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Message Number 266205
Re: Looking for dress and casual shoes similar to SAS lace-ups and Brooks Beast View Thread
Posted by Jeremy L, C Ped on 7/12/10 at 23:49

Honestly, I find REI to be a fairly poor destination for technical hiking boots. They merchandise for the masses and day/light-sectional hikers. The Wasatch is decently made, but I've been off the brand ever since they screwed up the updates on the Sundowner. If you are looking for durable, credible boots, my favorites include:

AKU Lagorai and Utah - The latter is a very solid sole

Garmont Tower Lite and Dakota - The latter is a more full volume boot

Lowa Baffin and Terek - One advantage with this brand is their inverted cant of their cuffs, which allows for greater reduction of initial rearfoot pronation

Asolo Powermatic and TPS - Very full volume forefoot last, suitable for broader feet

Vasque Summit - The only model I really recommend from them, anymore

La Sportiva Trango - Excxellent, low volume choice

Limmer Midweight - the king of backpacking boots, period. the Lightweight is also better made than any other in its category

One thing you'll find is that many of thse look alike. That's because there are only a handful of factories that make truly exceptional boots. The upper and sole constructions among thse are virtually identical; they just use different lasts.

Result number: 1

Message Number 266139

Re: Tarsal Tunnel Release surgery success rates odds Survey......... View Thread
Posted by Laurie C. on 7/09/10 at 15:35

I would see if the doctor released all the plantar nerves in your foot and not just the flexor retinaculum area. Most doctors do release all the plantar nerves, but if they don't and only release the flexor retinaculum, I believe the other nerves could still be causing pain if not released.

I have had both feet successfully released and have been able to continue with my exercise program.

Result number: 2

Message Number 265588

post surgery mri View Thread
Posted by dvertuno on 6/08/10 at 02:16

left ankle surgery 8-09 procedures; left ankle arthroscopy with synovectomy, removal of meniscal lesion. removal of bone from the lateral wall of the talus. removal of bone from the distal fibula. lateral ligament reconstruction using the modified brostom technique. peroneal synovectomy. peroneus brevis tendon repair. peroneal retinacular repair.

but still chronic pain and swelling.

6-2-10 mri findings; anterior/inferior tibiofibular ligament remains poorly defined and diminutive at its tibial attachment. marrow edema within the plantar aspect of the calcaneus has increased, a small plantar calcaneal spur with mild thickening of the plantar fascia attachment, mild nonspecific fluid distention of the retrocalcaneal bursa. mild to moderate common peroneal tenosynovitis. no peroneal tendon subluxation. mild fluid distention of the distal posterior tibialis tendon sheath with small amount of insertional heterogeneity within the navicular component. Impression;1-post surgical change of the anterior talofibular ligament repair. some fiber integrity of the repair can be identified. remaining lateral ankle and medial ankle ligaments are unchanged. 2-similar appearance of the peroneus longus and brevis tendons when compared to the prior examination with mild to moderate common peroneal tenosynovitis. 3-mild insertional tendinosis and tenosynovitis of the posterior tibialis tendon. 4-worsening reactive marrow edema along the plantar aspect of the calcaneus. small plantar calcaneal spur and changes of mild chronic plantar fascitis.

Dr. what are thoughts and opinion, should i have another surgery? thank you

Result number: 3

Message Number 265134

Re: Vision problems and Lyrica View Thread
Posted by Jim Miller on 5/13/10 at 03:45

Kate-
I'm a new visitor to the thread, taking lyrica and trying to research a major eye problem that has damaged the retina in my left eye. After 6 days in the hospital, all they would say was 'stop the lyrica!'. And I was contacted by a nice young physician acting as a recruiter for Phizer, for a study of some sort. All very evasive.
Can you send me a link or a reference to the monograph you referred to?
Jim Miller
risico at wanadoo.fr

Result number: 4

Message Number 265077

surgery or not? View Thread
Posted by christinaw on 5/09/10 at 18:39

My husband was advised by his ortho md that Tarsal Tunnel surgery has only a 50% success rate. The 2nd opinion dr (famous surgeon of the olympic team) says the surgery has a far better success rate with a surgeon who specializes in Tarsal Tunnel. We are thinking to go with #2's opinion as hubby's ability to walk is severely limited and has severe pain 24/7. Any advice?

(please email to: coastalchristina at hotmail.com

Result number: 5

Message Number 264736

Re: Life after a subtalar fusion View Thread
Posted by Janet on 4/19/10 at 12:32

WOW Tina I cant thank you enough for your words of encouragement!! I too have crushed foot injury and have had 10 surgerys todate, Im looking at subtalor fusion as last resort to removing the foot as last resort. I too am very active (was) lol and want to just get my life back, it will be 2 yrs in June from my accident. Im having surgery in few weeks and cant wait to now get this show on the road lol Thanks everyone for you posts, it really helps to have some support from both sides of the street :) GL everyone

Result number: 6

Message Number 264679

Re: Crashed Russian Aircraft View Thread
Posted by John H on 4/14/10 at 12:19

Julie I have read further on this crash. It seems Russian aircraft have black boxes but unlike U.S. and most European nations the Russian black boxes do not have voice record between the pilots or pilot and tower. That information would likely have settled what really happened as any information conveyed to the pilot from the back would have been picked up by voice. I can assure you the conversation between the two pilots would have been hot to say the least. I have read there were 4 attempts to land and 1 attempt. There should be no question on this. The base where the landing was attempted was apparently an old military base and reported not to have a precision landing system (ILS). Any pilot I know would never have even made the 1st landing attempt with visibility below 1/2 mile and no precision landing system. Further problem was the tower operator spoke only Russian. The Polish pilots did not speak Russian. As I previously noted the international language of flying is English but that only applies to certified international airports and this airport was apparently an old rundown military airport so there was no requirement for a common language. Everything about this flight seemed wrong. The pilot will take the fall but you can be sure there were other factors. The weather was bad at the destination airport before they even took off. They did have an alternate which should have been used when they arrived at an airport that was socked in below minimum conditions for a safe landing. In the U.S. a pilot would at the least lose his license for ever and could have even gone to jail for negligence as we have no law that I am familiar with that exempts pilots flying high profile people and not following Federal Air Regulations. I have flown many Senators and cabinet members in and out of Europe and no one ever remotely suggested I make a landing at a base below minimums. I have had lower ranking officers make such suggestions but I quickly advised them of the rules of the air and they quickly shut up even though I was a lowly Captain. The President of the U.S. could have been on board and I would still be in charge. Same goes with ships at sea. I am surprised that the Russian aircraft had no black boxes that could record voices. They apparently tend to save money at the expense of safety.

There are 96 dead people who should not be dead. The flight controls and engines were operating normally according to the black boxes. We will never know what really happened as there are no ear/eye witness to what occurred in the __pit. I have sat on various accident investigation boards and all they are going to be left with is pilot error unless someone had a cell phone and were talking to people on the ground. Maybe the pilot relayed some information to the ground we have not yet heard about but then again the pilots spoke Polish and the controller spoke Russian.

Result number: 7

Message Number 264648

Crashed Russian Aircraft View Thread
Posted by JOHN H on 4/12/10 at 16:46

There is a lot of misinformation concerning the downed Russian aircraft with the loss of 96 lives.

The information I am reading is that the pilot was advised to land somewhere else. Normally the tower will advise you of the weather condition and not order a pilot not to land unless the airport is closed. Normally each airport has minimum landing conditions based on the type of equipment being used for the approach and landing. Typically, one would need a 200 foot ceiling and 1/2 miles visibility for an approach if you have an Instrument Landing System 'ILS' on the aircraft and on the airport. This is the type of approach most U.S. airlines use to major airports. A radar approach is normally requires the same minimum but used mostly with the military. One can look up in a manual the minimum landing requirements for almost any airport in the world. You would have a good idea of the weather at your destination before you even took off. If the airport does not have those minimums when you arrive you can start your approach but under U.S. rules you would not attempt the landing if you did not have the minimums. You could continue with the approach but would make a go-around if the runway was not insight when you reach the specified minimum altitude. There are some airports that now have minimums of 100 feet and a half mile visibility which is really getting touchy unless you are real good. Some of the later technology will allow the plane to fly itself to touchdown though most pilots fly final approach by hand. I have also read today the airport did not have an ILS approach system which would raise the minimums even further. The pilot also apparently made at least one or maybe two failed approaches which tells you he either was not thinking straight or was receiving a lot of pressure from the passenger who was anxious to attend some sort of memorial. Radar approaches are where the pilot is given second by second corrections to make right up until he reaches minimum altitude at which time the radar controller will advise you to take over and you are visually cleared for landing.

There have been many cases when flying high profile people like on this flight that undue pressures will be put on the pilot to make the landing when in fact he should immediately go to his alternate airport. I forget who the high ranking U.S. official was that some years ago was killed in a crash, He was in the Clinton admistration. I think it was in Italy. I think it was determined he more or less ordered the pilot to land. Of course, the pilot is the man in charge even if the President orders him to land and it is up to him to make the decision to land or not to land. If you fly long enough you will encounter these situations. I was once fling a high ranking officer to Offutt AFB, NB in a small single engine aircraft. About 100 miles out of Offutt I encountered severe thunderstorms directly in my route. No way to get around them. I advised the General I was turning around and landing at a nearby military installation. We had no radar or deicing equipment. He told me to proceed ahead. I simply advised him it was not in his or my safety to do that and went to the alternate. On another occasion I was a co-pilot on a transport that had a three star general on board. A band was there and many people to see him off. As we reached the takeoff end of the runway the tower advised us there was a severe thunderstorm almost on the takeoff end of the runway. The pilot advised the General we would have to delay the flight. He would have none of that and in no uncertain words advised the pilot he would take off. The pilot followed instructions and off we went. Lucky for us we were able to make a steep turn just after lift off and clear the storm. It could have turned out very differently.

It will likely be the pilot will be charged with pilot error. That will be the correct decision. We will never know what he might have been told by the highest ranking political figures in Poland might have been telling him. No matter the pressure he was under he should have followed the training all pilots learn early on and is training to live by.

Result number: 8

Message Number 264532

Re: Dr. DSW: Is there any narcotic pain med without acetaminophen? View Thread
Posted by Dr.DSW on 4/07/10 at 07:16

Dottie,

Please once again remember that your pain management specialist certainly is aware of all the medications available, and probably knows more than I do about the pros and cons of all the meds, since he/she definitely prescribes more narcotics than I do in my practice.

The new 'trend' is to prescribe the lowest amount of acetaminophen 'piggybacked' to the Vicodin and/or Percocet to prevent potential liver problems. Not long ago, it was not unusual for each Vicodin or Percocet to have 500 mg or 750 mg of acetaminophen. However, since patients were often taking multiple medications containing acetaminophen, the toxic levels were being reached quickly, therefore the new recommendations were to decrease the dosage per tablet.

However, the addition of acetaminophen with the oxycodone and/or hyrodocodone (or if aspirin/ibuprofen is 'piggybacked') potentiates the analgesic effect of the medication.

There is additional concern with many patients if using Vicoprofen or Percodan (one contains ibuprofen and one contains aspirin) due to the potential for gastrointestinal side effects such as GI bleeding/ulcer with prolonged/constant use.

Therefore, once again, you must discuss your concerns with your PM doctor and also have confidence in his/her judgement, expertise and experience.

Result number: 9

Message Number 264505

Re: big pharma passing big money to doctors View Thread
Posted by Dr. Ed on 4/05/10 at 23:25

John:

Business can get big due to excellence. Business can also get big due to anticompetitive practices including undue influence in government. Energy independence is critical for economic and military security. Yet Adminstration after Administration has been negligent in this area. I have a bit of a hard time believing that it is not the influence of multinational big oil that has not been the culprit here.

The big financial institutions that created the current financial debacle were rewarded with bailout money that made them even bigger. Texas has numerous solid local banks that never got into trouble. Chase, for example, has opened new branches all over San Antonio to compete with the local banks compliments of the US taxpayer.

The GOP criticizes big government and the Dems criticize big business. Sometimes it seems like a charade since the boundaries between big government and big business have become very fuzzy.

Ed

Result number: 10

Message Number 264209

Re: I'm going to declare myself an Independent View Thread
Posted by marie:) on 3/22/10 at 21:00

'The further we move away from the day the nation was founded the more we move towards socialism.'

I love my country!!!!

So do you advocate closing all public libraries? I mean why should the government provide free books to everyone? People should buy their own books with the money they earn and if they have no money then they should just accept ignorance as a way of life. ;)

Now if you don't love our nation and the fact that our government provides free books for everyone you might consider moving to another country, like Rush....hmmm?? Canada....nope they provide books, Greenland, Austria, Andorra, Belgium, Bosnia, Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal,Romania, Russia, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Ukraine, the United Kingdom, Israel, Australia, New Zealand, Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Cuba, Mexico, Panama, Peru , Uruguay, Trinidad, Tobago, Venezuela, Bhutan, Brunei, China, Hong Kong SAR, North Korea, India, Kuwait, Qatar, UAE, Saudi Arabia, Israel, Japan, Malaysia, South Korea, Seychelles, Sri Lanka, Taiwan(R.O.C.), Pakistan and Thailand.....all provide books at libraries. Geesh the entire industrialized world provides books for free to their people and as of yesterday ALL the industrialized nations in the world also provide health care. I wonder if Rush knows that Costa Rica provides Universal health care and books? Smart and healthy! :) Of course I would urge all those who are looking for the perfect place to move to consider Somalia.....no public libraries, no taxes, no government....perfect! And best of all you can find work as a pirate.

Here's a few facts on Somalia for all those wishing for a no government Utopia....from the C_IA fact book.

Government type: no permanent national government; transitional, parliamentary federal government (Perfect!!)

Legal system: no national system; a mixture of English common law, Italian law, Islamic sharia, and Somali customary law; accepts compulsory ICJ jurisdiction with reservations

Judicial branch: following the breakdown of the central government, most regions have reverted to local forms of conflict resolution, either secular, traditional Somali customary law, or Sharia (Islamic) law with a provision for appeal of all sentences.

Political parties: none

aye aye matey :)

Result number: 11

Message Number 263755

Re: Intrasheath Peroneal Tendon Subluxation View Thread
Posted by Dr.DSW on 3/01/10 at 19:21

I can not make any significant recommendations without a hands on evaluation. My usual preference is to make a cortical window in the bone (fibula) and 'slide' it out to block the peroneal tendons and prevent subluxation. I have found this to usually prevent the exact type of situation you are experiencing. I have found that simply repairing the retinaculum can often result in less than optimal results.

Until you have a thorough evaluation, a high quality ankle brace may keep you comfortable in the interim. My favorite ankle brace is the ASO by Med Spec. In my opinion (as a competitive soccer player) it is by far the best ankle brace on the market.

Result number: 12

Message Number 263741

Intrasheath Peroneal Tendon Subluxation View Thread
Posted by Pete on 3/01/10 at 11:21

Hi Everyone,

First off, wonderful forum and network you have here, I'm lucky to have found it. I'm a 30 year old competitive water skier, and two years ago I fell and suffered a SPR injury (tear) resulting in chronic peroneal tendon subluxation. Six months following the injury, I had surgery to reconstruct the retinaculum. No groove deepening procedure was performed.

Now two years post op I still feel a similar subluxation sensation periodically (6-10 times per year), and the ankle is unstable at times -- however the sensations are far less violent and intense than before surgery. I visited my ortho last year on this and he said the repair was still in tact and there were no tears in the tendons. Last night it happened again while sleeping (oddly) and I noticed an audible 'pop' which woke me up, with pain. While I'm no MD (by far), I'm wondering if I'm experiencing some form of an intrasheath subluxation where the tendons are changing their relative locations. I'm concerned that a groove deepening procedure was necessary, but again, I'm not a surgeon.

Can anyone kindly offer any thoughts, recommendations as to a next step, or any doctors names in MI which may have further experience in this area? Ski season is approaching quickly, so surgery prior probably isn't an option right now, but possibly someone could also pass along any PT exercises or taping procedures which may help in the short term? Any thoughts or advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks again,
Pete

Result number: 13

Message Number 263105

Re: Cryosurgery View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 1/29/10 at 07:56

I have posted on tarsal tunnel syndrome and cryosurgery in the past. Prior to having the surgery by Dr. Spilken, I believe it's imperative to ask a few questions.

It's really a matter of semantics. In 'true' tarsal tunnel syndrome, the tibial nerve, which is a VERY large nerve is entrapped within the actual tarsal tunnel for one of several reasons. Part of the surgery involves releasing the tight retinaculum (covering) of the tarsal tunnel behind the ankle to 'decompress' the pressure on the nerve. Often, there are also varicose veins in the area placing pressure on the nerve.

In many instances, this alone will NOT alleviate the symptoms of TTS, and this is why the surgery fails. It is imperative that the tibial nerve be traced distally into the foot where it branches into the medial and lateral plantar nerve at an area called the 'porta pedis' and trace it's distal branches. Those branches must be released/'freed up' to really assure that the entire problem is adequately addressed.

The problem is that the actual 'main' branch of the nerve, (the tibial nerve within the actual tarsal tunnel) is a mixed nerve. That means it has both motor function and sensory function. The smaller distal branches have only sensory function.

Dr. Dellon performs a very thorough release of the tibial nerve and the distal branches under magnification and meticulous dissection.

My concern regarding the cryosurgery is whether Dr. Spilken is REALLY going to utilize the probe within the tarsal tunnel on the actual main body of the tibial nerve, or if he is simply using it on the smaller distal branches.

If he is using it on the smaller distal branches, I have no problem with that, since those nerves are only sensory, although Dr. Spilken must be sure that the problem isn't actually coming from more proximal in the actual tarsal tunnel.

I DO have a concern if he is using the probe on the actual tibial nerve within the tarsal tunnel. My question remains that if he is 'freezing'/destroying the main body of the tibial nerve, how does the freeze injury selectively destroy ONLY the sensory fibers (those causing the pain) and NOT the motor fibers (those responsible for motion). If the motor fibers are injured, you could potentially not be able to move some muscles of your foot and have no motor control of those muscles.

Therefore, I think some of those questions need to be answered.

I have no questions regarding Dr. Spilken's skills or integrity, but I do believe you should have a FULL understanding of what you are about to undergo.

Result number: 14

Message Number 263097

Re: heel pain View Thread
Posted by Shari on 1/28/10 at 19:56

Thank you for your response to my message. I appreciate you taking the time to post a response. I did have to go to a foot specialist once before for a metatarsal stress fracture in the same foot. He really didn't do much for it other than to say in time it will heal on its own. I wasn't all that comfortable with the doctor to begin with so I guess I am just procrastinating having to go back to him once again for the heel pain that I am having. What I probably need to do is to just go to another doctor. I have asked around but haven't gotten a reccomendation for a good foot doctor in my area. I'm going to have to just pick someone to go to because I realize this pain cannot go on forever. Once again thanks for your time and response to my message

Result number: 15

Message Number 263017

Re: Cyrosurgery and Tarsal Tunnel View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 1/24/10 at 14:07

I don't think you've understood my posts.

I will try to explain this one more time.

I simply stated that WHEN surgeons performn tarsal tunnel surgery via TRADITIONAL surgery, they open up the retinaculum to relieve the pressure within the tarsal tunnel, where the 'main body' of the tibial nerve exists. I also believe that it is imperative to follow the nerve distally as it enters the foot to make sure all the branches are also 'freed up' to help assure the success of this procedure, WHEN it is performed via traditional means.

You originally inquired as to cryosurgery. What I stated is that I DO NOT believe that cryosurgery should be performed within the actual tarsal tunnel on the large portion of the tibial nerve, since that nerve is both sensory AND motor fibers. As I previously stated, if there is damage to the motor fibers of the nerve during cryosurgery, it can affect MOTOR function of the foot, which you do NOT want to happen.

Therefore, I stated that the doctors that I know that perform cryosurgery for tarsal tunnel symptoms are simply using the cryosurgery at the distal branches, to AVOID any potential damage to the large tibial nerve and to avoid any possible injury to the motor function of the foot.

Some of these doctors believe they can relieve symptoms of tarsal tunnel syndrome this way WITHOUT surgical intervention or opening the tarsal tunnel.

So I am NOT saying that 'regardless of having cryosurgery a traditional TT release is necessary'. I discourage patients from surgery for tarsal tunnel syndrome as often as possible.

Result number: 16

Message Number 262995

Re: Cyrosurgery and Tarsal Tunnel View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 1/23/10 at 17:30

It is my personal opinion that ALL tarsal tunnel surgical procedures should include relieving the pressure in the tarsal tunnel by opening the retinaculum (and checking for varicose veins that may be putting pressure on the nerves), AND should also always include tracing the nerve distally to make sure that there is no entrapment of the distal brances.

It is sometimes possible to perform a nerve block at the distal aspect of the nerve/at the distal branches to see if that relieves symptoms. If it does, that is often indicative of distal involvement.

However, once again, I believe that distal inspection and release should ALWAYS be performed.

Result number: 17

Message Number 262974

Re: Cyrosurgery and Tarsal Tunnel View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 1/22/10 at 21:29

This is an excellent question and was a topic of significant controversey several years ago on this site.

I do believe that cryosurgery is a viable option for many conditions of the foot/ankle, but I can't say I recommend it for 'true' tarsal tunnel syndrome, and I will elaborate.

The actual tibial nerve is a very large nerve that is within the tarsal tunnel. This nerve is below a retinaculum that forms the 'tarsal tunnel' and in the tunnel there are also arteries, veins (which are often varicosities) and the tibialis posterior tendon, the flexor digitorum longus tendon and the flexor hallux longus tendon (to remember this it's often referred to as Tom, Dick and Harry--Tibialis posterior tendon (Tom), flexor DIGITORUM longus tendon (Dick) and flexor HALLUCIS longus tendon (Harry). During many traditional surgeries for tarsal tunnel surgery, the surgeon simply releases the retinaculum to 'decompress' the tarsal tunnel.

However, often this will not provide adequate relief of symptoms, since the nerve entrapment can involve the distal branches of the tibial nerve as it branches into the medial and lateral plantar nerves or other small branches at the medial aspect of the foot or at a small cartilaginous ring called the 'porta pedis'. If these nerves are not 'freed up', the symptoms will persist.

The actual tibial nerve is a mixed nerve, meaning it is both sensory AND motor. If cryosurgery is actually performed on this nerve at the area of the tarsal tunnel, my concern is that when the nerve is 'frozen' not only the sensory portion of the nerve can be injured, but also the motor portion of the nerve, which can actually affect the function of the muscles of the foot.

However, IF you are using cryosurgery on the smaller distal branches of the nerve that I previously described, that are not actually within the tarsal tunnel, these branches are strictly sensory branches and in my opinion are safe for cryosurgery and would probably respond well with this modality.

So the bottom line is that you have to have the doctor determine WHERE the actual problem exists. If the site of nerve entrapment is at the small distal branches then I would say cryosurgery may be an excellent option.

If the doctor is confident that the problem is actually within the true tarsal tunnel and involves the body of the large tibial nerve, I would be hesitant to avoid injury to the motor fibers to prevent possible loss of motor function.

Result number: 18

Message Number 262686

Re: Endoscopictt release View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 1/08/10 at 20:06

The ability to weightbear following surgery is only ONE of my concerns. My PRIMARY concern is alleviating the symptoms of the patient completely. I believe that it is generally well accepted that many cases of tarsal tunnel syndrome involve an entrapment of the distal/small branches of the nerve as they enter the plantar aspect of the foot.

Endoscopically, these small branches are not released. Simply releasing the retinaculum of the actual tarsal tunnel only decompresses the area of the 'main' body of the nerve, and in my opinion this can lead to an inadequate tarsal tunnel release.

Result number: 19

Message Number 262319

Could I have TTS? View Thread
Posted by MarkB on 12/13/09 at 08:09

Hello everyone. I need a little help in trying to determine if I have TTS. On September 25th I dislocated my right ankle with a running related injury. I tore three of my ankle ligaments in half, including the deltoid ligament.

I was in a boot and non-weight bearing for 4 weeks and have been going to PT for 7 weeks post boot. My only remaining pain is a burning sensation to the rear of the medial malleolus (feels like it's under the flexor retinaculum). This pain is not present when I walk at this point, but it is present in both dorsiflexion and plantar flexion. It is also there in both weight and non-weight bearing.

I have been diagnosed with Posterior Tibial Tendonitis, but after two steroid shots the pain is still as strong as ever. Also, and this is difficult to explain, if I accidentally bump my great toe on a surface I have an radiating pain that feels as if a large tuning fork has been placed on my ankle.

It's likely that this is just the tendonitis, but it's not responding. I'm very frustrated and looking to see if there might be something else going on. Should I bring this up to my podiatrist as a possiblity, or am I crazy?

Thanks in advance,
Mark

Result number: 20

Message Number 261733

Re: cryosurgery for Morton's neuroma in Washington, D.C. area View Thread
Posted by EECI on 11/04/09 at 12:37

Dr. Robert Cohen or Dr. Christina Teimouri (Beaver Valley Foot Clinic)

Result number: 21

Message Number 261548

Re: Valgus, Medial Foot Swelling, Tingling; Is that TTS? View Thread
Posted by Dr. Wedemeyer on 10/26/09 at 22:43

Alas we agree to disagree...I knew this day would come. Actually Dr. DSW if anyone else were to correct me I would take umbrage, but considering my deep respect for your clinical acumen (and our friendship) I decided to investigate further. Here are a couple of the studies that I found indicating heel varus in TTS:

http://www.foothyperbook.com/elective/tarsalTunnel/tarsalTunnelIntro.htm

Cimino’s review of the literature found foot deformities accounting for 19% (varus 11%, valgus 9%). Persons with planovalgus feet demonstrate abnormal electrophysiological indices; the clinical syndrome may be commoner in such persons. Bracilovic et al 2006 used MRI to measure mean tarsal tunnel volume and found that it is reduced in inversion and eversion compared with neutral positioning.

Cimino WR Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome: review of the Literature. Foot Ankle 1990 11(1):47-52.

This study actually bolsters your position, at least from a treatment perspective but it does show what I was taught, that heel varus is a large factor:

http://journals.lww.com/corr/Abstract/1983/12000/Tarsal_Tunnel_Syndrome.26.aspx

In 14 patients tarsal tunnel syndrome was associated with varus heels and pronated, splayed forefeet. Review of the literature and the author's experience suggest that these conditions may be a common cause of the tarsal tunnel syndrome. Treatment of fixed varus deformities of the heel by outer heel wedges has been shown to be ineffective. Although outer heel wedges provide symptomatic relief in patients with relatively flexible hindfeet, surgical release of the flexor retinaculum behind the medial malleolus is the treatment of choice in patients who have the tarsal tunnel syndrome with planovarus deformity and is successful in more than 90% of cases.

I shall investigate further but perhaps since I treat often from a more conservative fashion as a pedorthist I was taught somewhat differently (and don't take this the wrong way, I am well aware that you treat conservatively as well)? Most of the mechanical TTS that I treat is flexible with a compensated forefoot valgus/rearfoot varus.

We can discuss this over a Philly Cheese Steak on day when I am in town...

Result number: 22

Message Number 261474

Sleeping pilots?? View Thread
Posted by john h on 10/23/09 at 12:12

As I am sure you all are watching the news about the airliner that overflew its destination airport by over an hour. As a pilot I find it hard to believe however strange things do happen while flying.

In the 1950's I flew the DC-6B on trans-Atlantic flights. The was the primary aircraft for passengers during those days. Typically our flight hours to Paris or Berlin might be 10 hours of real flight time but perhaps 18 or more hours of duty time as we might have to refuel, etc. We carried three pilots so one could be sleeping and two navigators so one of those could also be sleeping. Today we need no navigators due to the state of the art navigation equipment using satellites and the increased speed from 300 knots for the DC-6 and 600 knots for a jet.

Flying east looking into the sun and then the moon can sure make one sleepy over 18 hours. The navigator had a table directly behind the pilots and he used navigation equipment that today would be from the dark ages. He took shots with his sextant, used dead reckoning, and LORAN which is not very precise to say the best. The auto pilot set directly between the pilot and co-pilot and direction was controlled by turning a round knob about 3-4' in diameter. Typically if the navigator wanted to change the direction a couple of degrees he would just reach up and slowly turn the knob to the new direction and then return it to neutral. One night over the Atlantic in the winter the navigator made a two degree change in direction using the auto pilot. He however left it just barely off neutral. After some point I noticed our direction was almost due north when we should be heading almost due west. The rate of change of direction was so miniscule you would have to stare at the compass to have noticed it. For all I knew we might have been heading north for an hour. There was no radar in those days to reach out into the Atlantic. We did have a couple of permanently stationed boats in the ocean we could check in with and report our position. I immediately turned to the navigator and asked him when he last adjusted the heading and fortunately he said about 20 minutes past. I had him immediately give me a position report and it turned out we were only about 20 miles of course. No harm done but I never again failed to check the auto pilot control after it had been used to insure it was in neutral.

On a flight to the our most northern base in Thule AFB, Greenland I had a new young navigator. Thule is not far from the North Pole. Compass headings in this area of the world are next to useless. Thule had a Omni Range navigation system which you could pickup when you were about 200 miles from the base. You could also track outbound on an Omni out of Newfoundland or Labrador for a couple of hundred miles. As all you cold see on the ground was ice and snow you had not ground marks to use. When I was about 150 miles from Thule and clearly had it on the Omni which showed direction and distance to Thule the Navigator advised me to turn 40 degrees to the left. He was clearly lost due to the magnetic forces in this far northern areas and his lack of experience in this area. Sure glad we had other navigation devices than the navigator.

Today you can set the coordinates of where you want to fly anywhere in the world and your plane will fly you there all by itself. It can even land itself although that is only done in practice.

I am sure every pilot who has flown for thousands of hours has some real strange stories to tell and some he does not care to tell.

Result number: 23

Message Number 260239

Re: Kidner Procedure Patient View Thread
Posted by dancediva on 8/31/09 at 20:23

I had the kidner procedure on May 22, 2009. The reason my navicular bone was bothering me is because i tripped over a backback and fractured the bone:(. I was verry good at keeping it elavated and iced and got a hard,non weight beiring cast 6 days after surgery. For the first week, i had alot of pain but after that, pain was minimal. I had the hard cast for 6 weeks, and got a walking boot with instructions to use crutches if needed. The boot came off 4 weeks later and was instructed to where a lace up ankle brace with orthotics. I am now walking in flipflobs (considering it is so hot here in Arizona!) and am able to run again. i highly recomend this surgery to anybody who is thinking about it. Im going in for my right foot on December 18 and am sure it will go just as well! If anybody has any questions, you can e-mail me directly at

tinaturtle2 at gmail.com

hope this was any help!

Result number: 24
Searching file 25

Message Number 259567

Re: Waiting View Thread
Posted by john h on 8/10/09 at 17:40

Wendy: I really have no problem with seeing a GP for a referral although in most cases it is not required. My question comes from a specific case. On a Friday afternoon I begin to see large 'floaters' in my right eye. I also saw flashes of light like lightning. I am savvy enough to know these are symptoms of a possible detaching retina. Sometimes a matter of hours can make the difference between losing your eyesight and not. At this time of day to go to my GP and get a referral was not a possibility. I had to call several Ophomoligist before I found one who would see me immediately after I told him my symptoms. My cousin who is younger than me had virtually the same thing happen to him on a Friday and he waited 5 days and as a result he lost his eyesight in his right eye forever when the retina detached. He was in his late 30's. Even going to an emergency room would not have been a good choice if they did not have a ophomoligist on site as an intern or the usual Doctors on call are not equipped to deal with this. Going to an emergency room is a nightmare as you might have to wait 5 hours unless you are having a heart attack. I have had a kidney stone so I know very much what they feel like. I asked my urologist what should I do if I developed one in the middle of the day. He said by all means go to the emergency room as they know how to treat it and diagnosis it or at least manage the pain until he could get there and make an assessment. Due to all the drug addicts trying to get narcotics and knowing how to mimic someone with a kidney stone you also have to go though various test to rule out being a druggie.It would have made no sense to head to my GP as she would have had to do the same thing and I would end up spending 4-5 more hours in very severe pain. Sure enough I had another stone on a Saturday night at this time and off to the emergency room. Once again I sat about 2 hours in agony while people with colds and coughs were ahead of me. As Obama and other people say we have got to get involved in our own health care. There will be times when a GP is not the first answer. If you think you are having a heart attack you better head to the emergency room or call 911 and not wast time going to your GP. Not all people are educated enough to know what to do with things like my eye and as a result just like my cousin he lost his eye. Some things just cannot wait a GP's referral even when I can see my GP within an hour 5 days a week.

As I said as a general policy seeing your GP is a good policy but there is no one size fits all. As you probably know that the emergency room in all hospitals is used by people without insurance for routine care Even illegals cannot be turned away so in fact there is no one that cannot receive medical care. It is not efficient and the cost are of course passed on in higher cost to insurance companies who pay for insured patients. This will be an interesting detail of what comes out of a healthcare plan. Will the emergency room stop treating colds and acting as the family doctor for the formerly uninsured? It will be hard to break old habits for these people as they are not used to making appointments. I would guess you could have the emergency room bill their insurance but emergency room cost are necessarily high cost. We need to get the emergency rooms back to what they do best and not be your GP for free.

Result number: 25

Message Number 259537

Re: Waiting View Thread
Posted by john h on 8/09/09 at 16:09

I can live with seeing the Primary Care doctor first Dr. Ed. In real practice if I injury my eye I head straight to the Ophmologist because if I am having a detached retina a few hours may be the difference between sight and blindness. If I think I am having a heart attack I head straight to the emergency room and do not make an appointment with my primary care doctor. Most things I do see my primary first and let her send me on to a specialist because for some cases or with some specialist this is a requirement. If my life may be on the line I will make the decision to go where I want as fast as I can get there. I am sure not going to wait for a bureaucrat in Washington to go down his checklist to see what I should or be allowed to do. I told the story about my wife who several years ago was sent by her primary to get a CAT Scan on her brain. She had a tumor located by the scan on the brain. Medicare refused to pay for the scan as they said the primary did not have enough evidence to recommend a scan. This even after finding a tumor. This is government involvement in medicine at its best. After writing my Senator and Representatives they took my case before a review board who appraently review such things and in the end paid for it. Certainly no Doctor I know of would deny payment on a CAT scan that found a brain tumor. Had to be a government non medical bureaucrat following his/her checklist who made this first decision.

Result number: 26

Message Number 259196

Re: Plantar Fibrosis View Thread
Posted by Dr. Ed on 7/28/09 at 07:51

Tina:
fibrosis = scar tissue
plantar = bottom of the foot
We would need to know more specifics about your condition to attempt to comment.
Dr. Ed

Result number: 27

Message Number 259189

Plantar Fibrosis View Thread
Posted by Tina B on 7/27/09 at 22:14

MD says that continued friction on the tendon (along the inside arch) has caused the fibrosis. If I do have surgery to remove it what is the likelihood of it returning? What is the down side to just putting up with it other than it being painful.

Result number: 28

Message Number 259187

Plantr Fibrosis View Thread
Posted by Tina B on 7/27/09 at 22:04

I have been told that I have plantar fibrosis that has incapsulated my tendon and the orthopedic wants to do surgery to remove. My question: Is this the only treatment and is this a cure? What causes this and could it come back after time? Can't find a lot on line to assist me with a decision on whether or not to have the surgery.

Result number: 29

Message Number 258878

Re: The politics of being rich. View Thread
Posted by marie:) on 7/15/09 at 16:55

Rck,

Only 1/2 of 1% of the population in the U.S. is considered wealthy. United for a Fair Economy reports that about 700 business leaders and wealthy in the top 5% of wealth and/or income in the U.S. advocate for fair taxes and corporate accountability. The middle class has been the biggest victim of taxation, simply by headcount. They are the majority. When we discuss middle class we have to keep in mind they include upper, middle, lower......and then the working class. Some 53% of Americans consider themselves middle class and around 19% consider themselves upper middle class and another 19% lower middle class. These numbers are based on a 2008 Pew Poll. You state 40% of the population is supported by the 1/2 of 1%....and that is a grotesque misrepresentation. The middle class pays for itself and the poor. The majority of financial gains since the late 70's has gone to the wealthy while the middle class has declined.

Therefore it is the middle class you should be concerned with and not 1/2 of 1% of the population. Sorry but majority rules and that is a democracy. Hey Somalia might not be so bad....I mean they don't have taxes and favor the rich. So by all means it should be a top destination for all our wealthy. I hear pirate watching is a big pass time there. Aye aye matey! ;)

http://pewresearch.org/pubs/793/inside-the-middle-class

For decades, middle-income Americans had been making absolute progress while enduring relative decline. But since 1999, they have not made economic gains.

From 1983 to 2004, the median net worth of upper-income families more than doubled, while the median net worth of middle-income families grew by just 29%. In effect, those in the middle have been making progress in absolute terms while falling behind in relative terms.

Economic, demographic, technological and sociological changes since 1970 have moved some groups up the income ladder and pushed others down.

Result number: 30

Message Number 258833

Re: Peroneal Subluxation questions View Thread
Posted by Brittney on 7/13/09 at 23:31

I am having peroneal tendon reconstruction done next week on my right ankle. My subluxtion was something I was born with. The grove where the tendon is supposed to rest is to shallow and did not form correctly. They will be going in to make the groove bigger and to repair the torn retinaculum. You asked about the surgury and what to expect. I thing you might find this website helful, I know I did.

http://www.eorthopod.com/public/patient_education/6581/peroneal_tendon_subluxation.html

As far as recovery my doctor told me this just today. I will be on crutches for about a week, then I will be in a hard cast for about 6 weeks and then a boot cast for an additional 4 weeks, I will then start PT and should make a full recovery about 6 months post-op. I know this is not what you want to hear, but if it is truly peroneal tendon subluxation, then you really have no other option. From what my doctor says, no-surgical methods are not very successful at all. I hope it all works out for you. Goodluck!

Result number: 31

Message Number 258269

Re: Netanyahu Agrees to Palestinian State View Thread
Posted by Dr. Ed on 6/20/09 at 15:04

Marie:
You state that you support a two state option. That set of circumstances already exists. The British Mandate of Palestine was split into a Jewish homeland on the West side of the Jordan River and the Palestinian Arabs given the part of Palestine east of the Jordan River which then became known as Transjordan and then Jordan. The issue is that the Brits handed over the reigns of power in Jordan, not to the Palestinian majority but to the minority Hashemites who are royalists and an offshoot of the Saudi royal family. Jordan is the Palestinian State but not ruled by Palestinians. Why are no Arab states protesting that? Why must a state run by Palestinians be inside Israel? Keep in mind that the so-called 'occupied territories' were under Arab control before 1967, the West Bank under the control of Jordan and Gaza under the control of Egypt. Yasser Arafat was an Egyptian. Why did no Arab state refer to the West Bank or Gaza as an 'occupied territory' before 1967. Why were Arabs living in Gaza called Egyptians prior to 1967?

There never was a nation nor a nationality of people know as Palestinians, nor Jordanians, nor Iraqis for that matter. The nations with such names were carved out of the Middle East by the European colonial powers, France and England after WW1 once the Ottoman Empire was defeated. It was those same power that laid down the artificial borders based on their political considerations. Syria had, on several occasions threatened Jordan militarily because Syria considered the people living in Jordan as Syrian Arabs, not Palestinan Arabs. Culturally and historically, Syria is probably correct although one could not want the Baathist thugs that run Syria to have any more power. You may also recall that after WW2 and into the 1950s there was a call to Arab unity and Syria and Egypt were to unite into one country, the United Arab Republic as they felt that they were one people.

The Arab refugees who left Israel in 1948 did so under the threat of seven Arab armies driving the Jew into the sea and those in the way being in jeopardy. Those refugees have been used as pawns by leaders of the Arab governments as a pretext to destroy Israel. Each of those refugees could probably have been given a nice condo by the beach when one adds up all the money poured into war making over the last 6 decades. To do so, though, would take away the ability of the Arab leaders to attempt to persuade the world that an Arab state need be established inside Israel. Israel has a miniscule amount of land in the Middle East; approximately 0.3%. The Arabs have 99.7% of the land. As such demands that Israel give up land or not use the land they have are not only absurd but an attempt to hurt Israel.

Ed

Result number: 32

Message Number 257168

Re: Cosmetic Foot Surgery View Thread
Posted by TinaC on 4/27/09 at 14:21

I have a size 4 foot with a bunion that does hurt. My podiatrist had said that he would do surgery to correct this, but also I have between a C and D width. Do I need to you that it is extremely hard to find shoes that fit me comfortably. I have no choice but to wear shoes that are too narrow and long for my foot. I also have a question: There is a prominent bone in both my feet that is right under my pinky toe, can that be modified to narrow my foot a little?

Result number: 33

Message Number 257064

Re: Life after a subtalar fusion View Thread
Posted by Ryan M. on 4/22/09 at 21:20

Tina E,

It has been a few years since your sub talar joint fusion. How is it going for you now? I broke my ankle and foot in a car accident as well and already have had the 3rd through 5th metatarsels in my foot and the talar joint fused in my ankle. The subtalar joint is now causing me extreme pain so I am wondering how you have come along since your surgery. I wish you the best.

Ryan M.

Result number: 34

Message Number 256884

Waterproof Sandals? View Thread
Posted by Jennifer L on 4/14/09 at 14:53

First of all, thank you for all the help you've given me in the past even though I haven't been diagnosed with PF! I procrastinated going back to the doctor for a while, but now I am working with a podiatrist and he just ordered me some new orthotics today. My problems seem to be super high arches that need support, and I seem to have developed some neuromas in the past few months and have had issues with tingling feet (he wants me to do some tests at home to isolate the exact triggers and figure out which nerves are bothering me).

Anyways, my husband and I are planning a trip to a theme park in a month that will involve a lot of water rides, so I was hoping someone could recommend some sandals that will at least minimize how sore I know my feet will be! :) I've searched the board and found a bunch of recommended brands, but since I don't have a lot of time to order and return sandals, I was hoping you could narrow it down to a few most promising styles/brands for me. I need:

* Waterproof / comfortable when wet

* Flip-flops or something with ankle straps. Slides and sling-backs (without toe posts) fall off my feet!

* Due to my high insteps, flip-flops with thin straps or styles with adjustable straps are easiest for me to fit. (i.e. no flip-flops with thick straps that cover part of the top of your foot -- I usually can't get my feet into these!)

* Really soft/squishy soles (e.g. Crocs, squishy cheap flip-flops, etc.) hurt my feet, so I need more support. Of course, not all supportive shoes fit for various reasons so I realize there will still be some trial-and-error! (E.g. Birks always hurt my feet in the store, so I've never bought any to see if they'd actually mold to my feet...)

* Many of the more supportive flip-flops I've seen appear to be turned up under the toes (I think it's called rocker toes?) Those haven't worked for me in the past so I am a bit hesitant -- perhaps because I have slightly curved toes (mild hammertoes?) that want to curl down rather than up!

Surprisingly, my most comfy flip-flops right now are these cheapo ones from Kohl's -- the foam is stiff, not squishy, the heel cup provides some stability, and notice that the straps do not cover much of my feet:

http://www.kohls.com/kohlsStore/shoes/juniors/flipflops/PRD~439078/Candies+Floral+Wedge+FlipFlops.jsp

But I think I can do better ;) Thanks!

Result number: 35

Message Number 256778

Re: Heel Pain: Rheum or Neuro issue or both?? View Thread
Posted by Dr. Wedemeyer on 4/09/09 at 17:17

I have a few questions before commenting if you don't mind.

What is your gender?
What is your age?
Is there a spinal or a peripheral joint component/complaint or history?
Have you experienced any extra-articular symptoms, ie; gastrointestinal, genitourinary or affecting the eyes?
Is there a history of a psoriasis skin condition?
Are there any radiographic plain film results that you can share (in that radiologists own words)?

Result number: 36

Message Number 256183

Paul Krugman View Thread
Posted by john h on 3/23/09 at 13:06

Paurl Krugman is a Nobel Prize winning econominst from Princeton University and a contributor to the New York Times. He is also very much a hard Liberal. The following is just out and comming from a man of his reputation and liberal leanings should make all just a little concerned:


Mon 23 Mar 2009


Financial Products
About Thomson Reuters
Nobel laureate Krugman slams Geithner bailout plan
Mon Mar 23, 2009 12:24pm EDT Email (PIPE) Print (PIPE) Share (PIPE) Reprints (PIPE) Single Page [-] Text [+]
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Nobel-prize winning economist Paul Krugman said in remarks published on Monday that the latest U.S. Treasury bailout program is nearly certain to fail, triggering a sense of personal despair.

U.S. Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner on Monday unveiled a plan aimed at persuading private investors to help rid banks up to $1 trillion in toxic assets that that are seen as a roadblock to economic recovery.

'This is more than disappointing,' Krugman wrote in The New York Times. ''In fact it fills me with a sense of despair.'

'The Geithner scheme would offer a one-way bet: if asset values go up, the investors profit, but if they go down, the investors can walk away from their debt,' the Princeton University economist said, citing weekend reports outlining the plan.

'This isn't really about letting markets work. It's just an indirect, disguised way to subsidize purchases of bad assets,' he added.

Krugman called it a recycled idea of former Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson, who later abandoned the 'cash for trash' proposal.

'But the real problem with this plan is that it won't work,' he says, adding that bad loans may be undervalued because there is too much fear in the current climate.

'But the fact is that financial executives literally bet their banks on the belief that there was no housing bubble, and the related belief that unprecedented levels of household debt were no problem. They lost that bet. And no amount of financial hocus-pocus -- for that is what the Geithner plan amounts to -- will change that fact,' Krugman wrote.

While the real economy is being hurt by the meltdown of the financial system itself, Krugman says this is not the first or the last time this has happened. And there are lots of roadmaps to get us out.

'It goes like this: the government secures confidence in the system by guaranteeing many (though not necessarily all) bank debts. At the same time, it takes temporary control of truly insolvent banks, in order to clean up their books,' Krugman said.

Time is running out on the Obama administration to take control of the banks - and the crisis.

'If this plan fails - as it almost surely will - it's unlikely that he'll be able to persuade Congress to come up with more funds to do what he should have done in the first place,' he wrote.

The White House strongly disagreed with Krugman's assessment, defending the administration plans on the morning talk shows.

'I think Paul's just wrong on this one,' Christina Romer, head of the White House Council of Economic Advisers, said on ABC's 'Good Morning America' show just ahead of the plan's release.

'This is really tails both the government and the private sector win, heads both the government and the private sector lose. We both are going to have, as the saying goes, skin in the game.'

(Reporting by Corbett B. Daly; Editing by Walker Simon)

Result number: 37

Message Number 256150

Re: MTP joint pain for 2 weeks now View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 3/22/09 at 08:12

Well, 'Sheila', I find it ironic that you point out the 'rules' to the doctors, but do not follow the 'rules' yourself about posting under two different identities, and posting on the 'ask the doctors' message board when it clearly states not to respond unless you're a medical professiona. When I searched your IP address, why do other posts that come from your IP address come up as 'Tina', yet this time you post as 'Sheila'?

A little hypocrisy?

Apparently you don't get our point. It clearly states that this site is not to provide diagnoses over the internet. Therefore, Dr. W and myself were re-stating that point as we do over and over and over again on this site. Patients can do significant harm do themselves by attempting to diagnose and 'cure' themselves via the internet, which is NOT a substitute for hands-on medical care.

We are simply setting this patient back on the rigt path and saving him some potential significant harm and delayed treatment.

So, if that offends you...so be it. Do NOT respond to this post because your post will be deleted. Responses on this board are to be from medical professionals as CLEARLY stated in the rules you so clearly referenced....but ignored.

Result number: 38

Message Number 255876

Use of Air Force Jets View Thread
Posted by john h on 3/13/09 at 10:14

George Bush became the first President to allow the Speaker of the House to use Air Force Jets for travel. The use of military jets is about the most expensive mode of travel there is. It would be cheaper to charter a jet but better yet to travel first class on an airline. The question arises at what level in the chain of command do you allow elected officials to travel by military jet? It is the most expensive mode of travel and in this day and age it seems we should revert to what had always been done prior to George Bush allowing Dennis Hassert to use military aircraft. For four years I flew Cabinet Members and other high ranking Generals to Europe out of Washington. At that time we had 4 flight attendants, 3 pilots, 2 navigators, and an engineer on each aircraft. An aircraft that would normally seat over 100 people was modified to carry around 40. We cooked meals on board and the passengers traveled in luxury. As a pilot I thought it was great as I was always given fast service when refueling and our destinations were usually London, Paris, and Frankfurt. A national reporter, Drew Pearson, somehow got wind of these flights and got on board one of the aircraft. He wrote a scathing article about the luxury flights in one of the Washington papers. On our flights back from Europe the normally very thorough Customs Agents looked at hardly anything and the goodies these people brought back were not checked by customs. The customs checks were on the aircraft. They did load up on goodies some of them big enough to take up space big enough for two passengers.

Nancy Polosi's office refused to release how many flights she took on military aircraft last year and her staff would make no comment. A request under the Freedom of Infomation Act has been submitted. Our elected officials to often feel they are entitled after a few years in office. President Obama should reign in such junkets as should of President Bush. We crow about the fat cats on Wall Street when we have our own version of fat cats running the country.

Result number: 39

Message Number 255769

Re: Tarsal Tunnel Surgery View Thread
Posted by Tina on 3/09/09 at 21:44

Kim, I wish you luck! When you're reading the comments on this site you have to understand that everyone is different. In my case it was not sucessful and am now facing another surgery with a Nero Stimulator. I had the TTR surgery Dec. 2007, I don't regret it but it was very hard. As far as recovery time I don't think every Doctor's answer would be the same. I was out of work for 6 weeks and no weight baring for 3 of those weeks. I think it depends on how well you heal. I know that after the surgery I had ALOT of pain. However, the Doctor that did mine had another case where the pateint had next to NO pain after. I wish you luck but just remember it is YOUR choice. If you want to have it done and your Doctor is not willing to do it PLEASE find a Doctor that will help you! Good luck. Keep us posted!

Result number: 40

Message Number 255622

Re: Has anyone became disabled from TTS and PF View Thread
Posted by Tina on 3/04/09 at 20:54

He is located in Chandler AZ. Dr. David Laurraino and Dr. Wladislaw Fedoriw. They are both VERY GOOD Doctors. Dr. Laurraino is the foot Doc and Dr. Fedoriw is the pain management Doc.

Result number: 41

Message Number 255606

Re: Has anyone became disabled from TTS and PF View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 3/04/09 at 08:01

Tina,
I'm very happy to hear that you're doing great. Where is your doctor located?

Result number: 42

Message Number 255600

Re: Has anyone became disabled from TTS and PF View Thread
Posted by Tina on 3/03/09 at 22:44

Hi, my name is Tina. I've had the same issues as you but, I have finally found releif... It was suggested by my foot doc and I have blogged about it on this site. This has helped me tremendously!!! I'm now waiting for the final sugery in the coming weeks...

This is an amazing story.... I've had TTS now for a few years and have had the TT Release surgery done but it failed... Let me tell you what a tremendous journey this as been on me and my family. As of today I am HAPPY to report that after trying creams, injections custom orthodics, physical therapy going 3 days a week for 4 monts, special shoes, pills including pain meds, missing MANY days of work and countless hundreds of dollars... I have FINALLY found releif, at it is all credited to a remarkable Doctor. I was intoduced to to a Spine and Back doctor who began evaluating me for a Neuro stimulator device. I will say that this may not be an option that everyone agrees with BUT, this was almost my last option. This device was just started yesterday as a 1 week trial and let me tell you the difference is unbeleivable. Like day and night. I have a 4 inch scar from the TT release surgery from 12/2007 and before I couldn't even touch it or even wear socks but, as a test last night I began to test it and I started to touch it very lightly. NOTHING happened. I even had my husband touch it and poke at it lightly while I had my eyes closed and again NOTHING.

Result number: 43

Message Number 255473

Re: Oh yeah and the best part of all ... View Thread
Posted by Tina on 2/26/09 at 16:30

Yes, it was inserted about 3 inches above the scar from the TTR, NOT in the spine.

Result number: 44

Message Number 255462

TTS View Thread
Posted by Beulah S. on 2/26/09 at 11:42

Tina I am SO happy for you, i would love to see the pictures, do you know if anyone in Indiana is doing this yet?
I went to my family Doctor Tuesday and he is sending me back to my neurology to see what is going on,i would love to get back my life, i'm SO tired of my sofa,
Hope things keep getting better, please e-mail me and really give me details.
Thank you---God Bless You, SO happy for you.
Beulah

Result number: 45

Message Number 255461

Re: Oh yeah and the best part of all ... View Thread
Posted by Tina on 2/26/09 at 11:07

Thank you, it has been a long time coming... The stimulator was designed to be placed on the spine however, the Doctor I'm seeing has actually placed it on the nerve in my leg (about 3 inches from the actuall scar from the TTR surgery)that is causing all of the pain and swelling because of the scar tissue build up. It will be sewed to the nerve (the paddle) and the battery pack will be sewen to to the muscle in the back of my calf. I hope this answer helps, if you want I would be willing to take pictures and email them to you. Here is my email if you want me to email them to you. goofycart at yahoo.com Thanks again!

Result number: 46

Message Number 255455

Re: Oh yeah and the best part of all ... View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 2/26/09 at 07:45

Tina, that's fantastic news. It's always great to hear that a patient is having pain relief.

I'm very curious to know where the doctor actually placed/inserted the stimulator, because there have been recent studies where some doctors were actually implanting the devices locally, to only block the signal in the local area instead of the spine.

So if you have the opportunity, I'd be very curious to know the actual location. Thank you and I sincerely hope you have continued relief and success.

Result number: 47

Message Number 255443

Oh yeah and the best part of all ... View Thread
Posted by Tina on 2/25/09 at 22:08

I forgot to tell you... I am now walking correctly and slowly getting back into the things that I use to love to do.

Result number: 48

Message Number 255442

I have FINALLY found some relief..... View Thread
Posted by Tina on 2/25/09 at 22:03

This is an amazing story.... I've had TTS now for a few years and have had the TT Release surgery done but it failed... Let me tell you what a tremendous journey this as been on me and my family. As of today I am HAPPY to report that after trying creams, injections custom orthodics, physical therapy going 3 days a week for 4 monts, special shoes, pills including pain meds, missing MANY days of work and countless hundreds of dollars... I have FINALLY found releif, at it is all credited to a remarkable Doctor. I was intoduced to to a Spine and Back doctor who began evaluating me for a Neuro stimulator device. I will say that this may not be an option that everyone agrees with BUT, this was almost my last option. This device was just started yesterday as a 1 week trial and let me tell you the difference is unbeleivable. Like day and night. I have a 4 inch scar from the TT release surgery from 12/2007 and before I couldn't even touch it or even wear socks but, as a test last night I began to test it and I started to touch it very lightly. NOTHING happened. I even had my husband touch it and poke at it lightly while I had my eyes closed and again NOTHING.

This thing actually works, I have to admit I had my doubts. I remained positive and with an open mind. I went to back to the doctor today for some adjustments on the device and told him and he was very pleased. I know this procedure is not for everyone but it is definitly for ME. I just wanted to share my sucess story with all of you. Not so mych as an option for you personally but just as a reminder NOT to give up. There is releif and to make sure you keep your options open and being open minded.

Result number: 49

Message Number 255416

update on tts View Thread
Posted by DinaG on 2/25/09 at 11:47

WOW! What a journey, I had TTS on Left foot and it went very well.
Had it on my Right foot and its been crazy, I went back to my surgeon yesterday to look at my top incision and I must say I have procrastinated due to the fact that it was excruciating to even act like you were going to touch the spot! I had to go considering I still have yet to wear a shoe and my foot is very swollen by the time the evening comes I cant even stand it is like a balloon.
Anyhow went to see Dr. she by the way is awesome apparently the little pink jelly like tissue is some sort of tumor like thing. She had a name and showed me a pic in a book but cant for the life of me remember, menig something. So I am scheduled for a in office surgery to reopen incision and re stitch and biopsy it for the sake of doing it. Another three weeks of stitches but at least get to the bottom of it all. Very strange she has never seen this and of course it would be me. My big toe was also locked up again! She believes the way I am walking because of the pain and swelling it is just really not doing my whole foot any good. The heel pain is horrible still she also believes because the way I am walking to compensate.
THERE IS ALWAYS HOPE! IT helps to have a wonderful Doctor who is very compassionate and gets it!

Result number: 50

Message Number 255358

Re: Failed Bi-Lateral TTS Surgery. What Now?? View Thread
Posted by Tina on 2/22/09 at 22:43

Just an FYI, that Spinal Stimulator you're refering to can also be implanted into your leg and not attached to your spine, I am actually doing the trial next week. I've had TTS for a few years on my right foot, and I have tried EVERYTHING with no releif. Including the TTS surgery, I will be one of the first 5 prople to have tried the Stimulator in Arizona. I'm trying to be positive about this but I do have to admit it is VERY hard giving the fact that EVERYTHING else has not worked. I will let you know how it goes but, for ME this was my only option. By the way I am only 34 years old and USE To be very active and now it pains be just to manage to get out of bed. I know I can relate to your situation when it comes to pain. I have tried custome orthodics, pain patches, cortison injections, physical therapy 3 days a week for 4 months special made shoes (not very stylish by the way) and spending a ton of money. I will know if the Stimulator works within a week and then it will be inserted into that area of my ankle and into the back of my calf. I'm betting it will be an interesting experience, I will let you know... Look for my blog!

Result number: 51

Message Number 255357

Re: TTS Surgery that didn't work View Thread
Posted by Tina on 2/22/09 at 22:31

Amanda,

On this site you're certainly NOT alone... I had the surgery last year for TTS, but it was not sucessful. It has almosts been a year and let me tell you I've tried EVERYTHING!! Pain and inflamation patches, cortison injections, steriod pills, custom orthodics, physical therapy for 4 months 3 days a week, and last but not least several hundreds of dollars. I am actually going on Tuesday for a new procedure. I will let you know how it goes... I can definatly relate to your situation, I also am very young, 34. I have been just as frustrated as you. I have missed a lot of time from work and it has gotten to me mentaly too. I'm going to be positive that this new procedure will work, this is the last attempt to correct a failed surgery. I can tell you it hasn't been easy at all. This procedure is very new, I actually got a personal email from another fellow suffer on this site and just mailed her the DVD's I received from my Doctor detailing about the procedure. I wish you luck, just remember NOT to over do it, you'll only suffer later!!

Result number: 52

Message Number 254985

Re: Archilles tendonitis / autologous blood injections View Thread
Posted by Dr. Z on 2/10/09 at 21:07

Level 5 .21mj/mm2 Total energy flux density 604mj. Some need need a 2nd treatment for additional pain relief. Never use local infiltration with lidocaine in the treatment area. Use post tib, sural and post calcaneal nerve blocks. Read Dr. Furia article on this specific protocol. If you can't find it e-mail me and I send it to you.
I just saw a patient that I did ESWT on for insertinal AT. from 1999. Back then I used the orbasone ESWT device. Patient is still pain free.

Result number: 53

Message Number 254888

Re: Is Donald Trump right? View Thread
Posted by Dr. Ed on 2/08/09 at 09:46

Trump makes a key point about an issue that is not being addressed. The bailout money going to banks is being used by the banks to cover bad debt but not being used for loans. The banks are unsure about how much more bad debt is coming due so they are sitting on the bailout funds.

Business lending, especially lending to small and medium size business, is not happening. Small business has been the creator of most jobs in America over the last two decades. Big business tends to outsource. Trump implies that there should be some mandate attached to the bailout funds that a percentage of such funds be lent out.

The current economic stimulus package as well as the actions of government over the last year has been based on the premise that the taxpayer need cover the bad debts of big business because such businesses are too important to allow to fail. That policy is flawed, in my opinion, because we are throwing money at businesses that have been part of the problem. A major reason for such policy is the revolving door between government and big business policy makers. What can you say about a Treasury Department that is run by people from Goldman Sachs and other large financial institutions. There has been a literal merger of our bloated bureaucracy with the interests of big business, often multinational businesses.

Have we all forgotten the Sherman Antitrust Act and the manner in which a President Theodore Roosevelt or William Howard Taft would approach this situation? Why cover the bad debts of financial institutions? Doing so puts absolutely no money back into the economy and is rapidly increasing the national debt. Is anyone considering the percentage of the federal budget that will now go to servicing this debt? Debt service will cripple the federal budget for years if not decades to come.

Let the involved big financial institutions declare bankruptcy. The bailout money can now go to really create jobs whether that be through a public works program, a revitalized Small Business Administration, etc. Such financial institutions should be broken up by the government as in the days of Roosevelt/Taft trustbusting and the assets re-allocated either to new smaller entities or to existing smaller financial institutions that employ US citizens. There would be a net job gain because the assets are being preserved and provided to small financial institutions that keep their hiring domestic.

The newly enlarged small financial institutions should then be encouraged to ramp up small business lending with infusions of bailout capital. That is how the bailout money creates and supports new or expanding small business and creates jobs.

Ed

Do we need to bring back the Bull Moose Party to get this done?

Result number: 54

Message Number 254838

Re: Life after a subtalar fusion View Thread
Posted by Paul J on 2/06/09 at 13:22

Hi Tina,

Just had my Subtalar Joint fused 10 weeks ago and am hopping for the best. How has yours healed? What was the realistic turn around. I start physical therapy on Monday, and am really excited to get my life back on track. I've been very active my entire life and at 35 years old it seemed like an extreem thing to do, but he pain was bad... Please contact me if you have a second.

Thank you

paul j

Result number: 55

Message Number 254759

Re: Dr. DSW View Thread
Posted by Dr. DJP on 2/04/09 at 11:25

Jessica,

First, I agree with the advice that you have received from Dr. DSW I would also like to add to Dr. DSW's comments. The posterior tibial tendon courses through the tarsal tunnel with great proximity to the posterior tibial nerve. This can cause problems in the tarsal tunnel and produce your symptoms. Basically, Posterior Tibial Tendon Inflammation can increase the pressure in the tunnel and compress the nerve. Also, a repeat of the NCV's may be in order, but make sure that the neurologist does a lot of them. I have had NCV's come back normal and the nerve actually looked terrible in the operating room. Lastly, Dr. DSW is 100% correct TTS is a clinical diagnosis and at times a diagnosis of exclusion.

Good Luck

Result number: 56

Message Number 254758

Re: TTS-RE OPERATION View Thread
Posted by Dr. DJP on 2/04/09 at 11:15

You have got to go to someone with significant experience with this. There is a product called neurawrap and it protects the damaged nerve. I always use it on revision surgeries to prevent increased scarring of the nerve. Send me a picture of your incision to pacman25 at hotmail.com and put 'Attention Dr. DJP!' in the subject, so I know it is not junk mail.

Result number: 57

Message Number 254757

Re: What is causing the numbness? View Thread
Posted by Dr. DJP on 2/04/09 at 11:05

Angie,

I will try to help you with your questions, but in a little different order than asked. I would tell you that if you are comfortable with your podiatrist stick with him. Initial therapies do not always work, but even their failure can provide important information and narrow down your differential diagnosis. We do not have magic pills and some problems take a little work on our end and your end to resolve, don't quit. If you did not like him, change venues. Ask a lot of questions and if he cannot give you satifactory reasons for why he is doing what he is doing that is a flag. Some quick thoughts on your symptoms:

1) Plantar Fasciitis can cause 'compensatory' pain, (ie: pain in other areas) due to subconsciously changing your gait pattern to guard your pain.
-I think treating the fascia pain first is a reasonable approach.

2) Numbness is not usually associated with fasciitis. if it shoots, burns, tingles and/or wakes you from sleep you need a nerve work-up.
At that point ask your podiatrist exactly how much training and experience he has in nerve problems/surgery. Nerve Conduction Velocities along with a detailed exam and possible MRI to rule out tendon inflammation and soft tissue mass in the tarsal tunnel may be in order.

3) There is no substitute for trusting your doctor and that means, he/she had better be able to walk you through his/her thought process as to what is wrong with you and why/ how he/she can fix it. I am a podiatrist, but I had extensive traing in peripheral nerve surgery, there are some podiatrist out there, plastic surgeons out there and some neurosurgeons with similar interests/ training. I personnaly have a much better track record with tarsal tunnel problems than the medical literature reports. This is a direct effect of the subspecialty training I received in residency. The orthopedists tend to continue the 'old' way of releasing the tarsal tunnel which they approach similarly to 'carpal tunnel' however they are very different in many respects. That said, I'm not telling you not to go to a foot and ankle orthopedist if he is the best qualified for your problem. If your orthopedists can convince you that nerve is what he trained and what he loves and does and that you won't just be another time slot filled between knee replacements AND you have confidence in him - go with him.

The point is don't categorize doctors by letters after their name or how big their group is. It is a personal decision and you need to do your homework on it. You need 2 things for successful treatment:
#1: Achieve the correct diagnosis
#2: Your doctor specifically performs whatever therapy your diagnosis dictates with a pedigree of adequate training, experience and a track record of good outcomes.

Result number: 58

Message Number 254321

Re: Life after a subtalar fusion View Thread
Posted by Louie M on 1/24/09 at 21:22

I, like Tina was in a head on collision and crushed my foot, along with half the rest of me. The only advice I can give you is to go see an orthopedic surgeon other than a podiatrias. At least for the acual surgery. Not because I know but because I've heard. So I guess I really don't have anything to tell you. I was also told to have the surgery but scared. I'd like to hear from Tina e again to hear how she is doing. Before anything. But I think you only come to this site before the surgery and never again.

Result number: 59

Message Number 254172

Re: Earth Shoes View Thread
Posted by christinap on 1/19/09 at 17:01

I have had pf for over 4 years. My pain is just in the arch, not in the heel. I discovered Earth shoes about 6 months ago and now they are the only shoes I will wear. I use inserts with them. My feet have been much better. Strangely, sneakers with inserts hurt worse than dress shoes for me if I am just standing or walking, but I can run a little in sneakers. Not sure if this is helpful, but for me Earth shoes were a godsend. Everyone is different though.
A side note - everyone warns against going barefoot and walking in sand, but I find walking barefoot in sand to really make my feet feel a lot better. They usually feel good for a day or two afterwards, I just wish I lived closer to the beach.

Result number: 60

Message Number 253913

Re: 263 View Thread
Posted by Beulah S. on 1/12/09 at 10:30

Hi Tina, I went off Lyrica on my own and very glad that i did, now just on cybalta, i'm still tired all the time and don't want to get out of bed but once i'm up its ok.
I so hope this works for you, be worth the trip where ever i had to go.
THANK YOU SO MUCH !!! sending you my address now---THANKS AGAIN---WISH YOU THE BEST OF LUCK---Beulah

Result number: 61

Message Number 253897

Re: 263 View Thread
Posted by Tina on 1/11/09 at 22:25

Hey Beulah, I haven't started the trial yet because of the Insurance and the guidlines they have I had to do a Mental evualation first... Don't ask! My personal email address is goofycart at yahoo.com
I can send you the DVD'd that my doc gave me if you give me your address. I will shout on the ROOF TOPS if this really does work. I'm from Arizona but I will send you the info if you want. Just let me know!

Result number: 62

Message Number 253895

Re: medrol pack? View Thread
Posted by Tina on 1/11/09 at 22:14

I've tried it but that among other things has not worked. Now, that doesn't mean that it will not work for you though.

Result number: 63

Message Number 253856

Re: many questions about tts View Thread
Posted by Dee on 1/10/09 at 17:46

Anne,

I had surgery, but I would not say it was successful. My pain is different - in some ways better, in some ways worse.

I recommend that you ask your doctor how many tarsal tunnel releases he/she has done. Unless the number is high, it might be better to get a referral to Dr. Tim Daniels in Toronto. There is a waiting list, but he has the most experience in Ontario. Actually, just get the referral regardless as the waiting list is very long. You could always cancel. Success rates seem to be higher when all tunnels distal to the flexor retinaculum are released, or at least checked.

Result number: 64

Message Number 253682

Re: 263 View Thread
Posted by Beulah S. on 1/03/09 at 15:03

Hi Tina, do you have a e-mail where i can send you my address and please keep me up on this NEW divice and where are you from, i'm in Indiana. Have you already started your trial period? How are things going?
This really sounds GREAT !!!!!! I just want my feet back and THANK YOU !!!!!!! Beulah S.

Result number: 65

Message Number 253669

Re: 263 View Thread
Posted by Tina on 1/03/09 at 05:07

Hey there, I wanted you all to know that I've had TTS now for a few years and it has gottn progressivly WORSE! I had the TT Release surgery 1 year ago but it failed... Lucky me. I've also had terrible pain and I can certainly relate to most of this issues described on this site. I have gone and seen a new DOC and he came up with a new treatment, it has been around for 35 years but, it most recently has been used for the pain releif of TTS it is a divice that they insert into your foot and the back of your leg. It serves almost like a road block for the pain. If you're interested let me know and I can mail you a copy of the DVD my doc gave me. I have to go through a trial of 5 days before they will surgicaly insert it but, at least it's kind of like buying a car... You get to test it before you commit to it. Good luck to you all!

Result number: 66

Message Number 253656

Dating 101 Rule #1 View Thread
Posted by john h on 1/02/09 at 13:43

1. You will look at the person lying next to you and wonder, Is this it? Forever?
When you get married, you think that as long as you pick the right guy -- your soul mate -- you'll be happy together until death do you part. Then you wake up one day and realize that no matter how great he is, he doesn't make you happy every moment of every day. In fact, some days you might wonder why you were in such a hurry to get married in the first place. You think to yourself, 'This is so not what I signed up for.'
Actually, it is. You just didn't realize it the day you and your guy were cramming wedding cake into each other's faces, clinking champagne glasses, and dancing the Electric Slide. Back then you had no idea that 'for better and for worse' doesn't kick in only when life hands you a tragedy. Your relationship mettle is, in fact, most tested on a daily basis, when the utter sameness of day-in/day-out togetherness can sometimes make you want to run for the hills. That's when the disappointment sneaks in, and maybe even a palpable sense of loneliness and grief. It's not him. It's just you, letting go of that sugarcoated fantasy of marriage that danced in your eyes the day you and your beloved posed in all those soft-focus wedding photos. You're learning that marriage isn't a destination; it's a journey filled with equal parts excitement and tedium.
Waking up from a good dream to face the harsh morning daylight may not seem like a reason to celebrate. But trust me, it is. Because once you let go of all the hokey stories of eternal bliss, you find that the reality of marriage is far richer and more rewarding than you ever could have guessed. Hard, yes. Frustrating, yes. But full of its own powerful, quiet enchantments just the same, and that's better than any fairy tale.

Result number: 67

Message Number 253519

Re: This is the 3rd time I've posted this, if it's not something you've heard of that's fine but at least RESPOND! View Thread
Posted by Tina on 12/27/08 at 17:44

Thank you for your reply and I will consider this option when I see my Doctor next week. Agan as always Thank you for your time....

Result number: 68

Message Number 253509

Re: This is the 3rd time I've posted this, if it's not something you've heard of that's fine but at least RESPOND! View Thread
Posted by Dr. Wedemeyer on 12/27/08 at 13:23

Tina

I am somewhat familiar with these devices for spinal injuries. They block impulses at the level of the spinal cord. They, like any treatment are hit-and-miss in my experience. These devices are an option for chronic nerve pain patients.

Have you tried anything less invasive such as a TENS unit? Although TENS is not as powerful as an implantable device, I have good success providing these to patients for a variety of musculoskeltal and nerve pain syndromes.

I would certainly explore this with your pain doctor prior to considering a surgical procedure.

Result number: 69

Message Number 253484

TINA possible info from your post on the Dr's only page View Thread
Posted by JuLeen on 12/26/08 at 11:28

Tina,

First, I want you to know I am not a doctor. I'm a patient just like you that has done extensive research and I'm finally with a team of excellent physicians that have been very informative also.

I personally have undergone a botched Tarsal Tunnel Release among other surgeries. I now have RSD and my Pain Management doctor has given me a ton of information on Spinal Cord Stimulars, what they are, how they work, etc...

What you are describing sounds something really similar to a Spinal Cord Stimulator, or they are talking about using something close to it in your foot and ankle. With a Spinal Cord Stimulator they implat the leads to your spine where the nerve inserts. They can have 1 or several leads depending on the person and the condition. Then there is a small unit, like a pace maker, that is also inserted. This is the brain of the unit and can be programmed to different levels to releive the pain. In essents it stops the signal that is being sent out from the nerve from reaching your brain. When you stop the pain signal - you stop the pain. Usually with a Spinal Cord Stimulator they do a 5-7 day trial. Then it is removed. It is worked by decreasing or stopping your pain during the trial then they look at moving forward with inserting a permanent unit. I've heard both good and bad things about them. It is similar to a TENS unit only implanted. I've spoken with people that have them and they said it was a trade off... with the unit they have a tingling feeling in their foot &/or toes, but it relieves the pain. I've talked to other that it didn't help. Just being honest - that is why the trial is so important.

One thing I would say is that I would look at all of my options prior to doing that. If you have had 1 bad Tarsal Tunnel Release and you are not confident in your doctor - talk to local hospitals, healthcare professions, etc... to get a referral to a doctor that specializes in nerve issues and had done a lot of successful surgeries. Ask the questions, find out how many surgeries they've done and what the outcomes have been. Become a very informed patient.

I will have my 5th foot surgery on Monday, Dec. 29th - 1 part of this surgery will by a 2nd Tarsal Tunnel Release.

I wish you the best and hope that this helped give you some information.

Result number: 70

Message Number 253483

This is the 3rd time I've posted this, if it's not something you've heard of that's fine but at least RESPOND! View Thread
Posted by Tina on 12/26/08 at 10:31

I have had pretty severe pain now in my right foot since my TTR surgery that failed last year. I've been seeing a new doctor and I was recently told about a new option called Neurostimulation Therapy with an implantable divice (afer a 1 week trial) that would almost serve as a 'Road Block' for the nerves in my ankle. This divice could be surgicaly implanted into the back of my calf and the lead would attach to the nerves in my ankle. This therapy has been around for about 35 years but must recently been introduced for TT patients that have gone through convential tratment including TTR surgery.
I was wondering if this is anything you've heard of? I just watched several different information DVD's on how it works and I think this is something that at this point I'm willing to give it a try.
Is this a therapy you've seen any positive results in?

Result number: 71

Message Number 253392

Neurostimulation Therapy for TTS View Thread
Posted by Tina on 12/22/08 at 10:17

I have had pretty severe pain now in my right foot since my TTR surgery that failed last year. I've been seeing a new doctor and I was recently told about a new option called Neurostimulation Therapy with an implantable divice (afer a 1 week trial) that would almost serve as a 'Road Block' for the nerves in my ankle. This divice could be surgicaly implanted into the back of my calf and the lead would attach to the nerves in my ankle. This therapy has been around for about 35 years but must recently been introduced for TT patients that have gone through convential tratment including TTR surgery.
I was wondering if this is anything you've heard of? I just watched several different information DVD's on how it works and I think this is something that at this point I'm willing to give it a try.
Is this a therapy you've seen any positive results in?

Result number: 72

Message Number 253312

Neurostimulation Therapy View Thread
Posted by Tina on 12/20/08 at 01:39

I have had pretty severe pain now in my right foot since my TTR surgery that failed last year. I've been seeing a new doctor and I was recently told about a new option called Neurostimulation Therapy with an implantable divice (afer a 1 week trial) that would almost serve as a 'Road Block' for the nerves in my ankle. This divice could be surgicaly implanted into the back of my calf and the lead would attach to the nerves in my ankle. This therapy has been around for about 35 years but must recently been introduced for TT patients that have gone through convential tratment including TTR surgery.
I was wondering if this is anything you've heard of? I just watched several different information DVD's on how it works and I think this is something that at this point I'm willing to give it a try.
Is this a therapy you've seen any positive results in?

Result number: 73

Message Number 253138

Re: Airrosti Treatments View Thread
Posted by Dr. Wedemeyer on 12/15/08 at 12:23

Tina good to hear about your success.

Did the Airrosti explain center explain how this treatment is different from the more familiar ones that I have heard of such as ASTYM, ART or Graston?

Result number: 74

Message Number 253134

Re: Airrosti Treatments View Thread
Posted by Tina M on 12/15/08 at 10:05

I've used airrosti recently (2008) and had great success for a knee injury. I had 7 treatments as it also affected my sciatic area from over compensating. My husband is going this week to get some treatments for his sciatica problem that the chiropractor has not been able to correct. I've had 2 frozen shoulders treated similarly in lieu of surgery with great results. You have to be persistent with the treatment program and the homework exercises they give you to be succesful. The taping helped me with my knee injury a lot.
I am a happy customer and would recommend to anyone.

Result number: 75

Message Number 253133

Re: 2nd airrosti treatment (don't read if you're only going to insult me. I just wanted to share my results.) View Thread
Posted by Tina M on 12/15/08 at 09:53

I've used airrosti for a knee injury. I went for 7 treatments and have had no problems since I've completed the program. My brother had surgery for the same problem and still has pain and limps at times. I am now sending my husband for sciatica. I've had two frozen shoulders treated similarly without surgery and I am sold on the procedure. Don't be negative about trying alternatives to surgery. What do you have to lose? Try it, if it doesn't work for you, then go have your surgery or continue to be in pain. Positive attitude is very important for our body to heal itself.

Result number: 76

Message Number 253068

Re: Dr. Z View Thread
Posted by Paisley on 12/13/08 at 00:10

Thank you so much for following up with my posts. I'm a bit reluctant to post some info on a public message board. I have confidence in my Dr. but have had some conflicting info from him... for example, when I went for my post ESWT he mentioned that retreatment was necessary in 50% of the cases. When I returned for my post EWST 3 week follow up, he didn't really even look at my foot. Plus I feel a bit guilty about going 'over his head.'

My podiatrist did recomment NSAID which in in contradiction to the post EWST in structions I received after the procedure so I am reluctant to take them. Also, NSAID do tend to play havoc with my intestinal system and raise my bp.

I cannot take prednisone -- have had severe reaction to it which, I know, is rare.

The plastic heel cups do not work for me.

I'm not familiar with the Unna boot. Could you provide more info?

I'd be reluctant to try a boot cast due to a history of DVT.

I've had steroid injections which my doctor agreed to try come January when I have a vacation scheduled. The last two injections (given in July and August) did no good. (Done by another podiatrist) In fact, the second one gave me a pretty severe cortizone flare and then only lasted two weeks. In the past, cortizone injections bought me 6-8 months of relief. Not so anymore.

I've tried over-the counter inserts and orthotics. October a year ago, I used Superfeet which I first thought was my miracle cure... 5 months later, another flare up of PF. I also read on this site about ProFeet orthotics which have been recommended by another doctor who frequents this site. However, many reported a problem that the arch support is too high for them. Looking at x-rays, my arch looks high. However, upon standing, it virtually disappears. I've tried using a multitude of OTC orthotics, but they seem to only worsen the severe pain I'm having since the procedure.

I also looked into the Strassburg Sock, but am reluctant to try it. I have a night splint which is very cumbersome -- it seems sometimes it helps, sometimes it doesn't. Let's just say I have 3 shoeboxes of orthotics and inserts. Some helped for awhile, and then the pain returned.

I will, indeed, email you with the info you need. But I need to know that it will remain confidential at least for the time being.

Again, thank you! I am grateful for your interest in my case.

Paisley

P.S. Hopefully, the info I send you will remain confidential.

Result number: 77

Message Number 252992

Re: Retired GM engineer has something to say............ View Thread
Posted by john h on 12/11/08 at 14:34

Having spent over 30 years going to the Florida/Alabama gulf coast every year I am safe in saying that come winter that the snow birds from Canada are probably the largest group of people to visit what I think are some of the most beautiful beaches in the world.

Destin and Gulf Shores are my usual points of destination and is about a 12 hour drive from Little Rock or a one hour flight. As long as they keep the college spring break crowd in Panama City this is one wonderful place to vacation. I do not base my vacation areas on politics else I would not have gone to Hong Kong or some of the former countries behind the Iron Curtin. If we limit where we go because of some elected official there would not be many places to go. You would avoid Illinois at all cost.

Result number: 78

Message Number 252991

Re: Retired GM engineer has something to say............ View Thread
Posted by john h on 12/11/08 at 13:09

Having spent over 30 years going to the Florida/Alabama gulf coast every year I am safe in saying that come winter that the snow birds from Canada are probably the largest group of people to visit what I think are some of the most beautiful beaches in the world.

Destin and Gulf Shores are my usual points of destination and is about a 12 hour drive from Little Rock or a one hour flight. As long as they keep the college spring break crowd in Panama City this is one wonderful place to vacation. I do not base my vacation areas on politics else I would not have gone to Hong Kong or some of the former countries behind the Iron Curtin. If we limit where we go because of some elected official there would not be many places to go. You would avoid Illinois at all cost.

Result number: 79

Message Number 252370

Re: Life after a subtalar fusion View Thread
Posted by ramona b on 11/18/08 at 00:10

hello Tina,

I injured my subtalar some 8 yrs. ago and i hadn't started to experience real pain until maybe a year or so ago. I've begun seeing an podiatriast who has treated it thus far with a freezing agent and a steroid shot, which seems to be working quite well. however, the pain eventually returns. she and i spoke on tge subtalar fusion. I am rather apprehensive about this procedure, but would love to get somethig done asap. Do you have any suggestions?

Please email me at ramonabeyerlein at yahoo.com

Thanks

Result number: 80

Message Number 252156

Pain in the left foot..... View Thread
Posted by Tina on 11/12/08 at 10:26

I've been wearing the Air cast on my right foot for 6 weeks. I have issues now with my left foot. The pain begins on the bottom but I can feel it all the way through the top on the outside of my foot. I know that my left foot has been working extra hard to make up for my right foot not moving when I walk. I have PF in both feet and it seems just as I'm noticing a good change in the right then the left foot begins to hurt again. Any suggestions? I'm thinking of just NOT wearing the Air Cast anymore....

Result number: 81

Message Number 251979

Re: Palin the scapegoat???? View Thread
Posted by wendyn on 11/07/08 at 18:14

I don't know Marie - maybe you're right. I hate to think that a party could set someone up to fail like that...it seems to nasty. I do beleive that you'r right in the sense that if she was being set up, she does not have the 'streets smarts' to figure it out.

I have known people who seemed very similar in personality to Palin and if I have her 'type' pegged right, then she had NO idea about what she DIDN'T know. These are truly the most dangerous people to put into any position of authority - I've seen disasters result in business when this happens. Sometimes people find it impossible to admit that they don't know - I suspect out of insecurity. When you can't admit you don't know something and you refuse to learn more in order to improve yourself (because that would be acknoledging your limitations) then you end up with a shell of arrogance. I think these people actually start believing that if they always tell themselves that they know it all and are in control, then everyone else will believe it too.

Palin looked honestly shocked at McCains conscession speech. Some quoted her as saying that the outcome was unanticipated. Really? She really didn't anticipate that things were not going well? That's too bad and really amazying. I think that if she had ended up as your VP it would have been a disaster.

I have been impressed to see the press seem to defend her a lot over the last few days. They've talked more about how the attacks on Palin are reflecting badly on McCain and the party (rather than just eating up the gossip and going after Palin again).

On a side note, I was just watching CNN and there was an analyst on there who was gorgeous. He was about 40ish and had a goatee/beard (I'm all about the facial hair). Anyway - they didn't have his name up so I can't tell you who he was. Hmm.

It's pretty rare that I consider anyone on tv attractive enough to really notice and even talk about. Perhaps I am having an off day? Perhaps anyone who talks about politics is just starting to look really appealing to me?

I must go and study for a Spanish exam that I have tomorrow. Enough procrastinating for one day!

Result number: 82

Message Number 251918

Re: Tammy View Thread
Posted by tammy on 11/06/08 at 07:16

Wendy,

I believe you are a thoughtful and well=educated person, however, the tone (if I read it right?) of your post was a little presumptuous and even a little condescending. I read many other news sites and have gone to many blog sites on both sides of the political spectrum. This is why I say most of the issues are more complex than what you can 'GOOGLE' in a headline. I lived in Asia for three years. As I said in another post, I grew up for sixteen years of my life in Detroit and then we moved to the South. In my career before I married, I lived in several major cities including Atlanta and Kansas City. I have two degrees. I believe I have a very well-rounded perspective other than Fox and CNN. That was insulting. It is also insulting to have to defend your intellect because you choose differently. One could argue the 'narrow-mindedness' of that presumption in and of itself.

I never believed we would be out of this mess in four years. I was merely reflecting on Obama's earlier speeches and what many voters seem to think he can do. I also never believed we got into this mess strictly because of Bush or the Republican party. That's an absolute fallacy!

As I said before, sacrifice is nothing new to me or my family. I think it might be a shock to some other people who really do see Obama as some sort of financial saviour. I am referring to Phylis Johnston (you can goog;e this) who was on camera talking about how she wouldn't 'have to worry about putting gas in her car anymore' or worry about 'making her mortgage payments'. She is only one person but she seems to reflect the view of many including some in my own family!

My main concern was and will continue to be foreign policy. Russia began testing the waters so to speak almost before the last poll closed. Worrying about Obama's abject lack of experience in this arena is a legitimate issue particularly if you are a military family as we are. Please don't start with 'Bush got us into the war in Iraq'. My take is different than many others and I believe the totally ineffective U.N. led by Kofi Annan got us into this war. Remember there were 14 years of sanctions violations and sabre rattling on the part of Saddam before we 'rushed' into this. Colin Powel also made a strong case as I recall. Like everyone else, I wish we hadn't gone to war as I have lost several friends and many other families have suffered as well but I am objective enough to see the path that led us into the war. My hope is that Gates will continue as Secretary of Defense, Petraeus will not retire anytime soon, and that Obama will NOT appoint Kerry as Secretary of State.

All that being said, I am touched to see the young black children of the world holding their heads just a little higher today because of this election. That elevates all of humanity and I am very happy about that. On the other hand, as this unfolds, if the emperor is naked, I am not going to say 'what a fine suit that is' just to make myself seem educated and enlightened.

Take care Wendy. You have been an interesting person to read but I have to stop procratinating for a little while anyway:-)

Result number: 83

Message Number 251852

Re: Dr. DSW (Accessory Navicular Bone) View Thread
Posted by claude on 11/05/08 at 06:54

Dear Dr Dsw

Here is the report of my doctor written to you in english. could you please advice me accordingly.

His diagnoses are
1. arthritis between accessary navivular and navicular bone.
2. tendinosis with inflammation of posterior tibial tendon, flexor hallucis tendon, and flexor digitorum tendon.
3. resorption of accessary navicular and navicular bone.

His main symptoms are
1. pain at accessary navicular bone
2. pain at flexor retinaculum area of posterior site of medial malleolar when flexion of his toes with tenderness.
3. pain at Henry's knot area in the sole when flexion of his toes with mild tenderness.

I explained about The treatments of Claude.
1. I applied short leg cast during the 6 weeks and first 2 weeks, foot postiion was mild supination because posterior tibial tendon resting.
2. Now, after cast cut off state, I treated flexor retinaculum area by physical therapy with ion tophoresis, especially.
3. I also treated Henry's knot area by extra corporeal shock wave therapy.
4. And I recommend if he tolerable to pain, walk with partial weight bearing.

I really hope that you can give me some good advice on this matter.. I have been in this situation now for three months and would like to end it soon... I also see that Obama won the elections.. haha

Kind regards, Claude

Result number: 84

Message Number 251726

Tammy View Thread
Posted by wendyn on 10/31/08 at 16:40

I have been TERRIBLE the last few weeks at procrastinating! If it's not politics it's the ecoonomy. Always something interesting to research.

Result number: 85

Message Number 251725

Re:The Truth! View Thread
Posted by tammy on 10/31/08 at 16:33

The truth is I watched a segment on CNN this morning about people being obsessed with the election and I had to laugh because I saw myself. I have been posting a few things on here since I came home from work today mainly just for the fun of it and to distract me from the fact that MY FEET HURT!. Wendy made an interesting comment and I agree with her. Sometimes I post on here just to procrastinate what I really should be doing! It's always going to be tit for tat. That is what keeps it interesting! I truly hope I am wrong about Obama if he gets elected and I truly hope I am right about Mccain if he gets elected. I am going to turn off the news for awhile and sit on my front porch passing out candy to all the precious little ones who come our way. Thank God it is almost over one way or another!

Result number: 86

Message Number 251509

Re: Does this warrent a 3rd opinion? View Thread
Posted by Tina on 10/26/08 at 12:55

Thank you very much for your suggestions, I WILL reconsider the injections. The doctor that I am seeing is not too concerned about the way that I walk he wants to try to controll the swelling first. I have to beleive that the way I walk may be contributing to the swelling in some way. I have a follow up apt with him this week and talk to him about the Posterior tibial tendon and wee what he thinks, thanks again for your suggestions.

Result number: 87

Message Number 251504

Re: Does this warrent a 3rd opinion? View Thread
Posted by Tina on 10/26/08 at 02:05

I'm sorry If I came accross as being Dramatic but, I'm desperate for some kind of releif instead of just being passified by the 2 Doctors I've seen. I don't just want to find a Doctor to tell me what I want to hear but, I KNOW there is something wrong. These are MY feet and I've only got 2 of them and my life has changed since I've had these issues, I'm only 34 years old and I feel that I'm just not being heard.... Again I'm sorry, I appreciate all of you and I understand that you don't have my personal records and have not seen my foot or how I walk, I'm just looking for other options.

Result number: 88

Message Number 251503

Re: Does this warrent a 3rd opinion? View Thread
Posted by Tina on 10/26/08 at 00:57

This is the 2nd Doctor, (not the original Doctor who did the surgery) my Therapist said that I should have seen an improvement by now. However the Doctor said that since it has been so long since I've had the surgery the PT would take much longer. The time from my surgery and the PT was 7 months.I don't mind spending the time or the money but, it just seems to me that after 3 months of PT 2 days a week clearly I should notice a difference. I can tell you that because of the way I'm walking it is starting to cause other issues, my knee and my lower back is bothering me now. It is not bad but, I don't want to wait until the pain is unbareable either. I'm not able to walk correctly mainly because I also suffer from Planter Facia with both feet. I'm getting concerned but the Doctor said other than doing the cortison injections there is nothing else he can do. I find it hard to beleive that I have tried EVERYTHING for some kind of releif, there HAS to be something else. I understand the point that he doesn't want to redo the TTS again but there has to be other options that someone can offer..... This is not an easy road and it is really getting harder and harder, I'm almost at the point where I'm just going to say forget it and just keep doing what I'm doing until I'm not able to walk anymore then I guess someone will HAVE to do something!

Result number: 89

Message Number 251502

Re: Pain at base of fifth metatarsal View Thread
Posted by ThankU on 10/25/08 at 23:57

Dr. DSW,

I appreciated reading your reply to the post regarding pain at base of fifth metatarsal and the information I gathered from it.
How can a peroneus brevis tendonitis condition be solved?

I think a have a combinatination of scar tissue with an entrapped nerve as well as peroneus tendonitis in my pinky toe area from what I have researched. My toe is overlapping the fourth toe.

Tip of my toe gets red and puffy and I have a hard time curling and uncurling my toe. It pulls around my toe and it feels 'thick' when I attempt this. And my pinky toe moves out of position when I each step.

Hard to wear shoes!

I would appreciate any hints about diagnostic steps and solutions.

Thanks,
Ann

Result number: 90

Message Number 251476

Does this warrent a 3rd opinion? View Thread
Posted by Tina on 10/25/08 at 02:35

I had Tarsal Tunnel Surgery last December, I was imoblized for 4 weeks and did not go to Physical Therapy. I've had cronic swelling, my foot is somtimes 2-3 times its normal size. I since have gotten a a second opinion. I've been going faithfully 2 times a week for the past 3 months and have been wearing an Air cast also using pain patches, cortisone patches and the Flector patch. I've had minimul results. I've had a cortisone injection in the past that has gone horribly WRONG and the new Doctor I'm seeing has sent me for an MRI and siad that the TTS Surgery was not sucessful and there is intence build up of Scar Tissue and is suggesting you guessed it another cortisone injection..... NO WAY!!
In your opinion, should I get a 3rd Doctors opinion? This has been almost a year with swelling that is really bad and when it is that swollen it is VERY painful. I Have another apt to see him on 10-30 if there is anything else he hasn't thought of that I could talk to him about. He refused to do ANY kind of surgery to get rid of the scar tissue, not that is what I want but, at this point I'm running out of options. I'm in pain everyday and am up most nights wondering if the pain is ever going to go away. I'm also wondering if the swelling is caused because I'm not walking correctly with my right foot (surgery foot) my foot turns out and I'm almost walking only on my arch. I've been working very hard with the PT to see if we can change the way I walk but, so far it is not working. I'm sorry if this message is so long but, I really need help, at this point I would WELCOME ANY suggestions.....

Result number: 91

Message Number 251475

Does this warrent a 3rd opinion? View Thread
Posted by Tina on 10/25/08 at 02:31

I had Tarsal Tunnel Surgery last December, I was imoblized for 4 weeks and did not go to Physical Therapy. I've had cronic swelling, my foot is somtimes 2-3 times its normal size. I since have gotten a a second opinion. I've been going faithfully 2 times a week for the past 3 months and have been wearing an Air cast also using pain patches, cortisone patches and the Flector patch. I've had minimul results. I've had a cortisone injection in the past that has gone horribly WRONG and the new Doctor I'm seeing has sent me for an MRI and siad that the TTS Surgery was not sucessful and there is intence build up of Scar Tissue and is suggesting you guessed it another cortisone injection..... NO WAY!!
In your opinion, should I get a 3rd Doctors opinion? This has been almost a year with swelling that is really bad and when it is that swollen it is VERY painful. I Have another apt to see him on 10-30 if there is anything else he hasn't thought of that I could talk to him about. He refused to do ANY kind of surgery to get rid of the scar tissue, not that is what I want but, at this point I'm running out of options. I'm in pain everyday and am up most nights wondering if the pain is ever going to go away. I'm also wondering if the swelling is caused because I'm not walking correctly with my right foot (surgery foot) my foot turns out and I'm almost walking only on my arch. I've been working very hard with the PT to see if we can change the way I walk but, so far it is not working. I'm sorry if this message is so long but, I really need help, at this point I would WELCOME ANY suggestions.....

Result number: 92

Message Number 251230

Re: Good Feet Store View Thread
Posted by Mike P on 10/16/08 at 09:55

I guess I should have done this search and reading earlier but alas, after the fact is better than nothing. I recently went to the GFS, like Tina. A much different problem though but still got the whole package. I had suffered a fall about 3+ years ago that continually made my back pain, sciatica, and long term standing and walking more difficult. After Chrioprator diagnosis and treatments that lasted about a week for over a year, I had to pursue another avenue. The problem was I 'broke' my back at the lower lumbar vertabrae, or so I was told and it healed slightly forward of proper alignment. Surgery was NOT recommended due to the risk and nerves associated. OK, that left me with enduring pain off and on or trying something new. Granted, I was taken in by the testimonials, espceially Emmett Smith, the footballer and Dancing with the Stars contestant who wears the GFS product. Now, after overpaying, in my opinion, for their 3 stage system, I must say I am satisfied with the results. Maybe I could have done it cheaper, who knows. But when you weigh it against Chrio treatments ongoing with my insurance co-pay, I will have broken even in less than a year. So, I guess the point is, each person is different as to what they accomplish with the GFS product and what the alternative is.

Result number: 93

Message Number 251054

John View Thread
Posted by wendyn on 10/10/08 at 17:50

You also have an excellent memory John! My feet are really good most days. Who knows what caused my years of misery, I`m just happy it`s better. I also fly very well now thanky you very much!

I had to stop posting on the foot boards. I personally believe that surgery makes so many people worse for both PF and TTS (based on everything I read and everything I saw happen on these boards). But, the reality is that most people who come to these boards don`t want to hear my warnings against surgery. People are usually pretty despearate for answers and hope and my message isn`t what makes people feel better. So, I stay away from the foot boards.

I come here to this board primarily because it give me something interesting to do when I`m procrastinating. The more I`m procrastinating, the more I`m posting! Right now, that`s a lot. I`m working on a research proposal that`s giving me some grief. It will gel in the next few days but for now...it`s just sort of a mess on paper.

Happy Canadian Thanksgiving weekend.

Result number: 94

Message Number 250720

Re: The Debate View Thread
Posted by judy on 10/03/08 at 10:52

The Choice
Never in living memory has an election been more critical than the one fast approaching—that’s the quadrennial cliché, as expected as the balloons and the bombast. And yet when has it ever felt so urgently true? When have so many Americans had so clear a sense that a Presidency has—at the levels of competence, vision, and integrity—undermined the country and its ideals?
The incumbent Administration has distinguished itself for the ages. The Presidency of George W. Bush is the worst since Reconstruction, so there is no mystery about why the Republican Party—which has held dominion over the executive branch of the federal government for the past eight years and the legislative branch for most of that time—has little desire to defend its record, domestic or foreign. The only speaker at the Convention in St. Paul who uttered more than a sentence or two in support of the President was his wife, Laura. Meanwhile, the nominee, John McCain, played the part of a vaudeville illusionist, asking to be regarded as an apostle of change after years of embracing the essentials of the Bush agenda with ever-increasing ardor.
The Republican disaster begins at home. Even before taking into account whatever fantastically expensive plan eventually emerges to help rescue the financial system from Wall Street’s long-running pyramid schemes, the economic and fiscal picture is bleak. During the Bush Administration, the national debt, now approaching ten trillion dollars, has nearly doubled. Next year’s federal budget is projected to run a half-trillion-dollar deficit, a precipitous fall from the seven-hundred-billion-dollar surplus that was projected when Bill Clinton left office. Private-sector job creation has been a sixth of what it was under President Clinton. Five million people have fallen into poverty. The number of Americans without health insurance has grown by seven million, while average premiums have nearly doubled. Meanwhile, the principal domestic achievement of the Bush Administration has been to shift the relative burden of taxation from the rich to the rest. For the top one per cent of us, the Bush tax cuts are worth, on average, about a thousand dollars a week; for the bottom fifth, about a dollar and a half. The unfairness will only increase if the painful, yet necessary, effort to rescue the credit markets ends up preventing the rescue of our health-care system, our environment, and our physical, educational, and industrial infrastructure.
At the same time, a hundred and fifty thousand American troops are in Iraq and thirty-three thousand are in Afghanistan. There is still disagreement about the wisdom of overthrowing Saddam Hussein and his horrific regime, but there is no longer the slightest doubt that the Bush Administration manipulated, bullied, and lied the American public into this war and then mismanaged its prosecution in nearly every aspect. The direct costs, besides an expenditure of more than six hundred billion dollars, have included the loss of more than four thousand Americans, the wounding of thirty thousand, the deaths of tens of thousands of Iraqis, and the displacement of four and a half million men, women, and children. Only now, after American forces have been fighting for a year longer than they did in the Second World War, is there a glimmer of hope that the conflict in Iraq has entered a stage of fragile stability.
The indirect costs, both of the war in particular and of the Administration’s unilateralist approach to foreign policy in general, have also been immense. The torture of prisoners, authorized at the highest level, has been an ethical and a public-diplomacy catastrophe. At a moment when the global environment, the global economy, and global stability all demand a transition to new sources of energy, the United States has been a global retrograde, wasteful in its consumption and heedless in its policy. Strategically and morally, the Bush Administration has squandered the American capacity to counter the example and the swagger of its rivals. China, Russia, Iran, Saudi Arabia, and other illiberal states have concluded, each in its own way, that democratic principles and human rights need not be components of a stable, prosperous future. At recent meetings of the United Nations, emboldened despots like Mahmoud Ahmadinejad of Iran came to town sneering at our predicament and hailing the “end of the American era.”
The election of 2008 is the first in more than half a century in which no incumbent President or Vice-President is on the ballot. There is, however, an incumbent party, and that party has been lucky enough to find itself, apparently against the wishes of its “base,” with a nominee who evidently disliked George W. Bush before it became fashionable to do so. In South Carolina in 2000, Bush crushed John McCain with a sub-rosa primary campaign of such viciousness that McCain lashed out memorably against Bush’s Christian-right allies. So profound was McCain’s anger that in 2004 he flirted with the possibility of joining the Democratic ticket under John Kerry. Bush, who took office as a “compassionate conservative,” governed immediately as a rightist ideologue. During that first term, McCain bolstered his reputation, sometimes deserved, as a “maverick” willing to work with Democrats on such issues as normalizing relations with Vietnam, campaign-finance reform, and immigration reform. He co-sponsored, with John Edwards and Edward Kennedy, a patients’ bill of rights. In 2001 and 2003, he voted against the Bush tax cuts. With John Kerry, he co-sponsored a bill raising auto-fuel efficiency standards and, with Joseph Lieberman, a cap-and-trade regime on carbon emissions. He was one of a minority of Republicans opposed to unlimited drilling for oil and gas off America’s shores.
Since the 2004 election, however, McCain has moved remorselessly rightward in his quest for the Republican nomination. He paid obeisance to Jerry Falwell and preachers of his ilk. He abandoned immigration reform, eventually coming out against his own bill. Most shocking, McCain, who had repeatedly denounced torture under all circumstances, voted in February against a ban on the very techniques of “enhanced interrogation” that he himself once endured in Vietnam—as long as the torturers were civilians employed by the C.I.A.
On almost every issue, McCain and the Democratic Party’s nominee, Barack Obama, speak the generalized language of “reform,” but only Obama has provided a convincing, rational, and fully developed vision. McCain has abandoned his opposition to the Bush-era tax cuts and has taken up the demagogic call—in the midst of recession and Wall Street calamity, with looming crises in Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid—for more tax cuts. Bush’s expire in 2011. If McCain, as he has proposed, cuts taxes for corporations and estates, the benefits once more would go disproportionately to the wealthy.
In Washington, the craze for pure market triumphalism is over. Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson arrived in town (via Goldman Sachs) a Republican, but it seems that he will leave a Democrat. In other words, he has come to see that the abuses that led to the current financial crisis––not least, excessive speculation on borrowed capital––can be fixed only with government regulation and oversight. McCain, who has never evinced much interest in, or knowledge of, economic questions, has had little of substance to say about the crisis. His most notable gesture of concern—a melodramatic call last month to suspend his campaign and postpone the first Presidential debate until the government bailout plan was ready—soon revealed itself as an empty diversionary tactic.
By contrast, Obama has made a serious study of the mechanics and the history of this economic disaster and of the possibilities of stimulating a recovery. Last March, in New York, in a speech notable for its depth, balance, and foresight, he said, “A complete disdain for pay-as-you-go budgeting, coupled with a generally scornful attitude towards oversight and enforcement, allowed far too many to put short-term gain ahead of long-term consequences.” Obama is committed to reforms that value not only the restoration of stability but also the protection of the vast majority of the population, which did not partake of the fruits of the binge years. He has called for greater and more programmatic regulation of the financial system; the creation of a National Infrastructure Reinvestment Bank, which would help reverse the decay of our roads, bridges, and mass-transit systems, and create millions of jobs; and a major investment in the green-energy sector.
On energy and global warming, Obama offers a set of forceful proposals. He supports a cap-and-trade program to reduce America’s carbon emissions by eighty per cent by 2050—an enormously ambitious goal, but one that many climate scientists say must be met if atmospheric carbon dioxide is to be kept below disastrous levels. Large emitters, like utilities, would acquire carbon allowances, and those which emit less carbon dioxide than their allotment could sell the resulting credits to those which emit more; over time, the available allowances would decline. Significantly, Obama wants to auction off the allowances; this would provide fifteen billion dollars a year for developing alternative-energy sources and creating job-training programs in green technologies. He also wants to raise federal fuel-economy standards and to require that ten per cent of America’s electricity be generated from renewable sources by 2012. Taken together, his proposals represent the most coherent and far-sighted strategy ever offered by a Presidential candidate for reducing the nation’s reliance on fossil fuels.
There was once reason to hope that McCain and Obama would have a sensible debate about energy and climate policy. McCain was one of the first Republicans in the Senate to support federal limits on carbon dioxide, and he has touted his own support for a less ambitious cap-and-trade program as evidence of his independence from the White House. But, as polls showed Americans growing jittery about gasoline prices, McCain apparently found it expedient in this area, too, to shift course. He took a dubious idea—lifting the federal moratorium on offshore oil drilling—and placed it at the very center of his campaign. Opening up America’s coastal waters to drilling would have no impact on gasoline prices in the short term, and, even over the long term, the effect, according to a recent analysis by the Department of Energy, would be “insignificant.” Such inconvenient facts, however, are waved away by a campaign that finally found its voice with the slogan “Drill, baby, drill!”
The contrast between the candidates is even sharper with respect to the third branch of government. A tense equipoise currently prevails among the Justices of the Supreme Court, where four hard-core conservatives face off against four moderate liberals. Anthony M. Kennedy is the swing vote, determining the outcome of case after case.
McCain cites Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Samuel Alito, two reliable conservatives, as models for his own prospective appointments. If he means what he says, and if he replaces even one moderate on the current Supreme Court, then Roe v. Wade will be reversed, and states will again be allowed to impose absolute bans on abortion. McCain’s views have hardened on this issue. In 1999, he said he opposed overturning Roe; by 2006, he was saying that its demise “wouldn’t bother me any”; by 2008, he no longer supported adding rape and incest as exceptions to his party’s platform opposing abortion.
But scrapping Roe—which, after all, would leave states as free to permit abortion as to criminalize it—would be just the beginning. Given the ideological agenda that the existing conservative bloc has pursued, it’s safe to predict that affirmative action of all kinds would likely be outlawed by a McCain Court. Efforts to expand executive power, which, in recent years, certain Justices have nobly tried to resist, would likely increase. Barriers between church and state would fall; executions would soar; legal checks on corporate power would wither—all with just one new conservative nominee on the Court. And the next President is likely to make three appointments.
Obama, who taught constitutional law at the University of Chicago, voted against confirming not only Roberts and Alito but also several unqualified lower-court nominees. As an Illinois state senator, he won the support of prosecutors and police organizations for new protections against convicting the innocent in capital cases. While McCain voted to continue to deny habeas-corpus rights to detainees, perpetuating the Bush Administration’s regime of state-sponsored extra-legal detention, Obama took the opposite side, pushing to restore the right of all U.S.-held prisoners to a hearing. The judicial future would be safe in his care.
In the shorthand of political commentary, the Iraq war seems to leave McCain and Obama roughly even. Opposing it before the invasion, Obama had the prescience to warn of a costly and indefinite occupation and rising anti-American radicalism around the world; supporting it, McCain foresaw none of this. More recently, in early 2007 McCain risked his Presidential prospects on the proposition that five additional combat brigades could salvage a war that by then appeared hopeless. Obama, along with most of the country, had decided that it was time to cut American losses. Neither candidate’s calculations on Iraq have been as cheaply political as McCain’s repeated assertion that Obama values his career over his country; both men based their positions, right or wrong, on judgment and principle.
President Bush’s successor will inherit two wars and the realities of limited resources, flagging popular will, and the dwindling possibilities of what can be achieved by American power. McCain’s views on these subjects range from the simplistic to the unknown. In Iraq, he seeks “victory”—a word that General David Petraeus refuses to use, and one that fundamentally misrepresents the messy, open-ended nature of the conflict. As for Afghanistan, on the rare occasions when McCain mentions it he implies that the surge can be transferred directly from Iraq, which suggests that his grasp of counterinsurgency is not as firm as he insisted it was during the first Presidential debate. McCain always displays more faith in force than interest in its strategic consequences. Unlike Obama, McCain has no political strategy for either war, only the dubious hope that greater security will allow things to work out. Obama has long warned of deterioration along the Afghanistan-Pakistan border, and has a considered grasp of its vital importance. His strategy for both Afghanistan and Iraq shows an understanding of the role that internal politics, economics, corruption, and regional diplomacy play in wars where there is no battlefield victory.
Unimaginably painful personal experience taught McCain that war is above all a test of honor: maintain the will to fight on, be prepared to risk everything, and you will prevail. Asked during the first debate to outline “the lessons of Iraq,” McCain said, “I think the lessons of Iraq are very clear: that you cannot have a failed strategy that will then cause you to nearly lose a conflict.” A soldier’s answer––but a statesman must have a broader view of war and peace. The years ahead will demand not only determination but also diplomacy, flexibility, patience, judiciousness, and intellectual engagement. These are no more McCain’s strong suit than the current President’s. Obama, for his part, seems to know that more will be required than willpower and force to extract some advantage from the wreckage of the Bush years.
Obama is also better suited for the task of renewing the bedrock foundations of American influence. An American restoration in foreign affairs will require a commitment not only to international coöperation but also to international institutions that can address global warming, the dislocations of what will likely be a deepening global economic crisis, disease epidemics, nuclear proliferation, terrorism, and other, more traditional security challenges. Many of the Cold War-era vehicles for engagement and negotiation—the United Nations, the World Bank, the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty regime, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization—are moribund, tattered, or outdated. Obama has the generational outlook that will be required to revive or reinvent these compacts. He would be the first postwar American President unencumbered by the legacies of either Munich or Vietnam.
The next President must also restore American moral credibility. Closing Guantánamo, banning all torture, and ending the Iraq war as responsibly as possible will provide a start, but only that. The modern Presidency is as much a vehicle for communication as for decision-making, and the relevant audiences are global. Obama has inspired many Americans in part because he holds up a mirror to their own idealism. His election would do no less—and likely more—overseas.
What most distinguishes the candidates, however, is character—and here, contrary to conventional wisdom, Obama is clearly the stronger of the two. Not long ago, Rick Davis, McCain’s campaign manager, said, “This election is not about issues. This election is about a composite view of what people take away from these candidates.” The view that this election is about personalities leaves out policy, complexity, and accountability. Even so, there’s some truth in what Davis said––but it hardly points to the conclusion that he intended.
Echoing Obama, McCain has made “change” one of his campaign mantras. But the change he has actually provided has been in himself, and it is not just a matter of altering his positions. A willingness to pander and even lie has come to define his Presidential campaign and its televised advertisements. A contemptuous duplicity, a meanness, has entered his talk on the stump—so much so that it seems obvious that, in the drive for victory, he is willing to replicate some of the same underhanded methods that defeated him eight years ago in South Carolina.
Perhaps nothing revealed McCain’s cynicism more than his choice of Sarah Palin, the former mayor of Wasilla, Alaska, who had been governor of that state for twenty-one months, as the Republican nominee for Vice-President. In the interviews she has given since her nomination, she has had difficulty uttering coherent unscripted responses about the most basic issues of the day. We are watching a candidate for Vice-President cram for her ongoing exam in elementary domestic and foreign policy. This is funny as a Tina Fey routine on “Saturday Night Live,” but as a vision of the political future it’s deeply unsettling. Palin has no business being the backup to a President of any age, much less to one who is seventy-two and in imperfect health. In choosing her, McCain committed an act of breathtaking heedlessness and irresponsibility. Obama’s choice, Joe Biden, is not without imperfections. His tongue sometimes runs in advance of his mind, providing his own fodder for late-night comedians, but there is no comparison with Palin. His deep experience in foreign affairs, the judiciary, and social policy makes him an assuring and complementary partner for Obama.
The longer the campaign goes on, the more the issues of personality and character have reflected badly on McCain. Unless appearances are very deceiving, he is impulsive, impatient, self-dramatizing, erratic, and a compulsive risk-taker. These qualities may have contributed to his usefulness as a “maverick” senator. But in a President they would be a menace.
By contrast, Obama’s transformative message is accompanied by a sense of pragmatic calm. A tropism for unity is an essential part of his character and of his campaign. It is part of what allowed him to overcome a Democratic opponent who entered the race with tremendous advantages. It is what helped him forge a political career relying both on the liberals of Hyde Park and on the political regulars of downtown Chicago. His policy preferences are distinctly liberal, but he is determined to speak to a broad range of Americans who do not necessarily share his every value or opinion. For some who oppose him, his equanimity even under the ugliest attack seems like hauteur; for some who support him, his reluctance to counterattack in the same vein seems like self-defeating detachment. Yet it is Obama’s temperament—and not McCain’s—that seems appropriate for the office both men seek and for the volatile and dangerous era in which we live. Those who dismiss his centeredness as self-centeredness or his composure as indifference are as wrong as those who mistook Eisenhower’s stolidity for denseness or Lincoln’s humor for lack of seriousness.
Nowadays, almost every politician who thinks about running for President arranges to become an author. Obama’s books are different: he wrote them. “The Audacity of Hope” (2006) is a set of policy disquisitions loosely structured around an account of his freshman year in the United States Senate. Though a campaign manifesto of sorts, it is superior to that genre’s usual blowsy pastiche of ghostwritten speeches. But it is Obama’s first book, “Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance” (1995), that offers an unprecedented glimpse into the mind and heart of a potential President. Obama began writing it in his early thirties, before he was a candidate for anything. Not since Theodore Roosevelt has an American politician this close to the pinnacle of power produced such a sustained, highly personal work of literary merit before being definitively swept up by the tides of political ambition.
A Presidential election is not the awarding of a Pulitzer Prize: we elect a politician and, we hope, a statesman, not an author. But Obama’s first book is valuable in the way that it reveals his fundamental attitudes of mind and spirit. “Dreams from My Father” is an illuminating memoir not only in the substance of Obama’s own peculiarly American story but also in the qualities he brings to the telling: a formidable intelligence, emotional empathy, self-reflection, balance, and a remarkable ability to see life and the world through the eyes of people very different from himself. In common with nearly all other senators and governors of his generation, Obama does not count military service as part of his biography. But his life has been full of tests—personal, spiritual, racial, political—that bear on his preparation for great responsibility.
It is perfectly legitimate to call attention, as McCain has done, to Obama’s lack of conventional national and international policymaking experience. We, too, wish he had more of it. But office-holding is not the only kind of experience relevant to the task of leading a wildly variegated nation. Obama’s immersion in diverse human environments (Hawaii’s racial rainbow, Chicago’s racial cauldron, countercultural New York, middle-class Kansas, predominantly Muslim Indonesia), his years of organizing among the poor, his taste of corporate law and his grounding in public-interest and constitutional law—these, too, are experiences. And his books show that he has wrung from them every drop of insight and breadth of perspective they contained.
The exhaustingly, sometimes infuriatingly long campaign of 2008 (and 2007) has had at least one virtue: it has demonstrated that Obama’s intelligence and steady temperament are not just figments of the writer’s craft. He has made mistakes, to be sure. (His failure to accept McCain’s imaginative proposal for a series of unmediated joint appearances was among them.) But, on the whole, his campaign has been marked by patience, planning, discipline, organization, technological proficiency, and strategic astuteness. Obama has often looked two or three moves ahead, relatively impervious to the permanent hysteria of the hourly news cycle and the cable-news shouters. And when crisis has struck, as it did when the divisive antics of his ex-pastor threatened to bring down his campaign, he has proved equal to the moment, rescuing himself with a speech that not only drew the poison but also demonstrated a profound respect for the electorate. Although his opponents have tried to attack him as a man of “mere” words, Obama has returned eloquence to its essential place in American politics. The choice between experience and eloquence is a false one––something that Lincoln, out of office after a single term in Congress, proved in his own campaign of political and national renewal. Obama’s “mere” speeches on everything from the economy and foreign affairs to race have been at the center of his campaign and its success; if he wins, his eloquence will be central to his ability to govern.
We cannot expect one man to heal every wound, to solve every major crisis of policy. So much of the Presidency, as they say, is a matter of waking up in the morning and trying to drink from a fire hydrant. In the quiet of the Oval Office, the noise of immediate demands can be deafening. And yet Obama has precisely the temperament to shut out the noise when necessary and concentrate on the essential. The election of Obama—a man of mixed ethnicity, at once comfortable in the world and utterly representative of twenty-first-century America—would, at a stroke, reverse our country’s image abroad and refresh its spirit at home. His ascendance to the Presidency would be a symbolic culmination of the civil- and voting-rights acts of the nineteen-sixties and the century-long struggles for equality that preceded them. It could not help but say something encouraging, even exhilarating, about the country, about its dedication to tolerance and inclusiveness, about its fidelity, after all, to the values it proclaims in its textbooks. At a moment of economic calamity, international perplexity, political failure, and battered morale, America needs both uplift and realism, both change and steadiness. It needs a leader temperamentally, intellectually, and emotionally attuned to the complexities of our troubled globe. That leader’s name is Barack Obama.
—The Editors

Result number: 95

Message Number 250697

~Up Date on the MRI Results~ View Thread
Posted by Tina on 10/02/08 at 14:03

I just came from the Doctor, the results of the MRI show Deep Scar Tissue. He recomended an Air Cast and a patch to control the swelling, and still going for the Physical Therapy 2-3 days a week. If that doesn't work he is insisting that the cortisone injections will work. He did say if thast doesn't work he is left with no other options, that concerns me but I guess I will deal with that later. At this point I feel hopfull that there may be a small tinny light t the end of this tunnel. Thank you for all your advice.

Result number: 96

Message Number 250659

Re: Night Splints View Thread
Posted by Tina on 10/01/08 at 01:53

Wendy,

I too was in your position about a year ago. Here are some tips I felt very helpful...

1. Call your medical insurance and ask if you have 'Durabile Medical Equipment' coverage. I found that all of my mediacal supplies were covered, my custome orthodics ($450.00), night splints ($149.00) and the boot ($380.00)I had to wear for 6 weeks. All of these items were covered because I did the work and called to make sure I had the coverage, I know it may take some time making the calls but it was worth it!

2. Please be very carful getthing the cortisone injections and make sure the Doctor does it correctly. The injection is painful, mine only lasted for 3 days and then I wasn;t able to walk at ALL. My situation probably is not the normal though. I did end up having surgery but, that didn't go well either.

I wish you luck and remember everyone is different, like i mentioned MY situation is different. Keep us posted!

Result number: 97

Message Number 250658

Re: Night Splints View Thread
Posted by Tina on 10/01/08 at 01:51

Wendy,

I too was in your position about a year ago. Here are some tips I felt very helpful...

1. Call your medical insurance and ask if you have 'Durabile Medical Equipment' coverage. I found that all of my mediacal supplies were covered, my custome orthodics ($450.00), night splints ($149.00) and the boot ($380.00)I had to wear for 6 weeks. All of these items were covered because I did the work and called to make sure I had the coverage, I know it may take some time making the calls but it was worth it!

2. Please be very carful getthing the cortisone injections and make sure the Doctor does it correctly. The injection is painful, mine only lasted for 3 days and then I wasn;t able to walk at ALL. My situation probably is not the normal though. I did end up having surgery but, that didn't go well either.

I wish you luck and remember everyone is different, like i mentioned MY situation is different. Keep us posted!

Result number: 98

Message Number 250657

Re: Night Splints View Thread
Posted by Tina on 10/01/08 at 01:45

Wendy,

I too was in your position about a year ago. Here are some tips I felt very helpful...

1. Call your medical insurance and ask if you have 'Durabile Medical Equipment' coverage. I found that all of my mediacal supplies were covered, my custome orthodics ($450.00), night splints ($149.00) and the boot ($380.00)I had to wear for 6 weeks. All of these items were covered because I did the work and called to make sure I had the coverage, I know it may take some time making the calls but it was worth it!

2. Please be very carful getthing the cortisone injections and make sure the Doctor does it correctly. The injection is painful, mine only lasted for 3 days and then I wasn;t able to walk at ALL. My situation probably is not the normal though. I did end up having surgery but, that didn't go well either.

I wish you luck and remember everyone is different, like i mentioned MY situation is different. Keep us posted!

Result number: 99

Message Number 250599

Re: PLEASE ANSWER!! View Thread
Posted by Tina on 9/29/08 at 12:43

Thank you again Dr.W, I will keep that in mind when I see my Surgeon on Thursday this week.

Result number: 100

Message Number 250598

Re: PLEASE ANSWER!! View Thread
Posted by Tina on 9/29/08 at 12:43

Thank you again Dr.W, I will keep that in mind when I see my Surgeon on Thursday this week.

Result number: 101

Message Number 250597

Re: PLEASE ANSWER!! View Thread
Posted by Tina on 9/29/08 at 12:42

Thank you again Dr.W, I will keep that in mind when I see my Surgeon on Thursday this week.

Result number: 102

Message Number 250588

Re: PLEASE ANSWER!! View Thread
Posted by Dr. Wedemeyer on 9/29/08 at 11:16

Again Tina no one here could possibly answer that question. When you see your surgeon explore all of the possibilities with him/her.

I will say that I am not a surgeon but I do frequently encounter patients who have had spinal or foot surgery. Often these procedures go well and there is success and less frequently we see failed surgeries and chronic pain patients who may not fully resolve and need new options. At that point I always advocate a second opinion.

Result number: 103

Message Number 250577

Re: PLEASE ANSWER!! View Thread
Posted by Tina on 9/28/08 at 23:55

Dr. W

I did have another question, in your opinion would you recommend redoing the surgery? Have you heard of a better sucess rate of someone who has had the surgery the 2nd time?

Result number: 104

Message Number 250576

Re: PLEASE ANSWER!! View Thread
Posted by Tina on 9/28/08 at 23:40

Dr.W

Actually this is my second opinion, I'm not seeing the same Doctor that did the surgery. I hope that it is not a failed surgery I don't know if I could do that again. As I said in my first posting I'm not able to walk normal with my right foor (surgery foor) it just hurts too bad. In the middle of the scar there is a fairly good size lump, maybe the size of a hafl dolor coin. I'm worried because I know that if I continue to walk like this it will effecr my knee and my hip too. Like I said I take the films to his office tomorrow. I think for my own piece of mind I might call his office tomorrow afternoon to see if the other Doctor in the office can read the results of the MRI. Thank you again for all you do, not just for me but for everyone using this site.

Result number: 105

Message Number 250575

Re: heel spurs problem solved View Thread
Posted by Dr. Wedemeyer on 9/28/08 at 23:18

That should have been addressed to Gail and not Tina. Sorry

Result number: 106

Message Number 250574

Re: heel spurs problem solved View Thread
Posted by Dr. Wedemeyer on 9/28/08 at 23:17

That should have been addressed to Gail and not Tina. Sorry

Result number: 107

Message Number 250573

Re: heel spurs problem solved View Thread
Posted by Dr. Wedemeyer on 9/28/08 at 23:15

Tina while your experience was positive I feel that it is very questionable judgment to offer a non-licensed, non-physician in lieu of a referral to a trained professional to the public.

I have always advocated myofascial release, manual therapy, ART, Graston and the like for PF along with other conservative measures and for many patients I have found that along with the treatments that you mention above the results are excellent.

Perhaps had you been afforded this massage and taping (which the doctors here do often recommend initially in PF treatment, the shoes, insoles, cortisone, ultrasound, PT and acupuncture may have helped you resolve long ago.

Result number: 108

Message Number 250572

Re: PLEASE ANSWER!! View Thread
Posted by Dr. Wedemeyer on 9/28/08 at 23:08

Tina no need to apologize, I am just trying to get a better idea of your concerns and presentation.

Fortunately you had the foresight to contact the pharmacist regarding the medication. Unfortunately it sounds as though you may be a failed TTS surgery. I would see your doctor and ask what can be done next and what the possible outcomes are, risk vs. gain and if you are not satisfied seek a second opinion.

Result number: 109

Message Number 250571

Re: PLEASE ANSWER!! View Thread
Posted by Tina on 9/28/08 at 22:17

Thank you for your reply. And yes I have Tarsal Tunnel and the surgery was last Dec. I looked up the side effects of taking the oral steriod and I called the local pharmacy and he said that the leg cramps are a side effect of taking them. I am frustrared and I do apologize to come off that way but, it seems like I keep hitting road blocks with no answers. My Doctor is out of the office until Thursday although I do have an apointment to see him when he returns. He is suggesting doing a cortisone injection and imobilizing my foot for a week. I have had that very same injection and 3 days later I wasn't able to walk so, I'm a lottle hesitent on going there again. I had the MRI done on Friday and I have the films but to be honest it just looks like a foot to me, I have to take them to his office in the morning. Again thank you again very much for your reply, I appreciate it.

Result number: 110

Message Number 250568

Re: PLEASE ANSWER!! View Thread
Posted by Dr. Wedemeyer on 9/28/08 at 20:52

Tina I know you are frustrated and in pain but it would be very difficult to guess beyond TTS given the lack of a history provided. When you say TTS do you mean Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome or surgery (or both in a logical progression)?

If you have had seen a foot specialist had surgery, that would be the most appropriate person to ask. We can certainly offer suggestions of what it MIGHT be but without a proper history, examination and possibly nerve and radiographic studies, we simply cannot provide the answer that you are seeking.

Result number: 111

Message Number 250561

Re: TTS Surgery in October View Thread
Posted by Tina on 9/28/08 at 17:10

Amy,


I was off of work for 5 weeks and was NOT able to drive either because of the boot I had to wear, someithing about getting pulled over and being given a ticket for driving while impared got me not to drive until I could get into regular shoes. Good luck getting around your house. I know that my husband helped out a lot, (much more than usual) and that made me feel better too. I wish you luck and please keep us posted.

Result number: 112

Message Number 250560

PLEASE ANSWER!! View Thread
Posted by Tina on 9/28/08 at 17:04

For the past week I have experienced a very sharp pain going from the back of my leg around to the side and then it extends to every little toe in my foot. I have had TTS back in Dec 07 and I'm not walking right. My right foot turns out to the right, I'm not able to walk heal to toe like I can in my left foor because of the pain in my heal and my arch. This pain wakes me up in the middle of the night and it is just horrible, I wake up and then attempt to stand on that foot within a few seconds the pain goes away. I don't know if it is a form of a 'Charlie horse' but. if I'm getting them consistantly every night I don't think this is normal. I'm wondering what is causing this?

Result number: 113

Message Number 250541

Re: TTS Surgery in October View Thread
Posted by Amy on 9/27/08 at 16:45

Hi Tina,

Thank you for your reply! I'm sorry that your surgery has been unsuccessful, that must be so frustrating for you :(

Luckily I still live at home, I'll be on my own three days a week but a soon to be very pregnant colleague of mine has half-jokingly offered to have me stay with her as she'll be off work then too, I may take her up on that! I don't think I'd be able to fit a walker around my house, its very old, very small, with steep narrow stairs and narrow doors, could be interesting moving about actually. I'm used to being very active, so its going to be weird for me trying to stay still!

I know everyone is different, but in your opinion/experience, could you 'guesstimate' how long it would be before I can go back to work? I drive an automatic car so driving shouldn't be an issue, I hope!

Thank you again, its nice to hear from someone, my doctor seemed nice enough, but didn't tell me anything really!

Result number: 114

Message Number 250523

Can anyone answer this?? View Thread
Posted by Tina on 9/27/08 at 11:20

This question goes out to EVERYONE....

For the past week I have experienced a very sharp pain going from the back of my leg around to the side and then it extends to every little toe in my foot. I have had TTS back in Dec 07 and I'm not walking right. My right foot turns out to the right, I'm not able to walk heal to toe like I can in my left foor because of the pain in my heal and my arch. This pain wakes me up in the middle of the night and it is just horrible, I wake up and then attempt to stand on that foot within a few seconds the pain goes away. I don't know if it is a form of a 'Charlie horse' but. if I'm getting them consistantly every night I don't think this is normal. I'm wondering what is causing this?

Result number: 115

Message Number 250517

Re: TTS Surgery in October View Thread
Posted by Tina on 9/27/08 at 00:15

Hi Amy,


My name is Tina, I had that very same surgery and all patients recover differently. I know that I was not able to walk at all for 3 weeks. I'll tell you I needed help with everything, thank god for my husband. He helped me with EVERYTHING! If there is one thing I could suggest is make sure you take your meds as prescribed, don't let yourself miss a dose because if you do it will take longer for them to work. Also get yourself a walker with a seat and wheels that is how I was able to get around the house when I was alone. Use this message board for updates, I know it can be a VERY difficult process. I unfortunatly am not having any sucess with the surgery. It was done in Dec. 07. But, I'm sure my case is not the norm. I had a long recovery and still have complications from the surgery. I wish you luck. If you want I have a person email address you can email me if you just want to vent (I'm sure you'll need it) goofycart at yahoo.com good luck and keep us all posted on your recovery!!

Result number: 116

Message Number 250490

Very strong pains in my sleep for 1 week... OUCH View Thread
Posted by Tina on 9/26/08 at 12:08

This question goes out to EVERYONE....

For the past week I have experienced a very sharp pain going from the back of my leg around to the side and then it extends to every little toe in my foot. I have had TTS back in Dec 07 and I'm not walking right. My right foot turns out to the right, I'm not able to walk heal to toe like I can in my left foor because of the pain in my heal and my arch. This pain wakes me up in the middle of the night and it is just horrible, I wake up and then attempt to stand on that foot within a few seconds the pain goes away. I don't know if it is a form of a 'Charlie horse' but. if I'm getting them consistantly every night I don't think this is normal. I'm wondering what is causing this?

Result number: 117

Message Number 250396

TT Release View Thread
Posted by Tina on 9/22/08 at 10:48

I was wondering if it is typical during TT Release for the surgeon to use stitches on the inside? I had the surgery last year Dec but I am still having issues. When I walk my right leg turns out to the right and I'm not able to walk heel to toe becuase the bottom of my foot has a burning sharp pain. I'm going for a MRI on Friday hoping that it will show why I still have a lot of pain and there is still so much swelling, even if I'm off my feet it still swells. The swelling is so bed that my foot bruises and there is a lump in the center of the scar. I'm still going for PT with no releif, I'm at the end of my rope with this issue. I'm about ready to just give up and just live with it but the doc said if I can't begin to walk the right way it will effect my knee and my hip, at this point I will just live with it. I mean they do knee and hip replacements right, I will just fix it when it needs to be. I'm so frustraited!!!

Result number: 118

Message Number 250361

Re: Introduction View Thread
Posted by Tina on 9/20/08 at 11:42

Hi Dianna,

I had Tarsal Tunnel Release surgery done in Dec last year although I still have pain in that same foot, it was almost like the surgery did nothing. I know that everyone heals differently and MY situation is not the NORM! It is very important to have faith in the medical staff and you were right YOU'RE NOT ALONE! Good luck and keep us posted on your recovery!

Result number: 119

Message Number 250360

Re: Surgery this Wednesday View Thread
Posted by Tina on 9/20/08 at 11:34

Hi Mandy,

I had this very same surgery back in Dec. 2007 and I agree with the others the Surgery Centers offer the same care that the Hospitals do but I think it is a little better. Since they are limited to having only a few patients at a time you get more personalized care. I think that if I had any suggestions for you it would to 'follow the dosage of the pain meds to the T' for the first few weeks take the pain meds exact, don't skip a dose thinking you're not in pain so you won't take it. I found by doing that it takes longer for the pain meds to work. And for getting around the house to use the bathroom I went on craigs list and bought a walker that had a seat and wheels so that I could get around the house with ease. Try not to get depressed, it will be difficult on some days of just getting tired of the whole situation. Last thing, use this message board, the people on this site have gone through the same thing you're facing. GOOD LUCK! You'll be ok just trust your Doctor and look to him for guidence if needed.

Result number: 120

Message Number 250348

Re: Very painful feet... Tarsal Tunnel Release patient almost a year ago, still not better... View Thread
Posted by Tina on 9/20/08 at 01:09

Dena,

That is a very good question, I have NO idea. I am scheduled for a MRI next week just for the Doctor to see the scar tissue and the tendons. I'll see what that show's. I will have to wait until the Doctor gets the report from the other Doctor and see what he did. Thanks for that question though, it was a good one!

Result number: 121

Message Number 250347

Re: Very painful feet... Tarsal Tunnel Release patient almost a year ago, still not better... View Thread
Posted by Dena on 9/19/08 at 23:27

Hi Tina.

I'm curious as to whether you had internal sutures. I too, have a lump, that I believe is contributing to my pain.

Dena.

Result number: 122

Message Number 250306

Re: Very painful feet... Tarsal Tunnel Release patient almost a year ago, still not better... View Thread
Posted by Tina on 9/18/08 at 09:26

Thank you very much. I've changed Doctors (I'm not seeing the same Doctor that did the surgery) Is it possible that the entrapment was further up the leg than what he realized? And the way way I walk with my right foor is not normal, (heel to toe) my entire leg truns out to the right and my foot is turned out too, it is just too painful to walk normally, do you have any suggestions? The new Doctor I'm seeing is trying to see if the swelling is caused from the scar tissue and has given me cortisone pills and patches to see if that helps, he is also recomending an injection too. But, I'm afraid to do that because the last one I had in that foor after 3 days I couldn't walk at all. The Doctor said that it is correctable so I've been very hopfull but it is not getting any better. I think at this point I will just have to live with it. I use to be very active but, as of now even just sitting on the sofa with my foot up it still swells very bad and it hurts worss when it is swollen.

Result number: 123

Message Number 250294

Re: Both Feet?? View Thread
Posted by Tina on 9/18/08 at 00:06

OUCH, I can relate to you. I had the TTS surgery last year and I know that all patients heal in a different way but, I know that my DOC said NO WAY to doing both feet at once. I was off of work for 6 weeks. It was not fun and I still have issues and am also seeing a new DOC. I wish you luck. Like I said I know that my situation is not the norm' but make sure you use this site as a tool to keep you in GOOD SPIRITS, it really helps get you through those tough days! You're in my thoughts!!

Result number: 124

Message Number 250293

Very painful feet... Tarsal Tunnel Release patient almost a year ago, still not better... View Thread
Posted by Tina on 9/17/08 at 23:54

Hi, I had Tarsal Tunnel Surgery back in Dec 2007. I was advised after surgery NO walking for 4 weeks, boy was that hard. I followed EVERY order given by the Doctor however, it has been almost 9 months out and it is still close to being unbareable. I have been doing PT now for 2 months (not recomened by the Doctor) and have taken several rounds of cortisone pills and am now using pain patches. This has changed the way I walk and every aspect of my life. I can't even stand for 30 minutes to iron some shirts. Does anyone have ANY advice? Oh yeah, I have a large LUMP in the middle of the scar and I still have terrible swelling!!


H~E~L~P!!

Result number: 125

Message Number 250192

Tina Faye and Sarah Paulin View Thread
Posted by john h on 9/15/08 at 09:13

On SNL this past Saturday they had a skit with imposters for Hillary and Sarah Paulin. Tina Faye played Sarah Paulin. This was the best look alike of a candidate I have ever seen. For a moment I really thought it was Sarah Paulin. She had the looks, dress, voice, down to a T. It has always been hard to imitate Hillary but I bet Tina really is pulling for Sarah as this will give her a job for the next 4 years. Actually Tina is a political activist and even for money she is unlikely to vote for Sarah Paulin. They even showed this skit on the Today Show it was so funny.

Result number: 126
Searching file 24

Message Number 249064

Re: pain View Thread
Posted by Mark F on 8/09/08 at 18:11

Sorry You have PF. Here's what I did. Two years ago I went to Vancouver BC and had shockwave therapy applied to both feet. The Dr. treated my left heel and part of the fascia and then treated my sesamoid on the right foot as well as the heel. This was the piezzo-electric machine that he used (Richard Wolf). 2000 pulses per site. I also was dealing with a neuroma on the right foot, but there was not much evidence of it on the ultrasound so he declined to treat it until on the last day. I insisted upon treatment and he accommodated. The acid test of a neuroma is if you have pain when the shockwave hits the area. I did. Side effects I encountered: Fever that night and general nausea the next day. I stayed in the hotel and slept until 3 pm the next day. Bear in mind that the calcium that is vaporized (in my humble opinion) has to be reabsorbed by the body. My feet felt kind of 'rubbery' when I went out walking around after the treatment. There was a certain analgesic effect after the treatment and that is documented in the literature. So, I did have an immediate reduction in pain. However, the symptoms did linger for the next year. There was steady improvement during this time with certain big milestones particulary in the sesamoid on the right foot. Compared to the pain I suffered in the previous 5 years I would have to say it was well worth the expense and travel costs. At the end of the year following treatment, I still was hobbling around somewhat and even though I had made substantial progress I decided to go for a second round of treatment. The neuroma was still bugging me. Also, the left heel still had alot of scar tissue and was affecting how the windlass mechanism from heel to toe operated. I.e. driving the toe into the pavement because the fascia was still tight and somewhat shortened due to the inflammation, scar tissue and just generally the way this whole thing works. I hope I am making sense. So, The next year I went up to Victoria BC and had another round of treatments this time with the pneumatic device. The Swiss Doloclast Radial D-Actor 100. This is sort of like a little jack hammer and is painful in a kind of 'funny bone' way. Again, three treatments spaced about two days apart (longer spacing would be nice but hotel rooms are expensive)The Dr. treated the neuroma on the right foot as well as the left heel at the terminus of the fascia and the calcaneal. Again, after each treatment my feet were rubbery when I walked on them and also, I had nausea after each treatment but no fever as before with the Wolf machine. Treating the neuroma with the radial was different in that the emphasis was on finding the nerve and then just hammering away on it. Ironically this was not painful per se. Again, there was a healing trajectory that lasted several months. I am happy to say that at this point, I am free of the misery of PF in general terms. But as always, This is a journey not a destination. My neuroma is 99% gone, My right sesamoid is gone. My right heel pain is gone. My left heel is maybe 75% but no PF pain. I still have the problem with my big toe not articulating all the way which limits my time in a pair of boots. But hey, that just means I get to wear my Teva's instead. I had orthortics built and glued in permanently to the teva's which I recommend. Why can't somebody make these sandals? Whoops, is that being political? In closing, I am still on a search for the holy grail of foot cures and there are remnants of scar tissue that remind me that once upon at time I had a really pitiful case of PF. But, as an optimist, I refuse to accept that this is as good as it gets.

Result number: 127

Message Number 248934

Re: Cost of ESWT? View Thread
Posted by Dr. Z on 8/04/08 at 18:29

What is the additinal cost if any if you need a 2nd high energy treatment and are there any other costs involved?

Result number: 128

Message Number 247966

Re: Looking for GREAT surgeon View Thread
Posted by Dottie on 6/25/08 at 00:00

I procrastinated YEARS from my initial diagnosis (about 1991) and did every conventional method offered this side of my town. After rejection for surgery by surgeon #1. My insurance recommended surgeon #2 who wanted to cut me up immediately (without really getting to know me). I hesitated for a while and then let him cut me. It didn't work at ALL. Surgeon #3 worked for a practice that advertises on televion. I was desperate so I thought what the heck...the group was convered by my insurance. I was paired with an angel of a surgeon who changed my life and gave me hope. He's a young husband & father and he gives his patients what I bet is the same compassion he gives his family. Actually, he switched practices by the time I was ready to do my first surgery and nobody would tell me where he was. Therefore, I rolled the dice and had a surgerical eff-up. Live and learn.

Months later my physical therapist told me I had a lot of PF release scar tissue that was not breaking up by PT & ultrasould. Pain in my arch was unbearable. Dr. Frank was confident he could clean the scar tissue out and improve my pain level. I trust him with my life. After Dr. Frank cleaned out my scar tissue, I could finally walk on my foot. I could finally rub & massage my foot without agony. Now the therapist can dig deep massage and do ultra found. It made a big difference. Dr. Frank also found a muscle that stretched directly over my never when the foot was held a certain way still on my left foot. But he fixed what Doc #1 missed. I am in recovery state. Ups and downs. Good days and less than good days. But that's normal. I understand it takes a year or more to get those nerves back up to snuff. Plus the Achilles tendon release is the hardest part to heal up from. Patience, patience, patience.

I hope I'm more along the lines after tomorrow's surgery like HC who is doing great (or she/he was...hope she/he is still in our 'in it to win it' list.) Every positive post brings us hope We gotta have hope....or we'd be lost. I know it's been said here before...attitude makes a big difference. The hardest part now is no drink or food after midnight. I'm pacing around the house.

I'm cleaning laundry, dusting, cleaning, organizing grocerys so that I can realy exist indepentantly during my recovery. I am doing the right foot surgery now since now I (a) still have a job despite being incapatated for four months and (b) I want to get these foot problems (that do not go away on their own) now so that when I am elderly, I will have a better chance to live independently. As a single woman, I need to get my freedom back.

Result number: 129

Message Number 247866

Re: EPS 8000 For Pain Relief View Thread
Posted by majic on 6/22/08 at 11:00

this machine also has a belt. i laid on the belt with 8 suction cups on lower back to block hip pain. the result was bladder incontinance and bloating on lower intestins. 5 months later still the same incontinance and bloating. the pain is back about 80%.

Result number: 130

Message Number 247309

Re: Life after a subtalar fusion View Thread
Posted by Gloria B. on 6/04/08 at 10:12

Tina, just wondering how it worked with your sub talar fusion? I just had my surgery on 5/6 with 2 f/u drs visit so far with good reports. I'd like to know how it worked out for you? Thanks for any info.

Gloria B.

Result number: 131

Message Number 244565

Do Republicans care about your job? View Thread
Posted by marie:) on 3/14/08 at 18:24

or do they care more about smear and fear politics? NAFTA loss more then 1 million jobs in our country! Ya know I posted this site as a bit of fun but now that I've gone throughtvhe site I'm beginning to question whether a Senator from the West or anyone from the South has the ability to turn things around in the Midwest. John your response didn't seem to answer any of those questions that are really on Americans minds. My advice is to look closely at supporters of the Republican Party. Do they speak for you or themselves? What's the purpose behind their post? Folks should really take a close look at the candidates for the right reasons because it will be up to them to elect the next president and their life depends on it.........the lives of their children depend on it.

Seems the economy is the last thing Republicans are talking about. They're spending all their time on the Democratic nominees. I've been everywhere on the Net to see what Republicans are talking about and the economy isn't one of them. What's more important to you? Your job? Feeding your children? The near collapse of the banking industry? McCainis a huge NAFTA supporterand all good rural farming Ohio voters know he voted forCAFTA too. Will voters there care about fear and smear? Will they care about their crops and getting a fair price for them? Or will they care about silly stuff????

What is McCain's stance on unemployment?? McCain's stance on NAFTA and CAFTA are extremely important to Midwesterners..

McCain: America Suffers from Protectionist Policies.
After telling Michiganders their manufacturing jobs are not coming back, McCain said, ““When you study history, every time we’ve adopted protectionism, we’ve paid a very heavy price.” [Pittsburgh Tribune Review, 1/26/08]

McCain in Iowa: “I know NAFTA was a good idea.” McCain said to the Des Moines Register leading up to the Iowa caucuses: “I know NAFTA was a good idea. It has created millions of jobs and it has helped the economies of all three of these nations. All you have to do is go to Detroit and see the trucks lined up every day or go to our southern border. There have been winners and losers. And that’s the problem. But free trade is something that I think is vital to America.”

McCain Voted for Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA). McCain voted for the Central American Free Trade Agreement. CAFTA cuts tariff s among the United States, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. But the agreement, modeled after NAFTA, does not contain adequate environmental protections or enforceable protections for such core workers’ rights as the freedom to form unions. At the same time, its excessive protections for multinational corporations will undermine the ability of governments to protect public health, strong communities and the environment. [S. 1307, Vote #170, 6/30/05]

I have seen this bumper sticker on vehicles throughout the Midwest..............

'Vote Democratic because the next job lost may be yours.'

I am waiting for the bumper sticker that saids..........

'Vote Republican because the next job lost may be yours.'

Result number: 132

Message Number 244299

Re: Subluxing peroneal tendons View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 3/09/08 at 08:06

For an accurate assessment of her peroneal subluxation, she really needs an MRI or IDEALLY a 'real time' ultrasound. A 'real time' ultrasound allows the doctor to actually visualize the peroneal tendon in action and can see the actual subluxation if it is really taking place, etc.

However, this is a very specific test and must be read by a doctor or radiologist EXTREMELY proficient with this type of test. If you are in a major city, this is usually performed at a major university teaching hospital that has a large radiology department, with a radiology residency program, etc.

If not, the peroneal tendons are well visualized on an MRI and if they have been subluxating, there are certain characteristics a WELL TRAINED MUSCULOSKELETAL radiologist will know what to look for on the MRI, including certain changes to the tendons, the condition of the peroneal retinaculum, the peroneal groove, etc. Once again, the MRI is only as valuable as the quality of the doctor that is reading the film!!

If your daughter is wearing a quality brace that is holding and supporting the peroneal tendons well enough (my preference is a brace called the ASO brace), then she can probably greatly reduce her chances of injury or greater damage. However, there is no way for physical therapy to really significantly address a TRUE case of subluxing peroneal tendons, and if this is really symptomatic, surgery is the only real 'fix'.

I would not call surgery 'simple' and it must be performed by someone with significant experience with this procedure. It can be performed as an outpatient, but does require significant patience and rehab post operative, as does any tendon surgery.

Result number: 133

Message Number 244139

Re: Two feet or one View Thread
Posted by Tina H on 3/05/08 at 14:01

Lucy,
Did you have your fascia cut? I had the surgery on one foot, then the other, four years ago. I have gotten the pain back over the years and more recent in the last few months. I am considering the radio frequency treatment. Has anyone heard of this podiatherm or know if it works on chronic pain for plantar fasciitis

Result number: 134

Message Number 243993

Re: internal suture problem?? View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 3/02/08 at 08:45

Dee,
Internal sutures are used for almost all surgeries. Internal sutures must be utilized to keep the deeper structures together. During surgery, the doctor must cut through various layers and when doing this, he/she doesn't simply take the blade and make one cut through skin, superficical layers, deep layers and get to the area of concern. The surgeon meticulously dissects through the skin, the superficial fascia, deep fascia (not plantar fascia), muscle layers if applicable, cuts through any retinaculum if performing tendon surgery or tendon sheaths, opens up joint capsules if performing joint surgery, etc., etc.

When the surgeon is done, he/she must now place these layers back together in anatomic alignment, and when doing this, it is VERY, VERY rare that permanent sutures are utilized. Absorbable sutures are used and the type and characteristics of the suture are dependent on the structure. It is important that the suture not absorb too quickly to allow the tissue to heal to itself to assure that the structure will not be compromised and will have adequate strength once the suture has absorbed.

Even when you have a deep cut/laceration and go to your doctor or emergency room, if the cut is deep enough internal sutures/absorbable sutures are often used prior to the skin sutures to help approximate the wound edges and take some of the tension off of the wound edges so that when the skin sutures are utilized there is less scar formation. There more tension that there is on the wound edges, the worse the scar will be later.

It is not uncommon for some patient's to 'reject' the suture material which is a very mild and localized response, and often this will appear as small red spots or pimples and the body will 'spit' out these sutures and it will look like small white threads (or other colors) coming out of the wounds. Some patients even call their doctors thinking there are small worms coming out of the wounds. These are simply the broken down sutures being 'spit' out of the body.

But I can assure you that 'internal' or deep sutures are utilized with almost every surgery that is performed.

Result number: 135

Message Number 243656

Re: Vitamin D Deficiency and pf View Thread
Posted by Kathy H on 2/24/08 at 17:42

Tina, I wonder about this also. I have had PF for almost 2 years. After having it for 5 months, I took a trip to Hawaii(I live in Nashville, TN) for 2 weeks and got lots of sun. When I got back, my PF was 80-90 percent healed. Unfortunately, I reinjured myself in an exercise class( thinking I was healed)and have been struggling trying to reheal. I am currently staying in Dallas,TX(where it is sunny in the winter) and have been putting my bare foot in the sun in my sister's sunroom as well as upping my dosage of vitamin D. I don't know if vitamin D supplementation is as good as sunlight though. I wish one of the doctor's would comment on that.

Result number: 136

Message Number 243651

Vitamin D Deficiency and pf View Thread
Posted by Tina H on 2/24/08 at 16:01

It's been a while since I've posted here. My 17 year old daughter has had pf for 4 years. She is the youngest case seen by every foot specialist we've been to. We've tried just about everything including casting, splints, ESWT, PT, cortisone shots(just one time), ART, stretching, orthotics, taping etc. She's been tested for connective tissues disease etc. We've noticed that her pf is always much worse in the winter even though it's not a big sports season for her. In the summer we've observed that during annual trips to the beach her pf is actually not as bad. I've begun to wonder if vitamin D deficiency while obviously not causing the pf, may play a role. We live in sunless Pittsburgh. Any thought on this possible connection?

Result number: 137

Message Number 242622

Women Only Public Transportation in Mexico City View Thread
Posted by john h on 1/31/08 at 12:56

Recently Mexico City with a population of 22 million has started using public buses that are for 'Women Only'. They are painted pink. The problem seems to be many women were reporting being harassed while riding on the cramped public busses. There are already rail cars on the subway system that are for women only. What I do not know is if women can still ride the other buses that are not designated for women only. I assume they can as it only makes sense as how could a husband and wife go anywhere together? So in essence they have discriminated against men. In our country it would likely go to the Supreme Court. Practically speaking it would not bother me at all.

I personally do not know if this is good or not good. I am sure there will be strong positions from various PC groups. It would not bother me as long as it did not increase my waiting time or time to get to my destination. How would this go over in say NYC?

I can see where in a city of 22 million most of who use public transportation that there is probably a lot of grouping going on and perhaps this can solve the problem. It will undoubtedly grow beyond solving the basic problem and will become an issue much larger. Meantime let the pink busses roll.

In the early 50's I rode the subway 5 days a week from Brooklyn to Wall Street where I worked. Never once did I get to sit down as where I boarded it was already full. No groping going on in the 50's.

Result number: 138

Message Number 242195

Re: Self Propelled non motorized wheelchairs View Thread
Posted by Dottie on 1/19/08 at 22:03

I look at the future and I also have questions abuot scooters. I know when I had the walker after my surgery in September, I learned so much about what so many people must endure every day....with not end in sight. I needed the walker for a few weeks and a four pronged cane for a few more. Still as I think about the next surgeries (I cannot live in this pain, I just can't - I need a Plan B and I need it now), I think about life in a scooter. I think of a ramp on my back steps, how do I get it in the car, all the stuff I never thought about before. I'd wear big purple webbed duck feet if it would take the pain away. I could give a shoot about the scars. Make the pain stop. Make the pain stop. Make the pain stop.

That fancy walker Tina discusses sounds interesting. After I see my second opinion surgeon Monday to discuss TTS on foot #2 and the possibility of destroying the nerve in foot #1 since TTS surgery didn't do a dang thing, I'll have more info to do more research.

Hang in there! You're among friends here!

Result number: 139

Message Number 242084

Re: Self Propelled non motorized wheelchairs View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 1/17/08 at 11:13

Hi Norm, I too have had the same surgery just 3 weeks ago. So far I'm doing fairly well. I found a walker with wheels, a seat and hand breaks for $25. online and look up craigslist.com and search in your local area for a 2nd hand wheel chair. You may even be able to find a motorized one for a good price. I live in Arizona and we have craigslist out here and looking at it, it is a Nation wide servcie. I wish you good luck and take care, let us know what you find :-)

Result number: 140

Message Number 241981

Re: The Ultimate & Final Last Resort for Unbearable TTS Pain View Thread
Posted by Helen W on 1/14/08 at 23:32

Tina

I can so relate to sitting and sleeping on the couch as well as the coffee table being the command center. My bedrooms are upstairs and after my surgery on left foot, I hopped up the stairs every night on crutches which only made my right foot rapidly decline and become even more painful. So when I had my right foot done only 7 weeks later, I made the family room my 'command center' (as you put it) and spent 21 days down stairs. After splint was off, stitches out and I could start partial weight bearing...I crawled my butt up the stairs and slept in my own bed...Oh how wonderful that was :)

Good Luck on Wednesday...this is about the same time I had my splint and stitches removed...I put on my own shoe and hobbled out with crutches. It will be a little stiff, do the calf stretches and it helps, but most of all don't push too fast.

Helen

Result number: 141

Message Number 241959

Re: The Ultimate & Final Last Resort for Unbearable TTS Pain View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 1/14/08 at 13:22

I hear you and can completly relate. I had TTS release just 2 1/2 weeks ago and latly I have been experiencing the strange feelings you described in your post. This is VERY tough! I try to compare what it was like before surgery and what it's likek now, it's the same just a different feeling. It's still driving me NUTS! I still have the stitches in and I get those out on Wednesday, we'll see how that goes. I am getting tired of sitting and sleeping on the sofa. My husband is very suportive but does he understand...NO he doesn't. I try to be positive but getting through the day sometines is hard. He goes to work in the morning and I sit on the sofa all day and he comes home and I'm still in the same spot he left me, on the sofa. He makes sure I have everything I need before he leaves, breakfast and lunch in my little fridge next to the sofa and he calls me all day long. We make jokes about the coffe table being my command center and I still communicate with my job via email. But it's not the same. On Wednesday I'm hoping that I can walk out of the DOC's office and I'll be ok. I'm not sure if that is very realistic but, that is my plan. I'm going to take my Birkinsstock sandles and plan to wear 2 shoes when I leave his office. I'll let you know how it goes. I wish everybody luck and DO NOT GIVE UP! Keep posting and reading the messages, I figure if I read what everyone else is expierencing and working for them, I'll find something that will work for me.

Result number: 142

Message Number 241958

Re: The Ultimate & Final Last Resort for Unbearable TTS Pain View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 1/14/08 at 13:22

I hear you and can completly relate. I had TTS release just 2 1/2 weeks ago and latly I have been experiencing the strange feelings you described in your post. This is VERY tough! I try to compare what it was like before surgery and what it's likek now, it's the same just a different feeling. It's still driving me NUTS! I still have the stitches in and I get those out on Wednesday, we'll see how that goes. I am getting tired of sitting and sleeping on the sofa. My husband is very suportive but does he understand...NO he doesn't. I try to be positive but getting through the day sometines is hard. He goes to work in the morning and I sit on the sofa all day and he comes home and I'm still in the same spot he left me, on the sofa. He makes sure I have everything I need before he leaves, breakfast and lunch in my little fridge next to the sofa and he calls me all day long. We make jokes about the coffe table being my command center and I still communicate with my job via email. But it's not the same. On Wednesday I'm hoping that I can walk out of the DOC's office and I'll be ok. I'm not sure if that is very realistic but, that is my plan. I'm going to take my Birkinsstock sandles and plan to wear 2 shoes when I leave his office. I'll let you know how it goes. I wish everybody luck and DO NOT GIVE UP! Keep posting and reading the messages, I figure if I read what everyone else is expierencing and working for them, I'll find something that will work for me.

Result number: 143

Message Number 241888

Re: Two feet or one? View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 1/12/08 at 09:44

WOW, you're really thinking of doing both at once? Let me tell you, I just had my Right foot done 2 weeks ago and it is very dificult to get around, I can't imagine having both done at once. Would your Doc do both at the same time? The recovery hasn't been that bad but I was told no walking or weight bearing for 3 weeks on my surgery foot. Then I still have PT for 4 weeks after that. I would be cautious of having 2 feet done at once. I can understand wanting to get both done and over with, what kind of support do you have at home? My husband as been wonderful. There are still many things I can not do on my own (shower, get dressed, getting into the car for Doc apts) Good luck please let us know what you deside:)

Result number: 144

Message Number 241887

Re: swelling of ankles View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 1/12/08 at 09:39

I.m sorry I didn't realize I was still in this message board.

Result number: 145

Message Number 241886

Re: swelling of ankles View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 1/12/08 at 09:34

Hi Susan, I also started with the same problems. I was also having swelling after doing the 'stair excersises' I was recently diagnocsed with TTS (tarsol tunell syndrome) I just had surgery 2 weeks ago and it is still to early to tell if it did the trick. Be careful of the stretching and be sure you're wearing orthodis shoes. I'm on a long road to recovery but if it will help, in the long run it is worth it. Is the swelling between your ankle bone and your heal? This is were my swelling was, after trying everything under the sun (stretches, shoes, brace, and cortisone injections) surgery waw the only other option. I would also recomend to be careful of the cortisone injections as well. I bought a few pairs of Birkenstock sandles (I'm lucky, I live in Arizona so wearing sandles my feet aren't cols at all) these are orthodic shoes too. Good luck to you and keep us posted on what you find works for you. ave a great day:)

Result number: 146

Message Number 241875

Re: Injections first or straight to surgery View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 1/11/08 at 23:26

I had TTS release surgery 2 weeks ago and I agree with Laurie, every Doc is different. I was told DO NOT WALK for 3 weeks, NO pressure at all! Granted it has been tougher than I thought. ( a lot tougher ) but I am willing to do what ever it takes to make this work. I still have to go through PT when I'm done cuz I haven't walked normal on my right foot in over 4 months. Please be careful.

Result number: 147

Message Number 241874

Re: Injections first or straight to surgery View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 1/11/08 at 23:20

Just be VERY cautious about those injections, I had them done and it made my pian severly worse and I could not walk.

Result number: 148

Message Number 241872

Re: Shoes after surgery? View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 1/11/08 at 23:12

Look on Birkenstockusa.com they have great orthodic shoes that are actually cute. I am 2 weeks post of for TTS release and my Doc said that wearing Birkenstocks are just fine. They are also sold on qvc.com as well as hsn.com they're kind of pricey but they last for years and they are cozy too. Just be careful.

Result number: 149

Message Number 241870

Re: Little twitches and funny feelings... View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 1/11/08 at 23:05

Thank you so much for your responce. I'm oping it will go away on it's own, I hate taking pills. It is just anoying when I'm trying to sleep or even when I'm awake. Where to you suggest putting the ice, I still have lots of bandages on my foot and my Doc told me to ice behind my knee but that doesn't make much difference. I'm glad you knew what it was I was talking about, I was telling my husband about it and he just gave me the wierdest look and said are you sure you're feeling that and it's not your imagination? I'm not that creative.

Result number: 150

Message Number 241837

Re: The Ultimate & Final Last Resort for Unbearable TTS Pain View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 1/11/08 at 11:38

I kinow what you're talking about, I too have PF as well as TTS. Just had TTS surgery and I haven't been able to walk. I'm using a walker that has wheels and a seat with hand breaks and I sit on it and push myself around the house. My husband thinks I look so cute. Cute hell, it is hard. Then he tried it and said this would be fun to do for a while and offered to trade me. After I started to cry and yell at him that it is not as FUN as it looks, then he felt pretty bad and offered to buy me ice cream. He has been a very big help and I don't know how I would have gotten through these past few weeks with our him. I truly understand your pain and your concerns, as they are mine too!

Result number: 151

Message Number 241836

Re: The Ultimate & Final Last Resort for Unbearable TTS Pain View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 1/11/08 at 11:31

Hey, have you tried Birkenstock shoes? I was told by my Pod that I can try to wear those after the stitches come out next week. I've owned 4 pair and those are super cozy. And yes they are orthodics too! Give them a try. They are sole on qvc.com and on birkenstockusa.com too. Good luck!

Result number: 152

Message Number 241835

Re: The Ultimate & Final Last Resort for Unbearable TTS Pain View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 1/11/08 at 11:28

I am glad that I'm not the only one who was experiencing that wierd feeling. Thanks for your help. Good luck!

Result number: 153

Message Number 241822

Re: The Ultimate & Final Last Resort for Unbearable TTS Pain View Thread
Posted by LindaW on 1/11/08 at 06:06

Tina, I had my stitches in for 3 weeks and it really did not hurt when they came out. It felt like someone was just doing a little tugging on your skin, but it wasn't painful. I have had both of my feet done and unfortunately I still have the tingling, zapping, stabbing pains and almost everything else that happens with TTS, but only in one foot. I had my left foot done almost 2 years ago (good foot) and my right one done a year and a half ago (bad foot). I figure that I will probably have to live with this for the rest of my life now. I know if I lose the weight, I will be a lot better off and the pain hopefully will not be as bad. Got to go to work now and then to school.
LindaW

Result number: 154

Message Number 241816

Re: The Ultimate & Final Last Resort for Unbearable TTS Pain View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 1/10/08 at 21:49

Wow, that certainly seems extreem huh? I just had TTS release surgery done 2 weeks ago and it's funny, for the past few days I've felt like a zapping, fizzle, and a fluttering feeling (not technical terms I'm sure). This is a very woerd feeling and thats the best way to describe it. This is my right foot and I can't flex my foot at all. How long did they keep in your stitches? Mine, 3 weeks I don't get them out until 1//16. I know that's going to hurt, I've worked in the Medical feild before and I've never heard of them leaving them in for that long but, the doctor said it was nesscary for proper recovery. I have a very hard time getting around and can't even sleep in my own bed yet. This has been at times very dificult and I've also wondered at times was it worth it. I'll be able to tell that if I can walk after 1/16, and if I need PF. Let me know how you're doing.

Result number: 155

Message Number 241809

Little twitches and funny feelings... View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 1/10/08 at 19:00

I've had TTS Surgery 2 weeks ago, over the past few days I've noticed a wierd twitching and fluttering feeling. Any thoughts on if this is just the nerves coming back? I also noticed when I lay on the couch and lay on that side of my foot I can really feel the swelling in my ankle, it feels like there is a golf ball there. The Doc said for that to use ice on the back of my knee. I was just looking for somw answers on the other feelings I have in my foot. A penny for your thoughts!

Result number: 156

Message Number 241542

Morton's vs. stump neuroma and other View Thread
Posted by TracyM on 1/04/08 at 15:41

Hello. I am a very active woman who has had multiple ankle surgeries (OCD, Tendon and Retinaculum repair, scar tissue removal). THe last surgery didn't go as well as expected and one of the arthroscopic entry points dehisced, exposing the entire joint - ended up with a flap and skin graft surgery to close the hole. One of the nerves on top of my foot was cut to turn the skin to make the flap and there is no feeling on the top of my foot (Expected), but I have terrible pain in the ball of my foot dx as a Neuroma - but what is the difference between stump and Morton's please? Also, the tendon (peroneal) which has 3 anchors is moving around and clicking painfully again...I am hesitant to mention this to my orthopedic; nearly a year post op from this should this be happening?

Result number: 157

Message Number 241364

Re: Post Op day 1, and I feel FANTASTIC!!! View Thread
Posted by Nursing Student on 12/29/07 at 16:29

Tina..I am so excited for you being pain free..I feel the same. The only pain I have ever experienced was incision pain but like the doctor said everyone is different. The pain was the only thing scaring me from having the surgery but once it was over my pain was gone. The only pain I feel now is in my opposite hip from having to stand on the opposite leg while I walk on my crutches. Not sure how to help that but once I start weight bearing on the other foot it will be fine I hope. Did you get a walker w/seat? I love mine. I couldnt function without it! I can do dishes sitting in it which is awkward but hey they get done. Hope all is well and keep up the continued improvement..here is my email address if you want to email me directly, nnnn_girl at hotmail.com...my name is Carla

Result number: 158

Message Number 241351

Re: Post Op day 1, and I feel FANTASTIC!!! View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 12/29/07 at 09:35

Thank you, I'm alot more positive now that the procedure is over and I have ZERO pain. I hope this continues! I'll keep you posted. Thank you for the encouragement!

Result number: 159

Message Number 241343

Post Op day 1, and I feel FANTASTIC!!! View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 12/28/07 at 22:54

Well, I am at post op day 1 and am pain FREE! (for now I'm sure, until the pain meds wear off) I will take the pain meds as the Doc said, but for now I have ZERO pain and I'm loving it. This has been a long and very tough 5 months. I know many of you have had pain a lot longer than that. I'm sure glad that I had a good surgeon. He made sure I had a pain level of 0 before I left the surgical center today and with all of the dressing it looks like I have a growth on my ankle. But so far I feel GREAT! That may change ovet the next few days but at least going forward the pain I will experience will be a recovery pain not just usless pain. I'll let you know how the next few days go.

Result number: 160

Message Number 241286

Re: walking a lil bit View Thread
Posted by Helen W on 12/27/07 at 18:37

Tina S: Good luck with your surgery tomorrow. Remember to follow your doctors prescribed recovery route. I can personally vouch for the fact that every person is different and even every foot is different. I have had both feet done in the last 2 12 months. Oct 12th was my left foot and Nov 30th was my right and although both surgeries were performed by the same surgeon at the same hospital and it was the same procedure... I had two very different recoveries. Neither was that bad and neither were that painful But nonetheless the road was different so listen to your doctor. But again, Good luck with your surgery and I will send happy thoughts your way...

Oh BTW- my incisions are identical...about 6 1/2 inches long, like a very wide C or rounded L ... I had 14 criss crossed stitches somewhat spread out too.

Result number: 161

Message Number 241282

Re: walking a lil bit View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 12/27/07 at 18:17

I just got back from my doc today and surgery is tomorrow. He drew like a little map of what he is planning on doing, it was interesting to say the least. I will keep in touch. I wonder why the stitches are spaced so far apart, umm... Well I will keep you posted. Goods luck in your recovery!

Result number: 162

Message Number 241259

Re: walking a lil bit View Thread
Posted by Nursing Student on 12/26/07 at 23:02

Tina, I had my surgery on Dec 18th and also have a walker w/ wheels and seat..it is awesome..not sure what I would do without it. Crutches suck! I have an incision about 5 inches long with about 10 big stitches that are spread out pretty far. I have a hard cast/splint on the bottom of my foot up to my knee. It is not that bad. I really was concerned about the pain but it has been very minimal but everyone is different..if you would like to email me directly my email address is nnnn_girl at hotmail.com and if you have instant messenger I have that also..keep in touch. Hope this helps..

Result number: 163

Message Number 241244

Re: walking a lil bit View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 12/26/07 at 17:38

I read your posting and I am having this very same surgery on Friday. I have been off of work since 12/13. I'm wondering how big is your incision? My doctor said that the cut will be in the shape of a large L. I hope I have as much sucess that you are having, my surgery is on my right foot (driving foot). I have been on tne sofa now off and on for almost a month. I do admit that I too need to find my right shoes too, it has been so long since I've worn them. I have been wearing the BOOT now for almost 2 weeks with no relief and not much difference in the swelling either. Well I will need to see how the surgery goes. I hope to be back on my feet by the end of Jan. I did have the opportunity to buy a walker with wheels and a seat, hoping that will get me through the house a little better. Happy Holidays to everyone:)

Result number: 164

Message Number 241148

Re: I have the TTS Surgery scheduled... Any thoughts on recovery? View Thread
Posted by LennieB on 12/22/07 at 09:33

TinaS,
I had Tarsal Tunnel surgery Nov 28, 2007, I did put my lil write up on here, check it out.
Cheers,
LennieB

Result number: 165

Message Number 241072

Re: Canadian waits View Thread
Posted by john h on 12/19/07 at 18:54

Rick: We sure have lost the connection to our grandparents and community. It was very common in my childhood to have grand parents living with their children or grand children. Elder care was basically unheard of. It was fully expected that children would take care of their aging parents or grandparents. Often both. Children had a collective support of parents, grandparents and even community and several generations from which to draw upon. Americans were not nearly as mobile then and most of your family generally lived not to far from where you lived. My grand parents lived about 30 miles from me. My mother would put me on a bus (age 6) and the bus driver would insure I reached my destination and my grand parents were there to pick me up. On the way back the bus driver would let me off in front of my home rather than the bus station. Ever look in a bus station today? A place to be somewhat scared.

Result number: 166

Message Number 240918

Re: Rolling Walker/ Insurance? Does anyone have instant messenger? View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 12/17/07 at 09:21

Sure, My surgery is also in about a week it is scheduled for 12/28. My email address is goofycart at yahoo.com. I too will be on the computer a lot. Good thing the internet companies don't charge you per hour huh? LOL! Good luck, please let us know how your surgery and recovery goes. :)

Result number: 167

Message Number 240869

Re: Rolling Walker/ Insurance? View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 12/16/07 at 02:20

Your best way to find out if it is covered is look up your Insurance contract or call and see if Durable Medical Equipment is covered. If it is make sure your doctor puts on the script that it is medicaly needed. Good luck! I too am facing TTS surgery as well on 12/28, and I still have concerns as well. I keep telling myself I'll be fine, I'm sure you'll be great too. Think HAPPY thoughts.

Result number: 168

Message Number 240865

I have the TTS Surgery scheduled... Any thoughts on recovery? View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 12/15/07 at 22:27

I am looking forward to having the surgery considering that the end result looks more promising than not having it done. I have had severe pain for months and I need relief. I am scheduled for surgery on 12/28, at least it is after the Holiday season. I have an appt with the DOC the day before just to be sure there is not too much swelling. I've taked many different pain meds but reality is that I still need to work for now until I have the surgery. I have a good idea of what to expect for recovery the DOC has said no walking for 3-5 weeks and advised the use of crutches for a few weeks after. This is the first time for me having this surgery. Last year I had part of the bone removed from a toe in my left foot. (recovery time was a piece of cake compared to this one) The DOC has dicided to do the full cut to correct the problem. I am looking at the BIG picture and being hopful about the recovery.

Result number: 169

Message Number 240853

Weekend Humor: Italian Boy's Confession View Thread
Posted by Dr. Wedemeyer on 12/15/07 at 16:01

An Italian altar boy goes to confessional....

Bless me Father, for I have sinned. I have been with a loose girl'.
The priest asks, 'Is that you, little Joey Pagano ?'
'Yes, Father, it is.'

'And who was the girl you were with?'
'I can't tell you, Father, I don't want to ruin her reputation'

Well, Joey, I'm sure to find out her name sooner or later
so you may as well tell me now. Was it Tina Minetti?'
'I cannot say.'

'Was it Teresa Mazzarelli?'
'I'll never tell.'

'Was it Nina Capelli?'
'I'm sorry, but I cannot name her.'

'Was it Cathy Piriano?'
'My lips are sealed.'

'Was it Rosa Di Angelo, then?'
'Please, Father, I cannot tell you.'

The priest sighs in frustration. 'You're very tight lipped, Joey Pagano, and I admire that. But you've sinned and have to atone.

You cannot be an altar boy now for 4 months. Now you go and behave yourself.'

Joey walks back to his pew, and his friend Franco slides over and
whispers, 'What'd you get?'

'4 months vacation and five good leads.'

Result number: 170

Message Number 240580

I have the results..... Finaly some relief! View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 12/10/07 at 21:45

I went back to the foot doc today, he was saying that the results did show that I do have TTS. He is trying one last thing to see if I get relief. I am now sporting a large black, uncomfortable, hard to walk in brace for my right foot. He has instructed me to wear it all the time (except while bathing) but, I am scheduled for TTS surgery on 12/28. I hope the surgery goes good. I have a lot riding on this!

Result number: 171

Message Number 240507

Re: My sucessful Doctor's appt. View Thread
Posted by JuliaB on 12/09/07 at 20:30

Tina, many of us are anxiously waiting to hear from you about the results of your tests. Please don't forget us. Thanks

Result number: 172

Message Number 240455

Re: Plantar pain in my foot! View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 12/08/07 at 19:43

Randy,

Please be careful doing the stretches, they made my symtoms much worse. I've had an EMG and an MRI done. I am waiting for the results. It looks like I will be having surgery for PF and Tarsol Tunnel. Just be careful! Keep us posted on your progress.

Result number: 173

Message Number 240360

Thanks Tina View Thread
Posted by Michelle on 12/07/07 at 07:25

Thanks and the same to you!

Result number: 174

Message Number 240353

Re: Poor care given for PF patients View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 12/06/07 at 20:24

Michelle,

I feel your pain. I also have not been able to get around since Thanksgiving day. However I have been to a Doctor that has given specific instructions and also Cortisone injections and Cortisone pills. Nothing has helped me either. I have gone for an EMG ( kind of painful and not 100% accurate ) and today I went for an MRI and my doctor has the CD but, is not saying much. I understand your concerns and your frustraition too. This message board is so very helpful and supportive. Good luck on your MRI. Be sure to post and let us know how it goes!

Result number: 175

Message Number 240270

Re: Ok, now I'm confused...... View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 12/04/07 at 21:51

Yeah, the doctor did not tell me that either. (40% defect rate) I am scheduled for the MRI on Thursday and the doctor should have the results on Friday. This is getting complicated huh? He said he will not be able to do much unless these results show to be abnormal. He ad no explaination as to why I have such pain still. He said after taking the power pack of Cortisone it should have taken away all of the pain including the swelling. But it didn't do either. Boy, I thought I was discouraged before, much more so now. I think after I go for the MRI and if the doctor still 'doesn't have a clue' I'm going to see another doctor. There has to be an explaination for the pain and the swelling! Thank you both for your help and I will message you again on Friday when I talk to my doctor.

Result number: 176

Message Number 240254

Ok, now I'm confused...... View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 12/04/07 at 18:27

I went to the neurologist today and the EMG was normal? What does that say about the pain I am having? I am scheduled for an MRI on THursday, I need answers. I am glad to see that the EMG was normal but, I'm confused what is causing the onset of sudden pain and the swelling? A penny for your thoughts? Is there anyone who can answer this????

Result number: 177

Message Number 240225

Re: My sucessful Doctor's appt. View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 12/03/07 at 20:15

Thank you for all your help, and god bless you for what you do on line and in the office for your patients. I'll let you know what the results are and the doctors plan.

Result number: 178

Message Number 240219

Finaly some answers! Woo Hoo.... View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 12/03/07 at 19:27

I went to the doctor today and he is sending me for an MRI and to have a test done at the Neurologist office tomorrow. THis is fantastic news. I still have trouble getting around and still I have a lot of pain but, at least I am on my way to finding some REAL answers. I am looking forward to getting the results by the end of this week and then the doctor said he will have a plan mapped out on the next step. Woo Hoo!!!! Well I'm off.

Result number: 179

Message Number 240217

My sucessful Doctor's appt. View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 12/03/07 at 19:02

I went to the Doctor today, and finaly I got some answers. Tomorrow I am going to the Nurologist to have the test done for the nerves in the bottom of my foot. Then on Wednesday I am going to have the MRI done. I am so glad to see that he is addressing my concerns. I hope they show something, at this point I don't care as long as the problem is fixed. Wish me luck!

Result number: 180

Message Number 240165

Re: Scared about surgery in 17 days View Thread
Posted by Nursing Student on 12/02/07 at 21:55

Thanks Tina S. for responding. After reading the posts on this page it sure has me changing some of my Christmas plans..My surgery is only 7 days before Christmas and you know how everyone wants you here then you have to go somewhere else the next day. I am trying to get my inlaws to do everything at one time so I dont have to keep running around..If not I can always stay home. That might be my only solution anyway. Will have to wait and see how things go by then. I just hope my foot is well enough by the time I have to go back to school. Having clinicals wont be fun if I am in constant pain. I already have enough and was sure hoping that by 3 weeks post op I would be doing quite well. I sure know I have my fingers crossed!

Result number: 181

Message Number 240144

Re: Doc's suggestions. View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 12/02/07 at 16:55

I will let you know, again tank you for your time.

Result number: 182

Message Number 240142

Re: Doc's suggestions. View Thread
Posted by Dr. Wedemeyer on 12/02/07 at 16:46

Tina these are questions and concerns best answered by your doctor. EMG/NCV tests are very routine and I seriously doubt that your surgery will be performed prior to the results being made available.

Let us know when you get the results.

Result number: 183

Message Number 240129

Re: Scared about surgery in 17 days View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 12/01/07 at 23:09

Oh my, I have the same problem. Including the Doctor issues too. I wish you luck. Please let me know how your surgery goes. I feel I will be facing the same surgery soon. I have not been able to walk since Thanksgiving day! I did receive a Cortisone injection in my right foot and it has been DOWN HILL since then. I know that icing my foot helps only for a short while but any relief is relief huh? I am going to see my Doctor on Monday and hopfully I will be on my way to a more long term solution. Do you experience numbing too? Well, just be careful on your recovery, I've been reading on this site that it can be a speedy recovery and some have had issues. I know from past foot surgery, TAKE THE PAIN PILLS AS DIRECTED! I know it may not seem like you're in pain but you'll be in better shape if you take them. Good luck!

Result number: 184

Message Number 240128

Re: Doc's suggestions. View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 12/01/07 at 22:59

Tank you. Is this something that will be painful? (Not like I don't have enough pain) I will be talking to my Doctor on Monday. If I have these test done how soon could I expect my Doctor would have the results? I hope not too long, he is suggesting to have the surgery for TTS. I am wanting this done ASAP, I haven't been able to walk since Thanksgiving day.

Result number: 185

Message Number 240125

Re: Doc's suggestions. View Thread
Posted by Dr. Wedemeyer on 12/01/07 at 21:33

The test you are describing is called an EMG Tina, needle electromyography.

Yes it is a routine study of the quality of efferent motor nerve root activity. They also utilize NCV (nerve conduction velocity) to assess the sensory (afferrent)component of these nerves.

While MRI can show structural anomalies or changes it is not as specific for decreased activity of an individual nerve or it's branches, entrapment and disease.

Result number: 186

Message Number 240117

Doc's suggestions. View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 12/01/07 at 19:24

I was wondering, my doctor has suggested going to a Nurologist for some test that includes needles and electrodes in the nerves in the bottom of my R foot. Is this common? Will the MRI not show damage to the nerves as well as this test performed by the other Doc? Is there anyone can answer that?

Result number: 187

Message Number 240115

Re: It's back... The swelling and the PAIN.. View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 12/01/07 at 19:14

I'm glad I'm not the only one who's concerned. I will wait it out until Monday and see what the Doc says and then I will make the disicion. It will be difficult to start fresh with a new Doc, but these are MY feet and they're pretty important to me and I need a Doc that will address MY concerns. Will it help to continue to ice them? (I don't notice a difference at this point) Would it help to ice and then apply heat too?

Result number: 188

Message Number 240110

Re: It's back... The swelling and the PAIN.. View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 12/01/07 at 18:47

I'm glad someone else see's that as a problem too. Thank you very much for your advise. I did call him on Thursday and left him a message to call me back because the pills were not working. The nurse called back and said that the doctor will address those issues on Monday when I return. I was taking old pain meds from my other foot surgery I had. I think if I go in there on Monday and he does not suggest an MRI I plan to get a second opinion and change doctors. He's not addressing the pain I am experiencing at all.

Result number: 189

Message Number 240098

It's back... The swelling and the PAIN.. View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 12/01/07 at 13:44

Well Hello to all of my fellow 'Painful feet suffers',

I have been off of my feet since Thanksgiving day! I did everything as my Doc suggested. I did notice the swelling and the pain slowly going away. I did begin walking. I'm not getting around too good. Then last night I saw my foot was swollen again and it is beninning to hurt again the constant throbbing is unbarable at times. I'm on my last dose of Cortisone pills today. I go back to the Doc on Monday but I am also expected to return to work on Monday too. I'm so tired of my feet swelling and not being able to get around. I can see why some Doc's say it is depressing I try to keep my humor, but it's very difficult! I plan to ask my Doc about the MRI and about the Surgery for TTS. I have tried soaking my foot in a 5 Gal. bucket of ice, besides being cold it doesn't do much. I will be suprised if he allows me to retun to work on Monday.

Result number: 190

Message Number 240091

Re: tina s View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 11/30/07 at 22:52

Thank you so very much, I think at this point I am almost ready to try ANYTHING! This has been very difficult on every aspect of my life, work, home and everything. This is definitly something I will look into. I have a Doctor's appt on Monday and I plan on asking him. I know after my last treatment of the cortisone injection my foot actually got worse. I don't think my system took to well to the injection at all. I have been taking the seriese of Cortisone pills and I have noticed a great improvement. Until tonight, I am noticing that the swelling is coming back and it is beginning to effect how I walk again. Thanks again and I will let you know how it goes....

Result number: 191

Message Number 240076

Re: The Meds are working, well kind of... View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 11/30/07 at 18:57

I am experiencing the same thing. I have not been able to walk since the day after Thanksgiving, until today. I was taking CXortisone Pills and they seem to have done the job. (for now) I was told by my Doc that surgery will help. I have been trying to put it off but, I think it is time. I wish you luck. Just be careful of the streteches you do they made be so much worse. Good luck and continue to post your experiences, it helps you to talk about it with others who suffer with the same problems and they help oters too:)

Result number: 192

Message Number 240022

Re: tina s View Thread
Posted by Jen R on 11/30/07 at 06:39

Hi Tina,

I am a PF sufferer and had many treatments done without success, including cryosurgery. As Dr. Rubin stated, it is something you may want to consider and you should look into it. Basically...a probe is placed into your foot and a machine is used to freeze some of the smaller nerves. Mabye the doctors can better explain the exact theory behind the cryosurgery.

What I can tell you is that there are some risks although compared to traditional surgery are relatively minor. However, it was not as simple for me as Dr. Rubin might like you to believe. The biggest risk is probably infection which I did not have...but it did take me almost two months to be able to walk without favoring the area where the probe was placed.

Again, I'm not trying to deter you from having the procedure...just be sure to do your research to be sure you understand what is being done. You could even start by going over to the cryosurgery message boards and get some info there. Keep in mind, though, most patients on these message boards are here because they failed treatments and you probably won't find many who are here to talk about how they were cured.

Jen R

Result number: 193

Message Number 240006

Re: tina s View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 11/29/07 at 15:42

Cryotheropy for you feet? I've not heard of that treatment. It sounds like you know about it, could you explain it to me?

Result number: 194
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Message Number 239994

tina s View Thread
Posted by dr brent rubin on 11/29/07 at 12:20

Tina have you every thought about cryotherapy for your heel pain. It is a very simple procedure done in the office, which takes 10 minutes and minimal recovery. If interested let me know and I will direct you to a dr in your area who provides this procedure.

Result number: 195

Message Number 239988

The Meds are working, well kind of... View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 11/29/07 at 09:52

Good morning,

I have been taking a series of Cortisone pills. This is my 4th day and 18 pills later, I am beginning to notice the swelling going away. (yea me) Only one thing it comes back after a few hours. I have called the Doctor and he just said 'We will discuss it on your next appt on Monday 12/3.' I am supose to go back to work on 12/3 and I am still not able to apply full weight on my right foot. If he suggest another round of Cortisone pills I may tell him no. This would be the 3rd time on Cortisone. I have stopped the stsretches, wearing the night splint and taking the Naproxon he originaly gave me. I find myself asking 'Am I on the right path?' I am still experiencing the tingly sensation in the bottom of my foot near the top. I do not want surgery but at this point I am missing too much work and it is becoming more difficult to perform just the simplist daily activities.

Result number: 196

Message Number 239986

Meds are working but.... View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 11/29/07 at 09:49

Good morning,

I have been taking a series of Cortisone pills. This is my 4th day and 18 pills later, I am beginning to notice the swelling going away. (yea me) Only one thing it comes back after a few hours. I have called the Doctor and he just said 'We will discuss it on your next appt on Monday 12/3.' I am supose to go back to work on 12/3 and I am still not able to apply full weight on my right foot. If he suggest another round of Cortisone pills should I take them? This would be the 3rd time on Cortisone. I have stopped the stsretches, wearing the night splint and taking the Naproxon he originaly gave me. Am I on the right path? I do not want surgery but at this point I am missing too much work and it is becoming more difficult to perform just the simplist daily activities.

Result number: 197

Message Number 239913

Re: My doctors visit View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 11/27/07 at 18:26

Thank you so much. I will call him in the morning. I'll let you know how it goes. Thanks again!

Result number: 198

Message Number 239897

Re: My doctors visit View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 11/27/07 at 11:41

I live in Chandler Arizona, is there any doctor you could recomend? ( I know you don't know every Foot doctor in America, but if I could find a good one I can stick with that would be better for me.)

Result number: 199

Message Number 239892

Re: My doctors visit View Thread
Posted by Dr. Wedemeyer on 11/27/07 at 11:09

A second opinion wouldn't hurt at this point Tina. You will have your feet for the rest of your life. With a good working diganosis and treatment you could enjoy them.

Result number: 200

Message Number 239879

My doctors visit View Thread
Posted by Tina S. on 11/27/07 at 06:17

I went back to the doctor today to be re-evualated, he tried to stretch my toes and I thought I was going to cry. I begged him not to so he didn't. He began tapping with his finger on a spot next to my ankle and asked me to discribe the feeling. (He talked about some tunnel of nerves that the PF may be creating pressure on causing all the pain)I told him that I get a tingly sensation and then a few sharp pains. He told me he wants to send me to a Nurologist to have small ecedctrodes and needles put into my foot to test the condition of the nerves in the bottom of my foot and then go for an MRI. I asked him about the possibility of the PF muscle rupturing and said it was not likely. He tried to persuade me into getting another Cortisone injection this time in my ankle. I said NO THANK YOU. He did prescribe the pill form to control the swelling. I am still concerding getting a second opinion. But, I have an HMO so it wil not be easy. In the mean time he has said no walking for 1 week and I have an appt to see him again in 1 week. Does anyone else have any other suggestions?

Result number: 201

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