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Message Number 261815
Re: Perception is reality & applying for disability is not a sin View Thread
Posted by Deb on 11/07/09 at 19:48

OMG I just read your post...and I have the same thing going on...I have had carpal tunnel repair in both arms, ulnar nerve transposition in both elbows and now have a case of tarsel tunnel in my left foot that is causing me SEVERE pain....I have crohns and rheumatoid arthritis...and I will say that I was approved for SSDI 6 weeks after my first application. I will also say that the pain in my foot is EXCRUCIATING....I have had 2 foot surgeries on my right foot...I had a mortons neuroma (another nerve problem) and the removal of my 2nd PIP joint.
I wonder if you should see a rheumatologist. I have autoimmune problems where my immune system attacks my body. I feel for you....and wish you a pain free day
Deb RN

Result number: 1

Message Number 261733

Re: cryosurgery for Morton's neuroma in Washington, D.C. area View Thread
Posted by EECI on 11/04/09 at 12:37

Dr. Robert Cohen or Dr. Christina Teimouri (Beaver Valley Foot Clinic)

Result number: 2

Message Number 261614

Re: still in pain View Thread
Posted by gayleh on 10/29/09 at 22:26

Hi Sharon,

Yes, all surgeries were for the same original neuroma. One explanation I was given was that it re-grew formed like a mushroom cap (stump neuroma). My scars on top and on bottom of my foot just kept getting longer (3 surgeries on top, 2 on bottom). I recently started PT again on my foot since I am going there for my knee. The massage and ultra sound are helping with the scar tissue. I need to be more diligent with massaging my foot at home.

After my 4th surgery I tried an Acti-Patch. This is similar to a TENS unit, but it is battery operated and the battery lasts only a month. I applied it to the bottom of my foot when I slept, hoping that the pain would not be as bad when I walked the next day. I tried this for 2 months and I did not see any noticeable improvement.

Regarding pain clinics: They do not put you on drugs, but rather teach you about chronic pain and provide group therapy, exercise, wellness, and in my case, art therapy classes. My pain meds are controlled by my pain doc, and I am not taking anything addictive. Folks addicted to pain meds must de-tox before entering the program. The physical therapists give you exercises specifically addressing your problem(s).

I am sure that there are numerous success stories after additional neuroma surgeries, it's just that I am not one of them (yet?).

Regarding ortho vs. DPM: Years ago I saw two orthos with the same x-ray and they could not diagnose a stress fracture. A DPM did within minutes of looking at the x-ray. I am sure that there are good foot orthos out there, but none came up when I asked my network for recommendations.

Best of Luck to you - I hope that you leave your appt. tomorrow with confidence in the next steps in your journey.

Gayle

Result number: 3

Message Number 261577

Re: still in pain View Thread
Posted by Sharon H. on 10/27/09 at 18:39

gayleh

Thanks for responding. Were all 5 of your surgeries for a neuroma? I can't believe you had to go through so many surgeries. I am terrified at the thought of another surgery. Whose to say that my foot would feel any better? What I experience is not really pain (although I think I could stand that better) What I have, I am told is scar tissue rubbing against a nerve. It feels like I am walking on sandpaper, or like walking on broken up seashells every step I take. Definately a bad nerve entrapment of some kind. Like you the pod who did the surgery has never admitted that anything went wrong. He had me going to therapy, acupuncture, and even suggested a pain clinic. I don't want to go there because I don't want to be doped up with a bunch of drugs that only cover up the problem. What did they do for you at the pain clinic and did it help you at all? I have been seeing a different pod for several months and he has tried different things that I mentioned in my other post. So far nothing is helping me.I go back to see him on Friday and I am going to ask him about prescribing a T.E.N.S Unit (Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulator)that I would use at home.I had tens treatment at his office, but it didn't really help much, and the reason is because you are supposed to use it daily and I only went to see him once a month. There must be some way to get rid of scar tissue.I did have one injection that was suppose to help soften the scar tissue. He said it did help a little to soften. It just seems that someone somewhere could come up with a solution to our ongoing foot probems. I wonder sometime if I should have went to an orthopedic Dr.

Result number: 4

Message Number 261554

Re: still in pain View Thread
Posted by gayleh on 10/27/09 at 02:07

Hi Sharon,

I certainly sympathize with you. I wish that I never had surgery #5 in May 2008 and could go back to my pain level after surgery #4 since the pain is so much greater now. On a scale of 1-10 my pain level prior to surgery #5 was a 6, and now it is an 8 (of course I really hate this scale system and recognize that our pain recalibrates after some interventions, etc.). I, too, have had all that you mention and have found that the low profile MBT's are better than the higher (and older) profile soles. The one sneaker that I now wear all the time (and bought 6 pairs in case I can't find them anymore) is the Reebok DMX Crosstown walking shoe. It is available at Kohls.com in more sizes than you will find in their stores. The 'pods' at the bottom of the shoe act in a similar fashion as a rocker bottom shoe and helps keep pressure off of the forefoot. This model Reebok has more natural padding inside than the MBT's. I have a wide foot, so many other makes of shoes that may work for some will not work for me.

My first podiatrist could not admit that his operation did not fix me. Surgeries 2-4 were done by an instructor at a local podiatry school. He thought that my issue was solvable, and sent me to a plastic surgeon to do a more intensive surgery. I see my pain doctor more frequently than I see my new podiatrist. I have just finished an 8 week program at a pain clinic. I understand chronic pain a lot more, but I still don't want to accept it.

So the sneaker is all that I can recommend right now. I am about to have another MRI (have not had one since surgery #3), to see why a recent lidocaine-type (can't remember the exact name) injection into the 2nd-3rd metatarsal space traveled up and then around the bottom of my foot out to the base of my pinky toe. Not what the doctor was expecting, but totally validating where my pain is under my foot. My second and third toes are now splaying, indicative of another neuroma (and why he injected there). If the diagnostic tests confirm a neuroma anywhere in my foot I will concede to another operation as I am not handling this pain well at all. I realize that I am very lucky not to have RSD after having so many surgeries, but the risk for me is worth it.

Result number: 5

Message Number 261501

Re: still in pain View Thread
Posted by Sharon H. on 10/25/09 at 10:18

I had neuroma surgery in May 2008 and now my foot feels worse than it did before surgery. What I am experiencing is numbness and annoying feeling in ball of foot. The pod I am going to now says it is scar tissue rubbing against the nerve. I have had tens treatments, an injection to help soften the scar tissue, padding to get the weight off ball of foot,orthotics, just to mention a few. I just purchased a pair of mpt shoes that I was told might help (they do help to get the weight off ball of foot a little) This feeling is driving me insane, I want it to stop, but no one seems to be able to come up with a solution. I also wish I would never have had the surgery in the first place. I am terrified with the thought of cutting into my foot again to remove scar tissue or a possible stump neuroma. Whose to say my foot wouldn't feel even worse? If there is anyone who has had a similiar experience who has found relief I would welcome any suggestions. Nothing worse than having a continual, never ending nerve problem in your foot that you feel with every step you take.

Result number: 6

Message Number 261375

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by gayleh on 10/19/09 at 02:09

A warning to all using a rollabout or turning leg caddy: I have had 5 surgeries over the past 6 years for a neuroma and subsequent regrowth. The past 3 surgeries I have used a TLC ('got addicted' since I did not have to weight bear on my painful foot), and now have knee problems. If your foot pain becomes chronic please save your knee and get a seated piece of equipment to use.

Result number: 7

Message Number 261293

Re: Morton's Neuroma View Thread
Posted by ROSE ANN on 10/14/09 at 13:37

I HAVE HAD MORTONS NEUROMA SURGERY
I HAVE MORE PAIN NOW THAN EVERY
I AM INTERESTED IN THE CRYSURGERY

I LIVE IN SO ILLINOIS
ARE THERE ANY DOCTORS IN MY AREA THAT WOULD PERFORM
THIS PROCEDUURE

Result number: 8

Message Number 261265

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Joni on 10/13/09 at 08:45

Podiatrists are not MD's, but neither are D.O.,s. My point is that Podiatrists have undergone extensive medical and surgical training similar to Physicians but including extensive attention to the foot and lower extremeties. A good D.P.M. will be much more successful than a poor MD/DO almost always.

Result number: 9

Message Number 261261

Re: cryosurgery for neuromas in IL View Thread
Posted by Mary Ann on 10/13/09 at 00:24

Don't have it done in Lombard, il It doesn't work.

Result number: 10

Message Number 261213

Re: Alpha Lipoic Acid View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 10/10/09 at 05:31

Norm,

I agree with Dr. Wedemeyer, but as per your thoughts, it certainly can't 'hurt'. Although Metanx is really indicated for diabetic neuropathy, I have prescribed Metanx for my patients with varying nerve related symptoms including tarsal tunnel symptoms, 'Morton's' neuroma symptoms, other peripheral neuropathy symptoms, nerve injuries, etc., and the vast majority of these patients have responded positively with successful results.

As you may already know, Metanx is simply a prescription of B vitamins, therefore patients ask why they can't take B vitamins without the RX. If you visit the Metanx website (PamLabs) there's an excellent explanation.

I have no financial interest in this company, but have seen excellent results in my patients.

There is an excellent doctor that used to post a lot on this site, Dr. Greg Mowen (Dr. G), but unfortunately doesn't post anymore. He's a DPM who has practice with a specialty in nerve related disorders. I believe that Dr. Mowen also utilizes Metanx on many of his patients with nerve related disorders of various etiologies, although I certainly can not speak for Dr. Mowen.

I personally have no experience with alpha lipoic acid, and Dr. Wedemeyer has a stronger background with nutrition/vitamins and may be able to tell you if you can take both alpha lipoic acid and Metanx. (I don't see any contra-indications).

Result number: 11

Message Number 261147

Re: years of foot pain View Thread
Posted by Jewel on 10/07/09 at 23:33

1. Have you ever seen this type of pain and tendonitis in a patient? If so, was there an underlying rheumatic/autoimmune disease? Was there anything done to help the patient?

2. What is the horseshoe area just around the edge of the heel? What is it and what would cause horrible pain there? What helps the pain/problem?

3. How do you tell the difference between neuroma and capsulitis/inflammation of ball of toe joint? If MRI is negative for neuroma? Ultrasound - would that show a neuroma? What are the chances of it being a neuroma if negative on MRI?

Thank you.... I would be so grateful for your opinion.

Jewel

Result number: 12

Message Number 261146

years of foot pain View Thread
Posted by Jewel on 10/07/09 at 23:31

First let me say that I have some sort of autoimmune disease. I've been to many doctors and none of them agree. The latest being where 2 highly regarded rheumatologists took a look at my records and gave their determination and both completely contradicted each other. The possible diagnosises are RA, Undifferentiated Spondy, CPPD, Reiters/Reactive arthritis, Lupus and fibromyalgia. So, really who knows. I'm partial to the spondyloarthoapathies due to my foot problems.

I've gotten this foot pain on and off since 97. It has come and gone of it's own accord despite treatment. But now, I've had pain in feet constant for the last 5 years. Terrible, excrutiating pain that has now rendered me immobile. No, I wasn't overweight when it started, yes I am now. The one podiatrist I went to kept saying it was PF. I did the stretching, PT, night splints, injections, custom oththodics and none of it worked. He finally said he couldn't help me. Yes, I do have heel spurs - quite large ones. Floated between several other doctors, had EMG's = negative. Finally the one I have now has Dx'd a haglunds (doesn't hurt unless you press on it) and achillies insertion tendonitis. PT isn't really helping much.

The pain is in the back heel in a horse shoe shape - just along the edge of the foot. Yes it hurts when you squeeze the heel. In addition, there's a bone on the side of the foot by the tarsals on one side of the 'tuberosity' and according to the PT and Podiatrist it's where another tendon attaches and its super painful too. The achillies is sore in the ankle areas going up the ankle sides into the calf. The peroneous tendons (?) are very sore from the foot all the way up to the knee.

The ball of the R foot has issues. Podiatrist thought there was a neuroma between toes 2 & 3 as it was super painful too. He injected it there 3 times now (cortisone, over the past 1.5yrs) and it has helped. However, MRI showed no neuroma. Now toe 2 has very quickly deformed curving toward the big toe and hammering out. The last time I was at the podiatrist he mentioned capsulitis in that toe. So, could it really be the autoimmune arthritis and not a neuroma? I don't know whether to let him cut me open or not.

Went to an orthopedic doctor who specializes in feet/ankle. He said I have tendonitis all over my foot/feet. Took an xray of the R foot ball and you can see that the toe has hammered, said he couldn't do surgery due to the inflammation in the feet = too much scar tissue would develope in my current state. I asked him if he ever saw something like this before. He said 'just a couple times and that I need to tell my rheumatologist to get my inflammation under control.'

Result number: 13

Message Number 261125

Re: Mortons Neuroma and Alcohol Shots View Thread
Posted by ShannonW on 10/07/09 at 14:21

What type of alcohol is used for the chemical sclerosis ?
I have had orthotics for years and been receving corizone shots with some relief but would love to be rid of Mortons Neuroma once and for all. My family doctor has been giving me the cortizone shots but is not familiar with the alcohol shots.
Any help would be appreciated..
I live in Canada and having said that it will be about a year before I see an orthopeodic surgeon and the possiblity for cryo...

Result number: 14

Message Number 261108

When to say no to a cortisone injection View Thread
Posted by Robbie on 10/06/09 at 14:28

I am non-weight bearing for 4 weeks now and no change in pain in the sesamoid area and for morton's neuroma. My doctor mentioned doing a cortisone shot at 6 weeks if not better. Two questions

1. If the MRI shows no inflammation (in my case), should a cortisone injection be given? Isn't it for inflammation? Podiatrist says inflammation is at cellular level which is why the MRI is not showing the inflammation.

2. Can two cortisone shots be received in the same visit? One for neuroma and other for sesamoid in the same foot.

Thanks. I'm just having trouble thinking a cortisone shot will help if no inflammation or neuroma is showing up on the MRI. Non-weight bearing has not improved my pain at all (pain when sitting too).

Thanks!

Result number: 15

Message Number 261082

Capsulitis...Help View Thread
Posted by MDUBS on 10/05/09 at 17:50

I have capsulitis in both of my feet. I've had it for 2 years now and nothing seems to be helping. Here's my timeline
-Went to Internal Medicine, doctor and he said to see a Ortho
-Ortho said its a Neuroma and gave me cortisone injections
-Couple of months passed, went back, another round of cortisone injections
-Now I'm seeing a double certified podiatrist/ortho-podiatrist and he said after more xrays and an ultrasound he said it was capsulitis
-I have taken Diclofenac, Celebrex, used anti-infalmmatory creams, lidocaine patches, and taped my 2nd toe down
-I am picking up my orthotics tomorrow, but honestly I cant imagine that they are going to miraculously take my pain away after all the above did nothing but temporarily relieve the pain (and I'm talking about 30-45 minutes relief)

I am 29 years old, expecting my first child I would like to be able to run after him/her if I have to....What else can I do!?!?

Result number: 16

Message Number 261081

Re: Doctors, any comments? View Thread
Posted by MDUBS on 10/05/09 at 17:47

I found this site searching for answers to this exact question. I'm over two years now with the same pain in the bottom of my BOTH of my feet. I train in Mixed martail arts and think this is what caused the capsulitis. Here's my timeline
-Went to Internal Medicine, doctor and he said to see a Ortho
-Ortho said its a Neuroma and gave me cortisone injections
-Couple of months passed, went back, another round of cortisone injections
-Now I'm seeing a double certified podiatrist/ortho-podiatrist and he said after more xrays and an ultrasound he said it was capsulitis
-I have taken Diclofenac, Celebrex, used anti-infalmmatory creams, lidocaine patches, and taped my 2nd toe down
-I am picking up my orthotics tomorrow, but honestly I cant imagine that they are going to miraculously take my pain away after all the above did nothing but temporarily relieve the pain (and I'm talking about 30-45 minutes relief)

I am 29 years old, expecting my first child I would like to be able to run after him/her if I have to....What else can I do!?!?

Result number: 17

Message Number 261080

Re: complicated.....more refined questions View Thread
Posted by Jewel on 10/05/09 at 17:14

I should have worded this so you know exactly what I'm looking for.

1. Have you ever seen this type of pain and tendonitis in a patient? If so, was there an underlying rheumatic/autoimmune disease? Was there anything done to help the patient?

2. What is the horseshoe area just around the edge of the heel? What is it and what would cause horrible pain there? What helps the pain/problem?

3. How do you tell the difference between neuroma and capsulitis/inflammation of ball of toe joint? If MRI is negative for neuroma? Ultrasound - would that show a neuroma? What are the chances of it being a neuroma if negative on MRI?

Thank you....yes, I know it's complicated and would be so grateful for your opinion.

Jewel

Result number: 18

Message Number 261070

Re: Pars defect in L5 vertebral body causing foot pain? View Thread
Posted by Curt on 10/05/09 at 14:45

Hello Alex

I was just curious what kind of foot pain you have. In my case i was diagnosed with morton's neuroma, a condition where one of the nerves get pinched between the bones in your foot. I get this pain when I wear some shoes. When the pain starts it becomes unbearable until I take off my shoes and wait for the pain to subside.

Result number: 19

Message Number 261039

complicated..... View Thread
Posted by Jewel on 10/04/09 at 14:10

Hello Doctors!

Gosh am I glad I found you. First let me say that I have some sort of autoimmune disease. I've been to many doctors and none of them agree. The latest being where 2 highly regarded rheumatologists took a look at my records and gave their determination and both completely contradicted each other. The possible diagnosises are RA, Undifferentiated Spondy, CPPD, Reiters/Reactive arthritis, Lupus and fibromyalgia. So, really who knows. I'm partial to the spondyloarthoapathies due to my foot problems.

I've gotten this foot pain on and off since 97. It has come and gone of it's own accord despite treatment. But now, I've had pain in feet constant for the last 5 years. Terrible, excrutiating pain that has now rendered me immobile. No, I wasn't overweight when it started, yes I am now. The one podiatrist I went to kept saying it was PF. I did the stretching, PT, night splints, injections, custom oththodics and none of it worked. He finally said he couldn't help me. Yes, I do have heel spurs - quite large ones. Floated between several other doctors, had EMG's = negative. Finally the one I have now has Dx'd a haglunds (doesn't hurt unless you press on it) and achillies insertion tendonitis. PT isn't really helping much.

The pain is in the back heel in a horse shoe shape - just along the edge of the foot. Yes it hurts when you squeeze the heel. In addition, there's a bone on the side of the foot by the tarsals on one side of the 'tuberosity' and according to the PT and Podiatrist it's where another tendon attaches and its super painful too. The achillies is sore in the ankle areas going up the ankle sides into the calf. The peroneous tendons (?) are very sore from the foot all the way up to the knee.

The ball of the R foot has issues. Podiatrist thought there was a neuroma between toes 2 & 3 as it was super painful too. He injected it there 3 times now (cortisone, over the past 1.5yrs) and it has helped. However, MRI showed no neuroma. Now toe 2 has very quickly deformed curving toward the big toe and hammering out. The last time I was at the podiatrist he mentioned capsulitis in that toe. So, could it really be the autoimmune arthritis and not a neuroma? I don't know whether to let him cut me open or not.

Went to an orthopedic doctor who specializes in feet/ankle. He said I have tendonitis all over my foot/feet. Took an xray of the R foot ball and you can see that the toe has hammered, said he couldn't do surgery due to the inflammation in the feet = too much scar tissue would develope in my current state. I asked him if he ever saw something like this before. He said 'just a couple times and that I need to tell my rheumatologist to get my inflammation under control.'

I don't know what to do. I've lost my ability to walk. The wheelchair/scooter people came on Friday..... I'm hoping you can help.

Thank you,
Jewel

Result number: 20

Message Number 260718

Re: cryosurgery for Morton's neuroma in Washington, D.C. area View Thread
Posted by Pat F on 9/20/09 at 19:33

also looking for more cryosurgery locations. I live near Pittsburgh PA

Result number: 21

Message Number 260612

Foot Pain in both feet View Thread
Posted by Karen on 9/16/09 at 08:55

Dear Dr.,

I am at my wits end. My foot history is extensive, unfortunately. I am wondering if one thing could really be causing all of my problems. I have had ingrown toenails in the big nails at the cuticle, morton's neuroma removal, implant put into right ankle, cyst removal out of left ankle entwined in nerves, I currently have capsulitis in my left second toe, etc. I have various foot pain at various times and am wondering what it could be. Currently I am getting intermittent pain on the top of my right foot, toward the outside of the top under the toes. I have had neuroma removal, so I know it's not that. I also sometimes get pain in my left ankle, causing me to limp because it hurts so bad but then it too goes away, comes back, etc. Any ideas??? THANK YOU.

PLEASE HELP. Thank you.

Result number: 22

Message Number 260557

Re: cryosurgery for neuromas in IL View Thread
Posted by ROSEANNA on 9/14/09 at 12:38

I AM ALSO TRYING TO FIND SOMEONE IN ILLINOIS
I LIVE IN SO ILL
HAVE YOU GOTTEN A NAME OF SOMEONE

Result number: 23

Message Number 260554

Re: Immobilization for Sesamoiditis and Morton's Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 9/14/09 at 06:07

Your question is case dependent. In some cases six weeks may help, in other cases 6 weeks may not be beneficial and in some cases a patient may need more time in a cast. Unfortunately, there really is no single answer to your question since every case and every individual is unique.

Result number: 24

Message Number 260546

Immobilization for Sesamoiditis and Morton's Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Robbie on 9/13/09 at 18:13

My doctor put me in a cam boot for sesamoiditis and mortonís neuroma and said no weight bearing for 6 weeks. I am removing the boot several times a day to ice and am taking 5 days of anti-inflammatories to hopefully jump start the healing process. Iíve had these problems for about 4 months now.

I suffer from other foot problems (arch pain for 5 years) and wanted to treat this aggressively. Before the boot we tried rest, ice, physical therapy (ultrasound and iontopheresis), custom orthotics Ė all this right at the beginning as I didnít want another chronic foot pain. None of these helped and the pain continued to get worse.

Question, is 6 weeks long enough in this boot and a treatment for sesamoiditis and morton's neuroma? Should I be doing something else besides resting and icing? Does this treatment have success for these issues? I should add a MRI was done to confirm a fracture did not exist. I do realize when I come out of the boot I will need to continue with shoe modifications to avoid this problem again (problem is not from injury). I did ask these questions of my doctor, but would like the opinions of the doctor's here too.

Thanks for your input.

Result number: 25

Message Number 260536

Re: Functional leg length discrepancy View Thread
Posted by BrianPK on 9/12/09 at 12:22

I do have a scoliosis present that is causing the misalignment. It took 50 years to get this bad and I assume it is going to take some time to resolve. I also have Morton's Neuroma bilaterally (worse on the 'short side'). I think that the buttock pain and the Morton's pain are connected. The Morton's pain alters my gait at toe off and I think that it is affecting the whole leg. I have been stretching my calves and doing exercises to strengthen the muscles in the hip area but there is still pain. On a positive note the pain is no longer so severe that I have to take motrin or celebrex. I can make the day without 90% of the time. I am in the process of relocating to the Carolina's and am planning to visit an excellent clinic in Ashville, NC as soon as I am settled to try & resolve the orthotic and morton's problems once & for all.

Result number: 26

Message Number 260383

Re: cryosurgery for Morton's neuroma in Washington, D.C. area View Thread
Posted by Ben on 9/07/09 at 07:36

Ellen,

Just reading your somewhat dated inquiry about looking for cryosurgery in D.C. I am doing the same and I'm wondering what success you may have had. I am willing to go just about anywhere at this point if this is a successful approach to my foot issue.

Ben

Result number: 27

Message Number 260329

chronic foot pain after steroid injection View Thread
Posted by jb on 9/03/09 at 20:34

I am looking for some help. Over a year ago I received a total of 4 steroid injections (over a 9 week period) into the top of my foot for what was an assumed neuroma. After seeking out a new doctor when I wasn't getting any answers or pain relief and MRI showed a torn interosseous muscle. The pain had always been in the ball of my foot. The torn muscle was diagnosed in March of this year. I was subsequently given a soft cast and a cam walker and was out of work for 12 weeks. During that time I did physical therapy twice a week for a total of 20 sessions. Before PT I had lost the ability to bend my first three toes but am now able to do so. I have gotten orthotics and MBT shoes to offload pressure to the fore foot. My problem now is that I seem to have chronic pain. The arch of the affected foot and the heel are so painful that it had made walking very difficult. The physical therapist told me that I had a lot of atrophy to the foot which I don't think will ever get better but I would like your opinion on steroid damage to soft tissue if you are able to give it and if there is anythng to reverse it. I live an hour north of New York City and am looking for a highly experienced foot doctor to see if there is any treatment for what I have going on since the doctors in the small town where I live really don't know what to do next and keep telling me that this will get better. I have trid NSAIDS but they don't do much to help the pain.

Result number: 28

Message Number 260321

Re: Morton's Neuroma sonographically guided alcohol injections View Thread
Posted by mitch b on 9/03/09 at 16:12

i am looking for a doc in oregon who uses this method or
some guidance system rather than sticking in the needle
and relying on the patient to tell the doc oh youve hit the nerve ,
my doc in eugene tells me the success rate is only about 50%
for alcohol injections this scares me, but surgery to remove
the nerve scares me more plus its hard to get time off work,i have had this condition for 8 years its getting really bad and i have to do
something soon
any feedback would be great
thanks
mitch b

Result number: 29

Message Number 260301

Re: Morton's Neuroma Steroid Injection View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 9/02/09 at 19:36

Your foot should not feel cold and clammy, but that is a subjective complaint. Never-the-less, ALL your questions concerning any procedure recently performed by your doctor should be addressed to that doctor, since he/she will ultimately have to care for your foot. If you are truly concerned you should call his/her office at any time, since every doctor's office I know has some form of system to reach the doctor in case of an emergency, or go to the emergency room if you are really concerned.

Result number: 30

Message Number 260298

Morton's Neuroma Steroid Injection View Thread
Posted by Lauren A. on 9/02/09 at 19:30

I got an injection in my foot yesterday between the 3rd and 4th metatarsals. I don't recall everything in the injection. I know it was 3cc and contained lidocaine and marcan(sp?) I do not remember what steroid was used. I went home and propped my foot up and iced it as directed. This morning I had a slight bruise, but expected that. This afternoon I had deep purple bruising along the bottom of my toes and am very sore to move my toes. The bruise has spread a bit more this evening and the top of my foot feels cold and clammy. Is this normal?

Result number: 31

Message Number 260248

Re: going to try acupuncture tomorrow, any suggestions on what to ask for? View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 9/01/09 at 07:22

First of all, although I don't advocate repeated cortisone injections, I also believe that when used judiciously, cortisone injections can be of significant benefit. I also believe that cortisone injections get a 'bad rap' and are completely misunderstood.

I've treated many high level athletes with cortisone, and I've been an extremely competitive soccer player and have received cortisone injections. Cortisone is a potent anti-inflammatory that can often provide significant relief, though it does not 'cure' the problem. It is one step is helping the problem in addition to the other steps you have attempted.

Repeated cortisone injections CAN be a problem because they can weaken the tissue or cause atrophy of the tissue. That's only when the injections are abused or too many are given. If you received one or two injections over a several week or month period, that's not going to have an impact on your performance as an athlete.

I'm not sold on acupuncture for plantar fasciitis. If you perform a search on this site you'll see that the success rate for plantar fasciitis and acupuncture hasn't been that great. Ironically, I treated a patient in my office yesterday for a neuroma and plantar fasciitis and her occupation was that she IS an acupuncturist!!!

Given the fact that you have failed the majority of conservative therapies, in my opinion your diagnosis must be reconsidered. Plantar fasciitis is not the only condition that causes heel pain, but it's the only condition you seem to be considering.

Result number: 32

Message Number 260218

CRPS/MORTENS NEUROMA View Thread
Posted by Janice H on 8/31/09 at 02:09

I HAVE RECENTLY BEEN DIAGNOSED WITH LOW GRADE CRPS FOLLOWING ANKLE FRACTURE. IHAVE A VERY PAINFUL AREA AT THE BASE OF MY 3RD TOE, THE AREA IS SWOLLEN,WARM,AND MY FOOT IS PINK. COULD I HAVE A MORTENS NEUROMA,ARE THE SYMPTOMS AT ALL SIMILAR TO CRPS. MY ANKLE FRACTURE WAS TREATED IN A MOON BOOT THE VELCROSE STRAP DID COVER THE AREA WHERE THE PAIN NOW IS. WOULD IT BE POSSIBLE FOR A NEUROMA TO FORM FROM THAT IRRITATION( BOOT ON 5-6 WKS BUT OFF AT NIGHT). Thanks Janice H

Result number: 33

Message Number 260217

CRPS/MORTENS NEUROMA View Thread
Posted by Janice H on 8/31/09 at 02:05

I HAVE RECENTLY BEEN DIAGNOSED WITH LOW GRADE CRPS FOLLOWING ANKLE FRACTURE. IHAVE A VERY PAINFUL AREA AT THE BASE OF MY 3RD TOE, THE AREA IS SWOLLEN,WARM,AND MY FOOT IS PINK. COULD I HAVE A MORTENS NEUROMA,ARE THE SYMPTOMS AT ALL SIMILAR TO CRPS. MY ANKLE FRACTURE WAS TREATED IN A MOON BOOT THE VELCROSE STRAP DID COVER THE AREA WHERE THE PAIN NOW IS. WOULD IT BE POSSIBLE FOR A NEUROMA TO FORM FROM THAT IRRITATION( BOOT ON 5-6 WKS BUT OFF AT NIGHT). Thanks Janice H

Result number: 34

Message Number 260216

CRPS/MORTENS NEUROMA View Thread
Posted by Janice H on 8/31/09 at 02:01

I HAVE RECENTLY BEEN DIAGNOSED WITH LOW GRADE CRPS FOLLOWING ANKLE FRACTURE. IHAVE A VERY PAINFUL AREA AT THE BASE OF MY 3RD TOE, THE AREA IS SWOLLEN,WARM,AND MY FOOT IS PINK. COULD I HAVE A MORTENS NEUROMA,ARE THE SYMPTOMS AT ALL SIMILAR TO CRPS. MY ANKLE FRACTURE WAS TREATED IN A MOON BOOT THE VELCROSE STRAP DID COVER THE AREA WHERE THE PAIN NOW IS. WOULD IT BE POSSIBLE FOR A NEUROMA TO FORM FROM THAT IRRITATION( BOOT ON 5-6 WKS BUT OFF AT NIGHT). Thanks Janice H

Result number: 35

Message Number 260212

Re: Swellen on top of foot View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 8/30/09 at 16:43

It is technically a perineural fibrosis or thickening of the nerve as it runs between the metatarsals. It is most common between the 3rd and 4th metatarsals, but can occur between any of the metatarsals. The pain is usually described as an aching, throbbing or burning in the area of the 'ball' of the foot or shooting into the bottom of the foot or into the toes. However, each patient can describe the pain differently, and some feel as if their socks are bunched up. Often the pain is worse in tight shoes and is relieved when taking off the shoe.

The pain is from the 'neuroma' pressing up against the transverse metatarsal ligment, which connects the adjacent metatarsal bones. The pressure on the nerve can cause the pain to shoot into the toes, stay localized or into the bottom of the foot or even back into the foot.

You can perform a 'google' search for more information or simply ask your doctor.

Result number: 36

Message Number 260210

Swellen on top of foot View Thread
Posted by kg on 8/30/09 at 14:42

What is Mortens neuroma.

Result number: 37

Message Number 260172

Re: 042 View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 8/29/09 at 11:17

A neuroma is always a possibility and it may have nothing to do with your ankle problem. I really don't know what your use of the symbol '#' is supposed to represent, so please speak in words, not symbols. Thanks.

But once again, a neuroma can occur despite any other problems. It can exist independently, therefore you should bring it to the attention of your doctor(s).

Result number: 38

Message Number 260167

042 View Thread
Posted by Janice H on 8/29/09 at 08:18

Have recently posted questions ,re diagnosis of crps post # ankle. As I have a lot of pain and some swelling in the forefoot particularly below my 3rd toe, is it possible I could have aMortens Neuroma.My whole foot continues to be warm and pink. Could a neuroma form post ankle # treated in a moon boot. My ortho spec has stated I only need to see physio,but have had advice from P4P doctor to try and get experienced help ASAP. I am working on getting a referral but it just doesn't happen as quickly as one would like. Can someone please quote on the possibility of neuroma.Thanks JH

Result number: 39

Message Number 260161

Re: chronic regional pain sydrome post fractured ankle View Thread
Posted by Janice H on 8/28/09 at 20:11

Thanks for previous comments,have since spoken to a GP about my problems, she has started me on amitriptyline 20mg.Also trying to find someone who understands the prob, I live in Nth QLD AUST not to many specialists, dont spose you know of anyone in Aust. My Dr made the suggestion that it could be A Mortons Neuroma. I have a very painful area at the base of my 3rd toe thou the pain is also over the forefoot, I still have warmth and discolouration of the whole foot, does that sound possible.

Result number: 40

Message Number 260152

tarsal tunnel syndrome View Thread
Posted by peg c on 8/28/09 at 14:30

How can you diagnose difference between tarsal tunnel syndrome and morton's neuroma? Also, I cannot point my big toe or 2nd toe of my right foot. Could this be peroneal nerve entrapment?

Result number: 41

Message Number 260036

Re: Cryoanalgesia: Outcomes for heel pain & Morton's Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Erik on 8/24/09 at 13:04

Ive been battling mortons neuroma for some time now and heard success stories with cold laser treatment. I live in SE Washington State. Any idea of how to get a hold of someone who does cold laser therapy in my area?

Result number: 42
Searching file 25

Message Number 259620

Re: Neuroma Cryosurgery Repeat timing View Thread
Posted by richard lanham on 8/11/09 at 18:26

i have had cryosurgy. the only thing it did was froze the front part of my foot. it
has been this way since oct. 2008. the doctor does'nt know what to do.

Result number: 43

Message Number 259594

Re: To Dr Ed & Dr DSW View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 8/11/09 at 14:29

You made some comments that are in my opinion completely inaccurate. First of all, you stated that 'cryo ablates the nerve in the same manner as alcohol but carries none of the toxic risk'.

I strongly disagree with that statement. The cryosurgery is an INVASIVE surgical procedure. Please don't forget that cryosurgery is a SURGICAL procedure. It is freezing the nerve and is not the same as the alcohol sclerosing the nerve. If the alcohol sclerosing injections are successful, the procedure is completed and the nerve is 'sclerosed', However, cryoablation can and does result in regeneration of the nerve and that's why the procedure often has to be repeated.

And I'd like to know what are the 'toxic risks' of the alcohol injections????? And although you are set on having these performed under ultrasound guidance, I personally believe that is an overkill and not necessary. The TOTAL injection for each sclerosing alcohol injection in 0.5 cc, which is a mixture of local anesthetic and alcohol. It is not 'rocket science' to determine the correct location to give the injection. The doctor simply needs to place the needle at the area where the clinical symptoms are present and then injects at the area WHEN the patient feels a reproduction of the symptoms. Ultrasound guidance is not necessary, simple feedback from the patient is all that is needed and works as well if not better than ultrasound. I have performed these injections both ways, and I will take patient feedback over ultrasound guidance anyday.

I don't know who your doctor in Milwaukee is, but I'm not very impressed by his comments. Although it's true that often those on the lecture circuit blow a lot of smoke, to state that the docs in your are aren't innovators is an insult to himself and his colleagues. There's nothing wrong with being on the 'cutting edge' of medicine. Additionally, I find it embarrassing and extremely unprofessional that he would refer to Dr. Dockery and Dr. Fallat as 'quacks'. Both of these doctors are brilliant and have done a lot for the profession and are FAR from quacks. I would personally have no problem myself utilizing the services of Dr. Dockery or Dr. Fallat and have referred patients to both of these doctors.

I believe the 'funniest' comment that you made was that the only doctors that gave you any 'guarantee' was the cryosurgeons, who told you that they 'assured you' that they would do you no further harm'.

I would personally tell you to stay AWAY from ANY doctor that gave you ANY guarantee or assurances, simply because in medicine, we can't do that, because you never know how a patient will react or respond.

If you spend some time on this site and perform a 'search' on cryosurgery, you will find that there were plenty of patients that have attempted the procedure for neuromas, etc., and DID have 'harm' following the procedure. I'm not attempting to say anything negative about cryosurgery, but once again it IS a surgical procedure and any surgical procedure definitely has the potential to cause harm post procedure. Therefore, no doctor can give you an 'assurance' that it won't be worse after the procedure. Patients can have increased pain, scar tissue from the probe, etc. No procedure is without risk.

Once again, I believe that of all the procedures you've discussed, the sclerosing alcohol injections are the simplest and safest and least invasive. I personally do not believe that ultrasound guidance is necessary, since once the needle is placed and before the medication is injected, the patient's feedback can accurately determine whether you are 'in the right spot' as well or as accurately as any ultrasound machine.

Result number: 44

Message Number 259583

To Dr Ed & Dr DSW View Thread
Posted by BrianPK on 8/11/09 at 11:18

Thanks,

You both are making me feel a lot better about the surgery, as to your comment about Doctors & Procedures, My orthopedic surgeon will not perform a neuroma removal. He is completely against removing nerves from the body and has in a 25 year career done 3 'revision' surgeries where he had to try & bury the nerve in bone to stop the stump pain.
It is my understanding that professional athletes (basketball & hockey players, golfers) get these removed all the time and so I am looking for a surgeon that does these operations for the local professional sports teams.

As to the sclerosing injections it is my understanding that if the sclerosing agent leaks into the surrounding tissues collateral damage and pain can be present. I am not opposed to trying the alcohol injections but would only have them done if they were ultrasound guided. I have read the technical paper on this procedure.

Before trying the alcohol I would prefer one more shot with Cryo. The cryo ablates the nerve in the same manner as the alcohol but carries none of the toxic risk. Cryo surgery has been used in pain management for back pain for many years. There is some debate however as to the timing of a repeat procedure should pain relief not be gained, some say 3 weeks, some say 10 I would like to know if it still hurts do we try again in 3 weeks or 10. What is the real answer.

Interestingly enough a local podiatrist who is highly regarded told me that both procedures (alcohol & cryo) 'are for lecture circuit doctos & innovators. Here in Milwaukee we are not innovators.'
This podiatrist fells that Dr. Dockery and Fallat are both quacks.

This doctor gave me a cortizone injection that sent me off the roof with pain for 3 months in january. So yes, after just a cortizone injection. I know what greater pain can be and I FEAR it. The cortizone basically disabled me for 6 weeks.

I'm really sick of dealing with this thing however, and am almost ready to have it cut out. It is ruining my life. Many posts both here and on other boards from podiatrists say that they have quit doing nerve removals and just use alcohol or cryo. And thost that use cryo basically say that they quit using the alcohol because of bad reactions.

I know that there is a lot of conflicting information out there and unfortunately Doctors are prevented by HIPPA to even tell you about patients that they have treated. I find it almost ridiculous that you can get a mechanic, plumber, or electrician to give you referrals to jobs done previously, but not medical professionals.

When a customer askes me to resolve an issue I can tell them how I will resolve the problem, how much it will cost and give them a guarantee of success and I deal with very complicated industrial systems. So far the only Doctors that can at least assure me that they will do no further harm are the cryosurgeons.

Result number: 45

Message Number 259582

Re: Question to your response Dr. Ed and other Doctors View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 8/11/09 at 09:54

Brian,

I agree with Ed. However, you seem to ask questions, but don't want to respond positively to any of the answers you receive. There has been a difference of opinions, but an excellent discussion. I prefer not to remove a neuroma or surgically intervene until I have attempted sclerosing alcohol injections, and obviously Dr. Ed feels that surgical removal when indicated is his preference.

However, you seem to have this horrible 'fear' that you may end up with some catastrophic result if you have a surgical intervention. Therefore, I don't understand why you wouldn't entertain the idea of sclerosing alcohol injections???

You keep asking about referring you to a doctor that has a tremendous success rate with surgical excision. Well, to be honest with you, I don't know of ANY doctor that will tell you that he/she doesn't have a high success rate. I doubt if you pick up the phone and call a lot of offices, the doctor will tell you that his/her success rate is not very high!!

Therefore, I wouldn't place too much emphasis on a particular doctor telling you how high his/her success rate is with a particular procedure, since I've rarely if ever heard a doctor tell a patient that he/she wasn't very good at a procedure!!

It appears as if you're looking for almost a guarantee that you won't have complications, and that's never going to happen, even in the most experienced/best hands. Complications occur, but as Dr. Ed stated, neuroma surgery really is not that complicated.

However, as I've already stated, if you really fear a post operative complication, why not ATTEMPT to avoid surgery by at least trying sclerosing alcohol injections? These often provide significant relief and in the worst scenario, if they don't work, you can still have surgery.

Result number: 46

Message Number 259576

Re: Question to your response Dr. Ed and other Doctors View Thread
Posted by Dr. Ed on 8/10/09 at 21:48

Brian:

I never will talk anyone into surgical treatment nevertheless, for the record, you are relating a lot of information here that is far from accurate.

First of all you reference a post from a fellow who used to frequent this site and post a lot of negative information. The study you have listed is one of many. One small study does not establish a fact.

What exactly do you mean by a 'failed removal.' One cannot fail to remove a neuroma. Some patients have surgical complications with this procedure as they can with any surgical treatment. Your hyperbole about a 'life of pain and disability' is a bit over the top. Yes, some patients have some pain after the neuroma is removed but it is generally far less than before removal.

Yes, there is a 'stump' by definition at the end of any cut nerve but the stump is rarely symptomatic. If the nerve stump is not resected sufficiently proximal or excessive scar tissue is allowed to form around the stump, there can be prolonged discomfort.

This discussion is about placing things in realistic and proper perspective.

Dr. Ed

Result number: 47

Message Number 259541

Re: Question to your response Dr. Ed and other Doctors View Thread
Posted by BrianPK on 8/09/09 at 18:45

Dr Ed,

By definition when a nerve is cut a stump neuroma is created. If someone were to give ma a better than 95% chance of success I probably would take it. The published rates on neuratectomys were documented on a heelspurs thread. http://heelspurs.com/m/17/03/t74.html.

A failed removal would be a crushing experience resulting in a 'changed life' of pain & disability.

As I move forward I am looking for the 'right surgeon'. Anyone reading these posts please respond with names of surgeons that have tremendously high success rates. My pain is grating but I refuse to move in a path that could cause greater disability.

Thanks everyone for your opinions, they are important and respected.

Result number: 48

Message Number 259519

Re: Question to your response Dr. Ed and other Doctors View Thread
Posted by Dr. Ed on 8/09/09 at 01:47

Brian:

I am puzzled by what you have heard about surgical removal of a Morton's neuroma. It is my belief that there is a size threshold at which attempts to deaden and sclerose the nerve are less successful so it is important to know the size of the lesion before beginning treatment. I prefer to make the measurement via sonography. Injecting the the neuroma with a sclerosing solution hurts just as much as injecting it to numb it for removal. So are multiple sclerosing injections or one injection of local anesthetic worse?

The nerve in question is a sensory nerve so its removal involves no loss of motor function. If it was my own foot and if the neuroma is of significant size I would have it removed. I too would be concerned if the surgeon related a poor success rate. I would consider my sucess rate with the procedure to be better than 95 percent. As far as finding the right surgeon, perhaps asking questions about success rates. Experiences vary but I believe that those who have a good success rate must be doing something right.

Dr. Ed

Result number: 49

Message Number 259518

Re: Question to your response Dr. Ed and other Doctors View Thread
Posted by Dr. Ed on 8/09/09 at 01:44

Brian:

I am puzzled by what you have heard about surgical removal of a Morton's neuroma. It is my belief that there is a size threshold at which attempts to deaden and sclerose the nerve are less successful so it is important to know the size of the lesion before beginning treatment. I prefer to make the measurement via sonography. Injecting the the neuroma with a sclerosing solution hurts just as much as injecting it to numb it for removal. So are multiple sclerosing injections or one injection of local anesthetic worse?

The nerve in question is a sensory nerve so its removal involves no loss of motor function. If it was my own foot and if the neuroma is of significant size I would have it removed. I too would be concerned if the surgeon related a poor success rate. I would consider my sucess rate with the procedure to be better than 95 percent. As far as finding the right surgeon, perhaps asking questions about success rates. Experiences vary but I believe that those who have a good success rate must be doing something right.

Dr. Ed

Result number: 50

Message Number 259496

Re: Question to your response Dr. DSW and other Doctors View Thread
Posted by Dr. Z on 8/07/09 at 20:09

I agree with Dr. Wander. 4% multiple alcohol injections can be very successful for the treatment of neuroma pain. I just saw a patient today that I treated three years ago with injections and is still pain free. If it were my foot I would treatment myself with 4% alcohol injections I used this protocol for the past 10 years plus

Result number: 51

Message Number 259483

Re: Question to your response Dr. Ed and other Doctors View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 8/07/09 at 16:29

I am also of the school that nerves should not simply be 'removed', if at all possible. I will perform a neuroma excision, but certainly not as 'quickly' as I did in the past.

I (actually my patients) have had tremendous success utilizing sclerosing alcohol injections with very few if any significant complications, while allowing the patients to still go about their daily business.

This is an option I would strongly recommend prior to surgical excision. If the injections aren't successful, you can always move forward with surgery, but not vice versa.

Result number: 52

Message Number 259468

Question to your response Dr. Ed and other Doctors View Thread
Posted by BrianPK on 8/07/09 at 08:26

Dr Ed,

I am terrified of the prospect of a failed neuroma surgery. Having read much on the subject the 50-80% reported success rate terrifies me. Knowing the neuroma pain I cannot imagine a higher level of pain from a stump neuroma. The 'couple of weeks' recovery seems short. People who have recently had the surgery report 3-6 weeks on crutches and 3 to 18 month recovery times.

My orthopedic surgern will not perform the surgery. He indicates that removal of a nerve from the body is never a good choice and will not do it. He has served me well for many years and I respect his opinion. He is a surgeon who keeps his knife in the sheath until no other option is available.

Many podiatrists report that they will no longer perform neuratectomy, that they use the sclerosing alcohol or cryo to ablate the nerve.

Even given the 'fear' that I have, none the less, I am starting to look at the removal. The pain is ruining my life, I am crabby and generaqlly not pleasant to be around. I've spent thousands on orthotics, shoes, Celebrex, Cryosurgery, Chiropractic, yet the pain remains.

How do I find a surgeon who is an expert at this procedure. Who has a large number of successful surgeries. If I am to have this procedure I need to have a better assurance than 'well it usually turns out pretty good'.

Please provide suggestions as to how to have a better confidence level in this matter. The pain has eroded the quality of my life, stressed out my family relationships, and impacted my ability to perform at a high level at work.

I am literally at my wits end but terrified of a failed neuratectomy. I would literally spend anything to end the pain knowing that the result was guaranteed.

Result number: 53

Message Number 259464

Re: Neuroma Cryosurgery Repeat timing View Thread
Posted by Dr. Ed on 8/07/09 at 00:02

Brian:
I do not have experience with repeat cryosurgery procedures for Morton's neuroma as the logic behind such a procedure, let alone the need for repeat procedures tends to escape me. There are other doctors whom I am sure will disagree. Surgical removal of an Morton's neuroma, while not right for everyone, for the most part is curative, providing good relief in a couple of weeks. Why drag out such treatment for weeks or months? I am an 'early adopter' of many new technologies but only if the technologies make sense, that is, if they offer higher success rates, are safer and/or faster healing.
Dr. Ed

Result number: 54

Message Number 259459

Neuroma Cryosurgery Repeat timing View Thread
Posted by BrianPK on 8/06/09 at 21:40

If a patient has cryosurgery to relieve Morton's Neuroma pain what is the recommended 'wait time' before performing a second procedure if the patient reports no significant pain relief? I have heard time frames from two to ten weeks, with some reporting that their standard treatment for neuroma is to repeat the procedure at about the two week time frame. Is it appropriate to wait the ten weeks or go in again quickly for a second ablation? Do any of the Doctors have experience with 'repeat' Cryo procedures?

Result number: 55

Message Number 259354

Re: 2 Surgeries and Sclerosing - and still so much pain... View Thread
Posted by pdc on 8/03/09 at 21:11

I have been down that exact same road of foot pain and in fact I am still there. I had a Mourton's Neuroma removed after steroid shots and seven sclerosing shots did not work on my left foot. I then was told by the doctor who did the foot surgery that he felt it was not a foot problem but a back problem. I have been to three neurologists, 4 orthopedic surgeons, and numerous general practitioners to no avail. I could star on the Missed Diagnosis show!!

I went to a University Hospitol and had a complete work up done and they discovered I have spinal stenosis- a narrowing of the spinal canal- an arthritic condition that causes pinching of the nerve root that goes all the way to the foot. My left leg and foot hurt constantly. I take Lyrica for pain and can function fairly well. I just had an MRI of my back again today - don't know results yet. I feel your pain!!! My advice - don't have any more foot surgery - it may actually be something else causing the foot pain. Hope this helps - pdc.

Result number: 56

Message Number 259346

Jeremy, can orthotics stop working View Thread
Posted by BrianPK on 8/03/09 at 17:43

I got a pair of orthotics on 6/9 to try & correct overpronation to help my morton's neuroma. They are hard, 3/4 length similar to 'solesupports'. I broke in the orthotics on a conservative schedule and by 7/21 was wearing them almost full time and actually feeling that they were helping the neuroma pain. Last week my feet started to feel worse and my lower back really started to give me trouble. Yesterday, my back & feet were killing me, the neuroma felt as big as a golf ball, my whole lower back on my right side was sore. When I get up in the morning I am virtually pain free. This morning I put on the shoes with the orthotics and took out the garbage. After walking up and down the driveway 3 times I was starting to feel the pain. I took off those shoes and in desperation put on a pair of clarks unstructured shoes with an older pair of orthotics that dont have as much arch support. Here it is at the end of the day, and I'm not feeling like dying, the neuroma doesn't hurt so much and my back isn't anywhere near as sore.

Can orthotic correction go bad ? Was the orthotic wrong in the first place ? I'm at a loss, I've spent thousands on orthotics, and haven't had a pair that don't hurt my feet or back. I don't know what to do. I don't want to hurt my feet or back further but I do realize that the bad biomechanics must be corrected to help ease the stress on my forefoot. Can you shed any light on what is happening ?

Result number: 57

Message Number 259156

Re: Crocs, Waldies, Nothinz, Airwalks.....AAAAAARRRRGH! Experiential info, please! View Thread
Posted by mandy m on 7/27/09 at 05:32

I suffer from flat feet with plantar fascitis and now a morton's neuroma on the right! I bought a pair of Nothinz in despair of ever finding foot comfort again. I have tried Crocs but don't find them supportive enough or really shock absorbing. Like you I can't wear strapless due to toe pain but the new strap design on the Nothinz is great as it's stretchy so gives as you walk so doesn't push your toes forward. I bought a size bigger than my normal shoe size and haven't taken them off!!!
My vote is for the nothinz even if they are really difficult to get in the uk!
Good luck

Result number: 58

Message Number 258929

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Marie B on 7/18/09 at 09:23

You ask what kind of Shoes to waer for Comfort I had Neuroma removed 2 years ago and about 6 months later had a Stump Neuroma I was never right from day one after the Surgery.I find that the only Shoes that i can walk for quite a while in are CROCS they are the ugliest shoes i have ever worn but the relief i get when wearing them is worth it I can walk for about 2 hours in them,but if i put anything with a small heel on within 15 minutes i am in AGONY
Hope this helps you as I know what its like we love going for long walks and I was never able to walk for very long until i got my CROCS Try them and see if they help you as much as they have helped me
Marie

Result number: 59

Message Number 258928

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by MarieB on 7/18/09 at 09:20

You ask what kind of Shoes to waer for Comfort I had Neuroma removed 2 years ago and about 6 months later had a Stump Neuroma I was never right from day one after the Surgery.I find that the only Shoes that i can walk for quite a while in are CROCS they are the ugliest shoes i have ever worn but the relief i get when wearing them is worth it I can walk for about 2 hours in them,but if i put anything with a small heel on within 15 minutes i am in AGONY
Hope this helps you as I know what its like we love going for long walks and I was never able to walk for very long until i got my CROCS Try them and see if they help you as much as they have helped me
Marie

Result number: 60

Message Number 258849

Sneakers 1 motion 1 neutral View Thread
Posted by vsmith on 7/14/09 at 20:47

I have been running for. In the past I have had PF and a neuroma. I purchased othotics from podiatrists which were not successful. I purchased the Blue Powerfeet they seem to work. But my question is:

I have medium arches with very very rigid feet which is whyt I wear nuetral sneakers. But for years I have had ITB which i am convinced is because my right foot rolls a bit to the outside.

My question to the good doctors or pedorthists can you wear 1 stability sneaker or motinlo control sneaker on 1 foot and a neutral on the other? If I trade up to stability or motion control I have to give up cushioning. It is a dilemma and my ITB's are short.

Thanks for any help

Result number: 61

Message Number 258847

Re: transmetatarsal amputation is a podiatrist or orthopedic surgeon the better choice? View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 7/14/09 at 19:57

In my opinion and experience it is not necessary to 'wrap' the nerves to the top of the foot as the orthopedic surgeon recommended. As a matter of fact, performing that procedure could potentially cause the nerves to become entrapped in tissue or scar tissue.

During the surgery, it is usually common to resect the nerves as far back proximally as possible specifically to address the concern of not developing a post operative neuroma or neuritis.

Result number: 62

Message Number 258843

transmetatarsal amputation is a podiatrist or orthopedic surgeon the better choice? View Thread
Posted by m. mills on 7/14/09 at 18:54

I have went to both doctors and both agree on the surgery however, the ortho surgeon is not that experienced in feet but said he would not sever the nerves but wrap them to the top of the foot. Where as the podiatrist said he would sever the nerves. In retrospect, I am concerned that I will form a neuroma and the feet be more hypersensitive than they are now. Also, is there any support web sites for amputation that I can view?

Result number: 63

Message Number 258831

Neuroma. View Thread
Posted by Hoopa7p on 7/13/09 at 19:17

Hi,

I have been having pain and numbness in the feet for quite some time now. Recemtly, I changed doctors because I was not happy with the doctor that I had been seeing. Last week I went to a new Podiatrist. He actually agreed with the first doctor's diagnosis of Plantar Fascitis. However, he did an ultra sound on my right foot and found that the Plantar tendon is swollen from 8 to a 12. I am not sure what that means. He gave me a shot in the right foot which only lasted one day. I just went back to him today. He diagnosed me with Neuroma in both feet. The only thing he used for a diagnosis was examining my feet with hands. He also put a machine on both feet that uses vibration to relax the tendons and the muscles. Next week, I go for a test to determine if there is any nerve damage to my feet.

My questios are: What is a Neuroma? Shouldn't this doctor have done a scan to determine the presence of a Neuroma? Can the Neuroma cause the symptoms that I have? I have always thought the symptoms were from my heel spurs.

Thank you very much.

Hoopa7p

Result number: 64

Message Number 258830

Re: Plantar Fascitis/Heel Spurs. View Thread
Posted by Hoopa7p on 7/13/09 at 19:04

Just to update everyone, my doctor diagnosed me with Neuroma in both feet. He did it just by feeling and pushing in on the top part of the foot. My bloodwork came back normal showing no Diabetes. I was very happy about that. I go back on July 25th to have a nerve test done. The doctor seems to feel that the Neuromas are the cause of most of my pain and numbness. However, on the right foot, most of the pain seems to be in the heel where the spur happens to be. There is a major pulling sensation and numbness in both feet. Could the Neuromas be causing this?

Result number: 65

Message Number 258814

Re: CRYO INFO View Thread
Posted by scooter on 7/13/09 at 00:15

I'm in good hands a The Univ of Penn. They have run more tests than I can remember Blood work, x-rays Nerve tests etc. I am 43 year old man in otherwise good health. All my tests came back fine. Sugar levels great. So They don't know what caused it but the pain is real. Very real. Now how is it possible that I have two very painful conditions. The neuromas from five years ago and the neurpathy. Could the neuroma caused the nuropthy ? So I have idiopathic small fiber neuropathy and a neuroma that are ruining my life. Lyrica and tramadol work some and the cryo worked for 11 months. Every day is a challenge. Something always hurts.

Result number: 66

Message Number 258791

Re: Misdignosed Neuroma is now plantar plate rupture-options View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 7/12/09 at 07:51

Why don't you return to the podiatrist that made the correct diagnosis?

If not, Dr. Alan Banks in Atlanta is top notch.

Result number: 67

Message Number 258789

Misdignosed Neuroma is now plantar plate rupture-options View Thread
Posted by maryo on 7/12/09 at 01:50

Hello, I went to an orthopedic doctor in atlanta and his PA took x-rays and said my pain under the 2nd toe was a neuroma. Apparently it wasn't (from my reading of all the materials across the internet). I have a hammertoe and am an avid run, dancer and yogi.

The PA at the Orthopedic's office shot the area with Coritesone and then the pain moved into the top of my foot and my toe was moving all over. I went to the podiatrist that said it is a plantar plate rupture given that the toe is over 2 milimeter off the foot and moves around and back into the foot when I walk.

I've padded the toe and have taped it to avoid it crossing over. Do you think this is a plantar plate rupture? Any doctors in Atlanta that you would trust? And should this be looked at immediately. The podiatrist said 'You should probably get this done since you are young (late 30s) versus in my 80s. But it isn't your heart or anything'. And, she didn't say it would get worse or it was urgent. I am assuming this will get worse as I walk on it everday and it is painful...and the other foot has the pain under the 2nd toe as well. More of a burning pain and not bone pain.

Am I making sense?

Result number: 68

Message Number 258788

Misdignosed Neuroma is now plantar plate rupture-options View Thread
Posted by maryo on 7/12/09 at 01:49

Hello, I went to an orthopedic doctor in atlanta and his PA took x-rays and said my pain under the 2nd toe was a neuroma. Apparently it wasn't (from my reading of all the materials across the internet). I have a hammertoe and am an avid run, dancer and yogi.

The PA at the Orthopedic's office shot the area with Coritesone and then the pain moved into the top of my foot and my toe was moving all over. I went to the podiatrist that said it is a plantar plate rupture given that the toe is over 2 milimeter off the foot and moves around and back into the foot when I walk.

I've padded the toe and have taped it to avoid it crossing over. Do you think this is a plantar plate rupture? Any doctors in Atlanta that you would trust? And should this be looked at immediately. The podiatrist said 'You should probably get this done since you are young (late 30s) versus in my 80s. But it isn't your heart or anything'. And, she didn't say it would get worse or it was urgent. I am assuming this will get worse as I walk on it everday and it is painful...and the other foot has the pain under the 2nd toe as well. More of a burning pain and not bone pain.

Am I making sense?

Result number: 69

Message Number 258787

Misdignosed Neuroma is now plantar plate rupture-options View Thread
Posted by maryo on 7/12/09 at 01:46

Hello, I went to an orthopedic doctor in atlanta and his PA took x-rays and said my pain under the 2nd toe was a neuroma. Apparently it wasn't (from my reading of all the materials across the internet). I have a hammertoe and am an avid run, dancer and yogi.

The PA at the Orthopedic's office shot the area with Coritesone and then the pain moved into the top of my foot and my toe was moving all over. I went to the podiatrist that said it is a plantar plate rupture given that the toe is over 2 milimeter off the foot and moves around and back into the foot when I walk.

I've padded the toe and have taped it to avoid it crossing over. Do you think this is a plantar plate rupture? Any doctors in Atlanta that you would trust? And should this be looked at immediately. The podiatrist said 'You should probably get this done since you are young (late 30s) versus in my 80s. But it isn't your heart or anything'. And, she didn't say it would get worse or it was urgent. I am assuming this will get worse as I walk on it everday and it is painful...and the other foot has the pain under the 2nd toe as well. More of a burning pain and not bone pain.

Am I making sense?

Result number: 70

Message Number 258786

Re: CRYO INFO View Thread
Posted by scooter on 7/11/09 at 15:30

Thank you doctor. I live in the Philly area and I am fortunate to have access to many qualified doctors that have several approaches to this nasty and debilitating condition. I should also mention that in addition to the neuroma I was recently diagnosed after 8 months with small-fiber neuropathy. A double wammy!!!!!

So I now have pretty bad feet. Lyica helps but many side effects. My insurance did pay for cryo so I will call the doctor in Philly on Monday. Are sclerosing injections painful and is there any down time?

Result number: 71

Message Number 258783

CRYO INFO View Thread
Posted by scooter on 7/11/09 at 14:05

Good afternoon. I've had a nueroma for 5 years. Initially the shots of cortisone worked. However , last year the neuroma would not respond so I had the cryo surgery. It was a miracle. After several days of soreness I had 100 % relief. Now 11 months after the surgery the pain is starting again. I know the procedure doesn't relieve or remove the nueroma and I was told that somewhere down the line it may come back. My question is can this be done over and over without complications? Especially since they seem to only be freezing it and I had a great outcome I would think I could just go back and have the procedure again.

Thanks

Scott

Result number: 72

Message Number 258667

Re: neuroma View Thread
Posted by nita on 7/06/09 at 18:18

Thank you very much. I do understand that swelling is normal, and that moisture between the toes will make it a little more difficult to heal, therefore I have been putting gauze between the toes to keep it dry like I was informed. I still cannot even put a shoe on my foot. I appreciate the information you have given me and I will have to be more aggressive in my approach with him.
Thanks so much.

Result number: 73

Message Number 258664

Re: neuroma View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 7/06/09 at 18:05

I obviously can not help you over the internet. However, I believe you need to get a little more assertive and/or aggressive regarding expressing your concerns with your surgeon.

When an incision extends between the toes, it is not unusual for excess moisture to build up causing some 'maceration' of the tissues. However, this should not cause a continuous solid white liquid come from coming out from the area. Some edema (swelling) is normal post operatively, but if there is constant swelling or if the swelling seems to be getting worse, and there is a constant drainage, it is definitely something that at LEAST needs to be addressed and not constantly brushed aside.

Let your surgeon know that at the present time you are very unhappy AND very concerned about the way your post operative care has been handled and hopefully he will respond accordingly.

If in addition to the swelling and white drainage, there is redness or the foot is warm or if you have a fever, you should speak to him sooner than later.

Result number: 74

Message Number 258662

neuroma View Thread
Posted by nita on 7/06/09 at 17:49

I had a neuroma removed 9 weeks ago, they went through the top of my foot. The first 2 1/2 weeks were terrible! I have an extremely high tollerence for pain and I could not even put my foot off of my pillows. The 3-5 weeks were getting a little better with regular visits to the doctor, who said every time that my foot looked 'normal'.. which I still could not put my toes on the floor because my foot was so swollen. I called within the next week to let him know that there was this solid white liquid coming out from between my toes from where part of the incision was, his response was that this is normal not to worry unless it was discolored or smelled. My foot was still so swollen that my toes would not touch the floor. The 7th week is getting a little easier as I keep rubbing & soaking my foot everyday 3 to 4 times a day pushing all of this white liquid out of my foot. 8th week...goes downhill foot is still swollen there is a knot at the top of my foot by the scar between the third and fourth toe along with the one that has been on the bottom since the beginning. I don't know what to do....please help me!! The knot that is on the bottom of my foot at the ball, is in the same spot that he said that the neuroma was, and it is still the same exact pain that I had before I had the surgery. Can you give me any suggestions?

Result number: 75

Message Number 258626

Treatment for Postier Tibual Tendonitis or what I may have? View Thread
Posted by NicoleL on 7/04/09 at 18:38

Hi,

Just some background info first a little lengthy but thank you in advance:

In Feb. 09 after walking barefoot in my apartment (which I never usually do) and doing that extreme foot stretch in yoga my feet went ballistic ; swelled creating neuromas in both feet and became quite inflamed. My entire foot hurt. (both feet but left is worse) Long story short (went to a sports clinic and a couple of podiatrists) xrays did not show anything and MRI did not show anything.The neuromas went away but when I stand for awhile the sole of my feet (plantar fascia area hurts , mid to forfoot, and feels very hard when I'm standing) I still have my arches when I stand but pronate when I walk which is why I wear my orthotics. I do not hyperpronate though according to the sports clinic. Two very reputable physio therapists diagnosed me with postier tibual tendonitis. I've done the excercises but it is only slightly better. The area is tender
I also notice my nerves are quite irritated and get buzzing sensations occasionally in my arches. I sometimes feel a tiny zing in the inner ankle. My GP has put me on neurotonin ( all other blood work etc are fine)The podiatrist my GP referred me to thought it was plantar fasciatis and the postier tibual tendonitis is secondary. However, when I went to see him I had stopped wearing my orthotics because I was suspicsous they were making me worse. Which is why I think the plantar fasciitis flared up in my heel. I did tell him that.

The plantar fasciitis I'm used to, which is why I went to a podiatrist a for, hurt for the first few steps. This is constant unless I'm resting for about 15 minutes then goes away.

Questions: 1) Is there anything more I can do conservatively for postier tibual tendonitis? 2) Does this sound like plantar fasciitis only more severe with postier tibual tendonitis - I do realize this is the internet and my feet would need to be examined etc... Any advice for the next step I should take would be greatly apprecieated.

Result number: 76

Message Number 258610

Re: local skin reaction alcohol injection for mortons neuroma? View Thread
Posted by Dr.DSW on 7/04/09 at 11:48

My 'gut' feeling is that what you experienced is a reaction to the skin freeze prior to the injection. This is actually pretty common, and more common among fair skinned patients.

The actual discoloration (if it is from the spray) can remain for several weeks. Please remember to remind your doctor of this reaction prior to your next injection. You may opt to have him not use the spray next time.

Result number: 77

Message Number 258609

Re: local skin reaction alcohol injection for mortons neuroma? View Thread
Posted by Nicole on 7/04/09 at 11:28

yes i will call him or his associate this week. he was literally running out of the office after he say me to catch a plane to Israel. he was an ass.
he did spray my foot with an anesthetic first!
thank you for helping me and i do know this website is not to replace my doctor...i appreciate it!

Result number: 78

Message Number 258602

Re: local skin reaction alcohol injection for mortons neuroma? View Thread
Posted by Dr.DSW on 7/04/09 at 08:50

Did you ever think of picking up the phone and calling the doctor that administered the injection?

What you describe may be a skin burn IF your doctor first sprayed your skin with a topical anesthetic spray to 'freeze' the skin prior to the injection. If this is the case, it is very common to see a circular discoloration about the size of a nickel or dime.

However, as I previously stated and as I ALWAYS state on this site, the opinions of the doctors on this site are really to answer general questions or to add to the information you've already obtained from your own doctor. The purpose is not to replace the care provided by your own doctor.

I would strongly recommend that you contact your doctor regarding this reaction and that you always contact your own doctor FIRST with any questions regarding treatment, since your doctor knows the most about your individual case.

Result number: 79

Message Number 258601

local skin reaction alcohol injection for mortons neuroma? View Thread
Posted by Nicole on 7/03/09 at 22:27

I received my first alcohol injection for my morton's neuroma on 7/1/09. A few minutes after receiving the injection, I experienced some local intense itching. After some rubbing over my sock, it lessened and became more of a warm burning sensation. I have not touched it since. The next day I see a dime sized, circular, dark reddened area at the injection site. There is no swelling and the area is not raised. It appears to be a burn (much like burns i have gotten with a curling iron) and it is tender and quite irritated. I am always aware of the discomfort and need to wear a barrier between my foot and everything i choose to wear on my foot. Now, 2 days later, the area looks the same. no change in size, color, pain or swelling......is this a normal side effect? did i have an allergic reaction? will it go away? what can i do to relieve the pain. HELP

Result number: 80

Message Number 258391

Foot Hypersensitivity View Thread
Posted by Bernadette on 6/26/09 at 01:13

I had surgery on Jan. 7, 2009 for the diagnosis of Baxter's Neuroma with plantar fasciitis. Now after 5 months I am beginning to regret the surgery as I had such discomfort shortly after the surgery. Could hardly walk on the foot so I was sent for physical therapy 3 x per week for about six weeks. I had to undergo a series of injections to break up the scar tissue which was causing so much discomfort when standing or walking barefoot. I was using scar cream after the stitches were taken out. My foot felt like it had a rope under it at all times. I have such hypersensivity in the foot. The arch area actually hurts more now than before the surgery. If I am out shopping for a couple of hours my foot starts hurting so much. Per my doctor, I have been putting Zostrix along the bottom outer side of my foot for weeks now and have started putting it below the ankle area. I do not know if this is even helping me. My doctor wanted me to take Lyrica but I do not want to take it due to the side effects and the fact that I am taking medication for hypertension. I need some guidance as to what approaches to take to resolve this issue. I want to hope that this will eventually fade but as time goes by I am beginning to lose hope. I should mention that I have started to take vitamin B12 in hopes that it may help this situation. Any suggestions or recommendations would be so helpful.

Result number: 81

Message Number 258233

Help - Metatarsal Pain Stumper View Thread
Posted by goaskalice on 6/18/09 at 18:46

Drs

Long time subscriber. Have bilateral pain in the lower 4th metatarsal area. When I don't walk the area burns and the fourth toe is numb. Have lived with this for 3 years. All tests negative - bone scan, xray, Mri, blood work, etc etc. Just looking for advice whatr avenue to pursue... Even had a neuroma taken out to no avail. My pain seems to be much lower when walking and then a stick and burn at night. Funny thing, if I pull the little toe up and out all my pain and burning/numbness goes away. Taping also helps.. Please advice - Thanx. And this has stumped all the drs I have seen - a challenge for all.

I am still very active - officate 3 sports.

Alice

Result number: 82

Message Number 258214

Re: neuroma View Thread
Posted by mely on 6/18/09 at 10:31

I would rather try the other options. I was concerned about the 1/2' gap between my toes, and whether it would cause more damage. I think the nerve is already damaged, but I can feel it shoot down my toes(senation not pain). How much reduction in size of the neuroma could I expect from the cortisone or alcohol injections?
Thank you

Result number: 83

Message Number 258211

Re: neuroma View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 6/18/09 at 06:27

First of all, if you don't have a lot of pain, your doctor shouldn't even recommend surgery.

Treatment options include a metatarsal pad to help off-load pressure from the area. If that helps an orthoses can be made to accomplish the same thing. Additionally, 'cortisone' injections may be helpful (a limited number) no matter how large the neuroma. If that doesn't help, sclerosing alcohol injections are often extremely beneficial.

Other treatment options include a change of shoes or shoe modifications and cryosurgery, which is significantly less invasive that traditional surgery.

I definitely wouldn't 'rush' into surgery, and if your doctor is pushing surgery, it may be time to seek another opinion.

Result number: 84

Message Number 258208

neuroma View Thread
Posted by mely on 6/17/09 at 22:13

I have a numbness and wide separation between 2nd and 3rd toes. MRI shows 6 x 7 mm neuroma. I have had little pain since wearing flat shoes, but after wearing tenny shoes once to the doctor, it has aggravated it and made it achy. Doctor wants to do surgery. Is it too large to try other treatments? Should I try other options before surgery? I'd rather live with the numbness than trade it for pain.

Result number: 85

Message Number 258150

cryosurgery for neuromas in IL View Thread
Posted by robinpastore on 6/15/09 at 12:51

Trying to find someone in the Illinois area that performs cryosurgery for neuromas or get the number for a company representative that can provide me with this information.

Thanks
Robin L. Pastore, D.P.M.

Result number: 86

Message Number 258149

cryosurgery for neuromas in IL View Thread
Posted by robinpastore on 6/15/09 at 12:51

Trying to find someone in the Illinois area that performs cryosurgery for neuromas or get the number for a company representative that can provide me with this information.

Thanks
Robin L. Pastore, D.P.M.

Result number: 87

Message Number 258044

Re: Plantar Plate Injuries View Thread
Posted by Jeremy L, C Ped on 6/09/09 at 20:48

In addition to Dr. W's poignant recommendations, your description further comes across to me that a re-evaluation of your footwear is in order. Switching to a different last shape may be paramount in getting yourself appropriate relief for the kind of mileage you are training.

It may also be necessary to change the sole type of your shoes. Those with neuromas, who also use shoes that place too much medial bias to the midsole, end up rotating the forefoot right into the area of neuroma pain.

Result number: 88

Message Number 258041

Re: Plantar Plate Injuries View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 6/09/09 at 17:06

I will not provide an internet diagnosis, since I don't provide diagnoses without examining patients.

However, I strongly disagree with your doctor's statement that he won't order an MRI because a neuroma can not be visualized on MRI. That statement is completely inaccurate. A neuroma can ABSOLUTELY be imaged on an MRI. If you have the good fortune of living near a major teaching hospital with a very high quality radiology department that also employs musculoskeletal radiologists (radiologists specializing in MRI of the musculoskeletal system), they can often perform an MRI with a specific 'protocol' to look for a neuroma (I practice in Philadelphia and the radiologists at Jefferson University Hospital do this often).

Additionally, many doctors simply order an MRI with contrast/gadolinium which is extremely useful in determining if a neuroma is present. But once again, an experienced musculoskeletal radiologist may be able to run a protocol and images without contrast FIRST to see if the 'neuroma' can be seen, prior to having to inject the contrast/gadolinium.

Another simple option which I did in our office today, is a diagnostic ultrasound. This is quick, painless and pretty accurate if performed in experienced hands. Our office has diagnostic ultrasound and this 5 minute procedure can confirm a neuroma.

I am not advocating you change doctors, but if you are seeking a second opinion, there is an excellent doctor in Pittsburgh named Dr. Robert Mendicino. I would recommend him HIGHLY.

I would not recommend any more 'cortisone' shots since it can cause muscle atrophy in the area. IF it is determined that you have a neuroma and not a plantar plate injury, sclerosing alcohol injections are another alternative prior to considering surgical intervention.

Result number: 89

Message Number 258039

Re: still in pain View Thread
Posted by Liz on 6/09/09 at 15:53

I went to the rheumatologist today.... /not for my foot/ and while I was there I figured why not ask him re my foot. He said.... he never ever t ells people to have the neuroma removed... the success rate was low and the nerve can 'misfire/ like in my case.. it is constant burning type of pain.. and he said it could take more than a year to calm it down... I wonder myself if it ever will.. he said that the nerve has been disturbed now and can behave in a weird way. My surgeon pushed on a certain area and it did not hurt and he was quite happy and said that he always tucks the nerve in the muscle...

So.... I am just hoping that in a long time it will be better............IMy two neighbors who has it are very happy with it.. I feel quite aggravated about my condition;... I am glad I can whine in this spot.... thanks for listening to me Deb...

Result number: 90

Message Number 258033

Plantar Plate Injuries View Thread
Posted by Lynnette on 6/09/09 at 09:28

My podiatrist has diagnosed me with a neuroma. His course of treatment so far has been:
1. Three cortizone shots (no relief from the first one, some relief from the second one to the point I could run up to 5 miles with mild discomfort, and increased pain since the third shot).
2. A pad to put in my shoe to raise and spread the bones in order to give the nerve 'space.'

He has not taken an MRI because he said the neuroma won't show up. He has suggested surgery; however, I'm not 100% confident in his diagnosis at this point. I don't want to undergo surgery for a neuroma if it isn't a neuroma.

I'm a marathon runner and the pain started in December when I was on a 24 mile run. I have pain when I get out of bed in the morning but subsides alittle the more I walk. I feel slight discomfort throughout the day regardless of what I'm doing. And, I have a throbbing pain at night when I'm trying to sleep. The problem has inhibited me from running altogether and limits me on other activities.

I'm from New Orleans and had a great sports doctor there. I now live in Pittsburgh, PA and haven't been able to find a good sports doctor here. Can you suggest a doctor or an internet diagnosis?

Result number: 91

Message Number 258004

Re: stull in pain View Thread
Posted by Deb on 6/07/09 at 08:48

Liz-
I'm so sorry to hear you have pain all the time! I don't have that problem thank goodness!
If I wear this one pair of shoes, my foot is pretty darn good, and that is the key to all of this, the proper shoe--- I don't have pain all the time like you do and actually I did wear a pair of high heels to a wedding yesterday---I was in the car riding to the wedding from 2:30-4:30, walked into the wedding---not much discomfort---sat at the outdoor wedding---had to walk on grass down a small hill, then back up, stood in line--- into the reception, sat and walked around a bit for food and drink-----left about 8:15 and didn't really experience that much pain at all, but when I got back into the car and took my shoe off, my foot did have some swelling which surprised me---some discomfort, but I can't say painful-----I was very happy that I could wear these certain heels, and they do have a pretty good heel on them,about 2 1/2 inches----I wouldn't do it every day, but it was nice to know I can wear them from time to time.
I think this getting back to a normal foot will happen for me, but I know now it will be a little longer before it just feels like a foot, and maybe it never will be just like it was before all this started with the neuroma 'click and rub'----but it is much better than it was!!! I did have the sharp nerve pain when I would touch the ball of my foot, but that is gone----every once and a while I get a pain---like a sharp nerve pain that lasts about 2 seconds and goes away---not very often, and actually not even every day, so that is improving as well.
I don't know what to tell you about your foot, but have you had any physical therapy? You might need it---I had it and I think that really helped me----desensitizes the nerve.
I never dreamed I would have any problems with my feet---its just something you don't expect to happen! Before the neuroma I was a speed walker, I exercised almost every day and I'm not talking easy stuff, I did alot---luckily I haven't gained any weight through all of this! Actually I am back to some light exercise, and hope to increase that gradually. I am not going to let this darn foot win, and you shouldn't either. Talk to your Dr. and ask lots of questions!!!
Good Luck and keep us all posted.
Deb

Result number: 92

Message Number 257882

metatarsal pain View Thread
Posted by DavidI on 6/02/09 at 11:46

48 year old male runner. Left foot toe number 3 has been sore on weight bearing for 6 months. Ultrasound shows some degeneration of plantar plates 1 and 2, but there is no pain at all in these areas. Ultrasound of asymptomatic left foot looks worse than symptomatic foot. Ultrasound also shows 2nd interspace neuroma. Mri shows neuroma in 2nd interspace, edema in fat pad beneath 2nd and 3d met heads no evidence of synovitis, bursitis. Tendons appear intact with no excess fluid within sheaths. No stress reaction in bones. No pain in interspace on palpation or Mulder's test. Don't believe it is neuroma. Pain on palpation to varying degrees from proximat met head to proximal end of phalanx. Variety of custom orthotics not nearly as effective as my own invention of hollowing area out beneath 3d metatarsal. Also some persistent tingling in toes 1,2,3 and maybe a little in number 4.

I have seen top guys in New York City. Rock at Hospital for Special surgery, Thomas Novella, John McNerny, Josef Geldwert. Nobody has an answer. I am a marathon runner who has not run since november '08. I am at my wits end. Any body out there have an insight? Please help!

Result number: 93

Message Number 257880

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Deb on 6/02/09 at 08:16

Dr. Ed--
My foot is doing much better, but it isn't perfect. I love to walk for exersize, and it is still uncomfortable---especially in my tennis shoes---the very shoes I should wear when doing such an activity----I know----get a tennis shoe that doesn't hurt---but my question is----will my foot eventually stop hurting completely? Become like my other and just function like a foot?
I had my surgery in November, and it is much better than it was, I just haven't had a day when I could say 'Hey I forgot I even had surgery!' Thats what I'm talking about!!
Thank You!
Deb

Result number: 94

Message Number 257638

Re: Now What? Long Term Effects of Plantar Fasciitis View Thread
Posted by Jessica on 5/20/09 at 01:07

Hi Jim,
I'm 43, had PF (right foot) for 4 yrs, had EPF release surgery 8 mos ago--and I'm STILL in so much pain, I really understand how frustrated you feel. My right foot is the only 'problem' foot I have--I feel sorry for you that both feet are a problem, I have no idea how you deal with that, especially having to be on your feet all day--there is no way I could do it.

The fact that you have the groin pain is very interesting. I have had sciatic pain (right side) for 5 yrs now. My right knee has been swollen this entire time, MRIs, etc. show nothing, there is a sharp pain only periodically. There is fluid build up right underneath the front, and it's very puffy, has been that way for 5 years. Also, as I'm typing this, I have pain going down my right leg, down into the right arch of my foot. I wish SOMEONE would figure out how to help us. My next step is 'pain management' (I have a HMO also). I'm in new orthotics, just had another cortisone shot friday, new shoes, and toe splint to pull my 4th toe back. I pain when walking in my outer foot after surgery, and then pain under my 3rd/4th toes. It could be a neuroma, but dr. is pulling my 4th toe back with a toe splint to see if it will relieve the inflammation in the joint. I have shooting pains at times where I absolutely just 'yell' when I move my foot a certain way. When I walk for more than 5 min., my outer foot hurts like hell and all I want to do is sit down.

As far as trying to fix this, you name it, I've tried it, or WILL try it to help the pain. If you find something that works, will you please post? I think that maybe the people that get better just 'move on' with their lives, and get better. If I ever do, I will post whatever helped me so nobody has to go through the hell I'm going through. (my story is on this board recently asking if there is any hope after 8 months as far as what I've tried in the past).

Have you tried a drug called Neurontin? Pain meds. (vicodin, etc.) didn't help me (nerve pain), but neurontin did (within a few days). The first day it's like taking benedryl, plan on sleeping all day, but you get used to it. Honestly it really helped the nerve pain, but for me, I gained alot of weight on it. Accupuncture/massage has helped me too, it's just very expensive (insurance doesn't cover it). Also, I put my shoes (w/orthotics) next to my bed and during the nite and/or in morning, when I get up, I put my feet in them instead of going barefoot or slippers. I know, sounds ridiculous, but believe me, my feet even hurt when I'm in the shower. I hurt worse and walk worse now after the EPF surgery that I did before.

Well, my question is the same thing...now what??!!! I have googled and researched SO much...looking and searching for patients like us that still hurt after the surgery---what they did, if they felt better, etc. If I could just see some hope in the future, knowing that I only had a certain amount of time and this would get better, maybe I wouldn't feel so helpless.

Result number: 95

Message Number 257531

Re: Post EPF Release Surgery Pain--any hope after 8 mos?? View Thread
Posted by Jessica on 5/15/09 at 18:46

Got new shoes and saw my dr today. I bought the Brooks Dyad, a size bigger. I really like how much room I have, and my dr. liked them too.

While my dr. was examining my foot, I was explaining my recent pain, (sharp pain under and over the 3rd/4th toes). He took another xray. After the xray, he said what he was thinking might be wrong was actually inflammation in the joint near my 4th toe. (I think I'm saying it right). The xray showed inflammation, but he said not as bad as he thought it could be. He said I could also be experiencing the nerve pain from a neuroma, but maybe this could have been the problem all along.

I'm going to wear a toe alignment splint at night, to pull back my 4th toe to relieve the pressure. In addition, he gave me a cortisone shot, I'm praying it calms down the nerve pain. Have you had a patient experience this? I'm going to see him in 3 weeks, meanwhile, continue stretching, etc.

Result number: 96

Message Number 257518

Re: Are orthotics even the answer? View Thread
Posted by Dr. Wedemeyer on 5/15/09 at 13:11

Dr. Jarrett,

Actually what Josh S describes on the original post is only partly correct: 'Describing rearfoot varus, Kirby asserts that the position of the calcaneus in rearfoot varus actually causes a relative supination moment during the contact phase. He also asserts that with a rearfoot varus the entire foot is inverted relative to the ground; and what actually forces compensatory pronation is the increased distance the medial forefoot must travel to reach foot flat (and the resultant longer lever arm for the pronatory influence of the lateral forefoot).'

In truth depending on where the location of the STJ axis actually lies, there could be either a subtalar pronation moment OR a supination moment. In a foot with a significantly medially deviated STJ axis, muscular activity from muscles which insert on the foot will produce a net pronation moment (or force). If the STJ axis lies more laterally it will produce a net supination moment during the contact phase. The STJ axis is a fulcrum about which muscles perform their functions to produce movement through moments (forces).

Why is this important and how do we know it is valid Dr. Jarrett? Many companies that proffer their proprietary insoles rely on the public (and many practitioners) being untrained in anatomy, physiology and human biomechanics. Look at your feet and for now dismiss the urge to determine if your STJ joint is more medially or more laterally deviated. Simply think about the muscles that insert on the medial side of the foot (PT, AT FHL, FDL, TS). In a normal foot the STJ axis lies just laterally to the Hallux and all of these muscles lie medially to this axis. Muscular activity on any of these muscles produces a net supination moment of the foot about this axis. The same mechanical advantage applies to the muscles with lateral insertions on the foot (Peroneus Brevis and Tertius and the EDL. Activity of these muscles produces a net pronation moment about this axis in feet without significantly deviated STJ axis.

By determining on static and active examination just where this axis lies in an individualís foot is one of the most profoundly important pieces of information about which we make clinical decisions in determining the highly individual needs of our orthoses patients. It is valid and efficient in clinical practice as are the tissue stress and sagittal plane theories. Not all feet are the same and not all providers and orthoses are created equally. Medial wedging is something I rarely add to orthoses unless you consider a medial heel skive in this category.

Much of the pathology that I see in my office is as a result of deviation of this axis either more medially or laterally to ideal and is the etiology of that patientís complaints through changing the function of the moments that act on our lower extremities. An excellent example is PTTD where you will find a low MLA, medial deviation of the STJ axis and compensatory heel valgus. Adding varus wedging to this type of foot alone will not cause a significant supination moment but will aggravate the midfoot and Hallux, disrupt the windlass and possibly lead to FnHL. In a foot with a high medial arch adding medial varus wedging will further supinate the foot and cause lateral column overload, medial arch tenderness, possibly compression that can exacerbate neuroma and chronic inversion ankle sprain

This is but one example of how a one-size-fits-all approach to orthoses is the cause of the high failure rate with custom orthoses. Well conceived designs, where the materials and modifications are chosen using critical thinking, knowledge of current theories and skill in applying this acumen is acquired through years of study and clinical implementation. You cannot simply relegate it to a foam box mailed to a patient sight unseen and expect results, regardless of the price.

Your assumptions based on your own anecdotal theories and proprietary design do not refute the currently theories in wide usage in the podiatric and O&P fields. It is yet another straw man argument to hawk your product on this web board and unless you can convince the providers here otherwise, I will ask that your specious posts be removed in the interest of ethics.

Word of advice; quit now. I am fully prepared to provide a long list of current research that validates what I am proposing that is journal published, peer reviewed and in clinical usage. You cannot do the same. Go sell your insoles somewhere else please.

Result number: 97

Message Number 257509

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Liz on 5/15/09 at 09:00

I think it is probably scar tissue..... Before the surgery I just had problems when I wore closed shoes... I could barely walk when the pain started.

I have only worn athletic shoes with lots of room and they seems OK with the new inserts. But the pain is ALWAYS there.. not too much but I am disappointed.

I will ask the dr about scar tissue. I don't believe it is neuropathy.. I mean that would not just be in THAT spot

The surgery was 2/20/09 and just a few days ago out came a stitch... with a knot maybe that had something to do with it.......

I also have osteoarthritis in my feet....

thanks for listening to me....

Result number: 98

Message Number 257499

Re: Podiatrist vs. Orthopedic foot speacilist View Thread
Posted by Carrie on 5/14/09 at 23:42

In terms of neuroma, which one is better?

Result number: 99

Message Number 257476

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Dr. Ed on 5/13/09 at 21:29

Liz:

It is too early for a stump neuroma to form. What does your doctor say is the cause of the pain? Is he stumped?

Here are some possibilities:
1) Scar tissue compressing the end of the cut nerve.
2) Another neuroma in an adjacent interspace.
3) Tarsal tunnel syndrome.
4) A structural problem such as a plantarflexed metatarsal.

The first possibility probably the most likely.
Diabetic neuropathy usually does not lead to focal pain as one would have with a neuroma.

Dr. Ed

D

Result number: 100

Message Number 257448

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Liz on 5/13/09 at 08:32

I had surgery feb 20 2009 and I have more pain now then I had right after the surgery... How are you doing now Ann? Ir is more of a burning sensation with me,

It is too soon for a stum.. so I have read but now I worry that it will always hurt because I can feel it at night too.... it is very tender.. what questions should I ask my dr when I see him at the end of the month. I am pre-diabetic and he says I have neuropathy and this is what is bothering me.. I don't think so.... because it is where he cut... beween the toe...


any ideas.. or maybe it just takes a long long time to feel better because the nerve was cut....

Result number: 101

Message Number 257432

Re: Post EPF Release Surgery Pain--any hope after 8 mos?? View Thread
Posted by Jessica on 5/12/09 at 13:09

Bugging you again-sorry-I was on my feet alot yesterday, in Dansko dress shoes (not heels). By bedtime I had sharp shooting pains at the inside of my right ankle (bad foot) that had me jumping in pain. I would just hardly move my leg/knee a certain way it would jolt in pain--and this is while I was already laying in bed trying to go to sleep. I tried massaging my ankle, outside shin, top of foot, anything to get it to stop, and it seem to aggravate my neuroma (the one under my 3rd/4th toe). Had to take a sleeping pill to fall asleep. Today inside shooting ankle pain has subsided but my neuroma is killing me. I'm buying the new shoes today. I'll be checking this board one more time just in case you suggest a different brand--I don't care how much it cost! Thanks!

Result number: 102

Message Number 257424

Re: Scar Tissue on bottom of foot View Thread
Posted by Brian K on 5/12/09 at 08:48

I use one of the 'dryer balls' that are to be used instead of fabric softener for the same thing. The dryer ball is the size of a tennis ball but covered with little spikes. I've been using it on my forefoot to help ease the pain of Morton's Neuroma. It really helps and feels good.

Result number: 103

Message Number 257404

Re: Post EPF Release Surgery Pain--any hope after 8 mos?? View Thread
Posted by Jessica on 5/10/09 at 16:18

Hi Jeremy,
You know, I have been wondering about that. I've been wearing the Asics GT-2130 for the past 3 yrs and even before the surgery, I complained to my dr. that the 'seam' around the 3rd/4th toe kept hurting me. If you look in my closet, I have about 10 pairs of the 2130 that look brand new, I just kept buying new ones, thinking they were defective, buying different colors, etc. After the surgery, he tried placing foam inserts near the 3rd/4th/5th toe, and then I developed the neuroma. I HAVE been complaining that it feels like I 'lean' that way. You just opened up my eyes--big time. Wow--I'm buying new shoes tomorrow. I also have custom orthotics that I always wear. Have you seen a case where the orthotics need to be adjusted? Back to the new shoes--what kind do you recommend? Thank you SO much--everything you said makes alot of sense. THANKS :)

Result number: 104

Message Number 257396

Re: Dr's-can you help me brain storm a little please? View Thread
Posted by Jillm on 5/10/09 at 11:00

Dr. Ed~ That seems to be my main problem-nothing shows up on x-rays or MRI's. I partially tore my peroneal tendon last May and then strained/sprained both Achilles tendons. The MRI showed a little bit of something on the peroneal and that's what brought them to a Dx of partial tear. Nothing showed up on the achilles. They just burn/ache and feel really tight even though I stretch calves and hamstrings throughout the day.
I'm wearing my orthotics every single day in my Saucony shoes and I can walk 10 minutes MAX! My grocery or mall shopping for me. I can run into the pharmacy for a quick trip, but the heels and achilles start to ache and throb, so I have to leave pretty fast. Are you asking about a hump behind the metatarsals? There is a hump in mine. My pedorthist is pretty perplexed because he says it doesn't look like there's any biomechanical issues. He has made multiple orthotics for me and is known around here for being one of the best. I've been back many times for adjustments and haven't been back in a while, just because nothing is helping. Like I've said, I've had lots of nerve testing and MRI's of the sacrum, lumbar, thoracic, neck and brain to see what the heck might be going on. They all came back normal (lumbar has tiny 2 mm disc issue, but he said that's pretty normal)
When she injected the heels with Cortisone, it really hurt, but I never got the numb feeling like I did in years past when I would get the neuroma areas injected with Cortisone. I had the heels injected twice-same thing-no difference. Took about 8 days for the pain of the injection to go away. Then it was back to the normal pain that I always have. My Rheum. says I have arthritis and that's causing achilles pain, but just not sure I'm willing to accept that and that there's nothing to do about it. I was walking up my yard and not rolling onto the toes enough last May when I first injured my peroneal tendon and achilles. I'm just so frustrated.
Thank you for helping me brain storm. Jill

Result number: 105

Message Number 257391

Re: Post EPF Release Surgery Pain--any hope after 8 mos?? View Thread
Posted by Jeremy L, C Ped on 5/10/09 at 07:37

First of all, what model Asics shoe are you wearing? If you look at the inside half of the midsole, and it's a darker color than the outside half of the midsole, replace it immediately. Those kinds of shoes (Asics Kayano, 2130, etc) all bias the shoe to the lateral column. The end result is that the orthotic inside the shoe, as well as the foot, invert and place excess force into the lateral column. This is especially the case with anyone having had the procedure performed on you. This would also aggravate your neuroma pain, as the foot would be forced to use the lesser toes and metatarsals to propel during gait.

As for a heel lift, in my opinion that is the opposite treatment required. For every little bit the heel is raised relative to the forefoot, the heel inverts. As your heel inverts, you again place more load into the lateral column, and likely exacerbating your pain.

Result number: 106

Message Number 257389

Post EPF Release Surgery Pain--any hope after 8 mos?? View Thread
Posted by Jessica on 5/10/09 at 04:28

Hi, I'm 8 mos. post-op EPF Surgery partial release(right foot), and wish I could find someone that has gone through this that has had abnormal pain post op, but has FINALLY recovered. Someone that has EVENTUALLY, even if it was a year, found relief and lived a normal life! I have searched the internet, and yes, I know everyone is different, but I just want to know--what did they do, how long did it take, how do they feel now? I DON'T blame my doctor--when you decide to have surgery, you take the chance--he did the best he could--and he is still trying to help me. I'm still trying to help myself--but dammit, there are so few of us around that this happens to, it's great, but is there still hope? Here's my story...I'll try to be brief--

I suffered from PF for 4 yrs. I tried custom orthotics, physical therapy, night splints, ice, stretching, active release technique, accupuncture, ultrasound therapy, cortisone shots, neurontin, and gained about 20 lbs. I had shooting pains up my ankle, and throughout my foot/heel, almost to my knee, and my dr. ordered nerve tests for tarsal tunnel, but they came back negative. Finally I decided it was time to have the surgery, I had tried everything else--I had been seeing this dr. for 4 yrs., and he agreed.

After the EPF surgery, I was in understandable pain, but it seemed to get better. After 2 months, I developed outer foot pain, and a neuroma near my 3rd/4th toe which is extremely painful. My dr. ordered new orthotics (which I wear). I never wear anything but asics tennis shoes and just started physical therapy. I'm doing everything right. There are times that not only the outside of my foot hurts, but the pain radiates different places, different ways, different days. I know it sounds crazy, but that's how I can describe it. The neuroma hurts when it's aggravated (walking around costco/target for instance), and the outer heel pain just hurts all the time. During the past 4 yrs, I didn't take pain meds (except neurontin). After the surgery I weaned myself off the neurontin--it actually was the only thing that worked, but I felt it made me gain weight. When the pain started back up again after my surgery, my dr. wanted me to go back on it due to the nerve pain he felt I was experiencing. Last week my primary care dr. suggested I go off it and try Topomax to see if it would help with weight loss. So far it's been great for my appetite, but has done nothing for my nerve pain.

So that's my story. I posted on another 'foot board'. The doctor there suggested I put a heel lift in my shoe to help with the outer foot pain. It seemed to help until it got lodged sideways. Geez, I was wondering why I was in so much pain 2 days ago during physical therapy. I don't want to put it back in--I can't chance it moving again. I also have a morton's neuroma gel pad I put in my shoe periodically. I ice alot, stretch every chance I get, and have lost about 15 lbs. since the surgery. I would give anything for my right foot to feel like my left.

Result number: 107

Message Number 257383

Re: Dr's-can you help me brain storm a little please? View Thread
Posted by Jillm on 5/09/09 at 17:30

Dr. Ed~

Thanks so much for your reply. I should just hop in the car and head down to San Antonio to see you. :) I'm in Dallas.
I can flex my foot with toes bending back toward my knee really well. I stretch often and have to stretch when I get up from sitting because the achilles 'locks down' until I stretch. So, my main pain when getting out of bed and getting up from sitting is the insertional achilles area and then up about 2 inches. The PF area seems a little stiff as well when I get up, but it's not a killer pain like some describe. When I get walking-that's when the PF starts to hurt more and then gets so bad I'll have to sit down. The achilles then continues to hurt with push off of walking. I have custom orthotics in my tennies and then have little lifts under each one.
The Dr. put the Cortisone/Lidocaine right in the area in front of the heel where it hurts-she entered from the side. Everyone else I talk to says it was such a relief, even if it was short lived because of the Lidocaine-and I got no relief.
The neuroma surgery I had was between toes 2&3. Went in through the top. Was a very very hard recovery for me-Dr.'s were questioning if I developed RSD, but they have said they think I wore it out, because the skin is no longer blue/shiney and some of the zaps/pain have disappeared. I still have lots of forefoot pain in both feet.

Looks like I need to find a Dr with an ultrasound machine who uses this for PF. Why don't all Dr's use this to Dx a positive case of PF? That would seem to be a first step to me.

Thanks again for your help. I'm just not sure what I have and to say it's affected my life is an understatement.

Thank you, Jill

Result number: 108

Message Number 257363

Re: Dr's-can you help me brain storm a little please? View Thread
Posted by Dr. Ed on 5/08/09 at 21:59

Jillm:

Have you had the dorsiflexion range of motion of your ankle checked (the amount that the foot moves upward to the leg)?

Do you experience pain upon arising in the am or after rest?

If you have plantar fasciitis but an injection containing lidocaine did not relieve the pain a short while after administration may imply that that plantar fasciitis is not the problem (assuming that the injection was provided in the correct spot).

I assume that you are speaking of a neuroma in between the bases of the toes. Such neuromas generally will not be seen on MRI unless the MRI is performed with contrast media. Neuromas take a long time to recur, not likely on would recur since you had neuroma surgery.

An ultrasound exam from a practitioner experienced in its use is a good idea. The are where the neuroma was removed and surrounding areas can be studied as well as the plantar fascia.

Dr. Ed

Result number: 109

Message Number 257325

Re: Dr's-can you help me brain storm a little please? View Thread
Posted by Kathryn P. on 5/07/09 at 17:19

I am not a doctor but, I just wanted to say that your story was incouraging to me. I am going through something similar and I know how hard it is. I began with a Neuroma as well and had it removed. It is very frustrating and sometimes I feel a little crazy and I'm getting cabin fever pretty bad. I think you are really brave for dealing with this for so long and not losing your mind.

Result number: 110

Message Number 257323

Dr's-can you help me brain storm a little please? View Thread
Posted by Jillm on 5/07/09 at 16:22

I've posted on here for a while, and am still having tons of problems. I have been to quite a few foot Dr's, have multiple pairs of orthotics, tried the Ibu-9 a day for 6 months, tried massage, accupunture, Cortizone shots, taping, stretching, boot at night, etc. Had neuroma surgery Dec-05-still tons of pain from that. MRI shows no recurrent neuroma. Had MRI's of both feet, ankles, etc. I have achilles problems as well and they showed nothing much-small cyst on one foot-it's gone now. My pain isn't worse in the morning-even though they do hurt a little and feel very stiff, it's when I've been walking around-the pain gets worse the longer I'm on my feet. Pain starts right in front of the heel and then spreads into arch and entire heel and then up back of heel the longer I'm on my feet. The 2 Cortizone shots I had were from the side into the place in front of the heel. She used lidocaine with it and I didn't even get temporary relief with either of those. Just more pain. I've had back MRI's and they aren't showing anything-even though I have a lot of back pain. I've never had anyone look at the fascia with an ultrasound-is that pretty much the only way to accurately diagnose PF? Also, wouldn't I have had some amount of relief with the injections? Hurt more for about 8 days each time. Feet rarely hurt when I'm off of them, but once in a while they'll twitch or throb a little-not often. I've had a Nerve test done and tinel test-didn't show much. Guy who did nerve test said I was very jumpy at the test and he said maybe maybe TTS, but I don't react to the tapping on foot. I'm stumped and they are too. Any other ideas???? I've been to Rheumetologist and he says I have arthritis. I guess I'm just looking for proof of what I have, so we can figure out best action to take. Thanks for reading to the end.

Result number: 111

Message Number 257304

EMG-Dr. DSW View Thread
Posted by dilynn on 5/05/09 at 22:45

Just thought I would give an update. I guess I am a medical mystery. You may remember my last MRI that someone read showed 2 7 mm growths could be start of neuroma and another a cyst . The ortho minimized the findings and again looked at me like I had 3 heads. He offered exploratory surgery. No thanks. I said I was ready to try the EMG tests he suggested earlier.

I went today and spent over an hr. the results from the neurologists said nerve roots in L5 are damaged. everything else fine. He asked me nothing about where was my pain. He said you have numbing and tingling in your legs? I said I have pain on a scale of 6-7 everyday mostly in my feet left foot specifically . The paper he filled out still said in his words pt. has tingling in and pain in legs. Nothing about feet. when I was done, I said so you dont see any signs of tarsal tunnel or anything like that and he said, well alot of podiatrists like to think everyone has tarsal tunnel. Thats a whole other set of tests that I would have to do. Why in the world would my dr. not specify or is it the neurologists? I had a feeling he would relay my severe foot pain to the back and I have a feeling that he will recommend me to a nice back surgeon if I go back for his hour consultation.

I am DONE! I will find out on my own what is wrong . I am an avid researcher and I will find out myself. At least I feel blessed that no one has found anything major wrong such as a disease.

Result number: 112

Message Number 257264

Expert in Morton's Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Brian K on 5/02/09 at 14:57

Can any of the doctors refer me to a known expert in Morton's Neuroma. I am looking for a physician / practice that specializes in diagnosing, identifying and treating all modalities of this condition.
A physician who actually suffered from this condition and recovered from it might be preferred.
I have had (1) cortisone injection which made the problem worse, and then 2 months a cryosurgery which after 8 weeks my foot is again the same or worse. I cannot wear any closed shoes, and feel basically hopeless. The pain to walk is unrelenting and unbearable, it feels like I am walking on broken glass. I have spent thousands of dollars on shoes, traveled across the country to have cryosurgery and buy orthotics. To date I have no relief, my pain is as bad or worse than it was 6 months ago. My experiences to date have been so bad, my fear of open surgery or MIND surgery so great that I am searching for any answer other than those options.
I do not believe that I could cope with the pain of a failed open procedure if it is worse than this.
If anyone knows of a physician or practice that will not cause greater pain or may be able to help me please reply to this post.

Result number: 113

Message Number 257236

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Hello All on 4/30/09 at 10:14

Hi,

I would suggest referring to www.dellon.com.

This institution has helped me tremendously with a very complicaton nerve problem.

They are leaders in this field.

Good luck.

Result number: 114

Message Number 257225

Re: reply to Dan View Thread
Posted by sandra k on 4/29/09 at 17:15

I had it done twice because first time was between 4th and 5th toes on both feet, the second time I had it done between the 2nd and 3rd toes on both feet Both times drove to dr's office (50 miles) each way and drove home, no problems. However lately, I think I'm going to have to have it done again between the 2nd and 3rd toes on both feet as it is coming back. But not too bad yet, will wait a while longer. I have no other problems on feet. Doctor told me it was because I wore 4' heels all my life. Try ice packs on bottom of foot,It will relieve a lot of pain. I don't have pain just numbness. On the doctor's x ray you could see the neuromas really well. Actually I think I have them between all toes. So I just keep going back when it gets too much and get the surgery done again. It is no biggy and painless. In cold weather they don't bother me at all, only in this hot weather.

Result number: 115

Message Number 257224

cryosurgery, does it work? View Thread
Posted by Dan W on 4/29/09 at 17:12

Hi all, I'm suffering with an ever painful neuroma and am wondering how others have been treated and if the cryosurgical treatment is considered to be a relatively safe one that won't make my foot worse. I already have had PF for ten years and was afraid to get any surgery because of the potential of it getting worse. Crysurgery is something I have not heard of and am interested in the procedure for my neuroma. Any good advice?

Result number: 116

Message Number 257222

Re: Mortons Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Dan on 4/29/09 at 16:47

Dear Sandra K. my name is Dan and I have been struggling with a neuroma in right foot that makes my life miserable. The cryosurgery worked for you and you are experiencing no complications? Why did you have it done twice and do your feet have other problems? I have PF too.

Result number: 117

Message Number 257145

Re: Endoscopic PF release View Thread
Posted by Dr. DGW on 4/26/09 at 11:58

Gina do you have a financial interest in this company? Thus far all of your posts contain an endorsement of this device and are fairly recent.

No offense but I am not buying that that device is indicated for 'Achilles tendinitis, hammertoes and neuroma'. First you cannot easily straighten hammertoes with any device that I am aware of. Achilles tendinitis and neuroma would in no credible way be affected by such a device and suggesting it could delay proper medical treatment.

None of these conditions are as a result of some deficiency of wearing a Medieval looking vise on the forefoot and I have never read any research touting this device. In fact I would classify it as snake oil until proven otherwise.

At this point I am going to ask that Scott become involved and decide if this should be allowed to continue. I propose that it is verified that you are a real patient sharing an experience with this product as opposed to having a fiduciary interest in it and shamelessly self-promoting it for financial gain.

Result number: 118

Message Number 257136

Re: Endoscopic PF release View Thread
Posted by ginam on 4/25/09 at 20:50

hi alex,

i had pf for 7 years - and along the way my feet and ankles developed a slew of other problems, including achilles tendonitis, hammer toes and a neuroma. misery, in other words. like you, i had done pt, exercises, orthotics, etc. i too was at the end of my rope when i discovered something called yoga toes. within weeks, they completely changed my feet, and thereby my life. today my feet are healthy and happy.

please read my story, posted in comment #14 at this link (just scroll past the skippable article): http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/10/13/painful-toes-and-where-they-lead/

i hope you will give them a try before you commit to all the time, pain and $$$ that surgery will entail.

best, gina

Result number: 119

Message Number 257095

cryosurgery View Thread
Posted by Mary F. on 4/23/09 at 17:48

I have 4 foot neuromas, 2 in each foot. They are so painful I am unable to work. I have had these for the past year. My own podiatrist does not like to perform surgery for these because of the high recurrence rate. He has never mention cryosurgery to me. I would like to know how to find a doctor in my area who performs this type of surgery. It sounds like it is a better option. Thank you.

Result number: 120

Message Number 257088

Subcalcaneal Nueroma? View Thread
Posted by Brandon W on 4/23/09 at 13:17

Has anyone ever heard of a subcalcaneal nueroma?
Here is some back story:
I have been battling foot pain for years now. I have seen four different doctors, and been through numerous treatments.
Bilateral plantar fasciotomy, which reconnected with scar tissue
Cortisone injections
Physical theropy
Ultrasound
Stretches
Orthodics
I was recommended a doctor, whom after a quick feel of my feet, says I have subcalcaneal nueroma and perineural fibrosis. It was described as tumors surrounding the nerve causing the pain. He wants to operate on me to correct both of those problems and do another fasciotomy, but at the heel bone instead of in the middle of the foot. I am nervous about surgery again and would have to work out something at my job to be off for a few weeks.
Any suggestions?
Is this a legitimate diagnosis? He claims to have coined the term 'subcalcaneal neuroma'. For some reason this worries me, maybe because google turns up no info on it.
Thanks in advance!!!

Result number: 121

Message Number 257069

Re: considering achilles tendon surgery View Thread
Posted by ginam on 4/22/09 at 23:24

i had achilles tendonitis - along with pf, hammertoes, a morton's neuroma, displaced peroneal tendons and partially collapsed arches. all of these issues resolved with yoga toes foot stretchers. you can read my story in comment #14 here:
http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/10/13/painful-toes-and-where-they-lead/

i hope you will consider trying these before committing to surgery and big $$$.

best, gina

Result number: 122

Message Number 257044

Length of recovery from Morton's cryosurgery View Thread
Posted by BrianK on 4/22/09 at 11:06

I had cryo for Morton's on 3/11. Overall, I would have to say that my condition has improved but, it still feels like there is something inside or under the ball of my foot, not actually under the third & 4th toe but closer to the ball of my foot almost in front of the toes. Some days are better than others. It seems to be better in the mornings (some days almost perfect when I get up.) I've read that some people say that it took 12 weeks to actually feel the full benefit of cryo. I'm at 6 weeks today. In general it takes soft tissue injuries 12 weeks to heal. Would this be true in this case ? Although minimally invasive it still is like having a swizzle stick stuck between your toes about an inch in. I don't want to panic or rush into anything else. Is it reasonable to allow for a 6 month time frame to evaluate such a procedure ? I've read that when describing traditional neuroma surgery many websites say that one can return to activities in 3 weeks, while many individuals who have had the surgery say that their physicians tell them they must wait for 1-2 years for their foot to 'calm down'.
It is true that you can walk out of the office after cryo and resume daily life almost immediately. But what is the true 'calm down' period for such a procedure? If there is one thing I've learned about foot problems in the last six months it is that 'the patient MUST have patience'.
Thanks, your professional opinion is appreciated.

Result number: 123

Message Number 257006

Re: pain worse after neuroma surgery View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 4/20/09 at 18:01

Most podiatrists do perform sclerosing alcohol injections. The only podiatrist that I know of in Colorado is Dr. Paul Stone who has an excellent reputation. I don't know if he performs sclerosing injections, but regardless he is an excellent choice for another opinion.

Result number: 124

Message Number 256999

pain worse after neuroma surgery View Thread
Posted by mimico on 4/20/09 at 15:30

I had surgery for Morton's neuromas on both feet 10 months ago and have had pain ever since, though it gets better and worse, sometimes dwindling to almost none and other times registering 8-9 on a 10 scale. The right foot is especially bad -- it often feels like there is a knife wedged between my third and fourth toes and into the ball of my foot, and at times the fourth toe is on fire. I also sometimes have burning pain in the spots under the ball where I understand the neuroma is concentrated. The dr who did the surgery made custom orthotics with metatarsal pads -- they don't help the pain though going without them is worse. In December I saw an orthopedic surgeon who did a cortisone injection that had no effect. I have also been getting acupuncture treatments for several months and can't tell if they are helping or not. The only shoes I seem to be able to wear are some New Balance running shoes which really need to be replaced.

I don't want to try surgery again as I fear it wouldn't help and would likely make things worse.I have read all kinds of conflicting information on the web, most of it not very encouraging. Cryosurgery seems to be one option, as is chemical destruction of the nerve. I live in Colorado and haven't found anyone who does either, and my insurance doesn't cover out of state providers. I also found a site for a dr in Utah who makes 'theta orthotics' and claims great success in relieving neuroma pain, but can't find anything outside his site to corroborate this. (http://www.theta-orthotics.com/orthotics/?page_id=36)

I am extremely discouraged. I have always been active and love to walk and to ski, and can't do either, or be on my feet for any length of time or wear any other shoes. What are my options? I would greatly appreciate any help you can give.

Result number: 125

Message Number 256976

Re: Waterproof Sandals? View Thread
Posted by Jeremy L, C Ped on 4/19/09 at 07:57

I'm in agreement with Gina. Based on what you describe, Chaco likely offers the best combination of fit and functional elements for you. Do keep in mind that the sole structure of this brand is highly supportive in the lateral column, and may initially irritate your foot. Do not judge Chaco's by their initial impression, and it is mandatory thet you wear them for small periods of time indoors every day in order to shape the footbed elements to your individual contour.

Keen, as mentioned before, can also be a good choice. Their traditional models are especially good due to their dedicated forefoot flex position. Some models are not as adjustable in the instep, so choosing a models will be greatly determined by fit. There may also be some reasonable choices from Merrell and Teva. Although functional design changes in their collections do not make them universally good options.

I do have a final word about flip flops. STOP wearing them, especially for long durations and over greater distances ... like in a theme park. Thong sandals alter gait mechanics, thrusting more ground force into the area of your neuroma. They also force the toes to squeeze and work harder, potentially causing your toes to further deform.

Due to the long distances on hard surfaces encountered at theme parks, I urge you to focus your shoe search on performance water sandals. The best all have good heel cushioning and credible forefoot mechanics.

Result number: 126

Message Number 256937

Re: What's wrong with me? View Thread
Posted by dilynn on 4/16/09 at 21:02

If you tap on the top of my foot around the 2nd metatarsal area it is like a 'zing' very uncomfortable tingling. Does not happen on other foot. Dr. Said 'yeah, that's your nerve' like it was normal. The numbing is around the 3-4 toe. Suspected neuroma.

When I stand on my toes it definitely hurts. I notice when bending my foot up on toes while sitting is very painful. Tightness in low calf is usually present.

I think the EMG/NCV is what the Dr. suggested because he suspects nerve/sciatica issues.

Thank you so much for your post. I am reading it a few times to understand. I have definitely have not been presented with this scenerio. What treatments did the pts. receive and was it helpful?

Thank you, again. :)

Result number: 127

Message Number 256884

Waterproof Sandals? View Thread
Posted by Jennifer L on 4/14/09 at 14:53

First of all, thank you for all the help you've given me in the past even though I haven't been diagnosed with PF! I procrastinated going back to the doctor for a while, but now I am working with a podiatrist and he just ordered me some new orthotics today. My problems seem to be super high arches that need support, and I seem to have developed some neuromas in the past few months and have had issues with tingling feet (he wants me to do some tests at home to isolate the exact triggers and figure out which nerves are bothering me).

Anyways, my husband and I are planning a trip to a theme park in a month that will involve a lot of water rides, so I was hoping someone could recommend some sandals that will at least minimize how sore I know my feet will be! :) I've searched the board and found a bunch of recommended brands, but since I don't have a lot of time to order and return sandals, I was hoping you could narrow it down to a few most promising styles/brands for me. I need:

* Waterproof / comfortable when wet

* Flip-flops or something with ankle straps. Slides and sling-backs (without toe posts) fall off my feet!

* Due to my high insteps, flip-flops with thin straps or styles with adjustable straps are easiest for me to fit. (i.e. no flip-flops with thick straps that cover part of the top of your foot -- I usually can't get my feet into these!)

* Really soft/squishy soles (e.g. Crocs, squishy cheap flip-flops, etc.) hurt my feet, so I need more support. Of course, not all supportive shoes fit for various reasons so I realize there will still be some trial-and-error! (E.g. Birks always hurt my feet in the store, so I've never bought any to see if they'd actually mold to my feet...)

* Many of the more supportive flip-flops I've seen appear to be turned up under the toes (I think it's called rocker toes?) Those haven't worked for me in the past so I am a bit hesitant -- perhaps because I have slightly curved toes (mild hammertoes?) that want to curl down rather than up!

Surprisingly, my most comfy flip-flops right now are these cheapo ones from Kohl's -- the foam is stiff, not squishy, the heel cup provides some stability, and notice that the straps do not cover much of my feet:

http://www.kohls.com/kohlsStore/shoes/juniors/flipflops/PRD~439078/Candies+Floral+Wedge+FlipFlops.jsp

But I think I can do better ;) Thanks!

Result number: 128

Message Number 256858

What's wrong with me? View Thread
Posted by Phoebe N. on 4/13/09 at 15:10

I have been suffering with bi-lateral foot pain for 5 years. At first the doctor thought it was neuromas (feet were tingling and i had surgery only to find out it was not neuromas but something else like plantar fasciitis. Doctor then sent me to a pain specialist who said I had RSD and they wanted to do a spinal block. But I didn't believe it. Then went to another podiatrist and he said I had tarsal tunnel, PF and stump neuromas and there was nothing he could do. So then I decided to go to a university foot speciast and he said it was medial plantar fasciitis and he wanted to operate. I didn't want the surgery so I went to another surgeon and he said I should cast the foot for 6 weeks - which I did and it didn't help. Meanwhile, still hobbling around in pain all the time. Then, I went to another podiatrist who made me a pair of orthotics which actually helped about 1/2. I have been wearing them and stretching exercises. But, it's weird I know, but the pain moves around in my feet. Sometimes it's in the middle of the foot, or my toes feel tingly and get all red. My GP says she thinks I have CRPS now, but she also says she knows nothing about feet.

Sorry to be so long with this story. BUT WHAT SHOULD I DO NOW??????????????????? I realize you can't examine me, but I just need some kind of direction to help me sort of this mess. I know I helped to create the mess by seeing so many drs. - please no lectures - you do desparate things when you are in so much pain.

Result number: 129

Message Number 256853

Re: Dr Wander - Same issue need some direction View Thread
Posted by Go ask Alice53 on 4/13/09 at 10:18

Dr Wander

Blood work normal
MRI 2 years ago showed 2 small neuromas in each foot - had one removed my very good POD - no relief. Have been back to POD and he says the pain is too far down to be a neuroma.
Bone Scan normal.

Could this be arthritis? Hurts when I walk - stiff and pins when I don't. Very stiff in the Ball of the foot in the morning.

POD is stumped - where do I go next... Thanx

Result number: 130

Message Number 256852

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Deb on 4/13/09 at 09:52

anne b-
i know it is scary and i'm not sure, but i think you should give it time to heal.
do everything your dr. tells you, and maybe suggest physical therapy.
ask lots of questions.
sorry i'm not much help, but everyone is different.
i had 2 bunions and a neuroma (dont know what size) removed in November. my foot still isn't perfect, and i'm guessing it will be a few more months before it is where it should be. i had alot more done than you did, but i would say give it time.
good luck.
Deb

Result number: 131

Message Number 256838

Re: Jeremy, Dr. DSW a little more info Please... View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 4/12/09 at 10:47

I have performed these injections with and without ultrasound guidance, and have seen no real difference in results. Since the neuroma is in a well defined area, I am usually more than confident that I am injecting the correct area without the need for ultrasound guidance. Additionally, there is usually patient feedback during the injection confirming the proper placement of the needle/injection.

Result number: 132

Message Number 256831

Jeremy, Dr. DSW a little more info Please... View Thread
Posted by Andreal on 4/11/09 at 18:03

Thank you for all your opinions. They are very supportive of my feelings.

Jeremy, I have a high arch with an arch length that is approximately 1 size larger than my foot length on my right foot, and about 1/2 size longer on my left foot. What shoes specifically do you recommend for mortons? Must you evaluate my foot to make a recommendation.

I have tried btooks DYAD and New Balance 883, 1023, Clarks unstructured. The Clarks feel best on my forefoot but make my heels and arches hurt. The New Balance and Brooks feel good on my heel and arch but it feels like there is a ball of sock under my toes.

Dr. DSW, do you use ultrasound to guide the alcohol injections ?

Are there special orthotics that can help the neuroma pain or just metatarsal pads in regular shoes.

Thanks Again

Result number: 133

Message Number 256806

Re: Dr. opinions on cryosurgery / alcohol injections for Morton's Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Dr. Z on 4/10/09 at 13:48

Hi

I agree with Dr. Wander. 4% alcohol injections can help you reduce or remove your neuroma pain. ( very high sucess rate) It does take multiple injections along with proper shoe and weight dispersement padding. You need to pad the area to move the weight away from the metataral heads. This is very important and in my opinion must be done along with the 4% alcohol injections.
If you have a true neuroma, which is a thickening of the nerve then the results are going to be harder if not impossible to achieve. You will only know after starting the padding along with injections. I have a neuroma in my left foot and before I did any type of traeatment I changed to a wider SHOE. and now I am painful free 25 years. Still must watch my shoe type Good luck

Result number: 134

Message Number 256794

Re: Dr. opinions on cryosurgery / alcohol injections for Morton's Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 4/10/09 at 07:00

Although Jeremy raised an excellent point, I will attempt to address your original question regarding cryosurgery, surgery and sclerosing alcohol injections.

I agree with the orthopedic surgeon regarding 'potential' complications following neuroma surgery, though the vast majority of these surgeries do very well.

However, I prefer to exhaust all conservative care prior to surgical intervention, and as per Jeremy's post, shoes may be beneficial.

I do NOT perform cyrosurgery, but please remember although cryosurgery is minimally invasive it is still a surgical procedure with inherent risks. It requires a small incision and the insertion of a probe to 'freeze' the nerve. There is a freeze and thaw cycle which varies from doctor to doctor (the area IS anesthetized so the procedure is painless). There can be post operative discomfort and the results are not always permanent and can obviously differ from surgeon to surgeon. But once again, this is still 'surgery'.

Sclerosing alcohol injections are basically unique to the podiatric community and are rarely used by the orthopedic community. Although not originated by Dr. Dockery, there is an excellent article by Gary Dockery, DPM that describes the technique and results that you may be able to find on the internet.

This is MY preferred method of treating neuromas prior to surgical intervention, and I have had excellent results with my patients, and very few have ended up with surgery.

It consists of a minimum of 3 and a maximum of 7 injections spaced 7-10 days apart. The injections are a combination of local anesthetic/alcohol and involve a slight burning feeling IF the doctor injects slowly. It should not be a painful or very uncomfortable procedure. Some patients report a temporary increase in symptoms following the first 2 injections, but I would say that's about 10% of the time.

It's a quick and safe procedure, and if it doesn't work, cryosurgery or traditional surgery can still be performed. It simply involves an injection that takes a few seconds. You can literally have the injection and go to work.

It's what I would highly recommend and consider prior to cryosurgery or traditional surgery, but that's just one opinion.

Result number: 135

Message Number 256792

Re: Dr. opinions on cryosurgery / alcohol injections for Morton's Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Jeremy L, C Ped on 4/10/09 at 05:51

What specific shoes have you tried. There are hordes of models from normally reputable brands that will specifically lead to neuroma pain flaring up or getting worse.

Result number: 136

Message Number 256787

Dr. opinions on cryosurgery / alcohol injections for Morton's Neuroma View Thread
Posted by AndreaL on 4/09/09 at 21:19

Im a 45 yr old female living in western MN. I've been diagnosed with Morton's neuroma in my right foot in the 3-4 interspace. I've lived with the problem for 14 months and can't face the prospect of summer without walking for exercise and pleasure. I've had two cortisone injections with no relief, tried many different shoes and two sets of orthotics. My doctor of podiatry wants me to have excision surgery, my orthopedic specialist recommends against it. She says that nerve removal is tricky at best and warns of complicatons. She recommends I learn to live with the pain take advil, and minimize my activity. I've read about the alcohol injections, and about cryosurgery and excision but can't seem to find much recent information on the internet about it. It seems a preferrable alternative to both alcohol injection and excision. What are the Dr.opinions on this board? If you have preference over one solution could you please recommend a Doctor to perform that particular procedure. I am willing to travel for a proper solution to my problem. I the research that I have done about the excision surgery scares me. I think my orthopedic surgeon might be right.

Thank You for your insights.
Andrea

Result number: 137

Message Number 256786

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by anne b on 4/09/09 at 21:02

I had a large Morton's neuroma (2 cm diameter) removed from my right foot on February 11th. Recovery went well for the first 7 weeks. Then all of a sudden I started getting electrical shock pains from the ball of my foot, through my arch to my heel. My surgeon gave me a cortisone shot 3 days ago, but the shooting pains have not changed. Should I be worried yet, or just give myself more time to heal?

Result number: 138

Message Number 256779

Re: stump neuroma View Thread
Posted by Dr. Z on 4/09/09 at 17:22

Its time. If it is determined that th stump neuroma is the cause of your pain then you should look into cryotherapy surgery before getting involved with another extensive procedure. Very important to find out the cause of the changes going on with your foot ASAP

Result number: 139

Message Number 256777

Re: stump neuroma View Thread
Posted by nelsons on 4/09/09 at 17:10

Thanks for the prompt reply. No I haven't seen a Dr about my foot since my 1sy surgery.

Result number: 140

Message Number 256776

Re: stump neuroma View Thread
Posted by Dr. Z on 4/09/09 at 16:58

. The change in length of the toe and color changes needs an x-ray , MRI and vascular testing to determine what the cause of these strange chances. are. Have you had any of these tests yet?

Result number: 141

Message Number 256775

Re: stump neuroma View Thread
Posted by Dr. Z on 4/09/09 at 16:57

. The change in length of the toe and color changes needs an x-ray , MRI and vascular testing to determine what the cause of these strange chances. are. Have you had any of these tests yet?

Result number: 142

Message Number 256774

stump neuroma View Thread
Posted by nelsons on 4/09/09 at 16:22

I had a neurectomy done in 2001. Almost immediately I developed a regrowth. The regrowth is 2 or 3x as large as the first neuroma, which I was told by my surgeon was the size of a quarter.
I live w/ daily pain (some days are better than others), I've not considered another surgical procedure for fear of it regrowing again. The podiatrist who performed my surgery used what he described as a unique procedure that had only a 3% chance of regrowth (yeah right). The neuroma was between my 3rd & 4th metatarsals, he cut the nerve above and below the neuroma, then stitched the loose nerves into my muscle. Since the procedure the shape of my toes has changed signicantly. My 3rd toe is quite abit shorter than it was pre-surgery, this toe also has some loss of feeling, in addition I have a large lump on the top of my foot. So my question is this, could this type of growth have any effect on my circulation? As recently the base of the toenail on this toe has turned purple. There has been no trauma to it. Also, I'd like to know with the large size of the regrowth could it cause permanent bone deformation? Thank you for responding.

Regards,
Scared of 2nd surgery
nelsons

Result number: 143

Message Number 256622

No one can help yet... View Thread
Posted by dilynn on 4/04/09 at 18:03

For 15 months I have lived with progressive pain in the top of my left foot and near ankle.(rt. foot as well but less) It began when I changed my workout routine at the gym, routinely doing heavy leg presses and moving feet down with same weight to do calf raises.
I first noticed pain right away and went to ortho. X-rays did not show any fractures. Pain progressively got worse bottom of feet and 3rd toe electrical shock so podiatrist diagnosed plantar fasciitis in both feet and neuroma in left. All shoes hurt.
Pain always got worse even after prescribed walking shoes and 'rest'. All 3 podiatrists said just rest it and ice it. Had multiple cortizone shots, NASAIDS, walking boot for a couple weeks(another dr. said to get rid of it because it was making my gait off. started having pain in back and other foot and hip. The pain now after 15 months, doctors looking at me like I am making this up b/c MRI's and bone scans only come back with 'possible 5th metatarsal fracture' and edema. RA tests are normal. I am so frustrated. I am very fearful the longer this goes on I am causing permanent damage. Last ortho (I have seen 3 podiatrists and 2 good orthos) said walking thru any pain is not good but doesnt suggest anything at all but rest and ice. He said if I still have pain, he will send me for neurological tests.
I personally think I should be retested for fractures. I have mild swelling everyday and it looks like black and blue by end of day top left near ankle but it also looks like blood pooling. My veins are very distinct and black and blue there compared to other foot and that is where my pain is. I read that there are so many possibilities for this pain but my dr's always say rest and ice and nothing else but possible RA. This is from an injury!!
I must add too, that I have a very high threshold of pain and do not complain about anything unless it is severe and constant. I just want an answer and somebody who cares. I am 47 yrs. old.

Result number: 144

Message Number 256607

Re: Plantar facistis View Thread
Posted by Jeremy L, C Ped on 4/04/09 at 07:27

Was anything at all addressed in regards to your shoes? It is not common practice to perform invasive procedures without first exhausting that most basic conservative line of care, especially when a diagnoses of neuromas is obtained.

Result number: 145

Message Number 256600

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Deb on 4/04/09 at 00:45

Hi Everyone--
Just wanted to give an update on my foot.
I'm doing much better---most of the time. I still have some discomfort in my foot from time to time. I have started doing some cardio exersize, and oh my; that not only helps the body but it REALLY helps the mind!
I thought I would be limping around for the rest of my life, but I can see that this all takes time and patience!
I have even tried on some of my presurgery shoes that I thought I would never be able to wear again, and by golly, I think there is hope there as well.
The proverbial 'Light at the end of the tunnel' if you will!
Anyway, some days like today when I have been so busy I didn't sit down all day, added to the day I had yesterday----shopping with my daughter and her 2 little girls---Olivia 2 1/2 and Augusta 7 mos.
Olivia likes Gramma Deb to carry her----alot!!
Anyway, my foot has been protesting today and I'm not sure why it hurts where it does, but I'm sure it has to do with the shoes or stepping the wrong way! I need to relax it more I guess.
Anyway, it doesn't look so bad now, and I only hope in a few months I will have forgotten all about the pain I have been experiencing, and walk with never thinking about that darn foot!!!!
Hope everyone is feeling as good or better than I am!!!
Oh, and Spring will help everyone---no doubt about it!!!!
Happy Spring,
Deb
P.S.
Karen---What is your pain like?
Is it constant, ache, sharp pain, electric shocks?

Result number: 146

Message Number 256566

Re: cryosurgery View Thread
Posted by Linda on 4/02/09 at 20:31

Anyone? A cryosurgery doctor in the Bay Area for California? I am 50 miles East of San Francisco..have Mortons Neuroma and want to try the cryosurgery.

Result number: 147

Message Number 256552

Plantar facistis View Thread
Posted by Van on 4/02/09 at 11:30

I suffered from mortons neuroma, my doctor injected both feet with cortisone and then a saline solution and gave me shoe inserts. The problem went away. Within a few short weeks of wearing the inserts, I suddenly developed plantar facistis. My doctor injected cortisone three times, gave me a foot brace for the night, and exercises to do, but, the pain has only worstened. He now feels that perhaps surgery should be done. I have read on the internet this is probably not the best idea, because of all the nerves in the foot and surgery does not have a high success rate. What would be your suggestion?

Result number: 148

Message Number 256494

Jeremy, a litle more on shoes please View Thread
Posted by BrianK on 3/30/09 at 19:29

Reviewing all the information I had to date I first looked up the directions for use of a Brannock device and I then went over to the New Balance Store. I measured my feet according to direction & found that my left foot measured a 12.5 with a 13 arch length and my right foot measured a 13 with an arch length of a little over 14. I looked for a NB 1062, 757, or 883. Of course none were to be had in my size but the clerk rather unhappily agreed to ordere them in. (2 week wait). I walked over to the 'dress shoe' side of the store and asked to try on some Birkenstocks which I never tried before after a time I found that a 47 felt best on my right foot and a 46 felt best on my left foot. They had one of the pressure sensitive devices there to find the pressure points on your feet. I had them use the device on me and it came up and said that I required custom orthotics. The band of high pressure on my right foot corresponded with the location of my neuroma / forefoot pain. The clerk even remarked that usually the high pressure areas are mroe towards thje great toe.
Having this information I feel that an orthotic / shoe combination is part of the puzzle that will reduce or eliminate my neuroma pain.

My question is this: as a pedorthist do you use (or need) the pressure sensitive pads, high speed cameras, and or other equipment to evaluate a patients stance and stride to come up with a combination to re-distribute loads ?

How do I pick a good pedorthist? I have learned more about feet and shoes since reading your posts and feel that pedorthics, although based on medical science are actually more an art. I want to have 'Monet' make my orthotics not some 'starving artist'. Right now I've paid 'Picasso Prices' but had 'Mc Donalds' service. What basis do I make my choice on ? What questions should be asked ? What type of evaluation should be done ?

Again sorry for the length of the post and thanks for your input, this is not a simple problem and will not have a simple solution.

Brian

Result number: 149

Message Number 256492

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Leslie H on 3/30/09 at 18:26

Hi Karen,

I have had pain from a neuroma for years in my right foot. Some shoes made it feel like someone popped a couple of my toes with a huge rubber band.

Finally I got diagnosed and started the cortizone shots. Some lasted up to 6 months and some only a couple. In November 08 I had surgery and now I'm in pain that is much worse than before. It's the same feeling though. No golf ball or electric shock.

Here's the weird thing and what I wanted you to know. I have a couple of shoes that give me completely pain free time! One pair of running shoes and any of my closed toe, high heels. My winter boots feel great.

My heels allow me to work in nice shoes and my running shoes allow me to stay in shape. I have even had to switch to them for tennis.

Keep experimenting with your shoes. You might find the same.

Leslie in Atlanta

Result number: 150

Message Number 256446

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Karen on 3/29/09 at 00:36

Hello, I just read this whole thread...and I gotta say...I don't think I want to risk making things worse than they are! You guyes are scaring me!

I have been dealing with Morton's Neuroma for about a year now. After months of frustation & pain, I found a ortho. dr who sold me insoles ($400 & hurt my feet) Spent a fortune on a couple pair of ugly shoes & had no real relief. He also gave me cortizone shots that were awful & only worked for 2 months. I see no point in doing that again.

I miss my volkswalks & hiking...so I started reseaching again. I heard that alcohol injections dissolved neuromas? Is this not the case? And what about prototherapy?

I appreciate reading your comments. You've all gone thru so much & I hope to learn from you. Thanks for any feedback you can give a newbe.

Karen in Oregon

Result number: 151

Message Number 256400

Re: stump neuroma? View Thread
Posted by JillD on 3/26/09 at 17:23

Sounds like exactly what happened to me. You may have a stump neuroma. If you do, it could be easily seen with an ultrasound. I did the alcohol injections and did them all - very, very painful - helped for a little while - but then wore off.

I had a second surgery a year after the first. I researhced for 6 months before I went back in as there are many risks with a second surgery.

I am told and the pictures show I have been fixed. HOwever - the surgery is much more extensive and about a 3 to 4 month recovery - I'm only 7 weeks out and just beginning to walk. Still pain - but I am confident I will heal this time.

If you choose a second surgery - be careful - there are only a handful of doctors in the country that perform a stump neuroma surgery (following a morton's neuroma surgery).

JillD

Result number: 152

Message Number 256385

Re: Neuroma Post Surgery Issues View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 3/26/09 at 07:50

Obviously, you need to seek another opinion. You certainly gave a very good and thorough history, but it's tough to determine exactly where the mass/lesion was removed anatomically, to determine which vital structures may have been irritated or compromised.

It's possible that a nerve/nerves in the area were injured secondary to the original mass or during one of the surgeries or from scar tissue formation. That can often be determined by an EMG/NCV which is usually performed by a neurologist or physiatrist. The pain definitely sounds to be nerve generated, and based on your surgical history it's plausible that there was damage to the nerve as described above. Now it simply has to be determined which actual nerve(s) involved and the extent of involvement.

That will require testing via EMG/NCV and possibly some diagnostic nerve blocks, which means blocking the nerve higher up to see if that eliminates your pain.

I don't know if you have other symptoms such as color changes, temperature changes, hair loss, etc., but if you do, RSD/CRPS must also be a consideration. Until you are able to see a neurologist or physiatrist, you may want to seek the care of a pain management specialist since your current doctor seems to have 'given up'.

There are definite options for your situation, and surgical release of the nerve may be an option, but first you must determine that actual cause of your pain and pinpoint the involved nerve. For that to happen, additional studies and work up is needed. But in the interim, you also must be kept comfortable.

Result number: 153

Message Number 256381

Re: Jeremy, question about Morton's Neuroma shoes & orthotics View Thread
Posted by Jeremy L, C Ped on 3/25/09 at 21:37

Those 'old black things' are Brannock devices. As for finding qualified fitters, the easiest method is to do a zip code search at www.abcop.org.

Result number: 154

Message Number 256374

Neuroma Post Surgery Issues View Thread
Posted by JonJonK on 3/25/09 at 16:52

I'm going to give a full run down for how I believe I've lead upto today.

In 97 I sustained a tib/fig compound fracture to my lower right leg about 5inches above the ankle. 17in rod was put in and two screws above the ankle and two screws at the knee. Took some time to get better but i got there. Then in 00 i had the screws removed which is normal but during that time they stripped one of the screws at the ankle because of the screw bit wasn't the same as they normally use. needless to say it was a struggle ot get them out. everything had been fine until July 08 where I all of a sudden found a mass about where they took the screws out and it was giving all sorts of pain. went to PC and they did the rote of going through gabepentin, to finally lyrica as well as from low dose pain to loratab 7.5. nothing was working so finally went to ortho. ortho first decided to do PT to see if could break up the mass. nothing worked. only suggestions where do nothing and deal or surgery. i opted for surgery in oct 08 because didn't feel at 27 this was something i wanted to deal with for the next 50 years. during surgery they removed the 4cm x 4cm x 1.2cm adipose tissue with acute classification and small hemmorhage. after removing this they can across a small traumatic neuroma that was non-neoplastic. which is good. they removed that too. after surgery they assured should be fine with everything in a couple days. well day each day it began to swell more and become really tight and very hot to the touch. my first assumption infection. well after a week they decided to open me back up and test for infection. and the culture came back negative for infection. still swelling and lots fluid build up. upped dosage of lyrica, on a antibio just to be safe, as well as upped loratabs to 10's. so they decided to keep my incision open, fill it with new gauze every 3 days and filling it less and less each visit until closed up. still experiencing pain to touch, feels like burning, tingling and all sorts of piercing. after about 3 weeks it started to heal but still feels the same. 7th week after surgery healed completely but still feels the same with lots of scar tissue. now we start on tramadol and slow decrease on loratabs. after a few weeks the pain plateaus and still decrease loratabs as well as massage therapy. on final week of loratab (5/week as needed) and still on tramadol (2/4to6hrs as needed) still plateaued. i'd definitely say that the pain isn't the same as 2months ago but definitely same in the last month and much more inconsistent from hour to hour and day to day. doc says either live with it and get off all meds, or surgery to cut nerves in middle of calf to eliminate pain. I'm really not sure about either one of those options so I asked for a second opinion and the 2nd doc didn't even meet with me. His PA just called and said declined to visit because doesn't feel he can offer anything more. So here I am stuck and not sure what I should do? surgery? 3rd opinion? I've tried talking to my doc but they don't seem to even take notice.

help!

Result number: 155

Message Number 256361

Re: Jeremy, question about Morton's Neuroma shoes & orthotics View Thread
Posted by Brian K on 3/25/09 at 09:31

Jeremy, typically where does one find a 'fitter' with a 'Brannock device'. All of the athletic shoe stores (even the high end Runners stores,in my area Milwaukee, WI) are staffed by teenagers who don't know anything about shoes. The only 'measuring devices' around are the old black things with the lines on them for size and the plate that squashes against the side of the foot for width.

I've developed this problem because I wore shoes that didn't fit correctly for 50 years.

Thanks for your input, at least I'm beginning to understand why these shoes don't fit.

Result number: 156

Message Number 256356

Re: Jeremy, question about Morton's Neuroma shoes & orthotics View Thread
Posted by Jeremy L, C Ped on 3/24/09 at 21:36

Based on all you wrote, I'm not sure how effective I can be without a direct evaluation. It certainly sounds like you have more challenges than most people who develop neuromas. Here a few things to keep in mind:

1. Your one doctor is right in that ALL unstructured shoes (Clarks, or any other brand) run the risk of irritating heel tissue. They are purposely made without any internal structure that could provide support to the midfoot. The sole benefit for you is that the forefoot will manipulate itself right to your specific flex point.

2. Both of your athletic shoes typically have dedicated forefoot flex positions. When fitting properly, they should do their part to adequately reduce/eliminate neuroma pain. When they do not it is most commonly because the wearer's ball length varies significantly from their overall foot measurement. With cases where the wearer has a functionally longer ball length, even most credibly made shoes can cause forefoot pain. Please, have an experienced fitter properly measure you with a Brannock Device to confirm or rule this out.

3. If an appropriate shoe is hard to come by due to limitations among your local retailers, there is the potential option of modifying one of your shoes. The Dyad is a good example, where it's rockered forefoot shape can be augmented with a springplate installed inside the midsole. This will effectively reduce forefoot pressures, and maintain a softer feeling inside the shoe (especially if the stock inlay is modified with a reasonably sized and placed metatarsal pad).

Good luck. I hope you're able to find some relief.

Result number: 157

Message Number 256343

Jeremy, question about Morton's Neuroma shoes & orthotics View Thread
Posted by Brian K on 3/24/09 at 10:43

Jeremy,
I have been fighting Morton's Neuroma pain since November in both feet. A visit to a local podiatrist ended up with a cortisone injection that made the situation worse in my right foot. I wear a size 14 shoe so finding shoes is difficult. I have a relatively high arch.

I have had three sets of custom orthotics made, one by a Pedorthist (used foam box cast), one by the POD that gave me the injection. One by a third POD. The inserts from the pedorthist (who supposedly makes orthotics for olympians) are made of cork & some various soft materials, they are over 1 3/8' thick cork at the highest point on the arch. They fit my arch when when there is no pressure on my feet but, when I put them into shoes and stand or walk it feels like the entire weight of my body is on my arches, with several 'pressure points' that really press on my feet and make localized pain points. I have tried to wear them for two months and cannot wear them for more than 2 hours. When I voiced my concerns to the pedorthist he said 'I made casts of your feet, they are right there is nothing wrong.' These cost $350.

The POD who gave me the injection had an office girl make plaster slippers of my feet, then after three weeks gave me a set of 'orthotics' that are labled 'system 3.0 sport'. These are very thin and hard. They have an extremely hard heel (raised about 1/4 ')and some type of low, thin, fibreglass arch. There is almost no padding in them. They have a heart shaped 'metatarsal pad' in them that is almost 3/8' tall. When I wear these it is like walking on concrete with golf balls under my feet right behind the ball of my foot. When I stand on them my little toe hangs about 1/8' off the side. I was told to wear these for 1 hour the first day then add an hour each day, If they started to hurt my feet I was supposed to 'back up' for a couple of days then try to advance with time again. I can't get past 2 hours with these. I paid $350 for these. The POD said that he only gives one injection and if it doesn't work he goes directly to neuratectomy, he also said that 'my prescription is correct, you should consider surgery'. When I asked him about sclerosing injections or cryosurgery he told me that those procedures are for 'innovators and lecture circuit doctors'. When asked about stump neuromas or complex regional pain syndrome as a result of the surgery he said, 'yeah, that happens sometimes'. This POD is the local teaching 'resident' for podiatry at a respected local hospital.
A second POD made me a set of 3/4 length plastc arch supports that were 'heat molded' to my feet. He made a couple of adjustments to them and they fit my arches fairly well. However after wearing them for more than a couple of hours my heels start to hurt (burning pain in the center of my heel) It's like walking on concrete. These cost $179.

I have purchased the following three pairs of shoes:

1) Clarks 'Unstructured' dress shoes. These shoes are least offensive to my feet with respect to the Morton's problem. The problem with them is they have very unusual insoles. Right over the heel there is a sewn in rubber button, they also have almost no arch support in them. When I wear these shoes for a long period of time I start getting a 'buzzer/burning' pain in my heel. I've tried putting pads over the heel area and after wearing the shoes you can remove the pad and see where the sewn in plug actually has impressed the pads. The POD that made me the plastic arch supports told me that the reason that my heels hurt when standing was that I was stretching my arches due to lack of support. These shoes are very flexible and pliable.

2) New balance 992 walking shoe. When I wear these shoes I feel the 'marble' in my forefoot from the neuroma in both feet. It feels like my sock is bunched up under my toes.

Almost every pair of shoes I try on regardless of manufacturer feels like this.

Walking in these shoes makes my forefoot hurt over time but the 'buzzers' in my heels seem better when wearing these shoes.

3) Brooks Dyad Same as the New balance 992

I can walk barefoot all day in the house on carpeting and not have the neuroma problem make my life unbearable. If I walk on the lawn with the 992's the neuromas 'sock ball' is significantly reduced. As soon as I walk or stand on a hard surface (especially concrete) the neuroma pain goes through the roof with the New balance and Brooks shoe. It feels like ther are golf balls under my toes. When I wear the Clarks shoes the neuroma pain is bearable on hard surfaces but, the 'buzzers' in my heels become unbearable.

The only 'gait analysis' done on me by anyone was having me walk down the hallway and they watched me walk from behind.

It would seem to me that if I can go barefoot on carpeting on all day without significant foot pain I should be able to find a suitable shoe / orthotic combination that can help.

This has become a very frustrating problem as the original pedorthist and POD are very hard headed. They don't want to make any adjustments or admit that their approach could have been wrong. Shoe stores don't want to see me because they always end up 'ordering in' shoes for me to try on because they don't carry 14's or 14 wides. They don't even want to order any more shoes for me unless I agree to purchase them unconditionally. They say 'we can't sell shoes that size and can't afford to ship them in and stock them'. (I'm 6'3' 210, it would seem to me that there have to be a lot of big guys that wear size 14 in the world.)

I've spent a lot of money and time and only have frustration and continued pain for my efforts. What suggestion might you have. You seem to be very versed in orthoses, materials, etc.

Sorry for the length of this post, but this has been an ongoing long term issue, and I am getting depressed over that fact that people are basically taking money without guaranteeing any type of result, and I can't seem to find any relief.

Brian

Result number: 158

Message Number 256313

Re: Finding the right doctor using alcohol shots for neuromas View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 3/23/09 at 17:36

Janetto,

You wrote...'You seem to have come close to what I ran into when I was searching for pain relief. Both doctors and podiatrists put me down, basically calling me stupid for having these neuromas taken out - basically because they didn't have any answers.'

When did I put you down or say anything even remotely negative??

If you don't want my help or honest opinion, than don't ask questions on this site. I simply told you that your case was very unique and I had not heard of a similar case in my 23 years of practice. I also stated that it would be very difficult to perform surgery on an area that many times due to abundant scar tissue.

Was there ANYWHERE in my original answer where I inferred that you were 'stupid' or where I was 'putting you down?'

I believe I did give you good, solid advice. My advice was simply that it was possible that the 'neuromas' good have been another soft tissue lesion that was not properly diagnosed, and prior to undergoing additional surgery or sclerosing alcohol injections, it would be prudent to simply have a small biopsy of one of the lesions, which is a very simple procedure.

I then recommended that this biopsy be sent to a major university teaching hospital pathology department for a 'second opinion' to make sure that the soft tissue lesion is in FACT a neuroma.

That was the content of my original post, there were absolutely no insults or inferences as to your intelligence or past decisions.

The reason I mentioned neurofibromas is because they fit the description of recurrent soft tissue lesions, containing nerve and fibrous tissue (similar to a neuroma whichis perineural fibrosis) and causes considerable pain.

Result number: 159

Message Number 256312

Re: Finding the right doctor using alcohol shots for neuromas View Thread
Posted by Jillm on 3/23/09 at 17:04

Janetto~ Can you go over the Surgery board and let me know where you saw the report from the Mayo on the Vit D diffiency that is a possible cause of neuromas? I looked and can't find it anywhere and am interested in this. Thanks, Jill

Result number: 160

Message Number 256311

Re: Finding the right doctor using alcohol shots for neuromas View Thread
Posted by Janetto on 3/23/09 at 16:41

Pathology reports said this matter was neuromas. As in the same case in Santa Fe, these neuromas just kept growing. These were in both feet. Four of the thirty surgeries were for bunions. Nobody can come up with an answer, but then nobody knows why tumors grow. It is just one of the mysteries of the body. You seem to have come close to what I ran into when I was searching for pain relief. Both doctors and podiatrists put me down, basically calling me stupid for having these neuromas taken out - basically because they didn't have any answers. I lived to learn with them until I couldn't walk any longer. When taken out, many of the neuromas were the size of a golfball. The Mayo mentions a possible lack of enough Vitamin D, but because my rheumatologist figured out I was peeing out my calcium - she put me on 50,000 u of it three times a week years ago. Also, I already see a neurologist. He's had me on Morphine for ten years. He gives me enough to keep me out of a wheelchair. I have fatpad atophy in both feet. I'm called The Princess and the Pea for if I step on the tiniest thing the pain will shoot through my system like a fire. Even on Morphine, I am still in pain 24/7. I have tried just about everything. The only thing that will work at this stage is to get rid of them, but I want to try the alcohol shots first.

Result number: 161

Message Number 256309

Re: Finding the right doctor using alcohol shots for neuromas View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 3/23/09 at 16:09

I really don't have much to say since I have never heard of a similar type of case in my 23 years of practice. I can not imagine 30 surgical procedures in the same area, simply because of the abundant amount of scar tissue that would develop.

I would be very interested to learn if all the pathology reports showed true evidence of 'neuroma' tissue/nerve tissue/perineural fibrosis following each surgical procedure.

I certainly hope that the tissue was sent for biopsy following each procedure. There may be a chance that these 'lesions' were neurofibromas, and NOT neuromas, and if that is the case, they will continue to recur and you need to be under the care of a neurologist in addition to a surgeon.

Prior to any additional surgery or injections, I would highly recommend having a small biopsy of one of the lesions, and have that biopsy read by a large university hospital pathology department, to make sure your diagnosis has been correct. It does not sound 'normal' and I would suspect something else may be going on in this case.

Result number: 162

Message Number 256307

Finding the right doctor using alcohol shots for neuromas View Thread
Posted by Janetto on 3/23/09 at 15:44

I am a bizarre case. Between 1990 & 1995 I constantly grew neuromas in both feet. I had 30 invasive surgeries to remove them. They stopped growing until this year. They are back with a vengence. The right foot has a front one so large it is pushing out the bottom. I also have one in my heel. (I know because I had one there before). These were all done by one podiatrist.
I've heard they can be dissolved with dessicated alcohol shots (about seven treatments). How do I go about finding a good, decent doctor that does this treatment? When I visited 29 doctors ten years ago they all made fun of me and basically called me stupid for having all the surgeries, but then they weren't in my shoes! They accused me of wanting pain medicine to get high. I dread going back to the doctors in Memphis. Should I go to a orthopedist or a podiatrist? How to I find out what procedures they do? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Btw, my brother sent me an article years ago about a woman who grew neuromas like me. Yes, we're rare, but totally real cases.
Thanks ahead of time.
Janetto

Result number: 163

Message Number 256176

achilles tendonitis View Thread
Posted by Rose on 3/23/09 at 10:02

I keep getting tendonitis. I will be fine for weeks and suddenly have severe pain in the back of the heel. I have had plantar fasciitis release surgery on one foot and neuroma surery on the other foot at the same trime about 5 years ago. The foot with the plantar fasciitis did not heal completely and I cannot stand long in one spot and have pain on the outside of my foot behind the outer toes. Is there anything you can recommend? Thank you so very much.....

Result number: 164

Message Number 256175

achilles tendonitis View Thread
Posted by Rose on 3/23/09 at 10:02

I keep getting tendonitis. I will be fine for weeks and suddenly have severe pain in the back of the heel. I have had plantar fasciitis release surgery on one foot and neuroma surery on the other foot at the same trime about 5 years ago. The foot with the plantar fasciitis did not heal completely and I cannot stand long in one spot and have pain on the outside of my foot behind the outer toes. Is there anything you can recommend? Thank you so very much.....

Result number: 165

Message Number 256165

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Deb on 3/22/09 at 22:06


Jill-
I hope you are doing much better.
I'm doing better----everything has to be just right with my shoes, but I walked half a mile outside this evening, and it felt pretty good. Some pain at the start, but not bad. Gonna take a while before I'm pain free, but getting better.
Let me know how you are doing from time to time----I'm really hopeful you will fully recover.
Talk to you later---
Deb

Result number: 166

Message Number 256146

Re: stump neuroma? View Thread
Posted by KMM on 3/21/09 at 20:21

I have a neuroma resulting from bunion surgery. The alcohol injections have helped me quite a bit. It hasn't taken the discomfort away completely and the injections were not a piece of cake (in my opinion.) But the results were worth it. I had a series of about 6 injections spaced about 10 days apart. Good luck.

Result number: 167

Message Number 256132

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Deb on 3/21/09 at 10:19

Jacqui-
Where are you?
Are you so much better that you don't pay attention to this site anymore? I hope so!
I'm doing much better, not perfect, but much better----hope you are as well!
Deb

Result number: 168

Message Number 256093

Re: stump neuroma? View Thread
Posted by Brian K on 3/19/09 at 15:55

Try Cryosurgery.

Result number: 169

Message Number 256082

stump neuroma? View Thread
Posted by betty p on 3/19/09 at 09:43

I had a morton's neuroma surgery last June 2008. Approx 2 months ago I began feeling a sharp pain, continuously. Podiatrist gave me 3 cortisone injections, now he wants to do alcohol injections. Mentally, I can't handle these injections. What is the best course of action to finally have me become pain free? My quality of life sucks, since I can't walk without limping, was fired from my waitressing job because I could not work a full shift. HELP!

Result number: 170

Message Number 255977

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by JillD on 3/16/09 at 20:36

Hi Deb,

Been quiet because until I heal from my most recent surgery, I don't have much to add. It is 6 weeks out now. Cast off a week ago. I can weight bear a little. Since they drilled a hole in my bone to put the nerve into, I am recovering from a fracture as well as the nerve damage.

Should know in a few weeks if I am truly fixed. I am hopeful.

Result number: 171

Message Number 255737

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Deb on 3/08/09 at 19:37

Miriam C
I think scar tissue is something that happens naturally after any kind of surgery, and I don't think there is much you can do to prevent it, however, I think when and if you think you have it, massaging it helps prevent it from getting to be too much. Ask your Dr if you can do the massage before you actually do it. I don't know what causes a stump neuroma, and don't know if you can prevent them from forming---again, ask your Dr.
Deb

Result number: 172

Message Number 255659

Re: Metarsalgia Capsulitis View Thread
Posted by Nicky on 3/06/09 at 01:02


I have come upon this board VERY late but I am sure people are still checking three years later. I have had this problem for four months- caused I think by some boots, which, whilst not being very high at all, focused the pressure on the ball of my foot too much.
i have been trying to find out what was wring myself for months- Morton's neuroma? Lisfranc injury? And now I have finally got it...and I know what to do!!!
Thanks guys.

Result number: 173

Message Number 255610

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Miriam C on 3/04/09 at 10:22

What causes scar tissue to form? What causes a stump neuroma to form?What, if anything, can I do to prevent these from happening? I had surgery on January 16th to excise the section of the nerve that had the neuroma.

Thanks.

Result number: 174

Message Number 255601

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Deb on 3/04/09 at 07:50

Jill-
Just checking in to see how you are doing. You're pretty quiet!!
Hope all is well!
Deb

Result number: 175

Message Number 255559

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Deb on 3/02/09 at 08:09

Jacqui-
I hope you are getting closer too!
I think I am as well!
It is so strange though------------some days I think 'yes this is going to be a bad memory soon, then the next day I think ' is my foot going to be this way for the rest of my life??' It is sooo much better, but then again I will have pain in strange spots on the bottom of my foot, then maybe my ankle or even my calf or thigh. Wierd!
This is what I feel now compared to before I started therapy:
More motion--alot less shocks, but still a few--sometimes I can walk and walk and just know I'm not totally better yet but getting better----- then maybe an hour later or several hours it is very uncomfortable and I want to take my shoe off.
What I really want is to not realize I have any problem!!!!!!!! Is that ever going to happen, or will I always have an issue with this darn foot?
From time to time I have slight shocks in my other foot reminding me that it may also have a neuroma forming-----what to do about that????
I want; as I know you do as well, is to put on my walking shoes and go for a 5 mile speed walk like I used to do!!!! Hey, I would settle for a stroll around the block without feeling anything but out of breath because I'm REALLY out of shape!
With nicer weather coming, it will really make me want to hit the streets in our little town and walk off all my anxieties, but for today since it is at this very moment only 12 degrees, I'm content to get ready and go to therapy! :)
Is there anyone else out there that has had these issues that can tell us if we are headed in the right direction and we will have a great summer with no problems????
I guess the people that have been through this and have no problems have given up talking about it and are going on with their normal lives----running, biking, wearing the shoes they like for a while, and trying to forget this part of their lives!!!!
That is coming for us,too,Jacqui!!!! I just know it!!!
Keep in touch and have a great week!!!
Deb
p.s.
At one time there was a Dr somebody that was chatting on here! I wish he would check us out and give us some good news!!!!!

Result number: 176

Message Number 255482

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by jack S on 2/27/09 at 00:42

Hi Deb. I had my 2nd sympathetic lumbar block. I felt better after each one. But day 7 exactly I woke up and some symptoms were back but not like they we. I go tomorrow for a recheck. I hope I don't have a third block. I am so glad you sound better. I hope this will be over soon. I want to walk thru Disneyland without a wheelchair and not pay for it the next day with pain n swelling. Maybe a run at the gym. I think we are getting closer. Talk to you soon
Jacqui

Result number: 177

Message Number 255407

Re: Cryoanalgesia: Outcomes for heel pain & Morton's Neuroma View Thread
Posted by beverley h on 2/24/09 at 22:57

I have had Morton's Neuroma for 11 years . I have refused conventional surgery . Tomorrow, I am going to have a Doctor that I found on the web site in Encinitas, California. Dr. James Hatfield, perform the cryosurgery on my foot . After what I have been through with Foot Doctor's wanting to try this ,and that treatment, and this and that drug for pain : All of which I refused .. except for two shots of Cortizone, and Orthodics for my shoes, I am looking forward to the procedure tomorrow. I am wondering where the updates are since 2006 .. Do the Dr's agree that this cryosurgery is the way to go in the year of 2009? My life has changed since 11 years ago, and these last months in particular have been sheer torture for me . I am totally desperate now. If the Cryosurgery does not work for me, I will not be able to stand this pain every day , two to three times a day any longer. My question is: If the cryosurgery does not work, What surgery would be the best ? Nerve Amputation or M I N D ? I go tomorrow with positive thoughts that the Cryosurgery will work. Not one Doctor in 11 years has ever mention Cryosurgery ! I have seen 8 doctors . Will someone please answer ! Thank You !
Ellen

Result number: 178

Message Number 255405

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Deb on 2/24/09 at 21:18

Hi Jacqui-
It sounds like you are getting somewhere!
It is such a slow process!
My shocks are sooooo much better, I finally feel I may come out of this. I still have pain, but I do not think it is all from the neuroma surgery---probably normal pain from all the work I had done with the bunions too. When you think of all that I actually had done, it has to take time to heal.
My PT started out with a little exersize and stretching on a wedge, and tENS unit---now they started using ultrasound about every 3rd time. I think the untrasound makes it feel much better than the tENS. They give me alot to do to strengthen my foot, ankle & calf, then the ultrasound or tENS and foot massage. They give me a little more to do each time.
Some days are better than others, but as I said before, I need a good shoe, and I haven't found that shoe yet. I am going to a store near me called 'The Runners Flat' I guess they are very good at fitting shoes for serious runners, and I bet they can help me too.
We'll see how that turns out.
Hope everything is going well for you and for everyone that reads this blog. I have really been worried I will be like this for the rest of my life, and I know there are lots of people out there that feel the same. As I said before, every day is different---some days I feel more hopeful than others that I will be walking around and all this pain and worry is forgotten forever!!! I'm praying that will happen for me and for everyone that has this problem.
I'm thinking of you all often!
Deb

Result number: 179

Message Number 255360

Re: 7 years of foot pain in UK View Thread
Posted by julie crowe on 2/23/09 at 05:02

I have had pain for 2 years and my story is similar to yours, being told there is nothing wrong when quite obviously there is. I started with what I thought was a neuroma, had an MRI and was told nothing there and given OTC inserts, not told to wear special or larger size shoes and consequently developed pain on outside of both feet so stopped wearing inserts, went back to podiatrist (Private, nothing in my area NHS) who got angry that I was telling him his job. Anyway, money ran out and I tried to manage myself and all went went OK ish until April when I developed medial ankle pain. Went to NHS orthopaedic and was told post tib - without even touching my feet! and sent to PT. Whilst waiting for app developed PF which has been with me ever since, I cannot tolerate arch supports as they seem to make the pain in the arch and around my ankle much worse. Had another MRI before Christmas for post tib and told nothing wrong! can see myself that I pronate - orthopaedic surgeon said I don't! do not know what to do anymore, have read about sinus tarsi implant but do not know where to get it in the UK - it sounds like just what I need.
Anyone out there had it done?

Result number: 180

Message Number 255345

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by jack S on 2/21/09 at 23:44

Hi Deb,
I had the 2nd round of lumbar block Tuesday n went right back to work Wednesday. I again immediately felt my foot move with more ease, had less pain,and less swelling. It is not quite like my right foot still but better. My back was more sore this time though. I hope you are doing better. I do not like the after effects of anesthesia on my body. I have had 3 round of it over the last 9 weeks. My nails are like paper n breaking. Did your PT try ultrsound or a tENS unit? My dr said that is useless for what I have. I may change my PT. Let me know if you have any new PT exercises. I do the windsheild wiper as I drive n my toe raises have a good night
Jacqui

Result number: 181

Message Number 255275

Re: Pain Location View Thread
Posted by Mary F on 2/19/09 at 16:12

Linda, unfortunately I cannot say that I've had any positive results from the ESWT yet, and I'm 13 weeks post procedure today. However, I did have a severe inflammatory response to the procedure so I'm still holding onto a thread of hope -- a slender one, though!

I just had a cortisone injection in my heel because I'm scheduled for a winter vacation next week. Hopefully, it will work and buy me enough time to get through the trip. As much as I don't want to, I am going to ask for wheelchair assistance at the airports, though. There's no way I can navigate making airlines connections!

Jill, my foot problem started out with a neuroma about 7 1/2 years ago. I used to get cortisone injections for that which usually gave me a good 9 months. It's now been two years since the neuroma has flared. (Knocking on wood)

Linda, is your foot any better now?

Mary

Result number: 182

Message Number 255271

Re: Chielectomy Recovery Timetable View Thread
Posted by Mary S on 2/19/09 at 14:45

I had a Chielectomy on Dec. 19,2008. I had considerable pain the day of surgery trying to get to the bathroom and was very concerned about how bad the pain was really going to be and for how long. I was taking Hydrocodone. The morning of the 20th I woke up and it felt amazingly better. I was able to put on my sugical shoe and walk to the kitchen without help. I kept it propped and iced the 20th and 21st and by Monday the 22nd, I was off the hydrocodone and walking around in my surgical shoe just fine. I was amazed at how really pud this surgery was for me.

Well its going on 9 weeks now and I'm a little disappointed that I still don't have much flexibility in my big toe. When I stand or walk for long periods the whole ball of my foot goes numb (but the Doctor said there is no neuroma and there is still pain trying to wear anything but athletic shoes. The doctor said that some people just don't get a lot of relief with the surgery and end up having to have the joint fused. In my case, however..there was a piece of bone broken off and was sitting on top of the joint. Removing that helped a lot of the pain I had on the top of the joint and having shoes press on the top of the joint does not hurt anymore. It just still hurts when I bend or flex the toe.

I've ordered some MBT's ($219) and hope that they will give me some relief.

Result number: 183

Message Number 255270

Re: Chielectomy Recovery Timetable View Thread
Posted by Mary S on 2/19/09 at 14:42

I had a Chielectomy on Dec. 19,2008. I had considerable pain the day of surgery trying to get to the bathroom and was very concerned about how bad the pain was really going to be and for how long. I was taking Hydrocodone. The morning of the 20th I woke up and it felt amazingly better. I was able to put on my sugical shoe and walk to the kitchen without help. I kept it propped and iced the 20th and 21st and by Monday the 22nd, I was off the hydrocodone and walking around in my surgical shoe just fine. I was amazed at how really pud this surgery was for me.

Well its going on 9 weeks now and I'm a little disappointed that I still don't have much flexibility in my big toe. When I stand or walk for long periods the whole ball of my foot goes numb (but the Doctor said there is no neuroma and there is still pain trying to wear anything but athletic shoes. The doctor said that some people just don't get a lot of relief with the surgery and end up having to have the joint fused. In my case, however..there was a piece of bone broken off and was sitting on top of the joint. Removing that helped a lot of the pain I had on the top of the joint and having shoes press on the top of the joint does not hurt anymore. It just still hurts when I bend or flex the toe.

I've ordered some MBT's ($219) and hope that they will give me some relief.

Result number: 184

Message Number 255264

Re: Pain Location View Thread
Posted by Jillm on 2/19/09 at 14:00

Linda~ I suffer as well with PF and also achilles pain and neuroma pain. Up until all of this happened, I was a pretty healthy girl who never sat still. Now all I do is take short little walks from bed to bathroom, bathroom to couch, etc. This has totally taken over my life and other people I know have had it a short while, have done a few things and are now all better. I know the frustration you are going through. I try to stay positive, pray a LOT and do what I can. The house may not always be clean and the dishes linger in the sink for a while, but I can't do things like I used to and I'm only 37. Hang in there and keep trying conservative methods. It really does seem like there isn't 1 things that cures all-it's a stubborn ailment. You are not alone!!!!!

Result number: 185

Message Number 255210

Re: Feedback please on radiofrequency therapy. Good and bad View Thread
Posted by Jillm on 2/18/09 at 13:39

Ryan-I was actually thinking of the same thing-sounds pretty related to me, except that Cryo uses freezing. I'd be curious to find out as well.

So, can cryo be used to treat heel pain as well? I thought it was mostly for neuromas.

Result number: 186

Message Number 255127

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Deb on 2/16/09 at 21:08

Jill-
I am so sorry you have had to put up with this pain for so long. I know how frustrating it must have been.
I feel foolish worring about my foot now. I can walk quite a bit, and do not have the shocks when I do, however, I do have an achie pain, so that is probably normal for this time when having 2 bunions and neuroma work done on the same foot. I do have pain in my foot sometimes if I walk too much,the electric shocks are decreasing little by little---physical therapy and rubbing my foot where they start (like a windshield wipper) all seems to help. It is hard to find the right shoe to wear though. I needed sort of a dress shoe--nothing fancy, but it is very hard to find anything without a heel, and some are too flat, some hit your foot just above the toes, really cute but not so comfortable---and thats the good ones like clarks, merrel, and many others. With therapy they are actually changing the shape of my foot--sort of back to its normal shape, and that will take time---but atleast I think the shocks will go away, and I hope they go away for you too.
I guess patience is key here, and just knowing that it will go back to normal is helping relax me. You too?
Have a great week, and keep in touch!
Deb

Result number: 187

Message Number 255097

my aching feet and legs View Thread
Posted by RN7888 on 2/15/09 at 22:29

My problem began 22 years ago, I had a neuroma removed in my right foot. Which lead to having the neuroma removed every two years until 1999. At which point I had tarsal tunnel surgery bilateral. This gave me a few years of relief. But I'm to the point now I can't take it anymore. I'm 45 years and my feet and lower legs are painful 24/7. I have tried every insert, shoe, brace, therapy I can find. I can't wear shoes with backs on them so clogs are it. Right I'm sitting here and from my feet to my knees feel cold, burning and hurt. There are areas on both now that are numb and my right leg is getting smaller. EMG, MRI's all come back negative. The pain always starts in my feet and moves up to my knees and sometimes to my hips. I can't walk barefoot even on carpet, and God help me in the morning after being off my feet all nite. The medication that gives me any relief right now is tramadol. I have taken the anti-inflammatories for so long I am either allergic to them or it does not help. I have to go to an assigned clinic because of my husband's job and the last time I went there the doctor to me that it was plantar facitis and treatment didn't help. I've been checked for diabetes and that negative. Also the skin on my feet peel from the heel around the bottom outside to the ankle (where my scars are) across the bottom of my foot (it makes a triangle). I really don't know what it' like to live without pain and I don't know who ask or request to see. I'm in Indiana and if there is a specialist around here I would greatly appreciate the name. Thanks

Result number: 188

Message Number 255080

Re: Is it scar tissue or a stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 2/14/09 at 13:09

Doreen,

You ask some excellent questions. Naturally, without an evaluation, there is no way for me to give you an accurate analysis over the internet. However, I can give you some information based on many years of experience.

First of all, many patients often report the 'feeling' of walking on a lump on the bottom of their foot following 'neuroma' excision, even though no real lump exists. So, I'm not sure when you say you have a lump, it's something that you can actually feel and touch, or something that you perceive. If it's something you perceive, it's not uncommon and is something that usually resolves with time.

If it's an ACTUAL lump, it's something you need to discuss with your doctor as soon as possible.

As far as your continued symptoms and pain, there are several scenarios.

#1) It may be a little early in the healing phase to determine whether the surgery was successful.

#2) You may be correct, and there may be some scar tissue developing causing continued symptoms. However, scar tissue takes a while to develop and should not have resulted in continued pain from the day surgery was completed.

#3) A 'stump' neuroma is a possibility, but once again, it takes a while for this to develop, and should not cause continued symptoms immediately post operatively. Instead, I would consider that there may have been inadequate resection of the perineural fibrosis/neuroma.

#4) There is always the possibility that the pre operative diagnosis was not correct. Unfortunately, this does occur and when it does, the post operative course will result in symptoms that are identical to to the pre operative symptoms.

These are just a few of the possibilities. Please discuss your concerns with your surgeon. He/she may be able to resolve the discomfort with injection(s), paddings, physical therapy, etc., and may have suggestions to relief your problem and address your concerns.

Result number: 189

Message Number 255079

Is it scar tissue or a stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by DoreenF on 2/14/09 at 11:57

I am still experiencing the same pain that I had prior to the Neuroma removal. Most of my pain is in the 3rd & 4th toe everytime I walk I feel pain. I also have a small lump on the bottom of my foot. I have been dilligent in the messaging of my foot in hopes of alliviating scar tissue or stump neuroma. I have been walking for exercise quite often and usually around 2 miles each time, this is painful but I think needed to keep healing. I had my surgery on 12/19/08 so it has been about 8 weeks.

Thanks for any help you can offer on how to proceed.

Result number: 190

Message Number 255051

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by JillD on 2/13/09 at 09:09

Hi Deb,

The stump neuroma hurt the most with any pressure from the bottom of my foot - either bearing weight or massage or anything that pushed up from the bottom just below where the original Morton's neuroma was. I was unable to walk without major pain and if I beared it and walked anyway - it would turn my foot purple and hurt 24 x 7. This went on for about 10 months. It takes a couple of months for the stump to form after the surgery - but I was never pain free.

Saw the foot surgeon yesterday. He said the stump formed from the surgery a year ago was stuck under the bone on the weight bearing part of the foot which is why I had so much pain. He was able to unstick it, pull it up through (looks like a knitting needle pulling a thread up through various layers of bone and tissue - in and around - like untangling a cord or something like that). He then drilled a hole in a small bone in the foot and sewed and tied the nerve ending into the bone. I actually saw the xray with the hole in the bone and the photos of the nerve. Fascinating.

I am in a 'sandwich cast' which they removed and put back on yesterday. I am not to walk or drive for another month. They don't want to take a chance of the small bone with the hole fracturing so it must heal completely before weight bearing.

I'm doing GREAT. I'm addicted to my device called a 'knee walker' or a 'rollabout' which is a scotter like device you sit your knee on and scoot with your good foot. They can be rented from mobility stores for about $40/wee and are a god send. I used one last summer also.

I have high hopes that after a year I will be able to walk pain free, but again - I'm not there yet.

The best way to know if you have a stump neuroma is with a sonogram. It will be very visible that way if you have one. MRIs don't always show it.

Jill

Result number: 191

Message Number 255049

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by jack S on 2/12/09 at 22:25

Hi Deb,
Congrats on your cleaner. With all my medical bills I had to let my every other week help take time off. Enjoy and relax in your clean home! Sounds like you are getting good results from therapy. I see my lumbar dr tomorrow for my re check aftter another therapy appt. This is all so expensive and time consuming. I felt shocks in my foot for the first time since my block on last Friday. Not a good sign i am sure. I hope you have a great pain free day
Jacqui

Result number: 192

Message Number 254986

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Deb on 2/10/09 at 21:12

JillD-
I wrote a note to you earlier, but didn't put your name on it.
Sorry about that!
Just asked exactly how your stump neuroma felt.
How are you doing after your new surgery?
Good I hope.
I'm doing pretty good. I had PT. yesterday, and am hoping I improve from it soon. Another tomorrow & Thursday.
My foot is sore, and I still have the electric shocks when rubbed. Sometimes I think it is less, then again I'm not sure. I hope some day I realize 'hey the shocks are gone' I will be SOOOOOO happy if that happens.
I know my foot is responding to the PT. it almost hurts more in ways and I'm sure it is from the PT. and not moving it the way they do.
Hope you are doing better.
Keep in touch!
Deb

Result number: 193

Message Number 254961

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Deb on 2/10/09 at 11:30

Jack-
Your foot sounds just like mine except I do not have the swelling.
Actually now my whole foot hurts, but I think it is from the PT. They are rubbing more than I was, and I'm doing alot of stretching and just more of everything. I pray that this works!!!
I too hate to take medication for anything! Right now I'm taking the coumadin, potassium, synthroid, prevacid, and ativan when I freak out!!! Which is often! Also, I take an inhaler for asthma!
I would suggesst the medication you are taking, but I don't think they will give it to me anyway because of the coumadin. I might get off that in about a month.
Thank goodness I sleep well. If I didn't I would really be nuts!
How are you feeling today?
I'm feeling good about one thing today!!! I just hired a cleaning service to clean my main living area. We have vaulted ceilings, and they are major dust collectors-------anyway, they will clean my living room, dining room, kitchen, bathroom,back entry room & foyer top to bottom for $350.00. That might sound like alot, but there is alot to do and I'm SOOOOOOOOO happy! It will be awhile before I will be able to do anything like that, so I'm pumped!! They have alot to do!!
I wish they could do the whole upstairs, that would be really GROOVY!!! If I win the lottery they can have at the whole darn house! Heck with that-----we'll build a new house! HA!
Hope your day goes well.
Talk later,
Deb

Result number: 194

Message Number 254957

Foot pain related any way to having spider veins zapped? View Thread
Posted by Jillm on 2/10/09 at 09:26

I've had so many issues with foot pain over the years, so I'm reaching for anything, I realize. I've had spider veins zapped on legs/ankles a couple of times-have also had the sclerosing stuff injected to get rid of surface spider veins. Could any of this have caused my problems? I have heel pain, neuroma pain, achilles pain. I have been to multiple foot Dr's, orthopedic Dr's, Neurologists, Neurosurgeon, Pedorthists, etc and they all say my feet look normal (meaning nothing obvious with my mechanics). The pain I'm having just doesn't seem to match my physical being. thanks! Jill

Result number: 195

Message Number 254952

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by jack S on 2/10/09 at 00:52

Hi Deb
I felt a huge difference the morning after taking the two pills that very first night. They numb nerve endings. I only feel the shocks now when the the dr touches the ball and brushes his hand up toward the toes. He said to de-sensitize the nerves by rubbing the ball like a windsheild wiper on the carpet or any surface as I sit. I would ask for the pills. It sounds like you need to calm your nerve endings down. They said I would take them only a few weeks. I do not like and have not ever had to take pills before but I was scared and i am being the ideal patient. Whatever they say I am doing. At physical therapy today I had an ultrasound treatment. They did a pulsating ultrasound not a constant heat wave to prevent swelling. I felt even better after. Maybe the pills would help you relax about all we are going thru also! I can't believe I said that. I usually refuse meds. My PT said today if we are not sleeping well we are post poning our healing. I call the electric shocks bee stings. It is a strange feeling and I know how that feels. I hope I never say too much. I keep hearing my pod say how this is missed in many cases until it progresses far and the key is eArly detection. Try to Have a good night. JAcqui

Result number: 196

Message Number 254919

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Deb on 2/08/09 at 22:31

Jacqui-
I did google chronic pain syndrome, but of course I'm in denial thinking that isn't my problem.
You had the nerve block, right? And you are having pt. Also taking lyrica and ellival?
What do you think helped most? Do I just ask for these things?
Yes, I had quite a time with all my other medical problems----I think they stemmed from my absolute fear that something awful was going to happen to me! Being an EMT I know how fast blood clots can cause BIG problems, even death! I lost it mentally, then physically, and with Christmas so close and knowing I couldn't get it all done-----I was a mess. I'm still not myself----but I'm alot better than I was. Also, I wonder if I was up and about more than I should have been. I really didn't do that much, but I was moving around my house.
Keep me posted on your progress, and thank you for continuing to talk to me. Unless you have gone through this, you don't understand whats going on!
My family Dr. is keeping a very close eye on me with the INR levels. I had it checked once a week for quite a while, then when it was perfect for 2 weeks, I got to go 2 weeks with no blood test,but I go in tomorrow, hopefully I'm a perfect 2.5 again!
Take care!
Deb

Result number: 197

Message Number 254917

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by jack S on 2/08/09 at 21:04

Hi Deb,
Have you googled chronic pain syndrome? It talks about the nerves misfiring and my pod said slot of Drs miss it in early stages. I knew something was wrong since I had both feet done at the same time, I have my other foot as a comparison. I told my pod it was like having twins and one is walking already and the other has not rolled over yet. I am sorry to heAr of your other complications. You must have been terrified. Coumadin does mess with your potassium. Make sure they check your INR levels often. I think 2.5 is perfect. You will be in my prayers. Don't let the chronic pain syndrome web sites scare you. Arm yourself with information. You should probably have orthodox in your shoes to keep your weight off where the neuroma was. But let your pod do them. There are Alot of useless ones out there. I just went to nordstroms and got a pair of Merrills. They feel like. Tennis shoe and a clog for a roomier ball of the foot. And my $400 orthodox fit in them. Insurance rarely covers these. I found it amazing after just one lyrica and one ellival the first night my electric zapz were almost gone. These are anti depressants found to numb nerve endings. Maybe it would work for you. Keep intouch. Jacqui

Result number: 198

Message Number 254916

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Deb on 2/08/09 at 20:25

What did your stump neuroma feel like? Maybe I don't want to know. Ha!
My pt. said she didn't feel much if any scar tissue, and not much of anything else either--just normal foot I guess.
So why the electric shocks?
I also have pain in my calf and thigh from time to time---I'm sure that is from walking poorly---pt. should help that.
I'm sooooo ready for normal!
Birmingham Alabama hugh? Wow! We have the Mayo Clinic just 90 miles from our home! If I don't get this problem under control I'm headed there.
I'm 10 almost 11 weeks out from surgery, and I dont know exactly how I'm supposed to be feeling. I'm pretty sure I'm expecting alot, but then again I dont know what to expect so I'm kinda CRAZY!
Let me know how your doing too. We can share!
Thanks,
Deb
PS-
I can walk pretty good, I followed my husband allll around the Lowes store today, but I did have some pain, but atleast I can walk---slowly. I think my shoes were the problem today! I need better shoes!!

Result number: 199

Message Number 254915

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Deb on 2/08/09 at 20:00

Hi Jack-
Thank You soooo much for sharing. Sounds like you went through alot, and I hope it works for you.
I have another pt. apt tomorrow, and I'm praying it will bring me out of whatever it is I'm going through.
I didn't tell you all I have been through---not only did I have the both bunions removed along with the neuroma, but a week later I developed a blood clot in my calf. It scared me to death!
The treatment for it is lovenox(sp?) injections in my tummy twice a day for 5 days, and taking coumadin for blood thinning. Well, I don't think the medication agreed with me, and I felt sick all the time with no appetite, and I don't think I was getting enough fluids, hence by the next weekend, I was feeling very ill---racing heart and exhaustion--- my husband took me to emergency room again, and they told me I needed potassium & fluids. O.K. we did that, then the next week it is about a week and a half before Christmas, and I had an anxiety attack---my husband called the ambulance(which I also work with) and took me to hosp. they did a ct scan because I was having numbness and tingling on my left face, neck, and arm. I was very upset thinking I may be having a stroke---well, needless to say I was given medication to take care of the anxiety, and have been feeling good one day and not so good the next---now with the electric shocks in my foot------I've about had it!!!
Long story, but if I sound anxious, I am!!! Anyway I would take any information I can get, and hope someone out there can tell me these electric shocks will go a way!!!!
My pt. says she thinks these shocks at this point are pretty normal, and within a few weeks I will notice a big change. Pray that I do!
Another question-----what are the best shoes to wear at this point. I wear nike shox when I do my speed walking, and that is what I'm wearing now, but the pt. suggested I find another shoe, because there is a bit of a higher heel on the shox----so I do have another pr. of nikes and have been wearing them only to find out that they bother me more than the other ones did.
I tell you-----this foot business is exhausting!!!!!
Well, keep me posted on how you are feeling, and I will do the same!
As I read these posts, I realize I'm really a long way from everyone!
I live in Iowa, and we have great surgeons close by, I don't really know how to make sure I'm getting the care I need. All I know is that I told my pod. I REALLY need to get better soon, and they assured me at the office (his nurse talks to me more that the doc. does) We will get to the bottom of this one way or another. Physical therapy is the next step! Sooooo.... Here we go!
Have a great night!
Deb

Result number: 200

Message Number 254908

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Ryan on 2/08/09 at 17:03

Hope you'll continue to update us from time to time on your outcome.
Thanks for posting your doctors name. Folks here always look for referrals. Maybe you've eliminated some research for folks in need of help.

Result number: 201

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