L, Hauschild M, Bachfischer K The change of clinical outcome of tendinitis calcarea after ESWT in course of time 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:28
Gerdesmeyer L, Russlies M, Peters P, Gradinger R Die hochenergetische ESWT zur Behandlung der Tendinosis calcarea. 1997 46. Jahrestagung Norddeutsche Orthopädenvereinigung, Kurzreferate: 14
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Galasso O, de Durante C, Russo S, Gigliotti S, Corrado B Chronic achilloynia. Treatment with extracorporeal shock waves 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:43
Gambihler S, Delius M In vitro interaction of lithotripter shock waves and cytotoxic drugs. 1992 British Journal of Cancer, 66: 69-73
Gambihler S, Delius M, Ellwart JW Permeabilization of the plasma membrane of L1210 mouse leukemia cells using lithotripter shock waves. 1994 Membr. Biol., 141: 267-275
Gambihler S, Delius M, Ellwart JW Transient increase in membrane permeability of L1210 cells upon exposure to lithotripter shock waves in vitro. 1992 Naturwissenschaften, 79: 328-329
Gebhart C, Widhalm R The Biological Effects of Shockwave Treatment 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 11-12
Gerdesmeyer L ESWT bei Tendinosis calcarea – Ergebnisse der prospektiven placebokontrollierten Multicenterstudie der DGOOC. 2001 Vortrag, Arbeitskreis Stoßwellentherapie, Berlin, 2001
Gerdesmeyer L, Bachfischer K, Hauschild M Overview of Calcifying Tendonitis of the Shoulder Treated with Shockwave Treatment 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 151-156
Gerdesmeyer L, Hasse A, Engel A, Bachfischer K, Rechl H Der Einfluß extrakorporaler Stoßwellen auf die Osteoinduktion nach Radiatio 2001 Siebert W, Buch M (Hrsg), Extrakorporale Stoßwellentherapie in der Orthopädie - Grundlagen und Anwendung, Ecomed Verlagsgesellschaft, Germany: 13-22
Gerdesmeyer L, Hauschild M, Bachfischer K The change of clinical outcome of tendinitis calcarea after ESWT in course of time 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:28
Gerdesmeyer L, Russlies M, Peters P, Gradinger R Die hochenergetische ESWT zur Behandlung der Tendinosis calcarea. 1997 46. Jahrestagung Norddeutsche Orthopädenvereinigung, Kurzreferate: 14
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Haake M, Böddeker IR, Decker T, Buch M, Vogel M, Labek G, Maier M, Loew M, Maier-Boerries O, Fischer J, Betthäuser A, Rehack HC, Kanovsky W, Müller I, Gerdesmeyer L, Rompe JD Efficacy of Extracorporal Shockwave Therapy (ESWT) in patients with lateral epicondylitis - A placebo controlled multicenter trial. 2001 4th International Congress of the ISMST, Berlin, 2001
Haake M, Böddeker IR, Decker T, Buch M, Vogel M, Labek G, Maier M, Loew M, Maier-Boerries OM, Fischer J, Betthäuser A, Rehack HC, Kanovsky W, Müller I, Gerdesmeyer L, Rompe JD Side effects of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy (ESWT) in the treatment of tennis elbow. 2002 Arch Orthop Traum Surg 2002
Haake M, Deike B, Thon A, Schmitt J Exact focusing of extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy for calcifying tendinopathy. 2002 Clin Orthop 2002
Haake M, Deike B, Thon A, Schmitt J. Importance of accurately focussing of extracorporeal shock waves (ESWT) in the treatment of calcifying tendinitis - A prospective randomised study. 2001 Biomed Tech 2001; 45: 69-74
Haake M, Jensen K, Prinz H, Willenberg T Design einer Multizenterstudie zum Wirksamkeitsnachweis der Extrakorporalen Stosswellentherapie (ESTW) bei Epicondylitis humeri radialis. 2000 Z Orthop Ihre Grenzgeb 2000; 138:99-103
Haake M, Rautmann M, Griss P Therapieergebnisse und Kostenanalyse der Extrakorporalen Stoßwellentherapie bei Tendinitis calcarea und Supraspinatussehnensyndrom. 1998 Orthop Praxis 1998;34: 110-113
Haake M, Rautmann M, Wirth T Assessment of treatment costs of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy (ESWT) - Comparison of ESWT and surgical treatment in shoulder diseases 2001 Int J Tech Ass Health Care 2001; 17: 612-617
Haake M, Rautmann M, Wirth T Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy versus surgical treatment in calcifying ttttrendinitis and non calcifying tendinitis of the supraspinatus muscle. 2001 Eur J Orthop Surg Traumatol 2001; 11: 21-24
Haake M, Sattler A, Gross MW, Schmitt J, Hildebrandt R, Müller HH Vergleich der Extrakorporalen Stoßwellentherapie mit der Röntgenreizbestrahlung beim Supraspinatussehnensyndrom – ein prospektiver randomisierter einfachblinder Parallelgruppenvergleich 2001 Z Orthop Ihre Grenzgeb 2001; 139: 397-402
Haist J Die Osteorestauration via Stosswellen-Anwendung. Eine neue Möglichkeit zur Therapie der gestörten knöchernen Konsolidierung. 1995 Chaussy C, Eisenberger F, Jocham D, Wilbert D (Hrsg), Die Stosswelle - Forschung und Klinik, Attempto Verlag, Tübingen: 157-161 Haist J Osteorestoration via shock wave application. A new possibility of treating disturbed bone union. 1997 Siebert W, Buch M (Hrsg), Extracorporeal shock waves in orthopaedics, Springer Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg New York: 119-129
Haist J Einsatzmöglichkeiten der analgetisch wirksamen extrakorporalen Stosswellentherapie an der Schulter. 1995 Orthopädische Praxis, 9: 591-593
Haist J Shockwave Treatment for Radial and Ulnar Epicondylitis 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 115-113
Haist J Shockwave Therapy for Pseudarthroses 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 195-196
Haist J Shockwave Treatment of Dupuytren's Contracture and Ledderhose's Contraction 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 253-254
Haist J, Reichel W, Bürger R, Witzsch U Einsatz der extrakorporalen Stosswelle bei der osteosynthetisch versorgten Pseudarthrose - eine experimentelle Studie. 1993 Orthopädische Praxis, 5: 345-346
Haist J, Reichel W, Witzsch U, Bürger R Die extrakorporale Stosswellenbehandlung der gestörten Frakturheilung - eine Alternative zu operativen Verfahren ? 1993 Orthopädische Praxis, 29: 842-844
Haist J, Steeger von Keitz D Die Stosswellentherapie (ESWT) der Epicondylopathia radialis et ulnaris. Ein neues Behandlungskonzept knochennaher Weichteilschmerzen. 1994 Orthopädie Mitteilungen, 173
Haist J, Steeger von Keitz D Stosswellentherapie knochennaher Weichteilschmerzen - ein neues Behandlungskonzept. 1995 Chaussy C, Eisenberger F, Jocham D, Wilbert D (Hrsg), Die Stosswelle - Forschung und Klinik, Attempto Verlag, Tübingen: 162-165
Haist J, Steeger von Keitz D, Mohr G, Schulze G, Weber F The orthopaedic shock wave therapy in the treatment of chronic insertion tendopathy and tendinosis calcarea. 1997 Siebert W, Buch M (Hrsg), Extracorporeal shock waves in orthopaedics, Springer Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg New York: 159-163
Haist J, Steeger von Keitz D, Witzsch U, Bürger R, Haist U The extracorporeal shockwave therapy in the treatment of disturbed bone union. 1992 7th International Conference on Biomedical Engineering, December 2.- 4.1992, Singapore: 222-224
Haist J, Steeger von Keitzr D Shock wave therapy in the treatment of near to bone soft tissue pain in sportsmen. 1996 International Journal of Sports Medicine, 17: 79-81
Hammer DS, Rupp S, Ensslin S, Kohn D, Seil R Extracorporal shock wave therapy in patients with tennis elbow and painful heel. 2000 Arch Orthop Trauma Surg 2000; 120:304-7
Hammer DS, Rupp S, Kreutz A, Pape D, Kohn D, Seil R Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) in patients with chronic proximal plantar fasciitis. 2002 Foot Ankle Int 2002;23:309-13
Hasegawa S, Kato K, Takashi M, Zhu Y, Obata K, Miyake K S100a0 protein as a marker for tissue damage related to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. 1993 Eur. Urology, 24: 393-396
Haupt G Stosswellen in der Orthopädie. 1997 Urologe A, 36, Nr.3: 233-238
Haupt G Use of extracorporeal shock waves in the treatment of pseudarthrosis, tendopathy and other orthopaedic diseases. 1997 Urology, 158: 4-11
Haupt G, Diesch R, Straub T, Penninger E, Fröhlich T, Scholl J, Löhrer H, Senge T Ballistic Shockwave Treatment 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 271-272
Haupt G, Ekkernkamp A, Püllenberg A, Senge T Einfluß extrakorporal erzeugter Stosswellen auf standardisierte Tibiafrakturen im Schafmodell. 1992 Urologe A, 31: A 43ff
Haupt G, Haupt A, Ekkernkamp A, Gerety B, Chvapil M Influence of shock waves on fracture healing. 1992 Urology, 39: 529-532
Haist J, Steeger von Keitz D, Witzsch U, Bürger R, Haist U The extracorporeal shockwave therapy in the treatment of disturbed bone union. 1992 7th International Conference on Biomedical Engineering, December 2.- 4.1992, Singapore: 222-224
Haist J, Steeger von Keitzr D Shock wave therapy in the treatment of near to bone soft tissue pain in sportsmen. 1996 International Journal of Sports Medicine, 17: 79-81
Hammer DS, Rupp S, Ensslin S, Kohn D, Seil R Extracorporal shock wave therapy in patients with tennis elbow and painful heel. 2000 Arch Orthop Trauma Surg 2000; 120:304-7
Hammer DS, Rupp S, Kreutz A, Pape D, Kohn D, Seil R Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) in patients with chronic proximal plantar fasciitis. 2002 Foot Ankle Int 2002;23:309-13
Hasegawa S, Kato K, Takashi M, Zhu Y, Obata K, Miyake K S100a0 protein as a marker for tissue damage related to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. 1993 Eur. Urology, 24: 393-396
Haupt G Stosswellen in der Orthopädie. 1997 Urologe A, 36, Nr.3: 233-238
Haupt G Use of extracorporeal shock waves in the treatment of pseudarthrosis, tendopathy and other orthopaedic diseases. 1997 Urology, 158: 4-11
Haupt G, Diesch R, Straub T, Penninger E, Fröhlich T, Scholl J, Löhrer H, Senge T Ballistic Shockwave Treatment 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 271-272
Haupt G, Ekkernkamp A, Püllenberg A, Senge T Einfluß extrakorporal erzeugter Stosswellen auf standardisierte Tibiafrakturen im Schafmodell. 1992 Urologe A, 31: A 43ff
Haupt G, Haupt A, Ekkernkamp A, Gerety B, Chvapil M Influence of shock waves on fracture healing. 1992 Urology, 39: 529-532
Haupt G, Haupt A, Gerety B, Chvapil M Enhancement of fracture healing with extracorporeal shock waves. 1990 AUA Annual Meeting, New Orleans 1990
Haupt G, Haupt A, Senge T Die Behandlung von Knochen mit extrakorporalen Stosswellen - Entwicklung einer neuen Therapie. 1993 Chaussy C, Eisenberger F, Jocham D, Wilbert D (Hrsg), Stosswellenlithotripsie - Aspekte und Prognosen, Attempto Verlag, Tübingen: 120-126
Haupt G, Katzmeier P Anwendung der hochenergetischen Stosswellen-therapie bei Pseudarthrosen, Tendinosis calcarea der Schulter und Ansatztendinosen (Fersensporn, Epiconylitis). 1995 Chaussy C, Eisenberger F, Jocham D, Wilbert D (Hrsg), Die Stosswelle - Forschung und Klinik, Attempto Verlag, Tübingen: 143-146
Hearnden A, Flannary MC A prospective, blinded randomised control trial assessing the use of different energy extracorporeal shock wave therapy for calcifying tendonitis 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:16
Heckman JD, Ryaby JP, McCabe J, Frey JJ, Kilcoyne RF Accleration of tibial fracture-healing by non-invasive low-intensity pulsed ultrasound. 1994 Bone Joint Surgery (Am), 76: 26-34
Heidersdorf S, Lauber S, Lauber H, Hötzinger H, Ludwig J, Dreisliker U Rädel R Osteochondritis Dissecans 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 255-264
Heinrichs W, Witzsch U, Bürger R Extrakorporale Stosswellentherapie (ESWT) von Pseudarthrosen. 1993 Anaesthesist, 42: 361-364
Helbig K, Herbert C, Schostok T, Brown M, Thiele R Correlations between the duration of pain and the success of shock wave therapy 2001 Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, 387: 68-71
Helbig K, Schostok T, Brown M, Herbert C, Thiele R Correlations Between Duration of Pain and Success 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 43-48
Heller KD, Niethard FU Der Einsatz der extrakorporalen Stoßwellentherapie in der Orthopädie – eine Metaanalyse 1998 Orthop Ihre Grenzgeb 1998; 136:390-401
Herbert C, Thiele R, Hartmann T, Helbig K Musculoskeletal shock wave therapy for the treatment of tendinosis calcarea, follow-up of 1483 patients between 1995 and 1998 (4 years) 2000 Minimally Invasive Therapy & Allied Technologies, Isis Medical Media, Volume 9, Number 3/4 August 2000: 322 (Abstract 28)
Herbert C, Thiele R, Helbig K, Hartmann T, Mälzer H Pseudarthrosentherapie mit der Stosswelle in der Praxis. 1997 Siebert W, Buch M (Hrsg), Stosswellenanwendung am Knochen - Klinische und experimentelle Erfahrungen, Dr. Kovac, Hamburg:
Herken K, Bernhardt F, Lenz G Die extracorporale Stosswellenbehandlung bei der chronischen, therapieresistenten Tendinosis calcarea der Schulter. 1996 45. Jahrestagung Norddeutsche Orthopädenvereinigung e.V.: 124-125
Holmes RP, Yeaman LD, Taylor RG, McCullough DL Altered neutrophil permeability following shock wave exposure in vitro. 1992 Urology, 147: 733-737
Hötzinger H, Rädel R, Lauber S, Lauber H, Platzek P, Ludwig J MRI-Guided Shockwaves for Multiple Stress Fractures of the Tibia 2000 Coombs R, Schaden W, Zhou S (eds), Musculoskeletal Shockwave Therapy, Greenwich Medical Media Ltd, London: 165-168
Jakobeit C, Welp L, Winiarski B, Schuhmacher R, Osenberg T, Splittgerber T, Spelsberg G, Buntrock W, Missulis U, Kroll U, Schmeiser A, Beer M, Watzlawik A, Olschner G, Winarski B Ultrasound-guided extracorporeal shock wave therapy of tendinosis calcarea of the shoulder, of symptomatic plantar calcaneal spur (heel spur) and of epicondylopathia radialis and ulnaris. 1997 Siebert W, Buch M (Hrsg), Extracorporeal shock waves in orthopaedics, Springer Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg New York: 165-180
Johannes EJ, Sukul Kaulesar DMKS, Mature E, Schutte HE High energy shock waves for the treatment of nonunions - experiments in dog. 1994 Surg. Research, 57: 246-252
Jurgowski W, Loew M, Cotta H, Staehler G Extracorporeal shock wave treatment of calcareous tendinitis of the shoulder. 1993 Endourology, 7, Suppl. 1: 193
Karlsen JS, Smevik B, Hovig T Acute morphological changes in canine kidneys following exposure to extracorporeal shock waves. 1991 Urological Research, 19: 105-115
Karpman R, Magee F, Gruen T, Mobley M The Lithotriptor and its potential use in the revision of total hip arthroplasty 2001 Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, 387: 4-7
Kawahara K, Koba M The effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in chronic hemodialysis patients 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:93
Ko J, Chen H, Chen L Treatment of lateral epicondylitis of the elbow with shock waves 2001 Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, 387: 60-67
Koeweiden E, Chin A Paw E Promising results of ESWT for tennis elbow 2000 3rd Congress of the ISMST - Naples, Abstracts:33
Kolsky H Stress waves in solids. 1963 Dover, New York: 186
Krause H Physik und Technik medizinischer Stosswellensysteme. 1997 Rompe JD (Hrsg), Extrakorporale Stosswellentherapie - Grundlagen, Indikation, Anwendung, Chapman & Hall GmbH, London Glasgow Weinheim New York Tokio Melbourne Madras
Krischek O, Hopf C, Nafe B, Rompe JD Shock-wave therapy for tennis and golfer`s elbow. 1999 Arch Orthop Trauma Surg 1999; 119: 62-66
Krischek O, Rompe JD, Herbsthofer B, Nafe B Symptomatische niedrig-energetische Stosswellentherapie bei Fersenschmerzen und radiologisch nachweisbarem plantarem Fersensporn. 1998 Orthopädie, 136: 169-174
Krischek O, Rompe JD, Hopf C, Stratmann M, Vogel J, Nafe B Ist die extrakorporelle Stosswellentherapie bei Epicondylitis humeri ulnaris indiziert? Kurzfristige Ergebnisse einer vergleichenden, prospektiven Studie. 1997 Orthopädische Praxis, 7: 465-469

Result number: 30

Message Number 171492

For Debra F View Thread
Posted by BrianG on 3/18/05 at 11:27

Hi Deb,

Just a quick question. Were you checked for TTS, before you had your PF surgery? It's usually done with a nerve conduction test. If not, you may have grounds for a law suit. Write to me at RebaIsFancy@Hotmail.com if you want more information.

Regards
BrianG

PS: I am not afiliated with any doctor, or attorney. Just a concerned patient.

Result number: 31

Message Number 171473

Re: Thanks to all of you who posted View Thread
Posted by Debra F on 3/18/05 at 02:04

I am going through the same thing you are. I had PF surgery last year on both feet and it took a while to recover; but i still had pain in my feet. Now we have discovered that I have tarsal tunnel syndrome in both feet and I have fallen into a bad depression and now my boss is talking about firing me for being off so much.

Result number: 32
Searching file 16

Message Number 168055

having eswt done. seeing nothing else is working. View Thread
Posted by debra s on 1/27/05 at 16:03

i am letter carrier for 27 years now. my heal pain in both feet started3 months ago to which i was off work. tried everything. iwas off work for 2 and half months just went just went back to work and that day i was back to square one. called doctor today and they are going to have me try eswt. please tell me what to exspect from this prosedure.thank you

Result number: 33

Message Number 167526

Heel Spur in relation to knee and hip joint pain? View Thread
Posted by Debra E on 1/19/05 at 09:48

Is it common when you have a heel spur for your hip joint,knee and ankle to ache?

Result number: 34

Message Number 166294

Re: What about soundwaves for heel pain? View Thread
Posted by debra on 12/29/04 at 21:27

both of my heel hurts bad, but the right one hurts the most.

Result number: 35

Message Number 160948

Re: Symptons View Thread
Posted by Lori S. on 10/04/04 at 02:00

Debra..... I had that same problem. It came down to my doc thinking outside the box.. trying to get me to my ESTW appt. I was actually having Una Boots ( soft casts) put on my feet. Which helped with swelling as well as pain.
Hope you feel better...... Lorinda

Result number: 36

Message Number 160674

Symptons View Thread
Posted by Debra on 9/29/04 at 07:15

I am currently waiting to have ESWT in Nov. But my foot pain is changing. I now also have pain on the Bottom outside lateral tendon, and my outside part of my ankle. could this be from walking funny due to the orginal foot pain?My ankle looks swellen.

Result number: 37

Message Number 160172

Poor circulation in foot View Thread
Posted by Debra on 9/19/04 at 12:51

I am having ESWT in November,But I have just started to experince some numbness in my foot and calf muscules is this normal with having heel sprus?

Result number: 38
Searching file 15

Message Number 159924

PT after ESWT View Thread
Posted by Debra on 9/15/04 at 06:59

What is PT?

Result number: 39

Message Number 159898

Need advice about anesthesia and a local ? View Thread
Posted by Debra on 9/14/04 at 19:40

I am having ESWT in Nov., my Doctor is talking about possibly doing this in her office.What type of anesthesia is best used for this?And is it best done in a hospital setting? I am paying for this out of pocket so she is trying to save me some money by bring the machine to her office.

Result number: 40

Message Number 159472

Re: To Debra - ESWT costs - ps View Thread
Posted by Julie on 9/07/04 at 01:36


I meant to add: ESWT seems to be much cheaper in Canada. Do a search on Bayshore.
.

Result number: 41

Message Number 159471

To Debra - ESWT costs View Thread
Posted by Julie on 9/07/04 at 01:34


Debra

I have learned from this board that the cost of ESWT varies wildly, from state to state, machine to machine, doctor to doctor. You've been quoted $3000 for one treatment. Other doctors offer three treatments for a flat fee of under $1000. Look around, do some research, and consider going somewhere out of your area for treatment. The cost of a flight and a night or two's accommodation would be minimal compared to top-of-the-range ESWT treatment. That's what I would do, I think.
.

Result number: 42

Message Number 159459

Re: Surgery or not View Thread
Posted by Debra on 9/06/04 at 21:24

I can only afford to have ESWT done once do you think it will help me?

Result number: 43

Message Number 158363

Re: It"s all about Choices View Thread
Posted by Ed Davis, DPM on 8/18/04 at 19:18

Debra:

It is important to understand that visitors/posters here probably do not represent a cross section of the population with PF out there. People on these boards are here primarily because they are in pain and still looking for a solution. Only a few who are cured stay around.

I look at the studies but more importantly, look at my treatment results and compare that to those of colleagues. ESWT is overwhelmingly successful when used properly, in the right patients. Nothing is 100% successful though.

An important thing to consider is that ESWT is not a "stand alone" treatment but is often used in combination with the various modalities necessary to address the causes of PF -- please see Scott's Heel Pain Book to help see the "big picture."
Ed

Result number: 44

Message Number 158311

Re: It"s all about Choices View Thread
Posted by Debra on 8/18/04 at 07:45

How many treatments did you have?The reason I ask is because I have to pay for this out of pocket.It seems that some pepole on the message board have had this done a few times.

Result number: 45

Message Number 158206

It"s all about Choices View Thread
Posted by Debra on 8/17/04 at 07:25

I have been living with heel PLantar fasciitis and heel spurs for about 10 years and have done all methods of dealing with the pain except surgery and I am about to try ESWT.Most of the feed back get frm the message is negative is there anyone that has a postive experiece with this treatmemt?

Result number: 46

Message Number 153366

In response to Dr. Sandell View Thread
Posted by Elyse B on 6/18/04 at 07:40

I took the libery of doing some research, let me know what you think:

What is mobilization?
Mobilization is a hands-on manual therapy designed to restore joint movement, power, and range of motion. The therapist gently coaxes joint motion by passive movement within or to the limit of a joint's normal range of motion. The therapist's movement of the joint is very precise and is limited by the amount of joint play, which may be less than 1/8th of an inch.
The overall goal of mobilization is to restore normal joint function including the surrounding soft tissue (e.g. muscle, ligaments, fascia). Physical Therapists, Osteopaths, and Chiropractors perform mobilization.
What part of the spine is treated?
In the spine, any of the facet joints and/or the costovertebral articulations (thoracic spine and ribs) may become stiff causing joint dysfunction. When a joint is unable to move freely, a cycle of muscle spasm, pain, and fatigue may begin.
What causes joint dysfunction?
Joint dysfunction can be caused by poor posture, trauma, spinal disease, or congenital problems. Left untreated, joint dysfunction can affect the surrounding soft tissue and may lead to a loss of strength and flexibility.
Are other treatments involved in mobilization?
Myofascial release, or soft tissue mobilization, is a therapy used to release tension stored in the fascia. Fascia are sheets of fibrous tissue that encase and support muscles separating them into groups and layers. Fascia also covers joints capsules and ligaments. Following trauma, the fascia and muscles may shorten restricting joint movement and blood flow. The techniques used in myofascial release break up fascial adhesions and relaxes muscle tension helping to normalize physical motion within the joint capsule.
Rehabilitation of Soft Tissue Injuries in the 1990s

The days of prolonged immobilization are a part of the past for the treatment of soft tissue injuries. The increased attention toward sports medicine throughout the late 1970s and 1980s has led to research and many clinical studies that will outline the course of rehabilitation throughout the years to come. A review of the current literature on acute soft tissue injuries classifies different types of soft tissue lesions as well various phases of healing.1 Current literature redefines the aims and objectives of rehabilitation pointing out the many benefits of the use of modalities, early mobilization, and the importance of a full rehabilitation program.
Over the past two decades, soft tissue injuries have hit the spotlight. Almost all traumatic injuries, automobile accidents, athletic or other injuries result in some degree of soft tissue damage. It's now recognized that many soft tissue injuries result in a degree of permanent impairment and leave their host with some permanent pain, restrictions, and loss of function.2 To combat the debilitating (aftermath) of soft tissue injury, new technology and rehabilitation protocols have been developed.
Etiology of Soft Tissue Injuries, Direct and Indirect Trauma
Many soft tissue injuries come from direct trauma such as being struck by a moving object or a fall; other injuries may be classified as indirect trauma and result from overloading or chronic overuse, thus giving us the classification of direct and indirect etiology.3 Indirect can be further divided into three sub-classes: acute -- which occurs from sudden overloading as seen in many lifting injuries; chronic or overuse -- which are often seen in many assembly line or factory workers who must perform repetitive movements hundreds of times daily; acute on chronic -- occurs when a chronic conditions hits an acute phase. This third sub-class is also very common in the work environment where the same job is performed day in and day out. By first defining the etiology of a condition, we are on the proper course toward treatment and the prevention of further injury.
Phases of Healing -- Phase I
The current literature describes three main phases of soft tissue healing. An initial reaction phase which lasts up to 72 hours post-injury.4 This phase is also referred to as the acute inflammation phase.3 The reaction phase displays with the classic signs of inflammation with pain, swelling, redness and warmth. In the cases of indirect etiology, these classic signs may not be readily visible but are proceeding at the microscopic level.5
The long-used application of cryotherapy (ice) is still supported by numerous studies as very effective treatment in this initial phase.6,7,8,9 Cryotherapy slows the inflammatory process as well as provides an analgesic effect. Ultrasound may also be used to decrease swelling in this inflammatory phase, but must be used for short periods to prevent hyperemia.10 Transcutaneous nerve stimulation (TNS) and electric muscle stimulation (EMS) have also been shown to be effective.
The use of continuous passive motion (CPM) has been shown to clear hemoarthrosis (blood present in the synovial joints post-trauma) during the initial reaction phase. In the 24 hours following trauma, the synovial fluid in joints treated with CPM displayed less blood than immobilized joints. At 48 hours the joints treated by CPM demonstrated the synovial fluid was clear where as the immobilized joint remained grossly bloody.11
The use of manipulation can also be employed in the reaction phase and is suggested in the areas of fixation that have resulted from the injury. This will expedite the removal of hemoarthrosis, reduce spasms, edema and pain as well as reduce nerve root irritation when present.12 Cyriax states, "When free mobility was encouraged from the onset, the fibers in the scar were arranged lengthwise as in a normal ligament. Gentle passive movements do not detach fibrils from their proper formation at the healing breach, but prevent their continued adherence at abnormal sites."13
In the initial reaction phase, the use of CPM and manipulations (which are both mobilization techniques) must be used in a controlled protective manner to prevent any further damage to the healing ligaments.11
The initial reaction phase can be treated effectively using classic cryotherapy, specific modalities, as well as a controlled program of CPM and manipulations.
Phase of Healing -- Phases II and III
The second stage of healing, the repair phase, may last from 48 up to 6 weeks. This phase is characterized by the production and laying down of new collagen.4 During this phase, the collagen is not fully oriented in the direction of tensile strength.5
The third phase, the remodeling phase, which lasts from 3 weeks to 12 months or more, is the phase in which the collagen is remodeled and along with with phase II determines the functional capabilities of the soft tissue after the healing process is completed.14 True rehabilitation must focus on maintaining these functional capabilities. Oakes3 describes the aims of rehabilitation as regaining pain-free movement with full strength, power and range of motion, thus describing the functional capabilities of the soft tissue.
To regain the functional capabilities, stresses of function must be put on the healing tissue. As described by Roy:15 "If a limb is completely immobilized during the recovery process, the tissues may emerge fully healed but poorly adapted functionally with little chance for change, particularly if the immobilization has been prolonged." Mobilization techniques must take place throughout the repair and remodeling phases to insure proper tissue adaptation. Several benefits of mobilization have been defined which include increased strength3,16 and flexibility of healed tissue, less scar formation and adhesions,14 increased cartilage nutrition,17 and lesser incidence of recurrence of injury.18
Rehabilitation Protocol
Rehabilitation protocol following soft tissue injury must include mobilization techniques to insure good functional adaptation. A program combining manipulations, the use of modalities, mobilization technique, and a strengthening program will insure optimal rehabilitation.
Manipulations and modalities should be used during all three phases of healing to limit fixations, control pain and spasms as well as maintain neurologic integrity. Mobilization should be carried out within the limits of pain on the patient, starting with controlled passive motion. Controlled passive motion should be employed until a maximum range of motion is reached. At this point, active assistive motion should be employed. As the injury heals and the tissue adapts, the patient can be graduated to active resistive motion. Active resistive motion should be followed by a strengthening program of kinetic resistive exercise. This will insure a return to maximum strength for the patient. Keep in mind all rehabilitation should be performed within the patient's limits of pain and periodic re-evaluation and testing such as muscle testing and surface EMG should be performed to evaluate the patient's progress. Also remember that the final remodeling phase can last over a year post injury; rehabilitation should be directed accordingly.
By following this rehabilitation protocol and progression, a return to maximum functional capabilities can be insured, returning the patient to maximum pain free range of motion and strength.
Rehabilitation in the 1990's focuses on regaining function. After all, function does determine what we can do with our lives.
J. Scott Brown, D.C.

Soft Tissue Injuries










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SOFT TISSUE INJURIES
Defined as an injury to muscle tissue, tendons, ligaments, fascia, and innervating nerve supply. It is common for soft tissue injuries to be coupled with joint pain, offering a worsening of pain upon initial movements (waking, sit to stand) or lessen with mild activity
History may reveal the following:
~ Blunt trauma
~ Rapid deceleration or acceleration (Such as injuries sustained in a motor vehicle accident)
~ Overstretching a tissue beyond its normal anatomical limits (Such as with over exertion or sports injuries)
Evaluation:
~ Range of motion-restricted due to pain- sensation of 'pulling"
~ Motor and sensory- possible decrease in sensory perception
~ Orthopedic testing- may not be positive for adjacent joints
~ Palpation-may elicit warmth and throbbing sensation. Edema and myospasm evident.
Treatment may include:
~ Cryotherapy (acute stages)
~ Interferential muscle stimulation
~ Hot fomentation
~ Ultrasound
~ Manual therapies including deep friction massage and joint mobilization
~ Passive and active stretching
~ Gentle, progressive resistance exercises both in office and at home
Due to the fact that there are three phases of soft tissue healing there are specific treatment objectives for each.
• Acute Phase- reduce inflammation, edema, and pain with physical therapy modalities
• Remodeling Phase- Scar tissue must be mobilized and tissue elasticity must be restored through manual techniques and passive and active stretching
• Rehabilitative Phase- It is important to strengthen all tissues in and around injured region. Education may be necessary for long-term prevention in the areas of posture, lifting techniques, and maintenance of exercise and overall health.
Physical therapy may be necessary to break the pain/myospasm cycle and to restore tissue to a normal pain free function. Additionally, there may be a need for gradual, supervised return to daily activity to avoid relapses.
Adverse affects of untreated injury could include:
Chronic pain or functional limitations due to:
~ Tissue shortening
~ Range of motion restrictions
~ Joint degeneration
~ Accumulation of adhesions along muscular fibers



Immobilization or Early Mobilization After an Acute Soft-Tissue Injury?
Pekka Kannus, MD, PhD
THE PHYSICIAN AND SPORTSMEDICINE - VOL 28 - NO. 3 - MARCH 2000

In Brief: Experimental and clinical studies demonstrate that early, controlled mobilization is superior to immobilization for primary treatment of acute musculoskeletal soft-tissue injuries and postoperative management. Optimal treatment and rehabilitation follow four steps that address response to trauma. First is treating the damaged area with PRICES: protection, rest, ice, compression, elevation, and support. Second, during the first 1 to 3 weeks after the injury, immobilization of the injured tissue areas allows healing without extensive scarring. Third, when soft-tissue regeneration begins, controlled mobilization and stretching of muscle and tendons stimulate healing. Fourth, at 6 to 8 weeks postinjury, the rehabilitative goal is full return to preinjury level of activity.
Acute soft-tissue injuries such as muscle-tendon strains, ligament sprains, and ligament or tendon ruptures occur frequently in sports and exercise. Without correct diagnosis and proper treatment, they may result in long-term breaks in training and competition. Far too often, injuries become chronic and end careers of competitive athletes or force recreational athletes to abandon their favorite activity. For these reasons, an increased focus has been on finding ways to ensure optimal healing. In this regard, the question has centered on immobilization or early mobilization in treatment.
Soft-Tissue Response to Trauma
Musculoskeletal soft tissue responds to trauma in three phases: the acute inflammatory phase (0 to 7 days), the proliferative phase (about 7 to 21 days), and the maturation and remodeling phase (21 days and thereafter; table 1). (1)

TABLE 1. Phases of Healing After an Acute Soft-Tissue Injury
Phase Approximate Days After Injury

Inflammation 0-7
Proliferation 7-21
Maturation and remodeling >21

Acute inflammatory phase. In this phase, ischemia, metabolic disturbance, and cell membrane damage lead to inflammation, which, in turn, is characterized by infiltration of inflammatory cells, tissue edema, fibrin exudation, capillary wall thickening, capillary occlusions, and plasma leakage. Clinically, inflammation manifests as swelling, erythema, increased temperature, pain, and loss of function. The process is time dependent and mediated by vascular, cellular, and chemical events culminating in tissue repair and sometimes scar (adhesion) formation.
Proliferative phase. These changes include fibrin clotting and a proliferation of fibroblasts, synovial cells, and capillaries. The inflammatory cells eliminate the damaged tissue fragments by phagocytosis, and fibroblasts extensively and markedly elevate production of collagen (initially, the weaker, type 3 collagen, later type 1) and other extracellular matrix components.
Maturation and remodeling phase. In this phase, the proteoglycan-water content of the healing tissue decreases and type 1 collagen fibers start to assume a normal orientation. Approximately 6 to 8 weeks postinjury, the new collagen fibers can withstand near-normal stress, although final maturation of tendon and ligament tissue may take as long as 6 to 12 months.
Injury and Four-Step Treatment
After an injury, the ideal treatment and rehabilitation program should include four steps.
PRICES. Immediately after injury, the damaged area should be treated with PRICES: protection, rest, ice (cold), compression, elevation, and support (table 2) (1,2). The aim is to minimize hemorrhage, swelling, inflammation, cellular metabolism, and pain, and to provide optimal conditions for healing (2). Since prolonged inflammation may lead to excessive scarring, early, effective treatment seeks to prevent it. On the other hand, one must remember that inflammation is not only the body's response to insult, but also the initial step in healing.

TABLE 2. Basic Treatment Plan for Acute Musculoskeletal Injury ('PRICES' Mnemonic)

P = Protection from further damage
R = Rest to avoid prolonging irritation
I = Ice (cold) for controlling pain, bleeding, and edema
C = Compression for support and controlling swelling
E = Elevation for decreasing bleeding and edema
S = Support for stabilizing the injured part

Immobilization and protection. The second step is immobilization and protection of the injured tissue area during the first 1 to 3 weeks. In the early phase of healing, immobilization allows undisturbed fibroblast invasion of the injured area that leads to unrestricted cell proliferation and collagen fiber production. Premature and intensive mobilization at this time leads to enhanced type 3 collagen production and weaker tissue than that produced during an optimal immobilization period (2). Protection (such as with a cast or brace) prevents secondary injuries and early distension and lengthening of injured collagenous structures such as a torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) (3).
Maturation. About 3 weeks after injury, collagen maturation and final scar tissue formation begins (1,2,4). In this phase, injured soft tissues need controlled mobilization. Less injured portions of the tissue or joint, however, can be mobilized earlier, sometimes even during the proliferative phase. Prolonged immobilization, though, must be avoided to prevent atrophy of cartilage, bone, muscle, tendons, and ligaments (5-12). Controlled muscle stretching and joint movement enhance new collagen fiber orientation parallel to the stress lines of the normal collagen fibers; these activities also serve to prevent tissue atrophy from immobilization. Treatment can be supported with physical therapy to improve local circulation and proprioception, inhibit pain, and strengthen muscle-tendon units.
Resumption of activity. Approximately 6 to 8 weeks after the injury, new collagen fibers can withstand near-normal stress, and the goal for rehabilitation is rapid and full recovery to activity. If the previous steps were followed, protection is no longer needed, and each component of the damaged soft tissue is ready for a progressive mobilization and rehabilitation program (2).
Soft-Tissue Healing: Experimental Studies
The current literature on experimental acute soft-tissue injury speaks strongly for the use of early, controlled mobilization rather than immobilization for optimal healing.
Knee joint. Studies by Woo and colleagues (reviewed in Woo and Hildebrand [13]) have shown that an experimentally induced tear of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) in animals heals much better with early, controlled mobilization than with immobilization. Early mobilization influenced healing even more than did surgical repair performed on the rupture. Exercise had an adverse effect on ligament healing and knee stability only when the animals' joints had been rendered unstable by transection of both the ACL and the MCL. These results probably reflect the poor regeneration potential of the ACL after rupture or transection (3,13).
Muscle. Much of the experimental data about the effects of early mobilization versus immobilization on muscle injury repair have come from studies in Tampere and Turku, Finland, and have been reviewed in Järvinen and Lehto (2). In experimentally injured rat gastrocnemius muscle, fiber regeneration is often inhibited by dense scar-tissue formation. Immobilization immediately after injury limits the size of the connective tissue area formed within the injury site. Penetration of muscle fibers into the connective tissue is prominent, but their orientation is complex and fibers are not parallel to the uninjured muscle fibers. In addition, immobilization for longer than 1 week resulted in marked atrophy of the injured gastrocnemius. Mobilization instituted immediately after injury resulted in dense scar formation and interfered with muscle regeneration.
In the rat model, the best results were achieved when mobilization was started after 3 to 5 days of immobilization. In the gastrocnemius, muscle fiber penetration through the immature connective tissue appeared optimal, and orientation of regenerated muscle fibers aligned with the uninjured muscle fibers. The gain in strength and capacity for energy absorption has been similar and as good as that of muscles treated by early immediate mobilization alone (2).
Tendons. Using a rat model, Enwemeka et al (14) demonstrated a significant increase in Achilles tendon strength after repair and early mobilization compared with repair and immobilization. In divided, unrepaired rat Achilles tendons, Murrell et al (15,16) obtained similar results. Gelberman at al (17) reported that mobilization of an animal extremity enhanced the orientation and organization of tendon collagen. Thus, after the inflammatory phase, a controlled stretching and strengthening of the regenerating, repaired tendon is likely to increase the final tensile properties of the tendon. However, suspicion remains that even with optimal therapy after repair, the collagen fibers in the tendon may be deficient in content, quality, and orientation (10). If so, this deficiency may present increased risk of inflammatory reaction, tendon degeneration, and tendon reruptures during later activities.
Soft-Tissue Healing: Clinical Trials
Early controlled mobilization. Controlled clinical trials of acute soft-tissue injuries support the results of experimental studies and have shown that early controlled mobilization is superior to immobilization, not only in primary treatment, but also in postoperative management. The superiority of early controlled mobilization has been especially clear in terms of quicker recovery and return to full activity without jeopardizing the subjective or objective long-term outcome. Evidence has been systematic and convincing for many injuries (table 3): acute ankle ligament rupture (18-20); after surgery for ankle ligament rupture (21); after surgery for chronic ankle ligament instability (22); knee ligament injury (6,23); articular cartilage injury (24); minimally displaced distal radius fracture (25); and complete Achilles tendon rupture (26-28). In addition, in many other injuries such as elbow or shoulder dislocation and many nondisplaced fractures, early mobilization yielded good results, although not all studies used a control group (10,29).

TABLE 3. Soft-Tissue Injuries That Have Been Shown to Have Better Outcomes With Early Mobilization Than With Immobilization

Acute ankle ligament tears
Postsurgery acute or chronic ankle ligament tears
Knee ligament injuries
Complete Achilles tendon ruptures

Randomized studies. The importance of results from prospective, randomized trials cannot be overemphasized; they may dramatically change our thinking and conventional treatment protocols. For example, 2-year results from a prospective, randomized study (27) from Hannover, Germany, (conservative functional treatment alone vs surgery plus similar functional treatment) support the use of early functional rehabilitation alone in complete Achilles tear. This finding is supported by an experimental observation in rats that surgical repair of a surgically divided Achilles tendon did not improve the outcome obtained by functional treatment (free-cage activity) alone (30).
Other examples come from investigations of patellar dislocation: Two randomized studies (31,32) from Finland indicate that after a 2-year follow-up, conservative treatment of acute patellar dislocation gives results at least as good as surgical treatment followed by similar conservative treatment. Comparable observations have been made in acute, complete rupture of the ankle ligaments: Early controlled mobilization alone gives results at least as good as surgery plus early controlled mobilization (18,21,33).
Practical Applications
Avoiding atrophy. Obviously, the best method for preventing immobilization atrophy is usage. Complete immobilization should be minimal and often is not needed at all. During the last 10 to 15 years, many postoperative protocols, especially those involving knee and ankle ligament injuries, have undergone a major change from long, complete immobilization to early, controlled mobilization using elastic or other bandages, rehabilitative braces, continuous passive devices, or a combination immediately after the trauma. Also, active joint motion and weight bearing is allowed earlier than before, and training during immobilization is becoming more and more effective (10). Even modern fracture treatment has considerably reduced the degree and duration of cast immobilization (10,25).
Early mobilization. Early mobilization is the best method to avoid joint contracture and its harmful consequences on articular cartilage. The technique also serves to maintain and return joint proprioception, which, in turn, may be important in preventing reinjury and in hastening recovery to full fitness. In addition, Frank et al (34) have suggested that joint motion may help reduce postinjury and postoperative pain, swelling, and thromboembolic complications.
The efficacy of early motion in preventing immobilization atrophy depends on how well it controls pain, inflammation, and swelling. Inflammation and pain result in voluntary inhibition of muscle activity across the affected joint. Spencer et al (35) have even reported that pain is not required to cause muscle inhibition; swelling alone is sufficient (so-called reflex inhibition). Therefore, primary treatment should control all three factors using early controlled motion in combination with other treatment modalities such as cold, anti-inflammatory analgesics, and transcutaneous neural stimulation.
Rehabilitation programs. For each joint and each type of injury, rehabilitation programs must be individualized, taking into account the injured structures that should be protected from premature and intensive mobilization, as well as the uninjured structures that should be mobilized as soon as possible. To prevent muscle dysfunction when immobilization must be used, diverse stimuli are needed throughout the entire period; these include strength, power, and endurance exercises. The modern operational principle in the treatment of acute soft-tissue injuries and during immobilization is that "within the limits of pain, everything that is not explicitly forbidden is allowed." (10) This, of course, requires good cooperation between the patient and the attending physician and physical therapist.
Take-Home Message
Controlled experimental and clinical trials have yielded convincing evidence that early, controlled mobilization is superior to immobilization for musculoskeletal soft-tissue injuries. This holds true not only in primary treatment of acute injuries, but also in their postoperative management. The superiority of early controlled mobilization is especially apparent in terms of producing quicker recovery and return to full activity, without jeopardizing the long-term rehabilitative outcome. Therefore, the technique can be recommended as the method of choice for acute soft-tissue injury.
MEDICO LEGAL NEWS
ALAN M. IMMERMAN, D.C.
DECEMBER 10, 1998
Copyright 1998

ACUTE SOFT TISSUE INJURIES: DO THEY HEAL PARTIALLY OR COMPLETELY?
As described by Kellett, there are three stages in the healing of soft tissue (referring to ligament and tendon):
1. Acute Inflammatory Phase: Marked by swelling, redness, warmth and pain, the acute inflammatory phase lasts about 72 hours. During this period of time, the body minimizes blood loss by activating the blood coagulation system; dilates (widens) the blood vessels so that healing elements may be more quickly delivered to the damaged tissues; and removes debris which results from the damage to soft tissue cells.
2. Repair Phase: This phase lasts from 48 hours to 6 weeks. Early in the repair phase the body finishes the job of cleansing the entire area of the soft tissue injury. Next the body synthesizes new fibers (collagen) to replace the damaged fibers. The new collagen is not, however, fully orientated in the direction of tensile strength.
3. Remodeling Phase: This phase lasts from 3 weeks to 12 months or more. During this phase, the body remodels the newly synthesized collagen in order to increase the functional capabilities of the tendon or ligament to withstand the stresses imposed on it. (Kellett, 1986)
It is important to note that normal ligaments are composed of type I collagen whereas damaged and healed ligaments contain a large proportion of type III collagen. Type III collagen is considered an "immature" form of collagen because it is deficient in the number of cross-linkages between and within the collagen subunits. Experiments which have studied ligament healing in rabbits have found that 40 weeks after injury the collagen is still deficient in content and quality. (Kellett, 1986) The cross-linkages are of critical importance in determining the strength of the newly synthesized collagen. (Loitz and Frank, 1993)
What do other authors say about the final extent of healing? Woo and Buckwalter in 1987 stated: "It became apparent that most injuries to the Musculoskeletal soft tissues do not result in repair that restores normal tissue structure and function and that the long-term results vary. Unlike bone, regeneration of normal tissue and complete restoration of normal function rarely occurs in the musculoskeletal soft tissues." (Woo and Buckwalter, 1987)
In 1993, Loitz and Frank stated: "Cellular changes indicative of scar maturation are present by 12 months and continue to approach normality for up to 30 months, but to date, no study has documented an end to scar remodeling and a return of the ligament to ‘normal.’" (Loitz and Frank, 1993)
CONCLUSIONS
The only reasonable conclusion that can be drawn from the existing research and literature is that acute soft tissue injuries never heal completely. Normal ligament and tendon is replaced by an inferior type of tissue.
Tissue Response to Injury
THE INFLAMMATORY REPSONSE
Acute Inflammation
Phase 1; Acute phase
- Redness
- Heat
- Swelling
- Pain
- Loss of function

- Cellular death continues after initial injury because of the following;
o Lack of oxygen caused by disruption of circulation
o Digestive enzymes of the engulfing phagocytes that spill over to kill normal cells
- Vascular response
o First hour; Vasoconstriction; Decrease in the diameter of a blood vessel
o Second hour; Vasodilation; Increase in the diameter of a blood vessel.
§ Exudate; Fluid with a high protein content and containing cellular debris that comes from blood vessels
and accumulates in the area of the injury
§ Permeable; Permitting the passage of a substance through a vessel wall
§ The vadodilator theory of autoregulation suggests that metabolic byproducts increase blood flow by
causing vasodilation in localized area
- Cellular response
o Mast cells; Connective tissue cells contain heparin (blood anticoagulant) and histamine
o Leukocytes; Consist of two types – granulocytes (e.g., basophils and neutrophils) and agranulocytes
(e.g., monocytes and lymphocytes)
o Phagocytosis; Process of ingesting microorganisms, other cells, or foreign particles, commonly performed
by monocytes (white blood cells)
o Macrophages engulf large quantities of bacteria
o Diapedesis is the process by which leukocytes squeeze through pores in the capillary wall
- Chemical mediators
o Histamine (Released by mast cells and platelets); Increased capillary permeability
o Serotonin (Released by mast cells and platelets)
o Bradykinin
o Prostaglandins
o Leukotrienes
- Complement system
o Leukocyte chemotaxis
o Phagocytosis
- Bleeding and exudate
o Blood coagulation; Thromboplastin + Calcium = Prothrombin = Thrombin = Fibrinogen
= Insoluble fibrin clot (+ Vitamin K)

Phase 2; Repair Phase (Fibroplasis phase); Scar formation
- Tissue repairs;
o By resolution
o By granulation tissue
o By regeneration
- Tissue repair depends on
o Elimination of debris
o Regeneration of endothelial cells
o Production of fibroblasts
- Fibroblasts become active during regeneration phase of the inflammatory response to begin building collagen

Phase 3; Remodeling phase (up to 1 ~2 years)
- Remodeling depends on the amount and type of scar tissue present
- Synthesis; Process of forming or building up
- Lysis; Process of breaking down

Chronic Inflammation
- Chronic inflammation can stem from repeated acute microtraumas and overuse.
Tissue Response to injury


Acute inflammation has a short onset and a short duration. It consists of hemodynamic changes, production of an exudate, and the presence of granular leukocytes. Chronic inflammation has a long onset and a long duration. It displays a presence of nongranular leukocytes and a more extensive formation of scar tissue.
Acute inflammation: vascular and cellular events

- 5 cardinal signs of inflammation (4) originally by Roman physician Celsius in 1st Century AD; Galen, a Greek physician added functio laesa in the second century.
- serve as reminder to athlete of injury and to prevent the athlete from exceeding safe limits and reinjuring area
Five signs
- redness (rubor)
- swelling (tumor)
- heat (calor)
- pain (dolor)
- loss of function (functio laesa)

Three phases: acute, reactive, or substrate inflammatory phase; the repair and regeneration phase; and the remodeling phase.

Acute inflammation

Phase I: Acute phase
The acute phase of inflammation is the initial reaction of body tissue to an irritant or injury and is characteristic of the first 3 or 4 days after injury. Acute inflammation is the fundamental reaction designed to protect, localize, and rid the body of some injurious agent in preparation for healing and repair. The main causes of inflammation are trauma, chemical agents, thermal extremes, and pathogenic organisms.

Vascular response
First hour. At the time of trauma, before the usual signs of inflammation appear, a transitory vasoconstriction occurs, causing decreased blood flow. At the moment of vasoconstriction, coagulation begins to seal broken blood vessels, followed by the activation of chemical influences. Vasoconstriction is replaced by dilation of venules, arterioles, and capillaries in the immediate area of the injury.
Second hour. Vasodilation brings with it a slowing of blood flow, increased blood viscosity, and stasis, which leads to swelling (edema). With dilation also comes exudation of plasma and concentration of red blood cells (hemoconcentration). Much of the plasma exudate results from fluid seepage through the intact vessel lining, which becomes more permeable, and from higher pressure within the vessel. Permeability is relatively transient in mild injuries, lasting only a few minutes, with restoration to a pre-injury state in 15 to 30 minutes. In slightly more severe situations there may be a delayed response with a late onset of permeability. In such cases, permeability may not appear for hours and then appears with some additional irritation and a display of rapid swelling lasting for an extended period.
A redistribution of leukocytes occurs within the intact vessels, caused in part by a slowing of circulation. These leukocytes move from the center of the blood flow to become concentrated and then line up and adhere to the endothelial walls. This process is known as margination, or pavementing, and occurs mainly in venules. The leukocytes pass through the wall of the blood vessel by ameboid action, known as diapedesis, and are directed to the injury site by chemotaxis (a chemical attraction to the injury). It should be noted that ameboid motion is a slow process, taking about 6 hours. With an injury there is also an increase in lymph flow because of a high interstitial tissue pressure.

Cellular response
In phase I of acute inflammation, mast cells and leukocytes are in abundance. Mast cells are connective tissue cells that contain heparin (a blood anticoagulant) and histamine. Basophils, monocytes, and neutrophils are the major leukocytes. Basophils leukocytes are believed to bring anticoagulant substances to tissues that are inflamed and are present during both acute and chronic inflammatory healing phases. The neutrophils representing about 60% to 70% of the leukocytes arrive at the injury site before the larger monocytes. They immigrate from the bloodstream. Neutrophils emigrate from the bloodstream through diapedesis and phagocytosis to ingest smaller debris than do monocytes. Phagocytosis is the process of ingesting material such as bacteria, dead cells, and other debris associated with disease, infection, or injury. Opsonin is a protein substance in the blood serum that coats microorganisms and other cells, making them more amenable to phagocytosis. The phagocyte commonly accomplishes this process by projecting cytoplasmic pseudopods, which engulf the object and ingest the particle through enzymes. When the neutrophils disintegrates, it gives off enzymes called lysozomes, which digest engulfed material. These enzymes act as irritants and continue the inflammatory process. Neutrophils also have chemotactic properties, attracting other leukocytes to the injured area. The monocyte, which is a nongranular leukocyte, arrives on the scene into large macrophages that have the ability to ingest large particles of bacteria or cellular debris.

Chemical mediators
Chemical mediators for the inflammatory process are stored and given off by various cells. Histamine, the first chemical to appear in inflammation, is given off by blood platelets, basophils leukocytes, and mast cells. It is a major producer of arterial dilation, venule, and capillary permeability. Serotonin is a powerful vasoconstrictor found in platelets and mast cells. With an increase in blood there is an increase in local metabolism. Permeability is produced by the contraction of the endothelial cells of the capillary wall, producing a gap between cells. Gaps allow plasma to leak proteins, platelets, and leukocytes. Plasma proteases, with their ability to produce polypeptides, act as chemical mediators. A major plasma protease in inflammation is bradykinin, which increases permeability and causes pain.
Heparin is also given off by mast cells and basophils and temporarily prevents blood coagulation. In addition, in the early stages of acute injury, prostaglandins and leukotrienes are produced. Both of these substances stem from arachidoic acid; however, prostaglandins are produced in almost all body tissues. They are stored in the cell membranes phospholipids. Leukotrienes alter capillary permeability and, it is believed, play a significant role, along with prostaglandin, in all aspects of the inflammatory process. Prostaglandins apparently encourage, as well as inhibit, inflammation depending on the conditions that are prevalent at the time.

Inflammation response Mediators
vasoconstriction serotonin from platelets and mast cells
vasodilation histamine from platelets, basophils, and mast cells
prostaglandin from arachidonic acid
leukotrienes from arachidonic acid
bradykinin from body fluids
margination and pavementing loss of micro-circulation, increase in blood viscosity
emigration of leukocytes leukocytes pass through capillary walls (diapedesis)
chemotaxis leukocytes attract other leukocytes
phagocytosis leukocytes, debris, complement, opsonization

Bleeding and exudate
The extent of fluid in the injured area is highly dependent on the extent of damaged vessels and the permeability of the intact vessel. Blood coagulates in three stages. In the initial stage thromboplastin is formed. In the second stage prothrombin is converted into thrombin under the influence of thromboplastin with calcium. In the third stage, thrombin changes from soluble fibrinogen into soluble fibrin. The plasma exudate then coagulates into a network of fibrin and localizes the injured area.

Phase II: Repair phase
The term repair is synonymous with healing, whereas regeneration refers to restoration of destroyed or lost tissue. Healing, which extends from the inflammatory phase (48 to 72 hours to approximately 6 weeks), occurs when the area has become clean through the removal of cellular debris, erythrocytes, and the fibrin clot. Tissue repair is accomplished through three processes: by resolution, in which there is little tissue damage and normal restoration; by the formation of granulation tissue, occurring if resolution is delayed, and by regeneration the replacement of tissue by the same tissue. The formation of scar tissue after trauma is a common occurrence; however, because scar tissue is less viable than normal tissue, the less scarring the better. When mature, scar tissue represents tissue that is firm, fibrous, inelastic, and devoid of capillary circulation. The type of scar tissue known as adhesion can complicate the recovery of joint or organ disabilities. Healing by scar tissue begins with an exudate, a fluid with a large content of protein and cellular debris that collects in the area of the injury site. From the exudate, a highly vascular mass develops known as granulation tissue. Infiltrating this mass is a proliferation of immature connective tissue (fibroblasts) and endothelial cells. Gradually the collagen protein substance, stemming from fibroblasts, forms a dense, fibrous scar. Collagenous fibers have the capacity to contract approximately 3 to 14 weeks after an injury and even as long as 6 months afterward in more severe cases.
During this stage, two types of healing occur. Primary healing, healing by first intention, takes place in an injury that has even and closely opposed edges, such as a cut or incision. With this type of injury, if the edges are held in very close approximation, a minimum of granulation tissue is produced. Secondary healing, healing by secondary intention, results when there is a gaping lesion and large tissue loss leading to replacement by scar tissue. External wounds such as lacerations and internal musculoskeletal injuries commonly heal by secondary intention.

Phase III: Remodeling Phase
Remodeling of the traumatized area overlaps that of repair and regeneration. Normally in acute injuries the first 3 to 6 weeks are characterized by increased production of scar tissue and increased strength fibers. Strength of scar tissue continues to increase from 3 months to 2 years after injury. Ligamentous tissue takes as long a 1 year to become completely remodeled. To avoid a rigid, non-yielding scar, there must be a physiological balance between synthesis and lysis. There is simultaneous synthesis of collagen by fibroblasts and lysis by collagenase enzymes. The tensile strength of collagen apparently is specific to the mechanical forces imposed during the remodeling phase. Forces applied to the ligament during rehabilitative exercise will develop strength specifically in the direction that force is applied. If too early or excessive strain is placed on the injury, the healing process is extended. For proper healing of muscles and tendons, there must be careful consideration to mobilize the site. Early mobilization can assist in producing a more viable injury site; on the other hand, too long a period of immobilization can delay healing. The ideal of collagen remodeling is to have the healed area contain a preponderance of mature collagenous fibers that have a number of cross-linkages. As stated, collagen content and quality may be deficient for months after injury.

Chronic inflammation
If acute inflammation reaction fails to be resolves in 1 month, it is termed a sub-acute inflammation. If it lasts for months or even years, the condition is termed chronic. Major chemicals found during chronic inflammation are the kinins (especially bradykinin), which also cause vasodilation, increased permeability, and pain. Prostaglandin, also seen in chronic conditions, causes vasodilation. Prostaglandin can be inhibited by aspirin.

Soft tissue healing
All tissues of the body can be defined as soft tissue except for bone. The human body has four types of soft tissue: epithelial tissue, which consists of the skin and the lining of vessels and many organs; connective tissue, which consists of tendons, ligaments, cartilage, fat, blood vessels, and bone; muscle, which can be skeletal, cardia, or visceral and nervous tissue, which consists of the brain, spinal cord, and nerves.

Cartilage healing
Articular cartilage has limited capacity to heal. Cartilage has little or no direct blood supply. When chondrocytes are destroyed and the matrix is disrupted, healing is variable. Articular cartilage that fails to clot and as no perichondrium heals and repairs slowly. On the other hand, if the affected area includes the subchondral bone, which has a greater blood supply, granulation tissue is formed and the healing process proceeds normally.

Ligament healing
Ligament healing follows the same course of healing as other vascular tissue. If proper immediate and follow-up management is done, a sprained ligament will undergo the acute, repair, and remodeling phases in approximately the same time period as other vascular tissues.
During the repair phase, collagen fibers realign in reaction to joint stress and strains. Full ligament healing with scar maturation may take as long as twelve months.

Skeletal muscle healing
Skeletal muscles cannot undergo the mitotic activity required to replace cells that have been injured. In other words, regeneration of new myofibers is minimal. Skeletal muscle healing and repair follow the same process as other soft tissue developing tensile strength according the Wolffs law.

Wolffs Law
Wolffs law states that after injury both bone and soft tissue will respond to the physical demands placed on them, causing them to remodel or realign along lines of tensile force. Therefore it is critical that injured structures be exposed to progressively increasing loads throughout the rehabilitation process.

Nerve healing
Because of the nature of nerve cells, they cannot regenerate after they have died. Regeneration can take place within a nerve fiber. The closer the injury is to the nerve cell, the more difficult regeneration becomes.
For nerve regeneration to occur, an optimal environment must be present. If peripheral nerve regeneration occurs, it is at a rate of only 3 to 4 mm per day. Injured nerves within the central nervous system do not regenerate as well as peripheral nerves do.

Modifying Soft-Tissue healing
The healing process is unique in each athlete. Age and general nutrition can play a role in healing. The older athlete may be more delayed in healing than younger athletes are. The injuries of an athlete with poor nutritional status may heal more slowly than normal. Athletes with certain organic disorders may heal slowly. For example, blood conditions such as anemia and diabetes often inhibit the healing process.

Management Concepts

1. Drugs to treat the inflammation. There is a current trend toward the use of antiprostaglandin medications, or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The intent of this practice is to decrease vasodilation and capillary permeability.

2. Therapeutic modalities. Both cold and heat are used for different conditions. In general, heat stimulates acute inflammation and cold acts as an inhibitor. Conversely, in chronic conditions, heat may severe as a depressant. A number of electrical modalities are used for the treatment of inflammation stemming from sports injuries.

3. Therapeutic exercise. A major aim of soft-tissue rehabilitation through exercise is pain-free movement, full-strength power, and full extensibility of associated muscles. The ligamentous tissue, if related to the injury, should become pain free and have full tensile strength and full range of motion. The dynamic joint stabilizers should regain full strength and power. Immobilization of a part after injury or surgery is not always good for all injuries. When a part is immobilized over an extended period of time, adverse biochemical changes occur in collagenous tissue. Early mobilization used in exercise rehabilitation that is highly controlled may enhance the healing process.

Fracture healing
The osteoblast is the cellular component of bone and forms its matrix; the osteocyte both forms and destroys bone, and osteoclasts destroy and resorb bone. The constant ongoing remodeling of bone is caused by osteocytes; osteoclasts are related mainly to pathological responses. Osteoclasts come from the cambium layer of the periosteum, which is the fibrous covering of the bone, and are involved in bone healing. The inner cambium layer, in contrast to the highly vascular and dense external layer, is more cellular and less vascular. It serves as a foundation for blood vessels and provides a place for attaching muscles, tendons, and ligaments.

Acute fracture healing
Acute fracture healing follows the same three phases that soft tissue does but is more complex. In general acute fracture healing has five stages: hematoma formation, cellular proliferation, callus formation, ossification, and remodeling.

Hematoma formation
Acute inflammation usually lasts approximately four days. When a bone fractures, there is trauma to the periosteum and surrounding soft tissue. With hemorrhaging, a hematoma accumulates in the medullary canal and surrounding soft tissue in the first 48 to 72 hours. The exposed ends of vascular channels become occluded with clotted blood accompanied by dying of the osteocytes, disrupting the intact blood supply. The dead bone and related soft tissue begin to elicit a typical inflammatory reaction, including vasodilation, plasma exudates, and inflammatory cells.

Cellular formation
The hematoma in a bony fracture, like in a soft-tissue injury, begins its organization in granulation tissue and gradually builds a fibrous junction between the fractured ends. At this time the environment is acid, but it will slowly change to neutral or slightly alkaline. A major influx of capillary buds that carry endosteal cells from the bones cambium layer occurs. These cells first produce a fibrous callus, then cartilage, and finally a woven bone. When there is an environment of high oxygen tension, fibrous tissue predominates, whereas when oxygen tension is low, cartilage develops. Bone will develop at the fracture site when oxygen tension and compression are in the proper amounts.

Callus formation
The soft callus, in general, is an unorganized network of woven bone formed at the ends of the broken bone that is later absorbed and replaced by bone. At the soft-callus stage, both internal and external calluses are produced that bring an influx of osteoblasts that begin to immobilize the fracture site. The internal and external calluses are formed by bone fragments that grow to bridge the fracture gap. The internal callus grows rapidly to create a rigid immobilization. Beginning in the three to four weeks, and lasting three to four months, the hard callus forms. Hard callus is depicted by a gradual connecting of bone filament to the woven bone at the fractured ends. Less than satisfactory immobilization produces a cartilaginous rather than bony union.

Ossification
With adequate immobilization and compression, the bone ends become crossed with a new haversian system that will eventually lead to the laying down of primary bone. The ossification stage is the completion of the laying down bone. The fracture has been bridged and firmly united. Excess has been resorbed by osteoclasts.

Remodeling
Remodeling occurs after the callus has been resorbed and trabecular bone is laid down along the lines of stress. Complete remodeling may take many years. The influence of biochemical stimulation (piezoelectric effect) is the basis for development of new trabecular bone to be laid down at a point of greatest stress. This influence is predicted on the fact that bone is electropositive on its convex side and electronegative on its concave side. The convex considered the tension side, whereas the concave is the compression side. Significantly, osteoclasts are drawn to a positive electrical charge and osteoblasts to a negative electrical charge. Remodeling is considered complete when a fractured bone has been restored to its former shape or has developed a shape that can withstand imposed stresses.

Management of Acute Fractures
1. If there is poor blood supply to the fractured area and one of the parts of the broken bone is not properly supplied by the blood, that part will die and union or healing of the fracture will not take place. This condition is known as avascular necrosis and often occurs in the head of the femur, the navicular of the wrist, the talus of the ankle, and isolated bone fragments.

2. Poor immobilization of the fracture site, resulting from poor casting by the physician and permitting motion between the bone parts, may not only prevent proper union but may also, in the event that union does transpire, cause deformity to develop.

3. Infection can materially interfere with the normal healing process, particularly in the case of a compound fracture, which offers an ideal situation for development of a severe streptococcal or staphylococcal infection.

Pain

Nociception
Pain receptors, known as nociceptors, or free nerve endings, are sensitive to extreme mechanical, thermal, and chemical energy. They are commonly found in meninges, periosteum, skin, teeth, and some organs.
A nociceptive neuron transmits pain information to the spinal cord via the unmyelinated C fibers and the myelinated A-delta fibers. The smaller C fibers carry the impulses at a rate of 0.5 to 2.0 m per second and larger A-delta fibers at a rate of 5 to 30 m per second. When a nociceptor is stimulated there is release of a neuropeptide (substance P) that initiates an electrical impulse along the afferent fiber toward the spinal cord. The faster A-delta afferent fiber impulse moves up the spinal cord at a moderately rapid speed to the thalamus, which gives a precise location of the acute pain, which is perceived as being bright, sharp, or stabbing. In contrast the slower-conducting smaller unmyelinated C fibers are concerned with pain that is diffused, dull, aching, and unpleasant. It also terminates in the thalamus, with projections to the limbic cortex that provide an emotional aspect to this pain. Nociceptive stimuli are at close to an intensity that produces tissue damage.

Endogenous analgesics
The nervous system is powered electromechanically. Chemicals released by a presynaptic cell cross a synapse, stimulating or inhibiting a postsynaptic cell. This is called a neurotransmitter. Two types of chemical neurotransmitters that mediate pain are the endorphins and serotonin. They are generated by noxious stimuli, which activate inhibition of pain transmission.
Stimulation of the periaqueductal gray area (PGA) of the midbrain and the raphe nucleus in the pons and medulla causes analgesia. Analgesia is produced by the stimulation of opiods, morphine-like substances manufactured in the PGA and many other areas of the central nervous system. These endogenous opoid peptides are known as endorphins and enkephalins.
Noradrenergic neurons stimulating norepinephrine can also inhibit pain transmission. Serotonin has also been identified as a neuromodulator.

Pain Categories
1. Fast or slow fast pain is localized and carried through A-delta axons located in the skin. Slow pain is perceived as aching, throbbing, or burning. It is conducted through the C-fibers.

2. Acute or chronic acute pain is less than 6 months. Chronic pain has a duration longer than 6 months.

3. Projected (referred) pain. Such pain occurring away from actual sire of irritation. Example Kehrs sign indicates an involved spleen.

Common to musculoskeletal injuries is the cyclic condition of pain-spasm-hypoxia-pain. Disrupting this cycle can occur trough a variety of means such as heat or cold, electrical stimulation-induced analgesia, or selected pharmacological approaches.
The gate theory and TENS
The gate theory, as developed by Melzack and Wall, sets forth the idea that the spinal cord is organized in such a way that pain or other sensations may be experienced. An area located in the dorsal horn causes inhibition of the pain impulses ascending to the cortex for perception. The area, or gate, within the dorsal horn is composed of T cells and substantia gelatinosa. T cells apparently are neurons that organize stimulus input and transmit the stimulus to the brain. The substantia gelatinosa functions as a gate-control system. It determines the stimulus input sent to the T cells from peripheral nerves. If the stimulus from a noxious material exceeds a certain threshold, pain is experienced. Apparently the smaller and slower nerve fibers carry pain impulses, and larger and faster nerve fibers carry other sensations. Impulses from the faster fibers arriving at the gate first inhibit pain impulses. In other words, stimulation of large, rapidly conducting fibers can selectively close the gate against the smaller pain fiber input. This concept explains why acupuncture, acupressure, cold, heat, and chemical skin irritation can provide some relief against pain. It also provides a rationale for the current success of TENS.

Result number: 47

Message Number 152194

plantar View Thread
Posted by debra on 6/07/04 at 06:20

hi
i have had plantar fasciitis for over a yr now.
the treatment i have had is ultra sound and foot taped, cortison injections and shoe supports and still no releife. although pain ahs changed it feels as though someone is sticking a pin in my foot. its that bad sometimes it makes me shudder.
hope you can make some suggestions
thanks debra

Result number: 48

Message Number 151760

plantar fasciitis View Thread
Posted by debra on 6/02/04 at 04:23

hi
i have had plantar fasciitis for over a yr now.
the treatment i have had is ultra sound and foot taped, cortison injections and shoe supports and still no releife. although pain ahs changed it feels as though someone is sticking a pin in my foot. its that bad sometimes it makes me shudder.
hope you can make some suggestions
thanks debra

Result number: 49
Searching file 14

Message Number 143312

Re: anybody else with TTS and burning past the calf? View Thread
Posted by Melody B. on 1/31/04 at 10:25

Hi Debra,
You sound just like me! I also have to now walk with a cane. I can "walk"
(limp actually, I haven't "walked" in over 2 years now) around inside the house without it. But if I try to cover a long distance like the grocery store or Walmart I can't do it without my cane and then I can only stand to be on my feet for about 45 min. to an hour. I was in a classroom for 10 years and now I have been told I will never do it again due to my feet. I had surgery in Nov. 2002 on my left foot.I had some relief for awhile.The pain is bad but I don't want narcotics to relieve it. I know that if I started them with the pain that I have, that I would take them all the time just to be able to walk pain free" and be "normal again". Now my right foot is getting really bad.I am so sick of all of this.
Have you applied for SS Disability? If so how long did it take? I am now to where I think this is what I will have to do. I have been out of work since my surgery. I keep hoping I will get better and I am denying that won't.But deep down I know that I have a real problam with my feet. It is good to know that I am not alone in this struggle.
Warm Regards,
Melody

Result number: 50

Message Number 143298

Re: anybody else with TTS and burning past the calf? View Thread
Posted by Debra on 1/30/04 at 22:52

Hey Mary I am 45 and I too am disabled due to tts. I have has 2tts surgeries ans too many other things done to my foot, I hope you recover my problem has lasted 4 long years I get around with a cane most of the time. Any good dr in the new orleans area? I have been thur 5 so far Help !!!!!Debra

Result number: 51
Searching file 13

Message Number 133917

Re: tts injection View Thread
Posted by Debra on 10/13/03 at 22:50

Hi I have had too many shots to count in the past 4yrs. Didnt do much. I had two surgerys. I have not walked without a cane over 5min. in 3yrs. I understandyour pain.anyway I have gone to a new dr , my 5th doctor. He is treating me with nuriton and ultrm and therapy. My other leg is also becoming affected. I hope you get better let me know what treatments have worked because so far nothing releaves this pain. Take care its nice to know I am not alone in this nitemare. DEBRA

Result number: 52
Searching file 12

Message Number 126564

Re: Monte's RFL View Thread
Posted by john h on 8/08/03 at 10:05

Debra: Ultram just introduced Ultracet which is a combo of ultram and tylenol.

Result number: 53

Message Number 126537

Re: Monte's RFL View Thread
Posted by Debra on 8/07/03 at 23:20

Yes I use the patches and ultram . It helps a little but I have found nothing that will help this pain in my foot. I have had 2 surgeries too, anybody got any help out there.

Result number: 54
Searching file 11

Message Number 118204

Re: Where have you read about them? View Thread
Posted by Terri on 5/09/03 at 19:28

Hi Debra, I actually gasped when I read your post. I too had a PF rupture right after surgery. I repeatedly told my Dr. about the pain I was having in the cuboid area. He took an x-ray and said nothing was wrong. This went on for about 7 months. He taped my foot, gave me cortisone injections, etc. Finally when I'd had enough, he went back to the original x-ray from months earlier and lo and behold, my cuboid was dislocated. It had been dislocated and bopping around in there for so long, that I have since had 4 corrective surgeries. The cuboid had to be fused as It would not stay where it was supposed to be. As a result of locking this area of my foot, other bones and joints took up the play and last July I had to have a subtalar heel fusion. I am still in alot of pain, ankle and behind the ankle very swollen, getting up on my feet is awful, and walking is done only when necessary as every step hurts me. I went to a pain management Dr. last week and he said "cuboids do not dislocate". I am living proof that they do! Find a good Dr. and see what exactly is going on in your foot. I hope things work out well for you.

Result number: 55

Message Number 117725

Re: research PN treatment View Thread
Posted by Sharon W on 5/03/03 at 06:47

Here's something else that interested me, from the same site (although it doesn't mention treatments):

Syndromes with Neuropathy & Myopathy
Paraneoplastic (with weight loss > 15%)
Neuropathy: Distal; Sensory > Motor
Myopathy: Proximal with type II muscle fiber atrophy
Inclusion Body Myositis
Systemic disorders
Uremia
Acromegaly
Collagen vascular disorders
Sarcoid
HIV Infection
Myopathy: Inflammatory;
Several types of neuropathy
Hereditary
Debrancher deficiency
Congenital muscular dystrophy: Merosin deficiency
Marinesco-Sjögren
Mitochondrial: MNGIE Syndrome
Tyrosinemia
Drugs & Toxins
Amiodarone
Chloroquine
Chlorphenoxy
Clofibrate: Risk factor - renal failure
Colchicine: Risk factor - renal failure
Doxorubicin
Eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome
Ethanol: Risk factor - fasting
Hydroxychloroquine
Organophosphates
Perhexiline
Vincristine


Sharon
.

Result number: 56

Message Number 116153

Re: Dr. Davis and Dr. Wander View Thread
Posted by Debra H. on 4/15/03 at 01:39

Thanks, Dr. Wander, for the honest answer. I will continue to give the orthoses time to work and cross my fingers.

Result number: 57

Message Number 116089

Dr. Davis and Dr. Wander View Thread
Posted by Debra H. on 4/14/03 at 10:56

I'm trying to find a podiatrist that has actually treated a patient that has had an acutely fallen arch following a PF rupture or release. I posted a week ago and Dr. Z answered by informing me that this was a complication of PF releases (I already knew this but I guess it was nice to have this confirmed again) and that it was rare. I really would like to talk to someone that has actually treated someone with this problem so I can get some direction about what my options are. The PF symptoms I had before have resolved, but now I have a whole new set of problems. I believe the biomechanics of my walking has changed. My evidence for this is in my foot print. It use to be a heel and ball connected by a thinner bar. Now they are connected by a bar that is almost as wide as the ball of my foot. placing a lot of strain on tendons / ligaments that are causing tendonitis in various areas. I know how to get tendonitis feeling better (rest, NSAIDS, etc), but my concern is that as long as the biomechanics are wrong, I will continue to develop tendonitis over and over again. I'm looking for a way to interrupt this cycle and actually fix the problem instead of just putting band-aids on it. Can you help me?

Result number: 58

Message Number 115905

Re: Where have you read about them? View Thread
Posted by Debra H. on 4/10/03 at 19:05

Hi Dave,
I just re-read your prior statement again as well and I'm sorry to hear about your troubles and for so long. No, I haven't had an ultrasound yet. What would I be looking for if I had one? In other words, how do you think it would help direct my treatments? We are pretty sure the fascia has detached in that foot. Are you thinking for the other areas that hurt? Also, was your rupture complete or partial? I'm thinking it must have been partial since they were still able to do a fasciotomy. Is this correct or am I totally misunderstanding? And, did you continue to have pain in the area around the insertion site or in other areas or both? Sorry for all the questions. And thank you for your willingness to share your story so far.

Sincerely,
Debra

Result number: 59

Message Number 115887

Re: Where have you read about them? View Thread
Posted by dave r on 4/10/03 at 15:38

Debra, i had a plantar fasciotomy. Have you had an ultrasound done on your foot. this will also show inflamation of the fascia and probably will show it better than an mri... You can email me if you like. driepe@qg.com

Result number: 60

Message Number 115886

Re: Where have you read about them? View Thread
Posted by Debra H. on 4/10/03 at 15:33

Steve,
Thanks for your suggestions and efforts.

Dave,
Thanks also for your response. It helps to know of someone else who has experienced this. What kind of surgery did you have? Did they do a fasciotomy, or something else?

Thanks,
Debra

Result number: 61

Message Number 115873

Re: Where have you read about them? View Thread
Posted by dave r on 4/10/03 at 14:22

Debra, i had eswt after the rupture had occured. I didnt get any improvement form the treatments. i have done it all. Physical therapy for two years and wearing nightsplints for 4 years.My original doctor told me that the rupture itself would be like having surgery and that my foot should be fine after a year. But it never was the same. I believe that after the rupture happened my tissue quality of the fascia went down to nothing. I could feel micro tearing and magor swelling for a very long time. It was horrible.I was forced to leave the job that i loved, i took a major paycut and lost contact with most of my friends. It seemed that noone understood.I had doctors tell me that they have never heard of this happening and that i was making it up. Until they saw my mri pictures and what the bottom of my foot looked like. I am not kidding you when i say that my heal has had a bruise on it for years. i finally found a doctor that had seen this before and was very understanding. I had surgery on february 7th of this year. I had the traditional open approach type surgery. I dont have any regrest either. It was a cake walk. It really wasnt painful at all. I will be having surgery on my other foot in two months to. So enough about me. Is there anything that i can do to help you?

Result number: 62

Message Number 115872

Re: Does anybody have anything useful to say for those of us who have complications following PF rupture or release? View Thread
Posted by SteveG on 4/10/03 at 14:11

Debra - you are right. The material I read discussed partial tears and ruptures. With the fascia no longer attached to the heal, you case is different and has, no doubt, resulted in other biomechanical problems. I live near the med school at the University of Washington, next time I am over there I will see if I can find any articles that discuss a case like yours. Best of luck to you, and it they pain and anxiety are getting to be a real problem, don't hesitate to discuss this with your doctor. There are plenty of meds out that that can help.

Result number: 63

Message Number 115864

Re: Where have you read about them? View Thread
Posted by Debra H on 4/10/03 at 13:20

Hi Dave,
I just saw your response. Did you have ESWT before or after the rupture? Where was the ESWT applied? Did it help? What surgery did you have?

Debra

Result number: 64

Message Number 115863

Where have you read about them? View Thread
Posted by Debra H on 4/10/03 at 13:17

Hi Steve,

I would be interested in any references to the articles you have read about PF ruptures (specifically therapy for the complications afterwards). Also, perhaps I wasn't clear. The rupture was a complete rupture (so I'm told it will never heal by reattaching itself to the calcaneous). The pain at the insertion site (where it use to hurt from just the plantar fasciitis) is completely resolved. My pain is now in different parts of the foot (dorsal metatarsals, medial mid-arch, lateral band, and cuboid areas). I'm told that ESWT is not indicated in these areas. What I'm trying to say is that my problem is no longer with the plantar fascia. Rather, it is a result of the stresses placed on my foot due to the change in biomechanics of walking. My arch has flattened and I think the bones have shifted placing different strains on the tendons and ligaments than they are accustomed too. I would be very interested in outcomes in other people who have had these problems, but I can't find literature about it. The only literature I can find is to say that they exist and not the ultimate outcomes or therapy, etc. I did go to an orthopedist who specializes in foot problems and his response was that he knew it existed but that he didn't know much about it. That's why I've stuck with the podiatrist. What I would really like to do is to find a podiatrist that can say that they have actually treated someone with these problems. So far, everyone just says they've heard about it and that it is rare. I would be interested in hearing from the other poster (dave r), if he is still watching. What kind of surgery did he have and what else did he try?

Thanks for your input!
Debra

Result number: 65

Message Number 115841

Re: I have read about PF ruptures View Thread
Posted by SteveG on 4/10/03 at 10:09

Debra - Sorry to hear about your rupture. I don't know about the arch, but I have read about ruptures. From what I have read, your pod is probably right that your symptoms will improve with time. However, I don't know if you will ever be completely pain free. The article I read stated that often the symptoms improve as the torn fascia heals over time. At that point, I don't see why ESWT might not be of benefit to help repair the torn and damaged tissue. You will need to be pretty agressive in your treatment plan - lots of PT, possible cast, etc. I have not read your earlier posts - did you have an MRI or ultrasound and, if so, what did it reveal about the extent of the rupture? You might consider getting a second opinion from anothe pod or ortho to see what they would recommend and to see if they are in agreement with the treatment plan your current doctor has outlined for you.

There is regular poster to these boards (dave r?) who rupture his fascia several years ago and still has problems, but he has improved over time. In fact, he recently had surgery and is seeing some definite improvement.

Result number: 66

Message Number 115791

Does anybody have anything useful to say for those of us who have complications following PF rupture or release? View Thread
Posted by Debra H. on 4/09/03 at 18:49

Since ESWT is no longer an option, what ELSE can be done for those people who have "complications" from PF rupture. More specifically, what can be done about an acutely fallen arch?

Result number: 67

Message Number 115784

Thanks for responding... View Thread
Posted by Debra H. on 4/09/03 at 16:23

Thanks for your response. What, if anything, can be done for it? Is there any hope of being pain-free? Can it be fixed?

Result number: 68

Message Number 115736

Until one of the doctors has time to answer.... View Thread
Posted by Debra H. on 4/08/03 at 21:36

Until one of the doctors has time to answer, has anyone else experienced such a change in their arch following either plantar fascia rupture or surgical release?

Result number: 69

Message Number 115732

Flattened arch after PF rupture #2 View Thread
Posted by Debra H. on 4/08/03 at 21:15

I ruptured my PF about 4 months ago. The heel pain has gotten better, but now I have pain in other parts of my foot (lateral band, mid-arch, midfoot and metatarsal area). I use to have a high arch, but since the PF rupture, had noticed that my foot with the PF rupture seemed flatter when I walked. Eventually, I took my own foot prints and the midfoot width of the non-ruptured foot was only 1 1/2 inches whereas it was 3 inches on the PF ruptured foot. Pain is worse with weight bearing activity. There is no swelling (except a little in the arch) and it is not particularly tender to touch. But, it is painful to walk (causing limping).

My pod has recently tried cortisone injections in three different areas. One area (metatarsals) seems to be helping. My theory is that I have tendonitis in several tendons due to the change in biomechanics resulting from the abrupt change in my arch. My pod doesn't seem to think the abrupt arch change is such a big deal and hopes my foot will settle down with time. I hope he is right.

Do you have any experience treating patients with these sort of problems and what are the outcomes? Am I doing the right things in terms of treatment? My pod is suggesting to cast it again. I do think this would help it feel better while it is casted, but what will keep the "tendonitis" from returning once the cast is removed since the biomechanics won't be corrected?

Any insights would be greatly appreciated.

Result number: 70

Message Number 115591

Flattened arch after PF rupture View Thread
Posted by Debra H. on 4/07/03 at 14:19

I ruptured my PF about 4 months ago. The heel pain has gotten better, but now I have pain in other parts of my foot (lateral band, mid-arch, midfoot and metatarsal area). I use to have a high arch, but since the PF rupture, had noticed that my foot with the PF rupture seemed flatter when I walked. Eventually, I took my own foot prints and the midfoot width of the non-ruptured foot was only 1 1/2 inches whereas it was 3 inches on the PF ruptured foot. Pain is worse with weight bearing activity. There is no swelling (except a little in the arch) and it is not particularly tender to touch. But, it is painful to walk (causing limping).

My pod has recently tried cortisone injections in three different areas. One area (metatarsals) seems to be helping. My theory is that I have tendonitis in several tendons due to the change in biomechanics resulting from the abrupt change in my arch. My pod doesn't seem to think the abrupt arch change is such a big deal and hopes my foot will settle down with time. I hope he is right.

Do you have any experience treating patients with these sort of problems and what are the outcomes? Am I doing the right things in terms of treatment? My pod is suggesting to cast it again. I do think this would help it feel better while it is casted, but what will keep the "tendonitis" from returning once the cast is removed since the biomechanics won't be corrected?

Any insights would be greatly appreciated.

Result number: 71

Message Number 112088

Re: Tarsal Tunnel Surgery View Thread
Posted by Debra on 3/07/03 at 01:00

Hello sorry to hear about your pain, I to suffer from this ,I have had 2 surgeries and am still in severe pain. I have gone to physical therapy, had shots , gone to pain management, none of these things have helped me. This has been with me for 2years , I can walk limited with a cane. My 2 Drs. operated and sent me on my way , Surgery was no help. I hope someday to recover but the drs, say there isnt much hope. I hope you will have a better recovery than I did. Take Care and God Bless, Debra

Result number: 72

Message Number 111758

Tearing of fascia View Thread
Posted by DebraN on 3/04/03 at 12:47

Under heelspurs.com, it talks about the tearing of the fascia away from the heel. I have just experienced this. This could be the beginning of recovery or the beginning of serious problems. What sort of serious problems?

Result number: 73

Message Number 110453

Tae Kwon Do Injury View Thread
Posted by Ted S on 2/23/03 at 07:38

I was performing spinning kicks when I pulled my support leg out and crashed to the floor spining. I fractured my wrist and bounced the side inner step of my heel off the floor. This happened in July 2002. I assumed it was the pain was a bone bruse. It is now getting more tender, I can't put all of my weight on it, and it is tender to touch. I am also starting to experience sharp pains with burning. I had it x-rayed and nothing is broken. I have an MRI this week under the cair of Dr. Debra Eisner in Haverhill, MA. Any ideas on what could be injured from blunt trama to the side of the heel?

Result number: 74
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Message Number 108941

Re: Raynaud's Syndrome View Thread
Posted by Dr. David S. Wander on 2/12/03 at 15:45

Debra has provided an accurate and excellent explanation of Raynaud's. It is usually named Raynaud's phenomena when it is found in conjunction with other disorders such as Lupus, etc. When there is no underlying disease process with the symptoms, it is usually referred to as Raynaud's disease. Debra is correct, and a visit to a vascular specialist is indicated and cold challenge should be utilized for an accurate diagnosis.

Result number: 75

Message Number 108939

Re: Raynaud's Syndrome View Thread
Posted by Debra H. on 2/12/03 at 15:16

I forgot to tell you that Raynaud's is generally diagnosed by having the above symptoms and then confirmed by a cold challenge. With exposure to cold conditions, one would see the characteristic changes in the fingers beginning with white, followed by blueness and then reactive redness. One can also use an ophtalmoscope to look at the small blood vessels of the fingernail cuticle. There is no lab test or study that can confirm it. There is also no cure. Treatment involves minimizing symptoms.

Result number: 76

Message Number 108920

Re: Raynaud's Syndrome View Thread
Posted by Debra H. on 2/12/03 at 10:59

Raynaud's is a blood vessel spasm disorder of the small arteries primarily of the fingers and toes. It is usually induced by exposure to cold, resulting in intermittent white, blue, and red color changes of the involved digits. Raynaud's, when not associated with other disorders, has no identifiable cause and is more common in younger women, usually affects both extremities and usually involves the fingers and toes. It is a benign condition (meaning not an immediate threat) that is usually controlled by avoidance of cold and occasionally by vessel dilation therapy (such as a calcium channel blocker or alpha-adrenergic blocker). Raynaud's may accompany a variety of other disorders such as lupus, systemic sclerosis, and vasculitis, but this form is more common in older men, is often only on one side, and usually invovles only the hands. Complications can result from ischemia (lack of oxygen to the tissue) when precautions are not taken (such as avoiding cold).

Hope this helps.

Result number: 77

Message Number 108407

surgery without anesthesia View Thread
Posted by Ed Davis, DPM on 2/07/03 at 20:06

Debra:
I can really believe that the pain was "intense"!
Ed

Result number: 78

Message Number 108303

Re: A novel idea...? View Thread
Posted by nancy s. on 2/07/03 at 04:40

debra, my first podiatrist offered no stretching guidelines at all. i wasn't aware that one should even be trying to stretch -- or trying to stay off the feet and give the injury time to heal.

by the time i had another doc and was sent to pt, a year later, i had found this website and knew a lot more about what i should try and what i should avoid.

my first pt was good in many ways, but within a month she was recommending the weight-bearing wall stretch to me, and i was still far from healed. i knew it would be wrong for me (in fact, i'd done it before and been made worse from it). got a new pt soon after, who was much more educated about how to treat pf. she had me doing only non-weight-bearing and very gradual stretching and strengthening for a long time.

i think the keys are (1) to listen to your own feet, as julie says, and (2) to self-educate as much as possible on this condition, because too many professionals sometimes don't seem aware of the most basic tenets of pf treatment. good doctors and good pt's will disagree at times, but in my mind some basic standards/do's&dont's for almost everyone with pf should apply. the kinds of stretching that should be done and those that should be avoided seem basic to me. but i wouldn't have known this -- and didn't know it -- until i educated myself, mostly on this site.

nancy
.

Result number: 79

Message Number 108301

Re: A novel idea...? View Thread
Posted by Julie on 2/07/03 at 04:03


Debra, you've said you're in the medical field, so I guess you're well aware that amongst medical professionals views and opinions differ. I'm addressing the part of your post that points out the discrepancy between your physical therapists' views on stretching, and the fact that they all said the stretches your podiatrist gave you were wrong.

It seems that many if not most podiatrists still recommend the 'wall stretch' and even the 'hanging off the stair stretch' (were these the ones your podiatrist counselled?) Many people here have followed that advice, only to be made worse. These stretches, which may be fine for healthy feet and legs, are far too aggressive for injured tissues. Non-weight bearing exercise is preferable in almost all cases of PF.

If you see several professionals (i.e. PTs) and are offered different exercises by each, there is only one way to determine which are right and helpful for you. Try them cautiously, and observe their effects, and follow the bottom line rule: anything that causes pain is probably causing further injury, so - stop.

Result number: 80

Message Number 108293

Re: How? View Thread
Posted by Debra H. on 2/06/03 at 21:45

It was really easy. I was trying to change directions and accelerate off that foot when I felt a big pop followed by intense pain. Keep in mind, I wasn't trying to do this. In fact, I didn't even know it was possible to rupture the PF. I'm in the medical field and have dissected out the PF of a cadaver. I remember it being a pretty tough piece of tissue.

Result number: 81

Message Number 108291

Thank you for your responses, everyone! View Thread
Posted by Debra H. on 2/06/03 at 21:40

This has been most informative, thank you.

Result number: 82

Message Number 108273

A novel idea...? View Thread
Posted by Debra H. on 2/06/03 at 18:57

Thankyou for your great responses! Here is a thought. Since it seems that either ESWT or even surgery are better than rupture, if someone goes to a podiatrist with a history of 8 years of PF despite great efforts at conservative management, why aren't they offered ESWT or fasciotomy sooner than the standard 6 months to one year? Why does a podiatrist start the clock the day they first see the patient rather than when conservative therapy began? (I'm not trying to pick on podiatrists, I think other medical professionals tend to do this as well.) It seems like everyone has "their set of stretches" etc. that works better than anyone else's. It's kind of funny because when I first started going to physical therapy, for the first 3 visits I saw a different physical therapist because the main guy was on vacation. They each gave me a different set of stretches and said the other ones weren't sufficient. And, they all said the stretches given to me by my podiatrist were all wrong. It was quite confusing.

Result number: 83

Message Number 108270

Re: PF Surgery vs. PF Rupture: Do they have the same outcomes? View Thread
Posted by Ed Davis, DPM on 2/06/03 at 18:30

Debra:

The effect of a release is the same but surgery involves a "clean" cut of the fascia while a rupture may involve a "burst" with rough margins thus leading to more edema and scar tissue. Also, in surgery, we know how much of the fascia is being cut -- not the case in a tear.

The plantar fascia has a function to buttress the foot so sacrificing that structure via surgery is less than ideal. ESWT provides the hope of restoring the tissue quality of the fascia and preserving its function.
Ed

Result number: 84

Message Number 108260

Re: PF Surgery vs. PF Rupture: Do they have the same outcomes? View Thread
Posted by Debra H. on 2/06/03 at 17:32

Does anyone know why a PF rupture has worse outcomes than a fasciotomy?

Result number: 85

Message Number 108253

Re: PF Surgery vs. PF Rupture: Do they have the same outcomes? View Thread
Posted by Debra H. on 2/06/03 at 16:46

If this is true, then while 60-70% is still not that great, it would be better to have surgery than to wait for it to rupture. Or at least, PF rupture is NOT just like having the surgery done. Sure, it didn't cost me anything, but the outcomes are worse. Can anyone give me a reference to any of the studies on surgical outcomes of PF relase?

Result number: 86

Message Number 108252

Re: PF Surgery vs. PF Rupture: Do they have the same outcomes? View Thread
Posted by SteveG on 2/06/03 at 16:42

Debra - This depends a lot on the study you look at. I have heard everything from 50% to 90%. I believe that Dr. Davis, one of the pods on this board, recently gave surgery about a 60-70% success rate.

Result number: 87

Message Number 108250

PF Surgery vs. PF Rupture: Do they have the same outcomes? View Thread
Posted by Debra H. on 2/06/03 at 16:35

There is an article posted on this website that indicates that in a study of 51 people with PF ruptures that 50% still had symptoms after 1 year. I've been told that one train of thought is that a PF rupture is a good thing because it does exactly what a PF surgical release would do. Does anyone know of a study of PF surgical relase outcomes? Do they have a better cure rate than only 50% at one year?

Result number: 88

Message Number 108158

Re: ...the article part one View Thread
Posted by Debra H. on 2/05/03 at 22:08

I don't find this encouraging because it says that 26 out of 51 (50 %)still had symptoms after 1-year and it doesn't say if they EVER got better. So, I have a 1 in 2 chance of getting better by 1 year. Are these the same statistics as if I had the PF surgically cut as apposed to a traumatic rupture? And, if so, why would anyone chose to have the surgery. If not, why is that?

Result number: 89

Message Number 108157

Re: To Dr. Z: For the record.... View Thread
Posted by Debra H. on 2/05/03 at 22:04

I had been avoiding swimming because I had dislocated my shoulder and tore the labrum. It kept locking up so I had to have surgery to repair it. It's not perfect yet, but it feels better than my foot. So, I do now swim. I like it better than a stationary bike and can get a bit of an adrenaline "fix." It is a great exercise. But, since I am female and want to avoid osteoporosis when I'm old, I hope to eventually get back to a weight bearing exercise. Though I agree, in the meantime, it is better than nothing.

Result number: 90

Message Number 108151

To Dr. Z: For the record.... View Thread
Posted by Debra H. on 2/05/03 at 21:46

I had been under the care of a podiatrist for 4 months undergoing physical therapy including stretching, exercise modification,iontophoresis and ultrasound when my PF ruptured. My podiatrist said my orthotics seemed like they fit perfectly, but I had some remade just to rule this out as a possible cause. I would be happy if I could just work one day without foot pain by noon. I've never wanted to run 50 miles a week and certainly don't. But, I dream of being able to jog 3 miles/ 3 days a week and join a community basketball or volleyball league and play one day a week. I don't think this is asking too much since I'm only 30 and it would greatly benefit my overall health. But, I can't because I can't last even 30 minutes before I have crippling foot pain. I get foot pain before I get tired. I have top of the line workout shoes and I wear a Dansko as a dress shoe. I had 2 steroid injections by time the PF ruptured. I'm guessing the rupture was related to the steroid injection. And, I do not have rheumatoid arthritis.

Result number: 91

Message Number 108031

Re: PF rupture View Thread
Posted by Debra H. on 2/04/03 at 22:42

It ruptured about 9 weeks ago. Before the rupture, I had a lot of more medial pain. The medial pain isn't as severe, but this other pain is at least as bad and possibly worse. I have worn orthotics for 8 years. I had new orthotics made just prior to rupture hoping this would help. Since it ruptured, I feel like I've traded one problem for another. I wear my orthotics religiously.

Result number: 92

Message Number 108024

Re: PF rupture View Thread
Posted by Debra H. on 2/04/03 at 21:33

Why would the ESWT help a PF that is already ruptured? Plus, the pain is more lateral and posterior and in metatarsal region and not at the insertional part of the PF. What would you do for this?

Result number: 93

Message Number 108004

PF rupture View Thread
Posted by Debra H. on 2/04/03 at 18:29

After rupturing my PF, I wore a cast for 4 weeks. I then tried to gradually return to normal activities over the past 5 weeks and I have worse pain than before rupturing the fascia in the first place. My doctor has put me on oral steroids. What do you think of this and what are my chances of recovery?

Result number: 94

Message Number 107921

Re: Life after plantar rupture View Thread
Posted by Debra H. on 2/04/03 at 10:41

I have looked and can't find the article on chronic pain following rupture of the pf. Can you direct me? Also, do you think a Medrol Dose Pack would help with my symptoms?

Result number: 95

Message Number 107879

Life after plantar rupture View Thread
Posted by Debra H. on 2/03/03 at 22:19

I had PF for about 8 years that started after a fracture of my anterolateral calcaneous. I have tried numerous home remedies including stretching, activity modification, NSAIDS, orthotics etc. I finally went to a podiatrist and tried physical therapy (stretching, activity modification, iontophoresis), new orthotics, steroid injections (2), etc. About 4 months after formal treatment, my plantar fascia ruptured. My doctor told me this would solve all my problems. It has been a few months and I'm still having intense pain on the lateral side of my foot as well as the metatarsal region and arch. Pain also radiates into my achilles tendon. In addition, my ankle and knee hurt as well. It feels like my foot has flattened out. It is swollen most of the time. Any weight bearing exacerbates the symptoms. Any suggestions to improve foot pain after a plantar fascia rupture? Is there anything I should be concerned about?

Thank you

Result number: 96
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Message Number 99087

itching toenails View Thread
Posted by Debra S. on 11/02/02 at 17:52

I suffer with itching toenails and sweaty feet which can be very uncomfortable at time.Please advise what may be the cause, and what treatments are available.
Thanks

Result number: 97

Message Number 90304

Re: Dry Skin buildup on heels View Thread
Posted by Debra S. on 7/21/02 at 18:41

When I went to see a Podiatrist he suggested I keep the area moist that was all, there was no discussion about my heel bone.

Result number: 98

Message Number 90277

Dry Skin buildup on heels View Thread
Posted by Debra S. on 7/21/02 at 10:11

I have been suffering with this condition for years. When I go to have pedicures they shave the skin down, however it continues to grow back. Is there any treatment available that I could us in lieu of shaving? I would love to be able to wear sandals, but I feel so uncomfortable because of this condition. Please advise ASAP.

Thanks

Result number: 99
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Message Number 87957

Re: ESWT in Alabama, Georgia or SC View Thread
Posted by Debra B on 6/18/02 at 20:59

Dr. Bruce Wellmon does the ESWT in Gaffney, South Carolina. Gaffney is located off of I-85 between Spartanburg, SC and Charlotte NC. I had mine done about 2 weeks ago, so the jury is still out. Although I do feel like my pain is better most of the time.

Result number: 100
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Message Number 47806

constant heel pain after injection fp heel spur View Thread
Posted by debra t. on 5/15/01 at hrmin

Several weeks ago i had and injection for my heel spur and the pain hasn't left yet. And i find myself walking on the ball will this pain every go away , will i have to deal with this for the rest of my life because i have 25 more years to work and my job require long amounts of standing.What could i do to rid this problem, i have already began to exercise to lose weight.

Result number: 101
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Message Number 29298

Re: Heel spur behind achilles tendon View Thread
Posted by Debra G on 9/27/00 at 23:18

By all means Vernon..I would definitely try any alternative that had any chances of improving your situation BEFORE you have the surgery..i had heel spur removal plus repair of a ruptured tendon due to that spur..and Dr Z you were so very right, it has been 3 weeks and i have hurt like $@#@&!! I have a very high pain tolerance and have made it thru ok..so far..(but don't think i am not counting down the days to get this contraption off my leg and outta this wheelchair! ha ha) I also realize that it's still a long road to complete use and recovery of this foot and leg. I would just recommend to anyone that had any chance of relief by other treatments besides surg..GO FOR IT!Result number: 102

Message Number 28945
Re: recovering pf release surgery View Thread
Posted by Cheryl on 9/23/00 at 11:35

dear Debra i tried to write you at the aol account but it would not go thru...I am glad to hear you are doing so well.....I have a few Qs Did you have a hard cast? what size? how long did you wear it for? how about the stiches when did they come out? did you have an air/walking cast? when did you start putting weight on it and did you need pain med? for how long? and what did you use? did you suffer long b/4 surgery? if you do not have time to answer i will understand....thanks keep smiling.... Cheryl..Result number: 103

Message Number 28919
recovering pf release surgery View Thread
Posted by debra on 9/22/00 at 21:13

had surgery 8/11/00. cast off 9/21/00. seems to be doing well. some tenderness,but can bend foot w/out the painful pulling of the heal and getting up in the morning is possible. however other foot is debilitaing me. it is soon, but seen enough difference to schedule surgery on other foot 11/03/00. will stay postedResult number: 104

Message Number 28311
Re: Question about post op surg on ruptured achilles tendon View Thread
Posted by Debra G on 9/15/00 at 16:42

NO WAY..ha ha I am even sticking to my wheelchair instead of crutches..not wanting to risk a chance of losing balance and slamming that foot down and snapping tendon. I try to only stay up without foot elevated 10 mins max at a time..etc, i am working very hard to do EVERYTHING he says... He has me in a full cast (right below knee..BUT says that in 6 weeks he will remove that and put me in a walker cast) so also, i wanted to ask your's and Dr B's opinion..do u think that is too soon to be out of heavy cast>>?? I do have full faith in my dr..he is wonderful..but I very much sooo appreciate your advice and opinions..and you guys are GREAT! ; )Result number: 105

Message Number 28264
Re: Question about post op surg on ruptured achilles tendon View Thread
Posted by Debra G on 9/14/00 at 23:32

oops..forgot to mention that this spur was on back of heel..and is what caused the ruptured achilles tendon :)Result number: 106

Message Number 28263
Question about post op surg on ruptured achilles tendon View Thread
Posted by Debra G on 9/14/00 at 23:30

Hi..

Just had my surg to remove what my dr called the BIGGEST bone spur he has ever seen on a woman..(had the surg wed sept 6) Dr said the roughest days would be 2nd and 3rd..was def not kidding either, ha ha) anyways..i managed with help of pain pills and keeping foot constantly elevated..However, this eve i was experiencing some weird feeling sharp (hard to describe pains) almost like someone running pins up from side of ankle to my last little toe..and then about an hour later felt it on other side more on top of foot leading to big toe..very very uncomfortable feeling..what would be your suggestion that this pain could be (i will be calling dr's office tomorrow to check on it, too) Also, wanted to ask if heating pad is ok to place under knee..it seems to provide great relief for an overall aching leg. I was off the pain pills..as dr said monday he wanted me to start weaning myself off..which i had no prob with, only i think i will take half of one tonight. Any suggestions are greatly appreciated..your website is so so helpful as well and comforting to all of us with foot problems..Thanks!Result number: 107

Message Number 26690
ruptured achilles tendon View Thread
Posted by Debra on 8/29/00 at 22:35

wondering if there is anyone out there that has had surgery to repair a ruptured achilles tendon..would like to know your thought on surgery, any advice,etc. ThanksResult number: 108

Message Number 26645
Re: Heel spur thru achilles tendon View Thread
Posted by DEBRA on 8/29/00 at 17:36

Dr Z..I have a partial rupture he says

Thank you very much for responding so quickResult number: 109

Message Number 26630
Re: To Debra ---Heel spur thru achilles tendon View Thread
Posted by Pauline on 8/29/00 at 15:49

As I understand it, if you want comments from people other than the
Drs you must post on one of the other boards as well. We can't respond here. Result number: 110

Message Number 26628
Heel spur thru achilles tendon View Thread
Posted by Debra on 8/29/00 at 15:28

I am currently being treated for a spur that appears to have grown thru achilles tendon..i started off with taking routine antiinflammatory drug and reciveing therapy 3 x's a week..pain only seemed to worsen..wondering if anyone can tell me a diagnosis name, and also any cooments from anyone who has had this same problem will be welcome. My dr sent me in for mri, called back next day and suggested surg as soon as possible..to allow an easier surg and avoid more reconstructive surgery down the wayResult number: 111
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Message Number 10104
Re: New Sneakers
Posted by debra on 8/23/99 at 00:00

I believe you under pronate if you walk more on the outside of your feet. You over pronate if you turn more to the inside of your feet. You can tell by looking at the way the soles of your shoes wear. Please correct me if I am wrong someone. Result number: 112
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Message Number 9850
New Sneakers
Posted by Debra on 8/18/99 at 11:57

I need to purchase new sneakers. I have a tendency towards under- pronating. I have PF and a heel spur as well in my left foot. I need these shoes for everyday wear and for walking. (I have had to give up my step aerobics) Any suggestions? I do get a Runners World catalog that has tons of shoes. Anything in there to recommend? Thanks for your help!Result number: 113

Message Number 9849
Re: PF
Posted by Debra on 8/18/99 at 11:47

I've just received my first Cortisone injection this morning. I'm waiting to see how it works. I've experienced foot pain in my left foot only. I know you are frustrated. This is my third visit to the podatrist. So far I think he has been pretty conservative in his approach based on what I have read here at this site. I asked him are we going to "cure" this? I have to go back to teaching in a few weeks and will be on my feet almost all day. He is optimisitic. I think each case is different and has to be approached as such. Keep working on what feels good and eliminate the rest. Good Luck!Result number: 114

Message Number 8618
x-ray
Posted by debra on 7/10/99 at 00:00

I just had my foot x-rayed this week. I have a bone spur on my heel. Is this considered the same as PF? I am lost as to what to do. I will be seeing a podiatrist as soon as I am referred. I was doing step aerobics but have stopped for about 3 months now. I can't walk my dog without experiencing some pain afterward. Any information would be helpful. Thanks.

Result number: 115

Message Number 1461

UFO Night Splints
Posted by Sue on 8/25/98 at 23:24

Kristen asked if anyone knew who sold the Universal Foot Orthosis (UFO) to non doctors.

I called the 800 # for Orthoamerica (800-637-4500) who makes the product. They told me to just look under Medical Supplies in the yellow pages and call around until I could find someone who sold it.

I did find someone who sold it--it was $79.00. I will go take a look at it.

However, I also called Biodex (800-224-6339)--They are going to send me a catalog with their night splint in it. They want $45 for one with a 90 degree fixed angle and $55 for one with an adjustable angle.
Thanks to Debra who posted the 800 # and the info about the Biodex splint. It sounds promising.

Sue

Result number: 116

Message Number 1421

Thanks for info on night splints
Posted by Sue Braddock on 8/21/98 at 21:43

Debra,

Thanks so much for the info on a brand of night splints and where I can buy them.

I went to the yellow pages today and tried to find a place to get them. (I live in LA so I thought it would be easy) I only found one place and he wanted $280 per foot and you don't even know if it is going to help
$48.75 sounds a lot better to me.

That is very interesting about a "DYNO" splint that rents at $230 a month. I can't even imagine what it looks like--it is great that after 4 yrs of pain you are pain free. It gives me hope.

I belong to Kaiser Medical--soon I am going to push and insist on some physical therapy--your physical therapy was mostly training in stretching exercises?

Thanks again for your help--if you have any update and have the time, please e-mail me--suedusty@aol.com. I try to read the board every day, but I think I sometimes miss posts.

Sue

Result number: 117

Message Number 1374

Re: Forgot to give you the phone #
Posted by Debra on 8/19/98 at 19:05

BIODEX Medical: 800-224-6339.

Result number: 118

Message Number 1373

Re: Where do you buy night splints?
Posted by Debra on 8/19/98 at 19:04

My physical therepist gave me an order form from BIODEX Medical. There is a splint he recommended for night therephy. It's called "Adjustable Ultra Plantar Fasciitis Spling" Cost is only $48.75 for whatever size you are. S-M-L-XL Womens, or same for men.

I have not ordered it, as my insurance is covering the rental of a "DYNO" splint. This think is state of the art, and rents at $230/month. To buy it is $1,500.

I will tell you the splint has helped me. It's a temporary relief, but it's helped. The salesman told me to wear it through the night, but I have never made it through the night because my foot starts getting uncomfortable, or I feel my foot/leg falling asleep. I wear it long enough to give me relief. In the morning, before I get out of bed, I wear it for about 10 minutes, and I can walk. When I was having a bad day, I would put it on for about 10 minutes, and be painfree for a little bit.

Miracuously, I am painfree right now. I have not put the splint on for days. I don't know what happened. Since Physical Therepy I learned a lot of different exercises, mostly stretching, then with my splint, I was doing pretty good. I do not want to get over confident because I am afraid it will come back. I have suffered with PF for almost four years now, so it's hard for me to believe it is gone. By the way, it got to its' worst this year. Unbearable, can't stand it anymore kind of pain. SO, being painfree at this present day could be a trick. I'll keep you posted.

Best of LUCK
!

Result number: 119

Message Number 1371

Re: ARE YOU KIDDING !
Posted by Debra on 8/19/98 at 18:31

Are you kidding???? What kind of medicine? Who is injecting it??? YOU? More details, please. Sound suspicious to me.

Result number: 120

Message Number 1267

Re: Just diagnosed with PF
Posted by Debra on 8/10/98 at 20:21

I agree with Ginny. I have been suffering for a long time, but only seeked treatment a year ago. There are only two things left that I have not tried; a cast, and surgery. I am really not favorable of the cast, because the splint has not worked long term for me, and I'm thinking the cast would only do the same. Try the stretching, icing, and exercises your doc. gives you before you consider the surgery.

Result number: 121

Message Number 1265

Re: Has anyone had the steroid injections in the heel?
Posted by Debra on 8/10/98 at 20:06

I have had a total of 6 from September '97 to March '98. The first two didn't do a thing. I was at that time being treated by my Primary Care Physician. I finally went to a podiatrist. The first shot he gave me felt totally different from the first two. I could actually feel the stuff going right to the pain. It really hurt. He did use the numb spray before the shot. I don't know if the numb spray made a difference because it hurt bad, I could feel myself getting hot from holding my breath. Anyway, after about three days I was absolutely pain free. I was in heaven. I though my pod. had performed a miracle. I even went to Universal and Epcott over a long weekend. NO PAIN at all. Even after all that walking. Again, I was in heaven. After about three and a half weeks, I felt it coming back. Dull at first, then back to pull strength pain. I saw my doctor again, and the second shot was given. It hurt, but not like the first time he did it. I felt he missed the spot. After about a week and a half, I got another one. Same thing. No relief at all. I am done with shots for a while. I'd do 'em again if it weren't so dangerous. Too many cortisones can cause more damage. My doctor used an example of a baseball player getting cortisone shots in the ankle for ankle pain, and after so many the a-keelies (sp?) tendon broke. That was a good enough example for me.

Since the last shot, I have gone to phyical therepy for a month. I got great foot massages, and some ultra sound. All temporary relief. After about two weeks in therephy, a splint guy showed up at my therepy. He had this contraption called a Dyna Splint. He fit me, and told me to wear it all night. Well, the first night my foot felt like it was falling asleep in this thing, however, I was determined, so I took it on and off several times during the night. Before I got out of bed, I had it on for about an hour. Guess what? When I took my first step, I could walk pain free. No hobbling and grabbing on to nearby walls or holding in the screams. It was great. I still have not made it thought the night, but I have concluded that the Dyna Splint is also a temporary "fix." This thing costs about $1,500 out right. I am renting it, and my insurance is paying the $230 monthly rent. My PT showed me a splint that will do the same thing for $48.00. I'll probably buy it, because I don't know how long my insurance will allow me to continue renting the Dyna Splint.

Needless to say, I am still hurting. Birks work ok. I wear those around the house, as I can no longer be the barefoot queen. Whenever I start hurting real bad I put the splint on, wear it for about 10 minutes, and I am feeling pretty good. Again, it's only temporary relief because the pain does come back.

I am at my wits end. I live in Florida and there is so much to do here. Usually around this time of the year I am in Orlando with my husband and kids using the free tickets I get to Sea World, Disney, and Universal. For the last couple of years, I have not been able to use all my tickets, and the thought of going to Orlando sends immediate pain to my heel. Wierd, huh?

This is not fun stuff
! My doctor, who is a surgeon, does not recommend the surgery, however, I believe it is time for me to see a new podiatrist.

I wish you the best of luck, and hope the shots help you. Keep an open mind. The shots do not work for everyone. This is just the beginning, and there is a ton of stuff your doctor will suggest before you go the surgery route. I am not anxious to go under the knife, but nothing else has worked, and I am looking for some kind of relief. Heck, there's even a chance the surgery does not work, and could leave you in more pain. Again, good luck! I apologize this is so long, but I thought I'd share everything I have been through to give you an idea that the best advise I can give you or anyone, is to keep an open mind.

Result number: 122

Message Number 1176

Re: OUCH! Debra, thank you!
Posted by Alyx on 8/01/98 at 12:28

Thank you for your input, I really appreciate it. I visited my podiatrist last week and asked for surgery after one cortisone injection...now I think I am going to wait. I believe I will ask about the night splint, and will work hard on the stretching. Thus far I am taking the anti-inflammatories and I think they are helping me...but it is early.Again, Debra, thank you.

Result number: 123

Message Number 1172

Re: OUCH! Can Anyone Advise As To The Proper Stretches?
Posted by Debra on 8/01/98 at 07:59

I use a long towel or even a wide belt would work. I place the towel on the ball of my foot and pull my foot towards me. I know I am stretching good when I begin to feel my calf pull or I feel a burning sensation. I hold it for the count of 20, relax, then do it again. I do several reps. but I find doing as many as I can really helps.

Icing helps too. Get some birks. I did and they have really made a difference. They are stiff, but everyday as I break them in they feel better and better.

I have had PF for 2-3 years. It's hard for me to really remember when I was "struck" with this because I ignored the pain for a very long time thinking it was going to get better. WRONG, it never did. It got worse. It has been a long process. I just got a night splint which seems to be really working. It's a splint that keeps your foot stretched, and when I take it off in the morning, I can actually walk to the bathroom without grabbing onto anything or hobbling. It has only been three nights now, but I have noticed some relief. The pain does come back usually around late morning, but it's dull, and doesn't compare to what I was feeling before.

This thing is no fun. It consumes you if you let it. It did me, but I decided to faithfully do what I am suppose to, and hopefully this thing will go away. Stretching, some exercises my physical therepist gave me, icing, and the night splint have all been helping me. I don't do anti-inflamatories, as I tried them, and I never got any relief. I have already had too many cortisone shots, and my doctor advises against anymore for now. I want to hold off on surgery as an absolute last resort, so I am praying I will get better.

I hope some of this information helps. You may want to read the message board for more ideas. There is a lot of good stuff on this board.

Good luck, and hang in there. You are not alone. Only the ones' of us who have PF truly know what kind of pain one is in.

Result number: 124

Message Number 1154

Re: EPF totally successful!
Posted by Debra on 7/30/98 at 20:38

Congratulations
! I wish you the best

And, a very happy school year

Thanks for yor advise along the way.

Result number: 125

Message Number 1126

DYNO Splint
Posted by Debra on 7/29/98 at 10:55

I got mine yesterday, too. It's called a DYNO Splint. I took it on and off several times last night because I was experiencing a burning sensation. It was uncomfortable. At 4 AM I put it on, got up at 5:30 for work, and I was painfree. I could actually walk to the bathroom without grapping onto anything in my path to hold myself up. YEY
! It's Noon now, and no pain, but a dull burning sensation. I see the Splint Man at Physical Therepy on Monday, and will ask him if these are normal "feelings." My thought is my foot is stretching way too much. I don't know, but I'm feeling pretty good right now. We shall see how the rest of the day goes. After work will be the test, because that is when I usually feel the worse pain. However, I am sure I will need to work on wearing the splint through the night, and staying with it until I can honestly say I am PAIN FREE.

Good luck with your splint.

Result number: 126

Message Number 1093

Follow Debra's suggestions, if those don't work try cortisone.
Posted by Melissa on 7/28/98 at 12:39

Cyndi,

Debra gave you some good suggestions. Try those first. If those don't work, your doctor could try cortisone shots. Don't allow your doctor to give you any more than three within six months time. Cortisone did cure my mother of her PF, but it did not help me. I had to have EPF.

Another idea that has helped some people is a night splint. Your doctor may be able to prescribe you one to wear in your sleep.

Feel free to e-mail, and best of luck!

Melissa

Result number: 127

Message Number 1084

Re: PF-I need help !
Posted by Debra on 7/27/98 at 21:41

16? Wow! If there is any advise I can give you it would be to keep reading the message board. You are bound to learn something new.

Stretching, and taping has help me with temporar relief. All of our circumstances are different, but we all have the same thought...relief however possible.

Hang in there. Keep reading the site for advise. By the way, do not send C.Simmons $6.50 for his "cure." He has no business sharing a site with us PF folks. The message board is free!

Keep your head up.

Result number: 128

Message Number 1081

Re: HEEL SPURS I Will Tell You How To Cure...............................
Posted by Bob on 7/27/98 at 18:19

Good for you Debra
!

C. simmons will not receive 6.50 from me either!

Result number: 129

Message Number 1080

Re: HEEL SPURS I Will Tell You How To Cure...............................
Posted by Debra on 7/27/98 at 17:54

What an insult C. Simmons. I have been surfing this site for over a week now, and appreciate the encouragement, and advise I have gotten. Why would you even think of "selling" your cure???? I hope no one sends you $6.50.

Result number: 130

Message Number 1071

Re: FRUSTRATED AND IN TERRIBLE PAIN
Posted by Melissa on 7/27/98 at 15:05

Debra,

Sorry to hear that you are suffering so much. You are more patient than I have been. There's no way I would have been able to put up with this for a year.

I had EPF on July 6. So far, I'm recovering just fine. Everyone around me is amazed that I can get around this well only three weeks after surgery. My suggestion would be that you at least visit another doctor to see what he or she has to say about surgery. I'm also wondering if your current podiatrist is a surgeon, because not all podiatrists are surgeons. If your podiatrist is not a surgeon, that might help explain why he or she is so hesitant to recommend surgery.

Best of luck! If you have any other questions or just need to vent, feel free to e-mail me.

Melissa

Result number: 131

Message Number 1067

FRUSTRATED AND IN TERRIBLE PAIN
Posted by Debra on 7/26/98 at 20:29

I have been in treatment for almost a year now. Did the c-shots, expensive grandma shoes, orthotics, stretching, icing; and now I am in physical therepy. Getting good foot massages and ultrasound, but keep hoping for releif. My pod. refuses to even discuss surgery (maybe it's time for a new pod.) He wants to try every alternative first. I have taken anti-inflamatory's, but no success. I am desparate for any kind of relief! I have been reading the message board on and off for the last week, and finding this site make me feel as though I am not alone. I really didn't realize there are so many suffers of PF. I am only 37, have two young children, and IT's JUST NOT FAIR to be suffering like this
! WHAT is NEXT???


Result number: 132

Message Number 1016

Re: Taking over my life
Posted by Debra Neitzel on 7/16/98 at 22:15

Finding this site and reading all the stories makes me feel as though I am not alone. I was diagnosed over a year ago, and started out with anti-inflamatories, then cortizone, orthotics, stretching, icing; you name it, I've done it. My podiatrist does not even want to talk about surgery until we have tried every possible antidote. I am only aware of two more things he wants to try, a cast, and a night splint. In the beginning, I really thought I would be through this in no time, now, the pain is worse than it was two years ago (I suffered for a year before I even went to the doctor), and my right foot is beginning to hurt. I feel consumed with this pain, I am frustrated, and literally HATE PF!

In reading the # of stories, I am going to try some different stretching exercises mentioned on this site.

Is there anyone out there who has been cured of PF? I have not come across any success stories.

I would love to hear from you.

Debra

Result number: 133

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Name: Debra Lane

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Email:debrakn@sprintmail.com

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Name: Debra Key Newhouse

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Name: Deborah
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Time: 1999-01-15 23:24:09
Comments: I have had PF now for 9 months. I used to wear Birkenstocks for years and had no problems. I bought a pair of Dr.Marten's sandals and wore them everyday to work. I think I made the connection after reading some of these postings, that maybe I got them from those sandals! I'll have to go back to wearing my Birks. I'm on my feet all day, and find that after not working the weekend, they are much better.I've tried several inserts, none worked, I just bought a brand new pair of Montrail lightweight hiking boots, ( I do alot of walking) I just joined the Y and am doing water aerobics 2 x's a week, and a bicycle spinning class. After each, the next morning, my heel feels great. I ice also. I haven't been to the doc yet, I'm waiting to see if they will ever get better! Any advise is welcomed!


Result number: 137
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