neuroma Search Results

Home The Book Dr Articles Products Message Boards Journal Articles Search Our Surveys Surgery ESWT Dr Messages Find Good Drs video


Search on portion of word, single word, or exact phrase.


Message Boards and Database
Journal Articles & Abstracts
Scott's heelspurs.com book

Begin Message Board Search

Searching file 26

Message Number 266317
Re: Dr. Wedemeyer View Thread
Posted by Nancy on 7/19/10 at 21:27

I now know the orthotics that were made for me by the Westwood doctor were way too soft and the diagnosis was not accurate either.

The PTTD and PF is in both feet and the nerve symptoms are in the arches of both feet as well. I am not a diabetic and I am healthy otherwise - I am very hypermobile.

I have had two bunion surgeries bi-laterally ages ago, and failed neuroma surgeries in 2005. Other than that - a very healthy person and I would like my active life back. I have been suffering for around 5 years with the pain levels gradually increasing.

I really don't trust surgery. It scares me that I could get worse afterwards and I don't know who I would trust after all this time to chose as a surgeon. A couple of years ago I went to USC and was advised to have a medial fasciotomy, but the doctor never watched me walk and miss the PTTD entirely. I chose another option of my second opinion doctor to wear a fiberglass cast on one foot for 6 weeks to see if it helped, but it didn't. What can you advise?

Result number: 1

Message Number 266129

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by marie b on 7/08/10 at 16:20

I had surgery 3 years ago and have never been right since
day one I find the best things to wear on my feet and I can still walk over a mile in are the ugly shoes called CROCS they are the best thing for people with Neuromes I wish I had them sooner it doesnt matter that they are ugly I wear them all the time in the house and if I havd been out and my foot is hurting I put them on as soon as I walk through the door Its almost instant relief
Hope this helps some of you with the same problem as I have
Regards Marie B

Result number: 2

Message Number 266128

Re: Morton's Neuroma-both feet View Thread
Posted by Rochelle on 7/08/10 at 15:14

Dr. DSW
Thank you for your responses. I am following up today with Dr. Joseph D. Neary, DPM in Portland, Oregon. He is part of the kaiser network I currently belong to so will see what he has to say about my next options.

I did look up some info on Dr. Dockery and will persue seeing him or his wife if I can't get any promising treatment in Portland.

Do you see many people under go a second surgery for the neuroma with good results? Not that I really want to go that route....
With alchol injections do they cause scar tissue that can be a problem?

What is the current opinions of alcohol injections v.s. cryrosurgery? Should both these procedures absoulutely be performed with ultrasound or other imaging guidance?

Thanks Again
Rochelle

I almost feel their sould be a clearing house for the latest greatest information for neuroma treatment(s). It's so debilatating.

Result number: 3

Message Number 266091

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by mimi g on 7/05/10 at 22:01

I had neuroma surgery on the 24th. Week one was great. no pain what so ever Two days ago, unbearable pain - lots of burning. Is this normal for post-op?

Result number: 4

Message Number 266033

Re: Metarsalgia Capsulitis View Thread
Posted by Dhavalm on 7/02/10 at 09:51

Has anyone heard of Cryosurgery for treating Metarsalgia Capsulitis?

I too had my share of going to 3 podiatrists for the similar issue. First podiatrist treated with cortizone assuming it as morton's neuroma. Second podiatrist provided with orthotics and also treated with cortizone and assumed it as capsulitis. Third podiatrist treated it with fracture boot, cortizone, and orthotics again assuming it as capsulitis probably. Last option he suggested was cryosurgery. And believe me 2 of these 3 podiatrist are well known. I am so disappointed that in spite of such a technological advancement we have, no one is able to diagnose and treat it accordingly. My pain is 1.5 yrs old and going worse day by day. I don't know how to treat this now.

Any suggestions from experts or from Doctors are welcome. Please provide us proper guidance.

THanks,
D

Result number: 5

Message Number 265889

Re: Morton's Neuroma-both feet View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 6/24/10 at 21:51

I have had tremendous success with alcohol injections with my patients, and relatively good success with patients I've seen from other doctors that have had prior surgery.

I would STRONGLY recommend Dr. Dockery or his wife in Washington state.

Result number: 6

Message Number 265877

Re: Morton's Neuroma-both feet View Thread
Posted by Rochelle on 6/24/10 at 13:22

Dr. DSW
Your right I did mean supine :)

I did look into the alcohol injections. The pod I'm seeing isn't experienced with them. And it seemed overall the outcome wasn't stellar from what I read and herd....

It makes sense to me to have imaging studies done and that's a reason I am looking for someone that's expert to consult with.

What's your opinion on cyrosurgery? Also treating scar tissue?

I just think the surgery I've had didn't slove the problem. What percent of cases with failed surgery have success with alcohol injections? Does the result last?

Thanks
Rochelle

Result number: 7

Message Number 265853

Re: Morton's Neuroma-both feet View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 6/23/10 at 17:59

You state you were 'prone' during your recovery with your foot elevated. Prone means you were on your stomach, are you sure you weren't supine, which means you were on your back?

I personally not perform a 'neuroma' surgery without an imaging study prior to the surgery, whether it be a diagnostic ultrasound or an MRI with contrast.

Since you are having continued pain, your doctor should really consider some imaging studies at this point. Prior to the surgery, I know you had cortisone injections, but did your doctor ever attempt sclerosing alcohol injections?

I have had tremendous success utilizing these injections on my patients, and this has prevented the majority of my 'neuroma' patients from going to the operating room. I have also utilized these injections for patients that have failed surgery from other doctors.

An excellent doctor who I would strongly recommend practices in Washington state is Gary Dockery DPM. He really was the first to publish the well known article on sclerosing alcohol injections, and he is very well known and respected surgically. He also practices with his wife Mary Campbell, DPM, who is also well respected.

Result number: 8

Message Number 265848

Really good foot surgeon in the Northwest Unites States View Thread
Posted by Rochelle on 6/23/10 at 15:39

I am looking for an expert in the treatment of morton's neuroma in the northwest united states.

Please let me know if you have found a great surgeon in this area.

I recently had on surgery for a neuroma and my need another so I want to find the best.

Thanks
Rochelle

Result number: 9

Message Number 265846

Next steps post neuromectomy still having pain View Thread
Posted by Rochelle on 6/23/10 at 15:32

Dr. Ed
This is the first I've herd of attending to scar tissue post neromaectomy. I had a surgery on June 18th, 2010. I am very healthy and no chronic health contidtions. I was very active until neuroma pain became unbearable. After getting releif with steroid injections for about a year and half I got concerned about lasting side effects from the medication (fat pad thinnning, etc.) so I opted for surgery. I am now still having pain in the ball of my foot and I get a eletric sensation up my third toe when I touch the neuroma area, whcih I didn't have before surgery. My neuroma was between my 2nd and 3rd toes.
I am not able to walk with any duration or for exercise without a severe pain.

So I want to figure out my next steps:
should I request/discuss the treatment for scar tissue?
Should I seek imaging which hasn't been done beyond an x-ray?
If part of the nerve was left behind would there be a high chance of success with a second procedure with a good surgeon?

I am in the Northwest United States and would appreciate referrals for experienced suregons in my area.

Thank you
Rochelle

Result number: 10

Message Number 265845

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Rochelle on 6/23/10 at 15:20

Dr. Ed
This is the first I've herd of attending to scar tissue post neromaectomy. I had a surgery on June 18th, 2010. I am very healthy and no chronic health contidtions. I was very active until neuroma pain became unbearable. After getting releif with steroid injections for about a year and half I got concerned about lasting side effects from the medication (fat pad thinnning, etc.) so I opted for surgery. I am now still having pain in the ball of my foot and I get a eletric sensation up my third toe when I touch the neuroma area, whcih I didn't have before surgery. My neuroma was between my 2nd and 3rd toes.
I am not able to walk with any duration or for exercise without a severe pain.

So I want to figure out my next steps:
should I request/discuss the treatment for scar tissue?
Should I seek imaging which hasn't been done beyond an x-ray?
If part of the nerve was left behind would there be a high chance of success with a second procedure with a good surgeon?

I am in the Northwest United States and would appreciate referrals for experienced suregons in my area.

Thank you
Rochelle

Result number: 11

Message Number 265843

Re: Morton's Neuroma-both feet View Thread
Posted by Rochelle on 6/23/10 at 14:59

HI
Wanted to clarify that when my mom had her surgery she did each foot separately, not both at the same time per her MD's advice.

I spoke to her a couple of days ago, because nearly six weeks out I am still having significant pain with walking. In her experience she did say it took six months before she stopped thinking about her feet (being painful.

In my case I was prone for two weeks with my foot elevated. Stitches out two weeks post op and started walking around some. Currently I walk the minimal amount possible to get through my day; work, shopping etc. Definitely not walking for exercise or with any type of duration.

And yes I am talking about my own personal experience here and not giving direct advice. Bottom line a good experienced surgeon that will listen to your concerns is very important.

I am very healthy HWP non smoking female and there no good reason I wouldn't heal well, etc.

At this point I really don't know if this is the outcome I should expect at nearly six weeks out. It feels as though not all of the nerve was taken out. But maybe it's lingering swelling...

A question of mine is, is it reasonable to expect some sort of imaging to sort out my problem. To date I've had none and my podiatrist has insisted it's not helpful. So it leaves me wonder if that's true or imaging isn't readily available, it's expensive or he isn't expert in using it.

Again if there are any recommendations for good foot surgeons in the Northwest US I would appreciate it.

Good luck

Result number: 12

Message Number 265828

Re: Morton's Neuroma-both feet View Thread
Posted by Laurie C. on 6/22/10 at 09:54

The other point that was missed is that this board does not provide a representative sample of foot surgery patients. The results and responses are quite skewed as many of them have ongoing problems. The persons with wonderful results and/or no longer any foot problems would not be posting here.

Result number: 13

Message Number 265827

Re: Morton's Neuroma-both feet View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 6/22/10 at 07:36

http://heel.server327.com/bbs/http://heel.server327.com/bbs/bbt.cgi?n=253585

Result number: 14

Message Number 265826

Re: Morton's Neuroma-both feet View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 6/22/10 at 07:29

I believe you completely missed my point. I never stated doctors are 'G-ds', nor did I state doctors aren't fallable.

I see no where in my post where I'm protecting my profession and my 'back is up'. As a matter of fact, I strongly resent those statements.

My post was simply to protect you from a lot of misinformation.

How is the feedback from a total stranger, who you no nothing about, who's case you no nothing about and who's surgeon's skills you know nothing about going to impact YOU?

That person may have other co-existing health problems you don't. That person may not have the ability to heal as well as you. That person may have a much lower threshold of pain than you. That person may smoke 2 packs of cigarettes daily and you don't. That person may not have complied with the doctor's post operative instructions. That person may not have had a surgeon with the skills or competence level of your doctor. That person's doctor may have had a completely different surgical approach or post operative regimen.

How is THAT defensive??? How is THAT protecting my profession??

What if a patient comes on here and tells you that it was the worst experience of his/her life. Will that dictate that you decide not to have surgery? On the other hand, what if a patient comes on here and tells you that he/she had the surgery, never had one minute of pain and it was 'cake'. Does that mean you won't have any pain or post op complications? Of course not.

I am in a group practice and all the doctors in the practice basically have different protocols for their patients for specific procedures. For my 'bunionectomy' patients, I usually utilize screws to maintain sugical correction, and some in my group use the older 'wires', which works well for them. I utilize Cam walker removal casts, and no crutches, and they use plaster splints and crutches for their patients.

I never told you in my response to stop educating yourself or not to research your condition or treatment options. I simply recommended that you dont' 'survey' other patients for their experiences, since that will have no impact or relativity to your case.

However, you decided to reply to my post with a series of insults, stating that I was attempting to protect my profession and that doctors weren't 'G-ds' nor infallable, comments that I never came even CLOSE to inferring.

I was simply attempting to protect YOU from misinformation, based on my over 20 years experience witnessed patients asking these questions in my practice and the last several years on this website.

The majority appreciate my response once they understand my intentioin, but apparently you missed the point.

Result number: 15

Message Number 265823

Re: Morton's Neuroma-both feet View Thread
Posted by Kim/AR on 6/22/10 at 07:01

Thanks for your response. With all due respect to your many years of education and practice, I strongly believe it is the patient's responsibility to perform as much research as possible before making a decision to have anyone perform a surgical procedure on their body. For decades patients have made poor decisions based solely on a doctor's judgement. Doctors are not Gods and they are not infallable. My judgement plays a more important role in this decision than any doctor's and I have a responsibility to research this procedure and get the opinions of others prior to making a decision that will alter my lifestyle for the better or for the worse. Please do not forget that the surgeon has some skin in this game as well. It's his livelihood; it's my lifestyle. I understand you are protecting your profession and your back is up because I'm asking others without your level of education and experience for their opinions. That doesn't make them any less valid. Please know that I am not giving any one opinion any more weight than another; at this point I am collecting data.

Result number: 16

Message Number 265818

Re: Morton's Neuroma-both feet View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 6/21/10 at 21:26

I would caution you regarding making comparisons with other patients. Another patient's experience has absolutely no bearing on how you will heal, since every individual is different, and every surgeon is different.

After performing surgery for well over 20 years, I can tell you as a matter of fact, making any comparison is simply not valid, and will have no impact on your individual case. Please simply rely on the judgement of your doctor and if you have concerns, address those concerns to your doctor, who is the most qualified to answer all your questions.

Result number: 17

Message Number 265811

Re: Surgery Morton's Neuroma 2 feet at once View Thread
Posted by Kim/AR on 6/21/10 at 14:50

Thank you for the speedy response. I appreciate your input.

Result number: 18

Message Number 265805

Re: Surgery Morton's Neuroma 2 feet at once View Thread
Posted by Dr. Ed on 6/20/10 at 00:12

Kim:

The decision to perform surgery on two feet vs. one foot at a time is often related to the magnitude of the procedures performed. A procedure that involves non-weight bearing is generally performed on one foot at a time. Procedures that involve relatively quick recovery times such as neuroma surgery may be performed bilaterally. Performing the procedures bilaterally involves one trip to the OR vs. two thus saving time and money and one recovery period.

Hematomas can be avoided by good surgical technique and elevation of the feet post-operatively. As far as going back to work in 3 days, it would probably be with surgical shoes and not being on one's feet for most of the day.

Dr. Ed

Result number: 19

Message Number 265804

Re: Morton's Neuroma-both feet View Thread
Posted by Kim/AR on 6/19/10 at 20:38

Thanks for the response. Did your Mom's recuperation go well having both feet done at once? How long post-op before she could get around? And, how long was it before you could move about post-op?

Result number: 20

Message Number 265801

Re: Morton's Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Sherry P on 6/19/10 at 13:54

I had the surgery 14 months ago after 6 years of MN. It was not very successful but the surgeon did redirect my nerves toward the back of my foot after he cut much of them out. I developed a lot of scar tissue which is putting additional pressure on the remains nerves and causing even more pain. I just had Tenolytis (sp) surgery where they put a small incision in the base of the toe and cut the sheath around the tendons which is minor and should help relieve some of the pain. During this minor procedure, the surgeon took out some of the scar tissue. Therefore, if you do opt for surgery, make sure your doctor begins the injections to break up the scar tissue early on and avoid the issue I had. Good Luck

Result number: 21

Message Number 265800

Re: Morton's Neuroma-both feet View Thread
Posted by Rochelle on 6/19/10 at 12:24

My mom had neuroma a surgery in both feet but at the time they recommended she have foot done at a time. which she did.


I just had a neuromaectomy in my left foot; incision on top of the foot. Five weeks post op my swelling is gone but I think there still some 'stumb' left that the whole thing wasn't taken out. So I now have hard clicky thing on the base for my Fore foot. Also when I thouch this area I get a electric sensation up to my third toe.
So of cousre I am worried that the whole thng wasn't taken out or I have somethng else wrong with my foot.

I go to Kaiser in Portland Oregon and to date I have met total resistance in getting an MRI or other imagaing. So I am going to have research my next step and am willing to go outside my insurance if need be if I can find a good solution. The Cyro technique sounds interesting so I want to find out more about that.

If anyone has a good foot doc in the Northwest US they would recommend please let me know.

THings I am doing post op:
I am doing foot exercises for general metarsal imfammation; streching, pogo jumping, grabbing a towel with my toes, standing and pulling myself foreward by pinching my toes.
ice massage
massage, but am worried the vibrating massage and red light will cause crazy nerve regrowth.
I get some relief wearing the rocker type shoe with added inserts. Avia brand, 9 wide kinda work.

I too find my podiatrist kinds of __y and not that concerned with my problem.

Good luck

Also I read where someone did yoga exercised with their feet and would spend time spreading their toes with the toes separators they use for pedicures.

This is the only surgery I've ever had and I really don't want to have another but if it would give me relief and I could walk again I'd consider it. I am really interested in the cyrosurgery.

Yesterday I was able to in line skate with out pain and I think I can bike alright. Walking is the main issue here. I used to walk nearly daily three miles and do group areobics three days a week. Deninfately not doing that now.

My neuroma was between my 2nd and 3rd toes, the inside areas of those toes are now numb from the surgery which I could live with but it's the damn nub under the ball of my foot I can't live with.

I am really peeved that my podiatrist has done no imaging.

Result number: 22

Message Number 265799

Surgery Morton's Neuroma 2 feet at once View Thread
Posted by Kim/AR on 6/19/10 at 11:50

I am scheduled to have surgery June 30 for Morton's Neuroma on both feet at the same time.

After reading this and other forums I am hesitant to have both feet operated on at the same time. My surgeon says my recovery will be short - I should plan on 3 days off my feet, hobbling for another day or two and back to work (I am a residential real estate appraiser) a week out.

I am confident in his abilities, but am concerned about being in a considerable amount of pain, avoiding a hematoma and/or complicating the healing process if I cannot stand on at least one 'good' foot.

I'm looking for pros and cons to a procedure on both feet at the same time. Thanks,

Result number: 23

Message Number 265780

Morton's Neuroma-both feet View Thread
Posted by Kim/AR on 6/17/10 at 07:39

I am scheduled for surgery June 30, 2010 for Morton's Neuromas in both feet between 2nd and 3rd toes. Surgery is from the top of the foot and the nerve will be 'tucked' into a muscle. I have been told by the surgeon that he recommends I do both feet at once. He says I should plan on being off my feet for 3 days to avoid hematomas, then some activity is ok after that. I am a real estate appraiser who walks alot on uneven ground. I am also a power-walker who walks 5-6 miles a day and am training for a half marathon. The surgeon said I could go back to power walking 3 weeks post-op.

I'm seriously reconsidering this procedure on not only both feet but 1 at a time based on what I've read on this and other forums. I'm interested in talking with someone who has had this surgery on both feet at the same time. Thanks,

Result number: 24

Message Number 265779

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Kim/AR on 6/17/10 at 07:28

Hi all. I am scheduled to have surgery on June 30, 2010 for neuromas in both feet at the same time (between 2nd and 3rd toes). The surgeon says he will tuck the severed nerve into muscle tissue to avoid later complications. After reading this and several other forum sites, I'm seriously reconsidering this procedure and just living with the pain I've suffered for the last 6-7 years; never wearing heels again, wearing wide-toe-box shoes and UGGs. I am a power walker who walks 5-6 miles a day and in training for a half marathon.

I am a real estate appraiser who is on her feet on uneven ground for several hours a day. My surgeon says I should be off my feet entirely for 3 days to avoid hematomas, then restrain from excessive activity for another 3 weeks before resuming my walking regimen. Is this realistic?

Result number: 25

Message Number 265774

Re: Pain 4 months after TTS release surgery View Thread
Posted by Jessica S on 6/16/10 at 15:33

well I saw a new doctor yesterday and he is going back and reopening my tarsal surgery and getting out 2 mortons neuromas, and releasing the nerve on my back calf. surgery should take 3 hours to do. but it sounds promising on fixing my pain. oh and I swear by Crocks! the rubber shoe is not too pretty but doesn't touch my ankle and is cushioning for my bruised heel. good luck to ya and Ill write back after surgery.

Result number: 26

Message Number 265766

Re: Mortons Neuroma? View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 6/16/10 at 06:44

With the limited time many of us have available, and the fact that we volunteer out time, it's simply not possible to provide answers to every question. That's particularly true when someone requests extremely specific answers such as you have that may take up to one half hour to answer accurately.

In an attempt to satisfy your inquiries, I will give a quick response.

First of all, it is possible to have a neuroma that is not visualized on a diagnostic ultrasound. It depends on the skill of the technician administering the exam and the skill of the doctor reading the study.

An MRI with contrast will certainly be helpful, but the examining and treating doctor must rely on his//her skills and clinical judgement. If the doctor does not believe a 'neuroma' is present, then treating a neuroma via the methods you discuss is a moot point.

1) I am not going to provide a complete list of complications that can occur with the use of cryosurgery, that will be the responsibility of the cryosurgeon you choose if you go that route. However, you can not develop a 'stump' neuroma from cryosurgery, since it does not involve removing/excising the 'neuroma'.

2) Similarly, you can not get a 'stump' neuroma from alcohol injections, since a stump neuroma forms following the excision of a neuroma where the 'stump' or resected end of the nerve re-grows.

3) Yes, as per my previous comments, if a doctor believes that there is a neuroma via his/her clinical findings, he/she may treat it as such despite a 'negative' ultrasound. An ultrasound is not always a definitive diagnostic tool.

4) A diagnostic nerve block simply involves injecting local anesthetic along the course of the suspected nerve to see if it provides temporary relief. Temporary relief would often indicate involvement of that nerve vs. other causes of the pain.

5) Risks of alcohol injections have been discussed many times on this site, and I welcome you do perform a 'search' via the search function.

6) This question is simply not appropriate. I can not tell YOU what to tell another doctor that has no experience performing these injections. In my opinion, you shouldn't have to 'convince' a doctor that has 'no experience' to perform this injection on you, nor should I have to tell you the technique to tell your doctor or the important steps for the injection to be administered properly. I actually find that question slightly 'bizarre'. If your doctor doesn't know how to perform the procedure, he should read how to do it in an up to date journal, take a course or read it in an up to date textbook, or more appropriately, consult a colleague with experience.

Result number: 27

Message Number 265763

Re: Mortons Neuroma? View Thread
Posted by Brianpk on 6/15/10 at 22:10

Aust I'm not a doc and wont answer any of your questions on this board, but look in the 'Social' message board for a post about Morton's.

Result number: 28

Message Number 265717

Re: Mortons Neuroma? View Thread
Posted by Aust on 6/12/10 at 06:14

Im just wondering why nobody is answering my questions?

Result number: 29

Message Number 265652

Re: Future issue's from TTS View Thread
Posted by Bill C on 6/10/10 at 09:54

John C., I will preface my comments with the usual 'every case is different' statement. You ask a very important question.

As an 18 year sufferer of TTS I will tell you how it has impacted me. 18 years is roughly one third of my life. I finally had surgery as a last resort 2 months ago and have noticed some improvement a specific type of pain, but still have some annoying symptoms that I hoped would go away but have not. One of these symptoms is the skin around my medial malleolus is very sensitive and anything touching it, like shoes, pant leg, etc. is very annoying. That problem is unrelieved.

I was very athletic when I was younger and continued to be into adulthood. I played very competitive hockey as an adult, even with this problem, until I was 48 years old. I am able to “play in pain” which is something athletes and learn. (Having a metal rod placed in my neck finally ended my hockey career) As a result of maintaining activity, my weight is normal and I am still in reasonably good shape. I continued to lift weights (not legs) starting five days after surgery.

With that being said, I think the impact of TTS with me has been significant. I have emotional fatigue, pain fatigue, obsession over footwear, a financial burden from buying multiple shoes and gimmicks including orthotics, magnet insoles, braces, wraps, creams, acupuncture, ect. I also have toenail fungus on the big toe and 4th toe. I find it interesting that I only have it on those 2 nails and have had it since my symptoms began. Both toes have some numbness. All the other toes with normal nails have normal sensation. When I look at pictures of me when I was young, the first thing I look at is what kind of shoes I was wearing.

There are other issues where people think I am a hypochondriac, a whiner, a malingerer, etc. Example: My father has known about my ankle problem for years and still acts like a jerk if the problem is mentioned. Not long ago when he found out I was having surgery, he asked me, 'What’s wrong with your ankle?' I have explained my symptoms to more than 10 different doctors over the years. Some looked at their watch, others became glassy eyed, almost all said to “try these orthotics”.

I think the problem can also evolve into other issues like a Morton’s neuroma, back pain, and so on (it has with me). My calf on the affected side is one inch smaller than the other. My affected foot has shrunk causing me to wear 2 different size shoes.

If you ask me in ten years, when I am 28 years into this, I will probably have even more issues.

Result number: 30

Message Number 265613

Re: Alcohol Injections / Morton's neuroma /Cryosurgery, for Will View Thread
Posted by Aust on 6/09/10 at 07:49

With this nerve block is it possible to distinguish between bursitis and a neuroma? I too have the click and neuroma like symptoms (pain in the area, pain that has radiated down the third and forth toes, burning. No neuroma was seen under ultrasound but bursitis was. I dont know anything about a nerve block with local but if performed is it possible that the pain from bursitis could also be relieved making it difficult to distinguish between bursitis and a neuroma?

Result number: 31

Message Number 265612

Mortons Neuroma? View Thread
Posted by Aust on 6/09/10 at 07:18

Hello everyone,

Firstly I would like to say thanks to the doctors for answering our questions and helping us suffers beat this troublesome mortons neuroma.

I have had a niggling pain in my left foot for years between the third and fourth metarsal heads (due to wearing narrow slip on shoes)that become very painful January 2009 after I tore my hamstring causing me to place excessive pressure on the metarsal region when walking. I then put more pressure on the right foot and got the same pain in the right foot.

Well its been 6 mths now and my feet are still both sore. I had 2 cortisone injections in the left 'bad' foot for bursitis (as under ultrasound no neuroma was seen and bursitis was). BUT I think/suspect I have a neuroma or similar damage to this nerve as in addition to having the mulders click (which I know can be caused by bursitis) and have had the pain raiditing down the toes. My toes have even seperated and now have a gap between them. I am puzzled however as I spent a month in a wheel chair trying to give my feet max rest and the 4th metarsal joint on both feet became sore and swollen. the pain and swelling has subsided in the left foot but the right foot is still sore in the joint and i am fearful that the pain could easily come back in the previoulsy worse left foot. One doctor said the nerve damage could have caused this joint pain. I also had x rays, a bone scan and blood tests to rule out arthritis, fractures etc. As yet I still do not have a clear diagnosis and am waiting to see a foot surgeon and will have an mri then(Australia has a referral system and it can take months to see a private surgeon). My pain has decreased after taking panafcort and more ibuprofen but remains.

I am terrified of the stump neuroma. I am only 29 and this has ruined my year and dont want to be in pain for the rest of my life. I am considering flying to america to have the cryosurgery. Also in Australia they do not commonly do the alcohol injections.

My questions:

1. What are the risks of cryosurgery? Is it just scar tissue? Is it possible to get a stump neuroma from cryosurgery?

2. Is it possible to get a stump neuroma from alcohol injections?

3. Is it possible to have alcohol injections or cryosurgery if you cant see the neuroma under ultrasound?

4. How is the diagnostic nerve block done?

5. What are the risks of alcohol injections?

6. What is improtant in administering alcohol injections? I might be able to convince a doctor here to give me the injections but they would have no prior experience performing this procedure.

7. Any advice for my situation?

THANK YOU VERY MUCH.

Result number: 32

Message Number 265610

Re: Alcohol Injections / Morton's neuroma /Cryosurgery, for Will View Thread
Posted by Aust on 6/09/10 at 07:10

Hello everyone,

Firstly I would like to say thanks to the doctors for answering our questions and helping us suffers beat this troublesome mortons neuroma.

I have had a niggling pain in my left foot for years between the third and fourth metarsal heads (due to wearing narrow slip on shoes)that become very painful January 2009 after I tore my hamstring causing me to place excessive pressure on the metarsal region when walking. I then put more pressure on the right foot and got the same pain in the right foot.

Well its been 6 mths now and my feet are still both sore. I had 2 cortisone injections in the left 'bad' foot for bursitis (as under ultrasound no neuroma was seen and bursitis was). BUT I think/suspect I have a neuroma or similar damage to this nerve as in addition to having the mulders click (which I know can be caused by bursitis) and have had the pain raiditing down the toes. My toes have even seperated and now have a gap between them. I am puzzled however as I spent a month in a wheel chair trying to give my feet max rest and the 4th metarsal joint on both feet became sore and swollen. the pain and swelling has subsided in the left foot but the right foot is still sore in the joint and i am fearful that the pain could easily come back in the previoulsy worse left foot. One doctor said the nerve damage could have caused this joint pain. I also had x rays, a bone scan and blood tests to rule out arthritis, fractures etc. As yet I still do not have a clear diagnosis and am waiting to see a foot surgeon and will have an mri then(Australia has a referral system and it can take months to see a private surgeon). My pain has decreased after taking panafcort and more ibuprofen but remains.

I am terrified of the stump neuroma. I am only 29 and this has ruined my year and dont want to be in pain for the rest of my life. I am considering flying to america to have the cryosurgery. Also in Australia they do not commonly do the alcohol injections.

My questions:

1. What are the risks of cryosurgery? Is it just scar tissue? Is it possible to get a stump neuroma from cryosurgery?

2. Is it possible to get a stump neuroma from alcohol injections?

3. Is it possible to have alcohol injections, or cryosurgery, if you cant see the neuroma under ultrasound?

4. How is the diagnostic nerve block done?

5. What are the risks of alcohol injections?

6. What is improtant in administering alcohol injections? I might be able to convince a doctor here to give me the injections but they would have no prior experience performing this procedure.

7. Any advice for my situation?

THANK YOU VERY MUCH.

Result number: 33

Message Number 265591

BUMP ON BOTTOM OF FOOT, NEED MRI View Thread
Posted by MANDY T on 6/08/10 at 08:32

I AM A 21 YEAR OLD FEMALE.I've HAD A LUMP/BUMP on the bottom of my foot for about 5-6 mths. I went to the podiatrist last wk. and he said the bump is a little less than 2 cm. It doesn't really hurt. It's near the heel. He ordered an x-ray which was negative for heel spurs, etc. Now he wants to do an MRI and I am very nervous. He said it may be a neuroma or cyst, and most likely is benign, but I am very nervous that it could be malignant. I'm trying to stay positive, and thinking that it's caused because I wear flip flops alot, but I'm still scared. If they find something, do they biopsy it or can an MRI show if tissue or a mass etc. is benign?

Result number: 34

Message Number 265503

Re: Just Misserable View Thread
Posted by Annette on 6/03/10 at 03:38

Wow--reading these posts just makes me realize that I'm not crazy, that there are people out there that experience this type of pain and it's so sad. I try not to complain to my family anymore..it's just not fair to them, so I deal with it and try to tell myself that there are people out there that have more to deal with than I do.

I'm doing physical therapy, massage, stretching and weekly accupuncture. I take a percocet only when I can't stand the pain and that's about once a day lately. Lately my sciatica is hurting alot and this 4th toe thing (I think its a mortons neuroma) is my biggest cause of pain.

I'm not nearly in as much pain as some of you, and I do have some relief since the TTS surgery. I really do hope and pray you all find relief--just know you're not alone and I care :)

Result number: 35

Message Number 265489

Re: Another Issue starting.. I think View Thread
Posted by Bill C on 6/02/10 at 23:16

I am not sure what you meant when you said that the chiropracter 'helped it out of her' in regards to her Morton's Neuroma. I am not an expert on chiropractors, but I believe they perform spinal manipulations to alleviate back pain. I have gone to a chiropractor occasionally for back issues. The results are about equal to waiting it out. Doctors used to call this a 'tincture of time'. I even told the chiropractor about my neuroma and he pulled on my foot and clicked it with his clicker a few times. Surgery was the only thing that helped me, and I dealt with the pain for more than 5 years. Ultrasound, orthotics, steroid injections, and PT did not relieve the problem. I wish it had been that simple as going to a chiroprator.

Result number: 36

Message Number 265428

Re: Another Issue starting.. I think View Thread
Posted by Cher on 5/30/10 at 16:11

I just wanted to say, that I met a lady at my chiropractor's that had morton's neuroma and was going to have to have surgery 'til she came to that office and they helped it out of her. I have never had a neuroma, but they are working with me on my TTS symptoms.
If you go to www.gonstead.org
you might find a dr. that specializes in that method.
I do not get any money for saying this.
I am just a fellow sufferer like you all, 8 months into this, and searching for my answer for relief.

Cher

Result number: 37

Message Number 265407

Re: still in pain View Thread
Posted by Robin on 5/28/10 at 10:46

I had neuroma surgery last year on both feet. Months after I noticed that anything that I step on while barefooted sends me down to the ground in pain. Both feet still hurt very badly. I went to another Orthopedic doctor and he found I had Tarsel Tunnell in my right foot. I was so excited that that was my 'other problem' and I had that surgery as well. That was a waste of pain and suffering and money. Did nothing. I cant walk hardly at all on my right foot and my left foot hurts as well. I just made yet another appointment because I am pretty sure it is stump neuroma and that is more painful than the neuroma was. I just want these doctors to know, that without pain free feet, life is less happy when you have to think about using a wheelchair at the age of 46 because no one cares about the excessive pain this causes.

Result number: 38

Message Number 265386

Re: Pain 4 months after TTS release surgery View Thread
Posted by J. Smith on 5/26/10 at 19:53

Thank you so much. I feel this forum has helped me a lot. I diagnosed myself with neuroma. My doctor is seeing me tomorrow and is going to try cortisone shot. we will see.... I really would just love to have a normal gait. Unfortunately I have been Limping since Oct of last year. I have a great doctor..I just feel that he misses a lot of what I am saying. The pain is exactly on the ball of my foot between the 3rd and 4th metatarsal. And yes I still get shocked, pins and needles from my TTS surgery, and also I feel like my heel is bruised and there are days I choose just not to walk. I hope to get this pain solved and then I can worry about my TTS recovery. I know everyone heals different but I sure feel like I pulled the 'short' stick.
I am just soooo tired of Pain! lets see what happens tomorrow :)

Result number: 39

Message Number 265376

Re: Another Issue starting.. I think View Thread
Posted by Bill C on 5/26/10 at 11:47

Anecdotally, and from my own experience, I would say yes. I do not know if it has been described in the literature. If it has not been, it would make for a good research study. I think such a study, if not already done could prove to be very beneficial to anyone with TTS, if the data shows a link between the 2. Morton's neuroma can be caused by irritation to the nerve. I would imagine that TTS itself or the altered gait from having TTS could be a factor.

Result number: 40

Message Number 265371

Re: Another Issue starting.. I think View Thread
Posted by Tony M. on 5/26/10 at 08:59

Is there any connection between having TTS and getting Mortin's Neuroma later?

Result number: 41

Message Number 265368

Re: Pain 4 months after TTS release surgery View Thread
Posted by Annette on 5/26/10 at 04:45

I understand your desperation and pain--believe me, it's so hard to deal with and so frustrating! Everyone is so different--there are those of us that have had this surgery and feel better and then there are those that are in still hurting just as bad (or worse). I honestly would get another opinion. I'm sure your doctor did the best he could, but obviously there is still something wrong.

I'm walking (with pain), and it still feels like I'm walking on bruises (mostly on the outer bottom side of my foot). I think I have a neuroma that is making everything worse. If the 4th toe pain would go away, I would actually feel like walking--but right now I have to baby it, otherwise it acts up. I've had one physical therapy session and will see how that goes. My sciatica pain is back, probably because I'm walking with a limp.

I don't have any swelling, and the TTS scar is mostly numb. I do get a random shooting pain every once in a while. I think my TTS surgery was a success, just have to figure out this 4th toe thing. Again, I totally feel for you, it's very frustrating--just know that there are people on this board that care and you're not alone. I try not to give any advice, I just know what I've gone through and am going through. Also, the doctors on here are great--listen to them, I have learned alot just reading this board. I hope you find help soon. :)

Result number: 42

Message Number 265367

Re: Another Issue starting.. I think View Thread
Posted by Annette on 5/26/10 at 04:32

Thank you so much for your post! I know for a fact that something is still wrong--it tingles, throbs, and there is sharp pain just when I'm lying down (which is the usual for me lately). I will also ask my dr. to do a ultrasound. He 'squeezed' the area in different ways, and said something about my 'sural' nerve? Anyways, I'm glad to hear the surgery isn't 'that' bad haha. It's weird that I didn't have this until after my 1st surgery (plantar facsia release), and J. Smith didn't have it until after TTS surgery...maybe it's a complication of surgery and the nerves get angry..who knows, but all I know is that I want this gone...sorry to ask one more question, but did you have to be completely out for the neuroma surgery?

Result number: 43

Message Number 265355

Re: Another Issue starting.. I think View Thread
Posted by Bill C on 5/25/10 at 18:36

Annette, My pain was around the 4th toe, going down into the ball of my foot. I walked with a pronounced limp. My 4th toe was also becoming numb. I could not put any weight in that area.

If someone who knew what they were looking for, squeezed the area, there was a pronounced 'click' that could be heard. The surgery was not bad and I could walk with partial weight bearing and could put full weight on it within a few days. I had a script for percs but did not take any. I had a bulky dressing for a week and wore a surgical shoe for about 3 weeks. I noticed immediate improvment. Not complete, but much better.

I was finally able to put weight on my foot in the morning, which I was unable to, for a long time. I used to get up and hop to the bathroom. Thankfully my right foot is normal. When I first got up in the morning, if I put any weight on the ball of my foot, it felt like an electric shock, which eventually just became pain as the day wore on. That is gone now and was gone very soon after surgery.

Like I said, I can't say it is completely better but it is much better. I had it done 3 years ago by an orthopedic surgeon (not a podiatrist) at Mass General Hospital.

I am almost 6 weeks post tarsal tunnel sugery now. The main thing is the incision up by my knee. It stings and is swollen. I still have some surgical sensitivity in my foot and can't tolerate shoes that are too tight. I have not felt that pain around my medial malleolus since the surgery. I can walk without pain that pain drove me crazy for years. I am more comfortable with the shoe off when sitting down but can walk without pain: weird huh?

I think that if I had the TTS surgery and had not the neuroma surgery, I would still be basically crippled. I did not have the procedures done at the same time, because I did not have a definitive diagnosis of TTS then. I knew I had it, but the doctor did not.

Result number: 44

Message Number 265329

Re: Another Issue starting.. I think View Thread
Posted by Annette on 5/24/10 at 05:07

Hi Bill,
I'm really starting to think you are correct. I've been doing some research and everything I read and the symptoms I have all point to that. I didn't have this problem until about 2 months after my first surgery (the PF release in '08). How was your recovery after the neuroma surgery? I can't imagine anything being as hard as post TTS surgery so I'm willing to do whatever it takes.

Before my TTS surgery, the 4th toe was killing me so bad that I told me doctor to inject it under the toe (which is where I feel most of the pain). I sat there and (and cussed away) haha...it did provide some relief, but not as much as I'd hoped.

Were you put all the way out, could you walk right away? Was your pain in the 4th toe area? Do you still hurt? Yes and I totally get why putting the pad in the shoes hurts worse...I use baby powder to get it in, but what a pain in the you know what.

I started physical therapy last week and my therapist was surprised how much pain my 4th toe had compared to the others..I literally jumped off the table. If someone messes with it, it will hurt the rest of the day and it seems like it gets 'angry' (sorry, that's the only way I can describe it).

I know everyone is different and I understand that what you went through necessarily doesn't mean that Tony and I have it, but it seriously does help to hear other patient's recovery and helpful guidance through this type of pain. Unless you live it, you can't imagine it. So thanks for all your helpful words! :)

Result number: 45

Message Number 265313

Re: Another Issue starting.. I think View Thread
Posted by Bill C on 5/23/10 at 08:41

I would not be surprised if both you and Tony have a Morton's neuroma. I only know from my own personal experience, but I think that a neuroma can result from altered gait related to TTS. I always defensively walked on the outside of my foot to take the pressure off of my posterier tibial nerve. I ended up with a neuroma, which mightily complicated things. The neuroma was confirmed by ultra sound, not emg testing. If the ultra sound is done correctly, it is a very good way to document the neuroma. I had it injected a few times which offered some relief. I thought the pads made it worse because they made my shoe tighter, which I could not tolerate. I ended up wearing shoes 2 sizes too big. I ultimately had surgery to remove it, which helped a lot.

Result number: 46

Message Number 265307

Hmm... now the nerves in the tops of my feet are tingling... View Thread
Posted by Stoney on 5/22/10 at 16:56

... that sure doesn't seem like neuroma to me. I've made a neurologist appointment; they podiatrist seems to think conventionally and considers my condition 'mechanical.' I don't think so any more.

It is getting worse daily, and is worse at the end of a day than the beginning. This morning upon rising it was worse than at the end of the day 2 weeks ago.

I'm adding B12 supplements (1g) and cutting back on Lamictal. I might try going off Zyprexa entirely (just guessing here, because when I was on much larger amounts I had minor toe tingling after taking a dose).

I need a medical detective!

Result number: 47

Message Number 265306

Diff diagnosis needed: several "neuromas" in both feet, think it must be systemic View Thread
Posted by Stoney on 5/22/10 at 16:50

I can barely walk now, not due to pain yet, but due to the feeling of mass across the entire ball of each foot that is finally starting to become painful... I don't want to aggrevate them further. I need a differential diagnosis -- it doesn't seem to be neuroma. It could be some sort of bilateral peripheral neuropathy.

It started as one 'bump' in the ball of each foot 3 months ago, but has expanded such that it feels as if all intertarsal spaces have neuromas. My toes tingle some and are a bit numb, all 5 toes in both feet. The bottom of my arches feel tight -- I think it is the nerves, not fascia. All the nerves in my soles feel sensitive if I push lightly, whether near the heel or into the arch. when I do this lightly, my foot nerves tingle for quite some time afterwards.

I can squeeze the foot without pain; same with pushing on it. The only pain I have is the nerves themselves... I can feel them and visualize them as I spread my toes. I've never 'felt my nerves' before. Joints feel fine. I don't run and am relatively sedentary aside from swimming, and some walking at work. I tried green superfeet and metatarsal pads under 2nd-4th, but didn't change the rate of worsening.

I think it is some sort of systemic process. Metabolic or autoimmune or side effects of meds. Sometimes I feel like the middle two fingers of each hand tingle slightly. One day I felt my noise was tingling slightly. However, I don't want to assume these are the same cause, and they are very minor. I also had sore sciatic nerves at times... again, no proof it is related, but maybe?

I am on medicines that may have side effects. I recently started Crestor, about the same time as symptoms appeared. But I'm afraid to stop it becaue it helped so much with cholesteral, and I've read that stopping a statin can present cardiovascular risk upon stopping. Years ago, Zocor caused pain in leg muscles. I'm also on Lamictal, effexor, zyprexa (2.5mg only), xanax XR (1mg only), for migraine prevention as well as BP II.

We're testing for B12 deficiency, for too much calcium. I also have a mother with osteoarthritis but I don't have evidence of that.

My feet are flat -- one entirely, the other almost. Never had any problem except rare, a tiny amount of plantar fasciitis that clears up when wearing blue Superfeet.

Help... I'm about to go on disability.

Result number: 48

Message Number 265290

Re: Just Diagnosed with Bilateral TTS View Thread
Posted by Bill C on 5/21/10 at 17:35

I had a couple of shots for a neuroma and it was a piece of cake.

Result number: 49

Message Number 265199

Re: Chielectomy Recovery Timetable View Thread
Posted by Eileen R on 5/18/10 at 08:42

I had a Chielectomy and the removal of a neuroma on October 21, 2009. I am a runner and was told I would be back running within 12 weeks. It is now 30 weeks later and I am running again but the pain at times from just walking is worse than before the surgery. The Neuroma surgery was painless but my advise to anyone would be unless you can't walk do NOT ever have a Chielectomy.

Result number: 50

Message Number 265100

Re: post op course variances View Thread
Posted by Bill C on 5/10/10 at 14:09

I am sorry that you are not better after your surgery. I have suffered with tarsal tunnel of the left ankle for many years. I am thankfull that my right ankle is fine. My problem is suspected to be the result of a severe ankle sprain while playing hockey. Chemotherapy for leukemia may have contributed to the problem. As I mentioned, I am just commenting on the differences between post-operative care between the doctors. I am in no way pain free and am not doing anything because it feels good. I am carefully walking as intstructed to do. I don't believe that I am pushing it, because I am doing exactly as instructed.
I was instructed to walk no more than 40 feet per hour the first week, 80 feet/hour the 2nd, and 120/hour the 3rd. I am now at the middle of the 4th week can ambulate ad lib. I was told to wiggle my toes the first week but not move my foot. Weight bearing progressed to full by the second week. I was told to start moving the foot the 3rd week.
I wonder if differences mean that means there is not enough basic research on the subject? Have there been studies done comparing one group with weight bearing and no casting comparing to non weight bearing and casting? I know that the rest of the body can suffer from being sedentary. I made it a point to do upper body strength traing starting 2 days post op. My bench press has actually improved in the 3 an a half weeks since surgery.
You mentioned a possible neuroma as well. I had that procedure 3 years ago which helped somewhat. I wonder if neuroma develops as a result of TTS?

Result number: 51

Message Number 265089

Re: post op course variances View Thread
Posted by Tony M. on 5/10/10 at 10:27

Wow...

You just had surgery and your pushing it already.... Unbelievable.

I was hard casted for 10 days and then had stiches removed. I was given motion/stretching excercises that started the same day the cast came off and was non-weight bearing for 5 weeks. I used a knee walker for those 5 weeks. No crutches. Also, Icing, elevation and meds for swelling.

My personal opinion, and its just my opinion, that you are way over doing it and aren't allowing the nerve to properly recover and heal. You can be your own worse enemy in your recovery. Just because today it feels good, doesn't mean you should be out and about. Because that could be hurting your chances for a full recovery of that nerve.

My surgery did not go so well for me. I am almost 4 months post op and my condition has worsened. I am allowed to do minor shopping (in and out) and little stuff around the yard. But I am having alot of pain issues as before with lots of numbness on the bottom of my foot. I take 1200 mg of neurontin daily along with pain meds (oxycodone). I have even considered not driving for awhile because it has become an issue.

My biggest issue is if I put my foot on the floor (sitting position) my foot starts hurting bad and starts swelling and if I stand very long, my foot becomes almost unbearable pain wise. So I tend to sit with my leg propped up most of the time. I have had many a days where after I have taken my shoe off, I have what feels like a million needles poking the bottom of my foot. I also get the same pokes in the ends of my toes.

My doctor talked to me about him going back in and removing scar tissue, which may not even do anything after removed and pain management. He also mentioned neuroma. ( I think thats how you spell it). My doctor is going to give it more time before making any other decision in hopes I just need more time.

You have to be diligent yourself and use common sense. Your nerve needs time to heal. The more time you spend on your foot, the slower and longer the recovery process will be and the more activity you do so soon means the lesser the chance the surgery will be a success.

Take it easy. No concerts, running, long walks on the beach or anything else for a bit. Its your feet and you only get 1 pair, so take care of them.

My doctor wants to give my foot every opportunity to heal correctly and for the surgery to be a success. I won't do anything stupid to ruin my chances even though for me, it isn't going so well currently. But I must try.

Result number: 52

Message Number 264990

Re: PLANTAR FIBROMAS View Thread
Posted by Scott Jac. on 5/04/10 at 19:02


Sarah,

Wow, I have never met anyone who seems to have these reoccuring buggers as bad 'if not worse' than I do. I have had Planter Fibromas in my right since I was 13 yrs old. in combonation with common neuromas. I am now 40 and just had a bunch removed. I would be so delighted if I could find a way to correct this problem without surgery. I am like you, I cant afford it anymore. I you find ANYTHING that seems to work or at least help, please contact me at jacobsonscott22 at yahoo.com

Empathetically,
Scott Jacobson

Result number: 53

Message Number 264937

Re: What works for me View Thread
Posted by Designeer on 5/01/10 at 17:36

I am trying the prolotherapy route, if the ligament structure becomes tight again by it, the neuroma may settle down and now I wonder about planter plate tear too. Also there is an injection of blood platelets that may help us, I did not try that yet.

Ball of foot pain for two years, nerve aspect of it diminishing but there is the metarsal aspect still hurting like arthritis.

Result number: 54

Message Number 264908

Re: Question View Thread
Posted by Bill C on 4/30/10 at 11:05

I had surgery for my TTS 2 weeks ago today. I had a little bit more than a standard tarsal tunnel release, I had a triple nerve decompression. I have an incision up on the outside of my leg, just below the knee, 1 on the top of my foot, and a big one on the inside of my ankle. I suffered (I mean it) for years with this problem. I saw multiple doctors, bought and threw out multiple orthotics and shoes, tried all the drugs and nothing helped me. Some of the doctors had no clue what I had and am sure they thought that I was crazy. At one time I thought amputation would be the best thing. 3 years ago I had partial relief from a neuroma surgery. I think that whether you have a neuroma or not, if you have TTS, burying that nerve offers some relief and it is an easy surgery. I have to say that 2 weeks later, I have noticed improvement. I still have pain which is from the incisions, but some of the pain that I had, for now is reduced or gone. This triple nerve decompression is used in diabetics as well. I would look into it. If you want to see pictures of my incisions I can email them, zultr at aol.com. I in no way represent anyone or product regarding TTS. I am a patient. The doctor that I found does more nerve release surgery than anyone in Massachusetts. I would highly recommend him.

Result number: 55

Message Number 264907

Re: Cryoanalgesia: Outcomes for heel pain & Morton's Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Mary Ann on 4/30/10 at 02:02

Sorry I had cryo surgery done for plantar faciitis; the doctor charged $26,000 for it plus another $5,000 for other work she did. She said go to work, even though I had to stand a lot at work. Went to this doctor a week after the pain started. I was told the opposite of what every other doctor said was the correct procedure. I never even saw the doctor before or after the surgery. Was put out, so I don't know what happen. It's a short surgery that just made the doctor wealthy. She didn't send any bills until I had been going to her for quite a while. The surgery charge was $20,000 more than what her office said it would be. The first visit turned out to be about $4,000. After the surgery the pain continued.

Result number: 56

Message Number 264840

Re: Question View Thread
Posted by Annette on 4/26/10 at 02:09

Hi Holli,
I'm 5 weeks post surgery and doing good. I posted my progress and what to expect in this category so you can see how I've been and what to expect. I used a knee walker intead of crutches post surgery and it was great. You can find it at CVS or Costco for around $100. I am walking in a cam boot for short periods of time, but recently over the weekend did way too much, didn't elevate my ankle like I should have, and it swelled (I'm hurting again).

Everyone's recovery and experience is unique. I wish you luck and hopefully you will be pain free soon! Listen to your doctor and read everyone's experiences. Unfortunately there are some that are still in pain (Tony is one). It will make you feel better sometimes when you know that you're not alone in this journey.

I do still have pain under and above my 4th toe. This was a problem before the surgery and unfortunately I think it's a neuroma (my dr. thinks so too). He's baffled as to why it hurts right now though. It comes and goes but I'm just trying to focus on the positive right now, knowing I'm ahead of schedule.

I'll try to keep up with these posts and if you have any questions feel free to ask :)

Result number: 57

Message Number 264811

Re: What works for me View Thread
Posted by H on 4/24/10 at 08:07

Hi Susie
Did you get a diagnosis of plantar plate tear-was any treatment recommended??
I am a keen tennis player, and dancer. I have several Neuromas in each foot, as well as a bunion and some arthritis. Think I may also have Plantar Plate tear---
I have had cortisone injections they didn't work and I found out afterwards, they can possibly break down the fatty padding under your foot-I wish I had known that.

I have been offered Surgery to realign my big toe and to remove the neuroma next to my big toe.There is no guarantee of course, that this will reduce my considerable pain

I have also been to see a Consultant in Sheffield,UK who is using Cryosurgery to freeze Neuromas and am considering this procedure instead of /or at least before surgery

How did you get on with MRI?

Result number: 58

Message Number 264766

011 View Thread
Posted by linda s. on 4/21/10 at 10:07

i had neuroma surgery last aug.never really healed properly,now i have a seroma.it leaks daily at wound site.for the past 2 days the pain in area under toes and toes 2 and 3 is extreme.also my second toe does not bend at all and hurts with any movement of toes.i am beside myself can any thing help this pain.

Result number: 59

Message Number 264723

Re: Morton's Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Janice A on 4/18/10 at 17:44

I've had Morton's neuroma for about 3 years now and have tired non-invasive procedures with a degree of success, but currently I have been in terrible pain. My doctor is fearful that if I have surgery for these neuromas which are in both feet, I may develop a stump neuroma and will regret the surgery. I cannot function currently. Please state your opinion of stump neuromas and cryosurgery. Thanks.

Result number: 60

Message Number 264649

Re: 3rd big toe fusion surgery View Thread
Posted by gabbie on 4/12/10 at 17:06

Thank you again for your comments. I am not a smoker. I am a 55 year old female who is athletic and physically fit. I am 5'6'' and weigh 125 pounds. I have had a bone density test and there was no significant problems. Prior to the 3 bone fusions I have had a first metatarsal joint replacement, weil osteotomy, screws removed from a plate, and 2 neuromas removed. This has been over the last five years after I broke my big toe. I am on my fourth surgeon as the first three in another group told me that there was nothing they could do for me. I continue to go to work each day as I am able to sit at my desk. If you can think of any other avenues for me to pursue, I am more than open to suggestions. Thank you again for giving me an avenue to discuss my current situation.

Result number: 61

Message Number 264575

Morton's neuroma View Thread
Posted by rebeccag on 4/09/10 at 08:24

This very painful conditions seems to be getting worse. My walking and other exercise are seriously limited by this. Orthotics and cortisone shots have had no effect. I am interested in the cryostar technique---are there doctors with experience in this treatment in the
Washington DC, VA, MD, NYC or PA areas I might contact? And is this treatment effective? Safe? Upsides? Downsides?

Many thanks!

rebeccag

Result number: 62

Message Number 264374

Re: Mortons Neuroma and hammer toe View Thread
Posted by Dr.DSW on 3/30/10 at 08:00

The 'sudden' onset of the hammertoe can be a result of the cortisone injection, and is a known side effect. It is no fault of the doctor. This is rare after one injection, and although you did have injections a year ago, I suspect that due to your bunion, you had a pre-existing weakening of the joint/capsule/soft tissue stabilizing structures around the 2nd toe.

Often, when there is a 'bunion' deformity, it places pressure on the second toe and that toe eventually becomes a 'hammertoe'. During the slow progressive process, the soft tissue stabilizing structures around the 2nd toe can become weakened sometimes causing a 'pre-dislocation' syndrome. This often causes the toe to not just look like a 'hammertoe', but to actually deviate medially or laterally.

Cortisone is a very potent anti-inflammatory, but can also cause weakening or atrophy of soft tissue structures, but this usually only occurs with repeated injections. My suspicion is that these structures were already weakened from the 'bunion' deformity causing biomechanical issues with the second toe and the injection simply exaccerbated that condition by causing further weakening of those structures.

Yes, if you require surgery to correct the bunion, hammertoe and/or neuroma, there should be no reason why these procedures can not be performed at the same time.

However, I am a strong proponent of sclerosing alcohol injections and not a strong proponent of 'neuroma' surgery if it can be avoided. My patients have fortunately had tremendous success with sclerosing alcohol injections and as a result it has resulted in most avoiding a trip to the operating room.

Result number: 63

Message Number 264372

Mortons Neuroma and hammer toe View Thread
Posted by Chris C on 3/29/10 at 23:36

I've had a neuroma between my 2nd and 3rd toes for about 5 years. I had 2 cortizone shots when first diagnosed which lasted over 3 years. I had another shot a couple months ago and two days later I developed a hammer toe in my 2nd toe. The shot didn't work. I still feel like I'm walking on a live electrical wire. I also feel like my sock is balled up on the bottom of my foot and now the hammer toe makes my foot feel cramped and finding shoes I can wear is so difficult. My question is, could the shot have caused the hammer toe?
Also, what would you recommend I do to relieve my discomfort? I've heard about alcohol shots killing the nerve without surgery...any comments on them? I should mention that I have orthotics and I also have a bunion on the same foot. If I opted to have surgery, which I've been told I would have to have to repair the hammer toe, could the bunion, hammer toe and neuroma all be done at one time?

Result number: 64

Message Number 264329

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by ROB K on 3/28/10 at 00:32

Hi Jill
It seems to be over a year since you had your surgury in Alabama, I am wondering how the recovery went and where you are now as far as foot pain after surgury. Would you do it again? I am dealing with a foot neuroma between my second and third toes and have had the shots which hace not worked, use the pads and a custom othotic which helps just a little, and am now considering surgery therefore I ask?
Would you still recommend it and would you still recommend the Dr in Alabama?
Thanks
ROB

Result number: 65

Message Number 264265

Re: What works for me View Thread
Posted by Susie S on 3/24/10 at 15:41

I am late coming onto this website but I feel for all your pain. I have been suffering with pain under my 2nd metatarsal for about 7 months now. I've been to 3 Podiatrists. #1 said 'Mortons Neuroma' and gave me a cortizone shot and scheduled me for surgery. Not feeling too confident about that diagnosis (pain was not in area it should have been)I cancelled the surgery and went to doctor #2 She said it was 'metatarsalgia' all that tells me is I have a sore foot! Duh! #3 Said is was probably 'capulitis' and scheduled me for a MRI which I had done yesterday. I will find out the results tomorrow. I am not feeling hopeful and am afraid that I will have pain for the rest of my life. I have had inserts, rocker soles, ice and anti-inflammitories. I'm just not feeling hopeful. After doing alot of research I'm really, REALLY thinking it might be a 'plantar plate tear' it has almost all the same symptoms....oh jeez. We'll just wait and see what happens. Good luck to all!

Result number: 66

Message Number 264152

Had Tarsal Tunnel Surgery 3/18/10 View Thread
Posted by Annette on 3/20/10 at 07:03

Before having my surgery, I would try and find out more info on my foot pain and find other people suffering with what I was going through, and it was very hard to find information. Not alot of people understand what we go through and I'm hoping this helps someone like me, as I've been suffering for the past 5-6 years. I've been through alot, and I'll try and post my history and progress the best that I can. I'm a 44 yr old female, 5'7, weigh 175 (used to be 210 lbs when I was on neurontin which helped the nerve pain but made me gain alot of weight). 5 years ago, I started out having right knee pain with swelling under my kneecap , and developed some vericose veins (not bad but visible compared to left leg). After numerous MRIs, the doctors could not find anything wrong. Then my right heel started to develop sharp pain.

I tried night splints (3 different kinds), custom orthotics, ice, stretching, PT, neurontin, steriods, anti-inflammatory prescription meds, active release technique, ultrasound, accupuncture, numerous cortisone shots, etc. After about 3-4 yrs of pain, I had endoscopic pf release surgery in Sept. '08. The pain diminished in my heel somewhat but I still had lateral pain, and developed severe shooting pain under my 4th/5th toe. I sometimes felt like I was walking on my 'skeleton bones', like there was no padding in my foot. It literally felt like I had bruises on the bottom of my feet. The pain was worse at nite, shooting pain, tingling, throbbing. I couldn't even explain where the pain was, because some days it was the arch, other days the bottom outside of my foot, then my 'neuroma' under my 3rd toe. My foot constantly 'ached', and I would have shooting, stabbing, and sharp pains all day long. After more cortisone injections and a MRI (which showed nothing wrong), I was at my wits end and decided to go through with the TTS surgery 2 days ago (with the same foot dr. that did my EPF surgery).

After my surgery, my dr. said I had a vein that had wrapped around my nerve numerous times, and there were 3 different spots that were very tight. I'm sorry I don't know the correct terminology, but he is certain that my pain was caused by the TTS.

I woke up in recovery and I could feel alot of pain in my foot (same thing happened after the pf release surgery--not sure why, but for some reason the block didn't work very well). He injected more meds and numbed it, it's wrapped up like a mummy from my toes to my knee.

I have been on percocet (10-650) every 4-6 hrs, and I'm in pain, but honestly it's not as bad as I thought. If you have this, you know the pain we've been through, so after surgery it hasn't been that much worse. I slept pretty well last nite and went from 3am til noon, woke up with no pain. After getting up, it started to hurt and started the pain meds every 4-6 hours.

I'm experiencing throbbing, tingling, some shooting pains up my calve. I bought a knee walker for $99 at CVS--it's a walker with brakes and a seat that I put my knee on. Much better than crutches, I recommend it. I also put a bath seat in my tub, and have a small folding chair in my bathroom that I can prop my foot on it.

I'm icing (under my knee) every hour. On monday I will have the dressing changed and will be placed in a CAM walker boot. I won't be able to have any weight bearing for approx. 3 weeks.

I had my surgery on Thursday a.m...it's now 4am on Saturday morning. I'm on pain meds, I will try my best to post my progress the best I can (I'm a little disoriented and dizzy). Gonna try and get some sleep--I think the oxycodone has me a bit 'wired' :)

Result number: 67

Message Number 264016

Re: Sural nerve removal to rid chronic pain in ankle View Thread
Posted by Dr. Z on 3/12/10 at 22:17

Hi
I would first determine if it really is the sural nerve block with a local anesthetic injection of lidocaine plain with one cc of depo-medrol. If relief I would then continue or switch to 4% alcohol injection. If you get temporary relief but not permenent relief then I would consider cyrotherapy procedure. Removal of the sural especially if you have a neuroma formation can be successful but the before treatment should be considered and attempted. Good luck

Result number: 68

Message Number 263923

Re: Alcohol Injections / Morton's neuroma /Cryosurgery, for Will View Thread
Posted by Dr.DSW on 3/08/10 at 22:21

No, you did not read my post correctly. I never mentioned a cortisone shot. I simply stated that a DIAGNOSTIC NERVE BLOCK, utilizing nothing but local anesthetic should be utlizied. The nerve block does nothing but anesthetize the area of the suspected 'neuroma'. If blocking this area with ONLY LOCAL ANESTHETIC provides temporary relief, it would indicate that the doctor probably has a correct diagnosis and that the alcohol injections may be successful or treatment directed at that area would be successful. If there NO temporary relief with the use of the local anesthetic, the doctor should re-think the diagnosis, because it may mean something else is contributing to the pain.

It is not surprising that your 'neuroma' (if you have one) did not show up on an MRI, because it is pretty well established that for the most accurate diagnosis, gadolinium/contrast should be utilized.

Without the use of contrast, it is much more difficult to image a neuroma, especially if it is small.

Result number: 69

Message Number 263922

Re: Alcohol Injections / Morton's neuroma /Cryosurgery, for Will View Thread
Posted by Will on 3/08/10 at 20:01

Thanks Dr. DSW.

The MRi was 1.5 Tesla but no contrast was used. (I hate to remember what I spent on that MRI!)

If I am 'hearing' you correctly, a shot of cortisone in the neuroma area may be a good diagnostic tool. If it provides short term relief, then you could reasonably assume a neuroma is causing pain and proceed with the alchohol shots as a course of treatment. However, if the shot provides no relief, then I should start looking elsewhere as the source of pain? Does this sound right?

Thanks a ton!

Result number: 70

Message Number 263921

Re: Alcohol Injections / Morton's neuroma /Cryosurgery, for Will View Thread
Posted by Dr.DSW on 3/08/10 at 19:08

First of all, I rarely talk in 'absolutes'. There are cases when a neuroma can possibly not show up on a diagnostic ultrasound or an MRI, but with a QUALITY ultrasound, read by someone with experience and a MRI WITH contrast performed on at least a 1.5 Tesla unit (a 3.0 Tesla is even better). It is also imperative that the MRI be a closed MRI and not an open MRI for the best resolution.

And an MRI is also only as useful as the doctor that is interpreting the films. I am 'spoiled' and have some of the best musculoskeletal radiologists specializing in MRI in the world in my 'backyard'. Additionally, I have one of the best, if not the best radiologists in the country specializing in ultrasound in the world (Lev Nazarian,MD), therefore I know the results I receive are extremely accurate.

That said, it is possible, but not very often that a neuroma exists and is missed with proper quality imaging and quality skilled reading.

Additionally, I'm not a believer that a doctor can always 'feel' a neuroma. There is a sign called 'Mulder's' sign that is a clicking feel/sound that can occur when the adjacent metatarsals are compressed and the 'neuroma' is supposed to get caught within the transverse metatarsal ligament. I'm not confident that it is the most accurate way to assess whether a neuroma exists. Additionally, an intermetatarsal bursa/bursitis can mimic the same feel.

Sclerosing alcohol injections are given in a very small localized area, and even if a 'neuroma' (perineural fibrosis)was not present, there really would not be significant damage to the small localized tissue involved.

However, if no 'neuroma' was visualized on ANY of your radiological studies, I personally would be hesitant to perform a surgical procedure or alcohol injections UNTIL I attempted a diagnostic nerve block to see if you obtained some temporary relief.

The purpose of a diagnostic nerve block is simply to block the 'neuroma' area with local anesthetic as a diagnostic tool. If you obtain temporary relief while the anesthetic has it's effect, then it confirms that's the problem and you're in the correct spot. If the local anesthetic provides NO temporary relief, it would signify that the original diagnosis may have to be re-thought.

Result number: 71

Message Number 263917

Re: Alcohol Injections / Morton's neuroma /Cryosurgery, for Will View Thread
Posted by will on 3/08/10 at 15:33

Thanks for these great comments.

I noticed you said,

'I am ultra-conservative performing this procedure, and choose my patients wisely, and never perform the surgery unless I'm sure there is a a neuroma. I make sure it's confirmed via ultrasound or MRI.'

I have had an MRI and ultrasound which DID NOT show a neuroma, however my POD dismissed this and said they don't always show up on those tests.


But my doc claims he can 'feel' my neuroma by manipulating my foot???

My main complaint in numbness in sole of foot and burning, tingling on top of toes. I am not having much 'sharp' type of pain in my foot...if that makes sense.

ONE MORE QUESTION, if you don't have a neuroma, and your get the shots, could the alcohol damage your foot?

And is there a way a POD could definitively rule something as a neuroma?

Result number: 72

Message Number 263888

Re: Alcohol Injections / Morton's neuroma /Cryosurgery, for Will View Thread
Posted by Dr. Z on 3/07/10 at 11:48

I have seen stump neuroma from my own excisions and that of other doctors. It not fun and or pretty and can cause lots of pain . The solution can be difficult with some patient even with a 2nd surgery still having pain.
I agree that knowing the area of surgery is very important to the outcome. It is my opinion that not resecting the nerve far away from the necks of the metarsals could be one of the causes for a stump neuroma.
Healing - we let patient try to put on a sneaker two weeks post surgery after the sutures are removed. Some but not all will be able to do this. I tell patients that avg time for the foot to start to feel good again is about 90 days but some six months

Result number: 73

Message Number 263887

Re: Alcohol Injections / Morton's neuroma /Cryosurgery, for Will View Thread
Posted by brianpk on 3/07/10 at 10:05

Thank you Doctors.

Your responses have been excellent and Morton's sufferers can learn a lot by viewing these threads. It would be nice if Mortons was an 'easy' problem to solve, unfortunately, it can be difficult and painful. I am ultra-conservative and therefore haven't plunged headlong into anything, maybe I've caused myself some undue suffering, but, at this point, at least I feel that if my current path is unsuccessful I have some reasonable options left.

Thanks again, the dialog on these threads have the potential to help many.

A final message to everyone.

I wish I would have taken better care of my feet 10-20 years ago, I wouldn't be in this position now, in the prime of my life, living with daily pain.

Take care of your feet the same way you take care of your eyes ! You don't realize how important they are until you can't use them.

Result number: 74

Message Number 263886

Re: Alcohol Injections / Morton's neuroma /Cryosurgery, for Will View Thread
Posted by Dr.DSW on 3/07/10 at 09:16

I did not respond to Kelly's post because I can not see her foot. Naturally, having pain 'up to her knee' following this surgery is not 'normal'. I can not evaluate her foot over the internet and therefore can not and will not comment on another doctor's post operative complication.

I have stated hundred's of times on this site that if a patient is having a post operative complication, the doctors on this site can unfortunately not make any intelligent evaluation by the description over the computer. Therefore it is the responsibility of the patient and surgeon that performed the procedure to address the problem.

If the patient is not obtaining satisfaction from her/his surgeon, a local second opinion must be obtained.

But in my opinion, some questions answer themselves. I think it's pretty obvious that a foot that is turning colors following this surgery with pain up to the knee is not 'normal' and needs attention. I'm not sure that needs confirmation from an 'expert'.

Once again, with the number of posts on this site, it's not always possible to answer all questions, so sometimes we have to pick and choose and prioritize.

You asked some excellent questions, so obviously I felt answering your question(s) would benefit you and others that read the answers.

Result number: 75

Message Number 263885

Re: Alcohol Injections / Morton's neuroma /Cryosurgery, for Will View Thread
Posted by Dr.DSW on 3/07/10 at 09:08

I have been very fortunate (or my patients have been very fortunate) regarding the formation of 'stump' neuromas following excision. However, due to the potential complications following neuroma excision, I am ultra-conservative performing this procedure, and choose my patients wisely, and never perform the surgery unless I'm sure there is a a neuroma. I make sure it's confirmed via ultrasound or MRI.

In my opinion, and the opinion of others, the key to helping prevent 'stump' neuroma is meticuluous dissection during surgery, respecting all tissue, and 'burying' the proximal end of the nerve in muscle belly (some actually advocate the periosteum of the bone).

Regardless of a 'perfect' surgery, it can still occur, but fortunately I am not aware of any of my prior surgeries experiencing this complication, though they may have and then sought another opinion with another doctor and not returned to me.

The average recovery time is extremely variable, and is completely dependent on the patient's tolerance, the patient's overall health status, the patient's activity level, the type of shoes the patient normally wears, etc. My average 'neuroma' post op patient will be back in a sneaker in 2 weeks, but will continue to have some residual sensations for up to two months, though the pre op symptoms are usually resolved pretty quickly. But it varies greatly from patient to patient.

I will look at the post you referred to when I get a chance.

Result number: 76

Message Number 263884

Re: Alcohol Injections / Morton's neuroma /Cryosurgery, for Will View Thread
Posted by brianpk on 3/07/10 at 08:09

Thank you, both doctors.

I have been told that with cryo it takes at least 100 procedures before the doctor becomes familiar, comfortable, and skilled with the procedure.

Based on your comments I would be comfortable getting the alcohol injections from either one of you. So if this problem doesn't get better I might be paying you a visit. If you did it to yourself, I'll let you do it to me.

Could you please comment on the success / recurrence / 'stump' rates that you have experienced with traditional removal surgery. And how long is the average recovery time ?

On 2/23 someone named kelly evans had questions regarding her morton's surgery. Could a doctor look at that post and maybe give her some guidance?

Bottom line is, everyone considering any kind of medical procedure should make sure that they have good information upon which they can make an informed decision.

Result number: 77

Message Number 263882

Re: Alcohol Injections / Morton's neuroma /Cryosurgery, for Will View Thread
Posted by Dr. Z on 3/07/10 at 00:07

Hi
I too use the 4% alcohol injections with very good relief. I also have patients that have undergone cyrotherapy with excellent relief. I have never seen any major problems with the 4% alcohol injection procedure but I have seen a few with the cyrotherapy.
Bottom line both are very good treatments before excision. I perfer the 4% alcohol because in my hands it just works.

Result number: 78

Message Number 263881

Re: Alcohol Injections / Morton's neuroma /Cryosurgery, for Will View Thread
Posted by Dr.DSW on 3/06/10 at 23:33

Brian,

First of all, tone down the 'attitude' slightly. I never stated that you or anyone else wasn't allowed to have an opinon. So don't put words in my mouth.

I volunteer my time on this site, and can not possibly spend two hours on one question answering the significant amount of details you are asking in your post.

I'm not writing a research paper on this site, I'm providing my opinion based on my 25 years of experience. If you want statistics based on evidence based medicine, you'll have to perform a literature review.

You stated the point that I was attempting to make. You are speaking from your point of view, based on your ONE individual experience. However, I'm basing my point of view on treating this condition over a 25 year span on thousands and thousands of patients. Therefore, I have a slightly larger patient 'sampling'.

I have experienced both the symptoms of plantar fasciitis and 'Morton's' neuroma, and gave myself, yes you read that correctly, gave myself injections to treat the problem. If I did not believe they worked, I would not inject myself or anyone else.

I no longer use the Koby system or EDIN procedure because I have had too many patients have a recurrence of symptoms after the procedure was performed by myself and by other doctors. Fortunately, I have never had a patient that has developed RSD/CRPS from any treatment I have rendered for a 'neuroma', though I'm sure it will happen someday.

I have treatd almost a dozen patients in my office that have undergone cryosurgery with unsuccessful results, that did have significant fibrosis when I intervened surgically.

Cryosurgery like any other procedure can fail. Citing the case of your friend that had success for his/her sciatica is wonderful, but certainly does not validate a treatment. Once again, I do believe cryosurgery is an excellent alternative, I simply beleive the alcohol injections are a better alternative to try first.

I don't count how many of my patients have failed alcohol injections and ended up in surgery, but I would state that approximately 90-95% of the patients that I have utilized sclerosing alcohol injections on have obtained at least 80% relief and as a result have not ended up with surgical intervention.

When using sclerosing alcohol injections, I use a 4% solution and follow the 'recipe' and technique described by Dr. Dockery.

I am not attempting to disuade you or anyone else from having cryosurgery. It's your body, do what you want. I am simply expressing my opinion based on thousands of cases over a 25 year period vs. a single experience.

And I practice in Philadelphia and Southern New Jersey.

Result number: 79

Message Number 263880

Re: Alcohol Injections / Morton's neuroma /Cryosurgery, for Will View Thread
Posted by brianpk on 3/06/10 at 21:05

Everyone is allowed an opinion.

Everyone should take whatever risks they deem acceptable with their health. One should gather all the information that you can, then make a decision based on what one thinks is right for their particular situation.

My comments are based on MY EXPERIENCE with Morton's neuroma in MY FEET.

I have spent a lot of time sitting in a chair with my feet on ice, in hot/cold baths, and spent a lot of time and money on this particular malady. I have spent thousands on plane trips around the country, visited podiatrists, my family doctor, orthopedic surgeons, pedorthists, chiropractors, massage therapists. Some helped, some didn't, only one individual made my circumstance worse, the original podiatrist with the steroid injection.


Dr. DSW, I have several questions for you. Have you had ANY of these procedures performed on your body? Have you experienced the pain of Morton's neuroma? If so, what procedure did you have performed on your body?

What percentage alcohol do you use in your injections? The original studies done were with 4%. There are physicians that report the use of % alcohol as high as 30%.

You state that you have performed ALL of the procedures including excisions, KOBYGUARD,EDIN, and alcohol injections. Do you still use them all ? Have you abandoned some ? How do you describe 'significant success' in terms of complete resolution of symptoms? 10% 50% 90% ? Could you give us more insight as to your personal success rates with all of the procedures that you have used?

How many people end up at surgery even after alcohol injection ?

After excision, what percentage of your patients develop stump neuromas? How long are they off their feet ? How long does it take to recover completely?

What problems have you seen arise from the use of the Koby or EDIN procedure ?

How many surgical patients have developed chronic regional pain syndrome after one of these procedures?

You state that you have no experience with cryo other than having 'observed' the procedure on many occasions.

Can you provide evidence or point to articles or references where 'the probe freezes or destroys blood vessels and/or instrinsic muscles, etc.'

Remember, this isn't a podiatric procedure only, cryo has been used in pain management for years, only in the last 7 years having been approved for podiatric use.

A friend of mine had a nerve in his back cryogenically ablated at a pain management clinic to relieve him of chronic sciatia. It worked !

Hard numbers from 25 years of experience would be invaluable to those suffering from Morton's and trying to make a decision on their course of treatment. Please consider providing readers with some numeric based on your experience with the various procedures that you have performed.

Finally, what city do you practice in ?

Thanks

Result number: 80

Message Number 263877

Re: Alcohol Injections / Morton's neuroma /Cryosurgery, for Will View Thread
Posted by Dr.DSW on 3/06/10 at 17:12

I believe that this particular post is filled with misconceptions. The first misconception is that the alcohol injections 'leak out' and can damage other tissues. If the injection is performed correctly, the medication does not 'leak out'. The interspace that is being injected has a very limited amount of anatomical structures to be damaged, and there is significant damage that can be performed inserting a cryotherapy probe 'blindly' into the same interspace. Even if ultrasound guidance is utilized, the probe can still freeze destroy blood vessels and/or instrinsic muscles, etc.

As for the statement that 'many have reported extreme pain' from these injections. Well, many have reported extreme pain from NOT having these injections, many have reported extreme pain following traditional surgery, many have reported extreme pain following EDIN procedure, Kobyguard procedures and cryotherapy procedures. So you simply can not isolate alcohol injections as the only culprit as having the potential of causing extreme pain.

In my opinion, after only 25 years of practice, the sclerosing alcohol injections have the best potential outcome vs. potential risk. There is very little realistic risk for complication. Cryosurgery, as safe as it may be is STILL surgery. A probe is being inserted and there are freeze and thaw cycles. Once again, there is the potential for damaging healthy tissue, and there is the potential for scar tissue/fibrosis along the probe tract that has been created. And naturally, with any invasive procedure, there is always the potential for post operative infection.

I have performed cortisone injections, I have performed surgical excision via a traditional dorsal approach and a plantar approach, I have performed the EDIN procedure, the Koby procedure and sclerosing alcohol injections, and have witnessed, but never performed cryosurgical procedures on many occassions.

I have had significant success with all of the above procedures, and with my years of experience, my treatment of choice at this time is still sclerosing alcohol injections, since MY patients experience the greatest relief with the fewest complications. And that's how I judge success.

Result number: 81

Message Number 263876

Alcohol Injections / Morton's neuroma /Cryosurgery, for Will View Thread
Posted by brianpk on 3/06/10 at 16:50

Having suffered with Bi-lateral Morton's for over 1 year I have had (1) cortizone injection 1/09 which made my pain almost intolerable. I had cryosurgery perfomed (bi-lateral) by a POD in the South who advertizes heavily. This procedure was partially successful but I believe that the technique and equipment was a little off so my relief was not as significant as hoped for. I have spent over $2500 on Orthotics. None of which I believe to be correct. I had a second Cryosurgery performed in 12/09 by a Cryosurgeon in AZ (only one foot this time). This Cryo was much more successful in relieving my pain. Pain relief is not complete but I can make it through the day on my feet, on concrete, without feeling like I want to cry at 6pm.
I strech my calf muscles and hamstrings several times each day, take some Motrin or Celebrex as required, and try to take my shoes off whenever possible.
I am contemplating a second round of cryo on the same foot to try & get more relief but, before I do that I need to get proper orthotics to help correct the mechanical deficiency in my feet that caused this problem in the first place. I chose cryo over the alcohol because the alcohol injections change the texture of the nerve. The sclerosing solution can leak out and damage other tissues in the foot and many have reported extreme pain with the shots. I had very little discomfort with the Cryo both times. The cryo has been used in pain control for nerve pain in other parts of the body for many years. It is relatively safe and has the least potential to cause long term damage of any 'more agressive' treatment. Whatever path you choose, I recommend that you move slowly. If you choose any surgical route it cannot be undone. If one looks down just a little int the 'ask the doc' section of this forum there is someone who had Morton's surgery that is suffering more than before the surgery. Note that the doctors did not reply to this post. In almost no other circumstance is it ever recommended that a nerve be removed from the body. It will always try to grow back, sometimes as a 'Stump' which is more painful than the original neuroma. Many report no problems with this procedure but published reports show recurrence rates as high as 50%. Some report complete relief for 5-8 years then terrible re-occurences. It is your body, choose your path wisely once any true surgery is performed it cannot be undone. Patience, time, an understanding of WHY THIS HAPPENED TO YOU is very important. Local talent may not be able to adequately solve the problem. Do your research, take your time, make an informed decision, these are your feet. You can find plenty of horror stories of people that have had their life ruined by foot surgery. Best of luck, may your relief come quickly.

Result number: 82

Message Number 263868

Re: Alcohol Shots for Neuromas View Thread
Posted by Brianpk on 3/06/10 at 08:05

Will, please go to the social board for my response. I will not post here as I am not a physician.

Result number: 83

Message Number 263866

Re: Alcohol Shots for Neuromas View Thread
Posted by Dr.DSW on 3/06/10 at 06:51

Absolutely. Sometimes the nerve looks a little atrophied, but the injections do not eliminate surgical intervention if they are not successful.

Result number: 84

Message Number 263854

Re: Alcohol Shots for Neuromas View Thread
Posted by Will on 3/05/10 at 20:22

Thank you greatly for your comprehensive answer. One more quick question, if the alcohol shots don't work could you always have the surgery later? Have you seen this?

Result number: 85

Message Number 263845

Re: Alcohol Shots for Neuromas View Thread
Posted by Dr.DSW on 3/05/10 at 17:59

With all due respect to Dr. Barrett, there are many well respected doctors all over this country performing sclerosing alcohol injections for 'neuromas'. A neuroma in reality is simply a perineural fibrosis.

Dr. Barrett is correct, and what he states on his website has been stated many, many times before by many, many doctors. And that comment is that a 'neuroma' in the foot is really the only area that we actually remove a nerve, rather than attempt to free up the entrapment. However, a 'neuroma' in the foot is unique and is not only an entrapment, but is also a fibrosis of the nerve, which IS confirmed on pathology report. It isn't simply a normal nerve caught under a ligament. Additionally, it is not a major nerve that will cause loss of motor function when it is removed.

On the other hand, with a simple release of the deep transverse ligament to 'decompress' the nerve, I have seen many cases performed by many different surgeons recur due to scar tissue, fibrous tissue, etc, causing a re-entrapment of the nerve. This is despite Dr. Barrett's reported 94% success rate. Once again, I do respect Dr. Barrett and do not doubt any of his comments, I simply have not seen other people reproduce these results with the EDIN or other methods that release the ligament.

Additionally, you must also remember that Dr. Barrett does have a proprietary interest in the EDIN procedure. And although it is also true that cortisone injections can cause instability to the instrinsic muscles, joint structures, etc., when used prudently, these injections can often be beneficial and in my opinion should not be dismissed.

I have utilized sclerosing alcohol injections with significant success for many of my patients when I believe they have been indicated, and have rarely if ever seen any complications. And the vast majority of these patients are grateful that these injections kept them from undergoing a surgical procedure.

ANY surgical procedure, whether it is the EDIN procedure, KOBY guard procedure, traditional dorsal excision of a neuroma, plantar approach, etc., has the potential to cause post operative complications, including infection, continued pain, recurrence, instability due to release of the transverse metatarsal ligament, etc., etc. The advantage of the EDIN or KOBY is that you won't get a 'stump' neuroma vs having a traditional surgery.

However, I believe that sclerosing alcohol injections are safe and effective when used prudently. I have no experience with cryotherapy, so can not comment on that procedure.

Result number: 86

Message Number 263842

Alcohol Shots for Neuromas View Thread
Posted by Will on 3/05/10 at 16:56

Doctors: I am confused. A lot of doctors use the 4% alcohol shots on neuromas, and some reputable doctors advise against them.

For example, on Dr. Stephen Barrett's website (He holds the patent for the EDIN procedure for Morton's Neuroma)

http://www.your-feet.com/procedures/mortons-entrapment

http://www.your-feet.com/procedures/mortons-entrapment/23-freezing-and-sclerosing-nerves

he highly advises against the procedure.

Now I don't know what to do. There is a doctor in my area that claims to have good success with the alcohol shots but now I'm not sure?

PLease help!!!

Result number: 87

Message Number 263783

Re: Plantar Plate tear View Thread
Posted by kim f on 3/03/10 at 18:10

I'm recoving from a surgery to repair mr Plantar Plate Tear and a Neuroma in the same foot. I have had little or no real pain and I'm stuck in a boot for three weeks and can olny get up to use the bathroom etc. I will let you know how it goes. I had cortisone shots first and they worked for a few months but my second set of shots last only a month.

Result number: 88

Message Number 263699

Complications from ESWT View Thread
Posted by dud on 2/26/10 at 15:11

I have posted on this site before, but not in the last couple of years. My hopes is that someone reading this may relate to my problems.

I was a healthy 30 year old avid runner in Fall 2002. I was diagnosed with bilateral PF. Conservative treatment was tried for nearly 2 years. In Summer of 2004, I had ESWT with Dornier Epos.

Prior to procedure, I had a PSSD test done on my right foot, I assume to rule out entrapment syndrome. It was negative. My ultrasound measured a very thick fascia. I remember my POS testing for TINEL sign and it was negative.

Prior to procedure, the pain was localized to a spot about the size of a half dollar smack dab in the middle of my heel. It got sorer as the day went on, but the next morning there would be not too much pain. I had no nerve sensation pain at all. I was able to play 18 holes of golf 3-4 times a week (walking). After walking long distances, foot would be extremely sore, but again only localized to the heel area.

After ESWT procedure, this is when the problems began. Literally, a day or two after procedure I had burning on inside of ankle. POD said was probably minor irritation from foot block. Over the course of the next few weeks, months, my right foot began having burning, numbness, tingling all over - and this has continued to this day, 6 years later. Again, I had zero of these symptoms the day before my ESWT procedure.

After the procedure, I visited 3 neurologists, and 5 different PODS. I had extensive nerve tests, another PSSD, MRIs,ultrasounds, etc, and everything was negative. Docs kept telling me they couldn't see anything wrong with my foot - all the while it was in much pain.

I can't run anymore, and I can't walk long distances either. If I rub my arch from my ankle down to my big toe, I get prickly sensations in the arch area. Additionally, it feels like I may have a neuroma. The ankle area on the inside of my foot appears swolen, but I really don't have a positve Tinels sign. Foot just feels cold, and burns.

Bottom line, I have now lived with this for 6 years. The foot limits my activity, but I can still do alot of things. For example, I can go to the mall and walk around OK. I can still play golf with a cart. I can walk a couple of miles OK. I have never needed to take pain medicine for the pain, and I sleep fine at night. It is frustrating, but not so life changing - if that makes sense? On a 1-10 scale, the worse the pain gets is about a 4-5.

I get frustrated because I have 4 kids under the age of 6 and I know my activity with them will be limited as they grow up - no running, no long hiking, no basketball, etc, etc.

But, should I now accept that this pain probably won't get any better and just plan on living with it?

My fear is that if I tried to have another surgery, my foot could really get screwed up for life and become a nightmare. I have read the nightmare stories on this board with people struggling just to live normally, and I don't want that to happen.

Any suggestions? Thanks for reading!

Result number: 89

Message Number 263693

Re: Finally got surgery View Thread
Posted by Deb K on 2/26/10 at 09:55

Jaf,
thank you for this post. My podiastrist just scheduled me for surgery on my left foot - TT, PF, Heel spurs and neuromas. The burning and pain in from the balls of both feet into the toes is sooo bad I cant sleep anymore. Now, I have heel spurs and PF in my left heel, just got 2nd cortisone shot yesterday t help releive that pain to hold me over until surgery.
I am scared though, I would like to hear if after a month you feel any relief, if the buring doesnt subside, that I am not sure I should go through with it casue that is why I would be having the surgery!

thanks again.

Result number: 90

Message Number 263633

Mortons neuroma surgery View Thread
Posted by kelly evans on 2/23/10 at 00:20

Hi, I had mortons neuroma surgery 8 weeks ago. My neuroma was between my second and third toe, my podiatrist told me if was the largest neuroma he had ever seen(the size of a lima bean) My foot still burns when I get in the shower or anytime I put my bare foot on the floor it turns dark red and I have pins and needles all the way up to my knee. I still cant put any wieght on the ball of this foot with my crocs on but can heel walk, I can not even heel walk barefoot. My podiatrist told me today this was all normal. I still cant bend any of the toes on this foot. I dont feel like this is normal, but he is the doctor. Please some advice from another professional field could really ease my mind or let me know I need to see someone else.

Result number: 91

Message Number 263565

What works for me View Thread
Posted by DJN on 2/18/10 at 17:39

I see that this is an old thread, but thought I'd add to it in case anyone else stumbles upon it like I just did.

I've have had metatarsalgia for several years (mis-diagnosed for 2 yrs as neuroma). Doc gave me orthotics with a huge gel-type pad, but they killed my feet--I couldn't even wear them for 5 minutes. I'm a very active person (sports, hiking, biking) and refuse to slow down, tho' I still can't jog since I've had this problem.

Here's my home-grown solution:

I've found firm soled shoes to be most comfortable (Vasque trail shoes are what I buy now). Not so pretty for work, but I'm lucky that there isn't a dress code.

I use Superfeet 'Berry' inserts (they have metataral padding & firm plastic heel/arch support). Then I add my own, custom cut, adhesive 1/8' felt 'metatarsal bar'. ('Bar' meaning it goes all the way across the width of the foot. I tried oval pads in the center of my foot, but they didn't work for me).

I place the felt (attached to underside of the insole) between the middle of my arch and just below the metatarsals to reduce the pressure on the metatarsal area. I bevel the edges of the felt using scissors. Here's a link to a picture in case my description isn't clear.

http://photos.smugmug.com/photos/791471021_jf82k-M.jpg

By the way, Superfeet are kind of expensive, so shop around online. I've found them on eBay. I get the felt padding (sold by the foot) at a local medical supply store. Maybe try experimenting with cardboard to get the right size/shape.

Hope this helps someone out there! Best of luck.

Result number: 92

Message Number 263463

Re: Jeremy View Thread
Posted by Cam on 2/14/10 at 12:50

I am very pleased to have read this discussion about the Cluffy Wedge. It is not very well understood by many in the podiatric and pedorthic world.

We picked up the Cluffy Wedge in May 2009 in our store and the results have been nothing short of amazing. We are experiencing nearly 100% success for significant relief of Morton's neuroma pain, anterior shin splints and lateral hip pain. All of these complaints can be directly associated with a big-toe-joint that 'locks' when the 1st MPJ comes in contact with the ground.

We test 100 percent of our adult customers for big-toe function, and better than 90% will have a first MPJ that locks when tested. We do not believe that Functional Hallux Limitus is abnormal. Rather, we believe this condition is the price we pay for walking upright on concrete and hard surfaces. It's easy to apply, generally well-tolerated and removeable if the customer doesn't like it.

I am also surprised at the sheer number of people that regard Functional Hallux Limitus as an arthritic condition. You can have excellent ROM and still 'lock' when the 1st MPJ hits the ground.

The resulting compensation is usually lateral movement at toe-off, which places stress on the lesser metatarsals, anterior shins, medial knee, lateral hip and back joints. Essentially, FHL makes our body move like a car out of alignment. And it is very common.

Result number: 93

Message Number 263452

Re: DRW - Challenge foot pain View Thread
Posted by Goaskalice on 2/13/10 at 23:01

Long term blogger... I actually had one neuroma surgery between the 3rd and 4th toe. No relief.. The pain is farther down and is persistent with and without weight. Seems to be more in the tnedon/Plantar. Just always stiff and present on both sides.

Result number: 94

Message Number 263444

Re: DRW - Challenge foot pain View Thread
Posted by Dr. Wedemeyer on 2/13/10 at 12:38

Burning indicates a nerve issue. Have they considered neuromas?

I know we had a previous discussion but I cannot access it BECAUSE THE SEARCH FUNCTION NO LONGER WORKS -HINT!

Result number: 95

Message Number 263415

Re: Morton's Neuroma Surgery Revision View Thread
Posted by Cameron B on 2/12/10 at 09:17

Nancy-

Just wondering if you have found anything to help your pain/situation. I am 35 year old female in VERY similar situation with surgery on left foot 12/07. It was never any better and my POD now thinks the ortho tied off the nerve to another structure and this is causing a fishhook like feeling. my email is burchsc at musc.edu I have constant pain, burning, stiffness in both feet along with plantar fasciitis which is pulling on the neuromas. Have tried everything....have to small children which makes situation very difficult!
thanks!

Result number: 96

Message Number 263280

Re: still in pain View Thread
Posted by Robin W on 2/06/10 at 12:13

The results are permanent in that unlike steroid injections the effect does not wear off. The freeze has various physiological effects on the nerve sheath, primarily causing ice formation within the blood supply to the nerve sheath (the tissue responsible for the neuroma). With Cryo there is a process of nerve sheath breakdown and repair over a 10 week period. The likelihood of the neuroma returning is low. However if you have a pronated foot type and you engage in high impact activities such as running the pronation will cause forefoot compression and trauma to the nerve. Essentially if you have an underlying mechanical issue that is not addressed with orthotics, exercises or shoes you might stand a higher chance of developing another neuroma. Worse case scenario if the neuroma returns you would simply have a repeat cryo.
I treat a lot of sports people, they are generally pain free and back to sport within 2 weeks.
Cryo really is a no brainer. Find someone that someone that has done over a couple of hundred and you will have a fantastic outcome

Result number: 97

Message Number 263247

Re: still in pain View Thread
Posted by Kathy on 2/05/10 at 08:40

Wow, after reading this, I am trying to contact DR. Katz. I am trying to avoid my Dr.'s suggestion of a second surgery through the bottom of my foot to remove the stump or whatever neuroma has recurred. I am so afraid of making it worse, as I am very active. I have been trying to live with the pain, but, some days it is so terrible. Does anyone actually have any results from cyrosurgery and does it eliminate the neuroma or just reduce the pain, as the injections supposedly did? Thanks. Kathy

Result number: 98

Message Number 263127

Re: Plantar Fasciitis & 4 heel spurs with neuromas-nothing has worked, what do I do now? View Thread
Posted by SherryR on 1/30/10 at 16:42

How come no one has tried to answer my questions? If I am being impatient, I apologize in advance.

Result number: 99

Message Number 263125

Re: still in pain View Thread
Posted by Robin W on 1/30/10 at 12:26

Hi Sharon, I have just read your post with so many others on this site. I am a UK based Podiatrist based in Sheffield. I am amazed that that no one on this site is aware of a cryosurgery as a treatment for neuroma and stump neuroma. Essentially it is an injection technique using hi resolution colour ultrasound to guide a probe into contact with the neuroma. The neuroma is then frozen for two 3 minute freezes cycles. Each freeze achieves a temp of -70 this causes the scar tissue around the nerve to simply breakdown. The technique does not involve cutting the nerve so there is absolutely NO Risk of stump neuroma pts have little to no pain after, this is also an office based procedure. The technique originated in the U.S. The main two DPMs who perform most cryos in the U.S are DR Deo Rampertab in Phoenix and DR Marc Katz in Florida. I am amazed that people are still being sliced and diced for neuromas when there is a much better option that spares the nerve and has a zero % of causing stump neuroma. The technique is difficult to learn, but once perfected is incredibly effective. I use the same technique as Dr s Rampertab and Katz and enjoy success rates in the high ninety’s. there are pt blogg sites re cryo so have a good read. good luck.

Result number: 100

Message Number 263112

Sesamoidectomy, Osteotomy, and Neuroma removal? - need advice View Thread
Posted by CarrieM on 1/29/10 at 17:49

My feet are extremely cavus causing me to fracture a sesamoid in my right foot about 12 years ago. It is necrotic and fragmented and causing me increasing amounts of pain. I think I have finally made the decision to have it removed and my foot surgeon has suggested an osteotomy to help alleviate the pressure on the remaining sesamoid which appears healthy at this time. I also have a VERY uncomfortable neuroma in the same foot and a less problematic one in my left foot. Can anyone advise 1. Whether or not it is a good idea to tackle all three in one surgery? and 2. Whether or not all of the people I keep reading about on various web sites are a representative sample of experiences with sesamoidectomies? For the most part they seem miserable. I have had a surgeon describe it to me as a 'good surgery, but not a great surgery.' If that is true, I would have expected more positive outcomes. Maybe I should stay off of these sites altogether?

Result number: 101

Message Number 263074

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by CynthiaH on 1/27/10 at 18:25

After neuroma surgery on both feet on 12/16/09 I think I am improving very well. I am a long distance runner and on 1/24/10 took my first run. My total mileage was about five miles, approximately two of which I ran. Today, 1/27/10 I ran/walked six miles, running 1/2 mile and walking 1/2 mile. My feet feel the same after the run as before. My concern is a shooting, neuroma-like sensation in one of my feet whether I run or not. Am I being too impatient? My doc says it is the post-surgery healing process. He also said it takes several months post-surgery before a stump neuroma shows up.
Thanks for the feedback.

Result number: 102

Message Number 263044

Plantar Plate tear View Thread
Posted by Maia on 1/26/10 at 10:35

I incurred an acute injury to my foot at 3 months ago while running on rocky terrain. Initially, I was dxed with a neuroma and treated with a cortisone injection. This barely helped. I was then sent for an MRI which showed a plantar plate tear and inflammation. The doc then put me in a boot for two weeks. Two weeks are over and there is no change. Any ideas about where treatment should head now?

Result number: 103

Message Number 263014

Re: neuroma surgery View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 1/24/10 at 12:06

A tourniquet is really standard on most surgery performed on the foot and ankle, if the patient does not have a pre-existing vascular disease.

Unlike your vivid imaginiation, it's not going to cause gangrene, nor is the doctor going to rip off his shirt and tie it tightly around your leg.

The tourniquet is like a blood pressure cuff placed around your ankle or thigh, depending upon the procedure performed and the anesthesia used. The tourniquet is then inflated at a specific pressure which is often based upon your blood pressure.

It is generally safe to keep the tourniquet inflated for up to 1.5 hours before it has to be deflated to let the tissues 'perfuse'. If the surgery is going to last longer than 1.5 hours, the 'general' rule is to wrap the surgical site, and let the tourniquet down for about 5 minutes for every 1/2 hour it was inflated. Then it is safe to re-inflate the tourniquet.

The actual purpose of using the tourniquet in the first place is to allow a 'dry field', which means there is no bleeding during the surgery. This usually allows for a quicker surgery since it allows the surgeon to perform the surgery without constantly having to wipe away blood,etc. It also allows for excellent visualization of the anatomaical structures such as tendons, ligaments, nerves, blood vessels, etc. And of course it eliminates blood loss.

There are some surgeons that prefer not to use a tourniquet during surgery, but the overwhelming majority of surgeons that perform surgery on the foot and ankle routinely and safely use tourniquets.

Result number: 104

Message Number 263011

neuroma surgery View Thread
Posted by mipmupper on 1/24/10 at 10:05

I have been diagnosed with a neuroma in my left foot and have had 4 cortezone shots over the last 2 years. The last shot did not work. The pain is worse now and my podiatrist has suggested surgery. I also have a hammer toe on the same foot which he said he can fix at the same time. I'm kind of nervous about the surgery because the doctor said they use a tournequet on the lower part of the leg. Is that dangerous? Makes me think of gangrene and olden days. What's the dealio?????

Result number: 105

Message Number 262993

Plantar Fasciitis & 4 heel spurs with neuromas-nothing has worked, what do I do now? View Thread
Posted by SherryR on 1/23/10 at 16:30

I was diagnosed with plantar fasciitis in both heels in 2004, given an in injection in both heels and orthotics for my shoes. Pain didn't go away completely but I got MUCH relief and was able to deal. By the end of 2007 I had gained weight up to 319lbs (overweight my whole life, thyroid removed when i was 24). Had lapband surery Jan 2008, started excercising on the elliptical immediatley after lap-band surgery, heels immediatle started getting worse. Went to a different podiatrist who said my orthotics did not fit and remade a new pair for me. Tried injections again for a few months with no results, switched excercise to swimming instead of elliptical, lost 100 lbs in a 1.5 yrs, still hurting and getting worse, finally had Ossatron procedure (Dr. decision-not procedure with holes b/c i get Keloid scars), heels got better after about 2 months. Started using elliptical again, went back to work as a real estate agent, on my feet most of the day. Still losing weight, around 219lbs now, 5'7. Heels hurting worse than ever but in different spots than before. Now the pain is on the inside of the back of my heel in 1 specific spot and radiates pain outward in circular area, not in my arches like before Ossatron procedure AND started having pain in balls of feet that Dr. said was a neuroma. Dr. started me on ultrasound therapy 3 times per week, and gave me a prescription for pain medication. Both give me relief but I still can't stand longer than 1 hour without severe pain that takes me completely off my feet, can't stand AT ALL without orthotics, stopped excercising, started using a shower chair since I can't stand without orthotics. Told Dr. the other day that i can't live like this, i hate not being able to hike with my husband shop with my Mom/friends, clean my house, work, everyday things and I wanted to move to the next treatment. His answer was to send me to a pain management clinic, which I don't know much about, and I asked him are we at the point of not 'correcting' the problem causing my heel pain and now we are just going to 'manage' my pain? he said pain mmanagemnt would be able to offer my injections and physical therapy. i have already done those thngs for years now. i asl started having cramps and twitches really bad in my feet and leg muscles (not like restless leg syndrome). I told im I needed to think and do some research first. i get the feeling I am being 'passed on' to another Dr. which makes me frustrated and helpless. I am only 33 year old, why can't anyone help me? Where do i go, what do i do now, i don't want to go to 'pain management' I don't want to take pain medication, it doesn't help anyway, PT nor injections help. Could I have something different than plantar fasciitis? I just want to solve the root of the problem not throw things at the symptoms.

Result number: 106

Message Number 262963

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by bevl on 1/22/10 at 12:33

Would like to know who the othopitic dr was you had ?I had a neroma

surgery 2Yrs ago and have had no releif. Just don't know what to do

next. Have also had all the ijections possiable .Have you used the

Threa

Result number: 107

Message Number 262797

Haflinger's are great! View Thread
Posted by Kathy G on 1/15/10 at 13:57

It's been ages since I've posted but I just wanted to mention a shoe I've tried and had great luck with. I have atypical PF in that my pain is in my arch most of the time, although I've had heel pain.

Since I've stopped posting, I've been diagnosed with an unknown type of Osteo/Rheumatoid arthritis. I've had four surgeries on one of my hands and one on the other. Feel much better with my joints replaced or fused. My neck vertebrae are fused, except for two of the them and I have chronic pain which is being treated well.

About a month ago, out of the blue, my Morton's neuroma started to hurt. I wasn't surprised since I was starting with bilateral arthritis in my toes.

I was going through some of the shoe websites and found these Haflinger clogs, made of boiled wool. I figured I had nothing to lose since shipping and return was free. I bought three pair and I love them. My right toe, which was very painful and starting to slip under my big toe, straightened out after a couple of weeks. The neuroma pain is gone.

I am allergic to wool and tend to have hot feet but these shoes are neither hot nor itchy. I was so impressed, I ordered some of their slippers.

I have one pair I thought I should return because I didn't think I really needed that many pair of shoes but it's so cute. It's a dark charcoal gray with wild flowers embroidered on the top of the shoe. I got permission to return them but now I'm thinking I'm going to break them in!

That's one important thing about them. You must be patient. They felt big on me and kind of sloppy. After a short period of wearing them, they seem to mold to one's foot.

Just wanted you all to know of a brand I wasn't aware. I hope they help some of you!

Oh, and they accommodated my big toe which is turning up and the fact that my second toe is longer than my big one. No wonder I have trouble with my feet; they were imperfect from the day I was born!

Follow people's recommendations as to size. I would have thought I was a 40 because I wear a nine with my orthotics in a running shoe but the 39's fit fine as the comments suggested they would - even with my orthtotics.

Good luck to all of you struggling with foot pain. It takes a long time but PF does go away and most people don't replace it with arthritis! Just be patient and do Julie's foot exercises. I stopped and I swear that's why the Neuroma came back.

Result number: 108

Message Number 262724

Re: itchy left Heel View Thread
Posted by sbks on 1/11/10 at 09:02

Me too! I am 46 and my heel started itching at night about five days ago, and has kept me awake ever since. It feels like it's deep inside my heel, and I don't think it has anything to do with the skin. I don't have any dry skin or calluses on my feet, anyway. It is kind of like a tingle more than an itch.

A couple of things changed recently in my lifestyle: I started using the comforter on my bed in addition to the usual blankets as it has been really cold lately (causing my feet to be warmer than usual), and for the past ten days I have been on a vegan diet (no animal products at all). I exercise moderately, nothing excessive.

I have had sciatic nerve pain many years ago and also have had four neuromas removed from my feet, so with my history of nerve issues, I think it has something to do with that. But after reading some of the previous posts, I now wonder if my feet being hot is causing the itching, or possibly something in my diet (or lack of something in my diet).

I hope we can all find help for this soon!

Result number: 109

Message Number 262700

Re: Morton's Nueroma Post Pain View Thread
Posted by JenniferE on 1/09/10 at 21:30

Arlon- I know this post was from a few years ago but if you ever check it still please respond to me. I have alot of the same issues as you have talked about. Would like to know what came about on your situation. Did you have the cryosurgery and did it work? I too have been diagnosed with RSDS after having a neuroma surgery and have been in pain ever since.

Result number: 110

Message Number 262692

Re: NY Times and Physical Therapy View Thread
Posted by janice on 1/09/10 at 08:04

I think that Gina Kolata is an excellent writer and what she suggests should not be taken lightly. Of course everyone has their own individual histories with PT. I have my own with PF, neuromas and piriformis and ITB. All related running injuries and frankly I am in agreement with Ms. Kolata. Lots of 'voodoo'. My own personal experience has suggested that custom orthotics are expensive and over the counter ones work equally as well. But I do feel the article is worth reading and thinking about.

Result number: 111

Message Number 262658

new shoes with orthodics View Thread
Posted by scooter on 1/06/10 at 22:01

I have a neuroma on my left foot, extremely flat feet and bunions. In addition I have neuropathy that affects my feet. I'm looking for shoes casual and dress that would fit custom orthodics 3/4.

Someone recommended the following shoes:


Drew Arlington

Propét Suburbanlite Walker

Aetrex Ariya Moc Toe Oxford

Drew Traveler

Result number: 112

Message Number 262657

Re: Going crazy and broke!!!!!!!! View Thread
Posted by scooter on 1/06/10 at 21:04

Jeremy thank you again for your advice on sneaks. Now I need advice on shoes. I need a wide deep toe box for neuroma and bunion and a shoe that fits my 3/4 hard orthodics. Any suggestions.

Scott

Result number: 113

Message Number 262606

Going crazy and broke!!!!!!!! View Thread
Posted by scooter on 1/04/10 at 20:52

I have a major problem with finding sneakers for my orthodics. I have a bunion, neuroma and neuropathy. Triple whammy. Up until now my orthodics have been working just great. The doctor said they are just fine.

I've been through three pair of New Balance sneakers going broke and in pain. I loved the old NB zip but they are now discontinued ( figures)I've tried three other models since. New Balance: M587 ( nice and deep but so rigid that it hurts my front part of my foot), New Balance: MX8520 ( hurt my bunion in toe box)and I'm picking up NB 992 tomorrow. I'm so scared that I won't find a decent pair of sneaks. Dress shoes seem to be ok. I don't understand why all of a sudden they are causing me pain. I have 3/4 orthodics and they fit beautifully in my old NB 8505 ( discontinued ). Any suggestions?

Scott

Result number: 114

Message Number 262477

choosing sneakers with orthodics View Thread
Posted by scooter on 12/27/09 at 00:31

If anyone can be of help I would greatly appreciate it. I have bunions, neuroma and neuropathy in my painful feet. I am wearing custom orthodics successfully . However, the only sneaks I felt comfortable in were discontinued. Can anyone help direct me in the right direction? I never thought choosing a sneak or shoe would be so expensive and difficult.

I' enjoy New balance sneaks and shoes. I'm not sure what a last is or what type of shoe would be good for me. I just bought a pair of NB with motion control and I don't feel like they are the most comfortable model. I do however like the generous toe box. My question is what should I be looking for and anyone have any suggestions on brand style of shoe?

Thanks.

Scott

Result number: 115

Message Number 262474

Re: morton's neuroma& TTs combined View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 12/26/09 at 13:51

Laurie is 100% correct. You should not be asking ANYONE for any post operative advice other than the surgeon that performed your surgery.

He/she knows your case better than anyone, and will have his/her own preferences, and also has the ability to actually see and evaluate your feet, and I don't.

If you are frustrated, concerned, etc., PLEASE use your absolute best resource who happens to be your own doctor. You had enough confidence in your doctor to allow him/her to perform the surgery, now have enough confidence to address all your questions to this same doctor.

The advice others give you may be in complete contrast to what your doctor may advise, which can ultimately cause you harm.

Result number: 116

Message Number 262473

Re: morton's neuroma& TTs combined View Thread
Posted by Laurie C. on 12/26/09 at 12:16

Although, I'm not a doctor, but a TTS recovered patient, I know the doctors on tnis board will tell you that 'any and all post op questions should be directed to your doctor.'

Three weeks is early and although I was back to work after 1, I work from my home and in a desk job. Perhaps you should talk to your doctor about going to work for 3/4 time.

You'll do fine - just give it time.

Result number: 117

Message Number 262470

morton's neuroma& TTs combined View Thread
Posted by marie l on 12/26/09 at 10:32

I've had surgery for the neuroma and TTs one month ago,I was release to work 3 weeks post, I was told to wear the cast boot,I started to get an irritation on the neuroma incision, wearing the boot keeps it moist and irritated and was slowing down heeling, I am having a hard time finishing my day at work since I am on my feetand in pain, is it ok when I am at home to wear padded sandals to allow this irritation to heel and air out as long as I do not go into plantar flexion, If I mimic the same motion of the foot mechanic when I am in the sandals as I do in the cast boot is that ok?,thnak you so very much , Marie

Result number: 118

Message Number 262442

Re: plantar faciitis & bunion surgery View Thread
Posted by kmm on 12/22/09 at 09:56

Do you ever see PF resolved as a 'side effect' of bunion surgery? I had bunion surgery about 5 years ago on the foot that had also been affected for over a year by PF. The bunion surgery involved shortening my first metatarsal. Although I had a poor result from the bunion surgery (too much bone removed, big toe still won't flex downward, neuroma developed in space between first and second mets, etc.) the PF resolved immediately. My podiatrist said it was probably because shortening of the bone reduced the tension on the plantar fascia. Does that track for you, or might it have just been the result of time spent off my feet or in a walking boot?

Result number: 119

Message Number 262277

Jeremy a quick shoe recommendation please !! View Thread
Posted by BrianPK on 12/11/09 at 09:11

Jeremy, shoebuy.com has sent out some 50% off email coupons and I was wondering if you could make a recommendation for some athletic shoes. I've got bilateral Morton's neuroma and have what has been called a 'hyperflexible first ray'. What brand / style would at least be worth looking at. The deal ends quickly but with the free shipping & free return shipping if they don't work out I don't care. If they do work out finally I'll have gotten a break finding shoes with these sore feet.

Result number: 120

Message Number 262135

Re: Debating on whether to try a heel lift for a "short" leg. View Thread
Posted by JCA on 12/02/09 at 18:55

BrianPK,

Your detailed response is greatly appreciated. Thank you very much.

I have been shown to have an *anatomically* short right leg by 1 cm. Some say that is not a lot of a difference and some people live with that their whole lives without pain. Also, that difference was only shown through a leg length x-ray, which in itself could be flawed. However, I just put in a 1/4 inch lift in my right shoe today since nothing else so far has worked. It is possible that I have both a functional and anatomically short right leg, maybe.

1. How long did you leave your lift in before deciding it was hurting you more than helping? I have been told to give it 3-4 weeks.
2. I saw this article online. http://www.davedraper.com/blog/2008/09/10/what-is-an-elevated-hip/ I thought it directly related to me. At the end there is a link to a forum post that shows what to do for an elevated hip. The second entry in that post shows what to do for the elevated side (in case my left hip) and the normal side (in case my right hip with the possible short leg). Do you agree with the workout plan there?
3. If I we go on the assumption that am really 1 cm off anatomically, would using a heel lift be a benefit in addition to stretching and strengthening various muscles of the body? Or would you try targeted stretching and strengthening first before using the heel lift at all?

Thank you and good luck kicking your neuroma problem too.

Result number: 121

Message Number 262134

Re: Debating on whether to try a heel lift for a "short" leg. View Thread
Posted by BrianPK on 12/02/09 at 18:30

I have exactly the same problem along with a morton's neuroma. My butt will hurt after walking or standing for a time. Like you 60% of the population will have more visible spinal problems on film than I do but, my right leg shows to be 1/2 to 3/4' shorter 'functionally' not anatomically and I have a tipped pelvis. I haven't licked the neuroma problem but I have beat down the pain in my butt significantly by doing the following:
Stretching calves, hamstrings, and quads at least two times each day, (preferrably four)especially calves. Doing leg lifts to strengthen the 'weak side'. Having regular chiropractic visits to keep the 'SI joint' mobile, and, I feel more importantly then the chiropractic getting weekly massage therapy from a real massage therapist. Not a 'feel good' therapist, a real theraputic specialist that really works you over. I started with the massage twice a week and am now down to once a week. A year ago I couldn't walk a mile without having to stop and massage my butt, now I can make it through the day. I tried using a '1/4 heel lift' and felt that it might have hurt more than it helped. I ended up wearing orthotics which I also feel helped to a degree but also feel are still incorrect as they cause pain in other areas of my feet. I am working to resolve this problem. The doc's on this board are pretty good but will usually tell you to work with your physician(s). I would also recommend that but also advise that you be active in your healthcare decisions and don't be impatient. Go slow, gets lots of opinions, don't let anyone do something to you that can ultimately do greater harm. There are plenty of people on this board and others that have had irreversible procedures performed on them and end up worse than they were to start with.

The latin root of the word patience is 'pain'. Go slow, gather information, and let nature,time,exercise,ice etc. help to heal you.

Good luck

Result number: 122

Message Number 262060

Re: stump neuroma View Thread
Posted by Jeremy L, C Ped on 11/27/09 at 08:53

Within the next couple months Lowa will have an expanded collection available in their walking category. What's nice about them in general is the ability of their soles to not just rocker, but to load ground force energy into the sole and spring the gait forward. What I don;t remember is if they are initially starting these shoes with width options, or if that's a benefit just with their Renegade hikers.

Result number: 123

Message Number 262055

Re: cryosurgery for plantar fibroma View Thread
Posted by martha h. on 11/26/09 at 12:36

Dr. Chuck Peter in Lewisburg, TN, did cryosurgery for my morton's neuroma a year and a half ago - and no pain at all until recently, and it didn't take long at all in his office. He is very professional, and a really nice person. I plan to return and have it done again, as the nerve probably grew back, and is causing the same pain again. I shouldn't have done line dancing in tight cowboy boots. LOL. I think this (cryosurgery)is a great alternative to open surgery or orthotics.

Result number: 124

Message Number 261993

Re: stump neuroma View Thread
Posted by KarinH on 11/22/09 at 12:23

Thanks for the suggestions for shoes. I have a Schuler Shoes by me that carries the Glide from Earth. I will go and try them on. I also found a store by me that carries the Paloma. It's nice to have something specific to check out instead of trying on lots of shoes that all irritate my foot.

Result number: 125

Message Number 261990

Re: stump neuroma View Thread
Posted by Jeremy L, C Ped on 11/22/09 at 09:08

Finding footwear to accommodate these problems ca be a real challenge. Two models that often work well with similar patients in our offices are the Glide from Earth and Allegria from PG Lite (especially their Paloma). The essence of both is their abilities to provide suitable rockering of the forefoot to reduce ground force to the area of your pain. They also use extensive padding inside their shoes, and permit substantial interior modification by experienced professionals. Both are also available in extra widths.

Result number: 126

Message Number 261986

stump neuroma View Thread
Posted by KarinH on 11/21/09 at 19:38

Hi! I had a Morton's Neuroma removed 12 years ago, then I grew a stump neuroma. I had surgery by a podiatrist 8 months ago, and he removed a large neuroma with a plantar incision. I have had a lot of pain and nerve issues since the surgery. The surgeon placed a nerve cap made out of collagen over the nerve so it wouldn't be able to grow another stump. Has anyone heard of this being done before? I had physical therapy for the prevention of scar tissue. I also had 7 treatments with an Iontophoresis patch using an anti-inflammatory medication. This helped quite a bit....temporarily. The last month the nerve pain has been getting worse. I don't know what to do now. I have a follow up appt. with my podiatrist this week and I'm worried that he will tell me that there is nothing that he can do. I would be very reluctant to have surgery again. At this point I don't have even one pair of shoes I can wear without pain, and use a lidocaine patch daily to help remove some of the pain. AT times I can't stand the nerve pain and think I'm going to go crazy. :0 Any suggestions?????? Thank you! Karin

Result number: 127

Message Number 261978

Re: dansko professional (closed back) clogs View Thread
Posted by Jeremy L, C Ped on 11/21/09 at 10:05

There are three things that help neuromas: space, space, and more space. There are also some other characteristics that help. These include an accurate forefoot flex position (preferably with a rocker element to the sole) and a reduced heel pitch.

The reason I don't recommend Danskos (more specifically, most Danskos) is because they use a 1' or greater pitch angle. This can commonly reduce heel pain, ultimately leads to excess pressure and pain in a neuroma. This is why I more often recommend PG Lite Allegria clogs within this footwear category. It possesses all the desired functional characteristics, a less aggressive heel pitch, and the stock footbed is easily modifiable to gain additional forefoot volume.

On a side note, and I hope none of my allied health colleagues here or elsewhere take offense, most podiatrists have extremely limited knowledge in footwear. They will commonly know more than the lay consumer, but possess very limited knowledge and exposure to the full breadth of any particular brand's product collection.

An excellent example is New Balance. Podiatrists will frequently recommend patients to seek out this brand. There are good reasons for this:

- The brand is widely available
- There are a variety of widths, commonly stocked at most retailers
- The brand financially and otherwise supports the profession
- The brand has a reputation for excellence

What is not told is that the vast majority of shoes sold through the most common trade channels (discount, self-service footwear and department store) are most often the worst shoes the brand makes. Many times a patient's purchase may fit better, and perform worse than what they previously had.

My advice is the only advice that is really relevant is where an experienced shoe professional examines your feet AND present shoes to gain o true understanding of your needs. Podiatric stamps of approval and peer recommendations can be of value, but often limited to their own personal experiences.

Result number: 128

Message Number 261939

dansko professional (closed back) clogs View Thread
Posted by AnnB on 11/19/09 at 12:42

Hello,

I researched dansko clogs and neuromas and in a 2006 note Jeremy indicated that clogs are not good for neuromas/forefoot pain. Is it the same situation with a closed back clog or any clog (ie any other brand, a clog with a heel strap)?

I have forefoot pain and two neuromas in the left foot. I tried on a pair of the closed back clogs and my feet felt wonderful walking around the stores. But I remembered the message on the board and didn't buy them. I noticed that some websites from podiatrists recommended dansko for patients with neuromas. Can you help me and clear this up? Thanks so much, Ann B.

Result number: 129

Message Number 261893

Re: NEWEST MEDICATION FOR TTS AND NEUROPATHY View Thread
Posted by Cathy D on 11/12/09 at 07:47

I have been on Metanx for two years. I have neuropathy, tingling, loss of sensation on my feet and matching neuromas. It got to the point that I was not able to do my daily walks. This affected my glucose control. This Tuesday I got a shot on my right foot of a low steroid (localized) injection that strung the tumor on my right foot. It did not affect my glucose. I cant say enough how much better that foot feels. I cant wait to get the second one done. My podiatrist is Kristi Conway of Tampa.

Result number: 130

Message Number 261877

Re: Morton's Neuroma View Thread
Posted by JohannaD on 11/11/09 at 13:11

I am also looking for a doctor in Canada, preferably. Is it covered by our medical plans?

Result number: 131

Message Number 261867

Re: Spenco vs. Superfeet vs. Powerstep View Thread
Posted by John B. on 11/11/09 at 07:50

I have Morton's neuroma in both feet but it's at a mid level with respect to pain at this stage. I had surgery on one foor and the other is scheduled. Would Powerstep products be preferred over Superfeet and/or Spenco insoles for heavy duty (e.g. 30+ lbs) backpacking? Spenco® PolySorb® Outdoor Series Backpacker Replacement Insoles, for example, are recommended for: increased shock absorption, advanced support for the arch and heel, and improved motion control to reduce pronation and supination. I could not find a similar product when browsing the Powerstep website.

Result number: 132

Message Number 261815

Re: Perception is reality & applying for disability is not a sin View Thread
Posted by Deb on 11/07/09 at 19:48

OMG I just read your post...and I have the same thing going on...I have had carpal tunnel repair in both arms, ulnar nerve transposition in both elbows and now have a case of tarsel tunnel in my left foot that is causing me SEVERE pain....I have crohns and rheumatoid arthritis...and I will say that I was approved for SSDI 6 weeks after my first application. I will also say that the pain in my foot is EXCRUCIATING....I have had 2 foot surgeries on my right foot...I had a mortons neuroma (another nerve problem) and the removal of my 2nd PIP joint.
I wonder if you should see a rheumatologist. I have autoimmune problems where my immune system attacks my body. I feel for you....and wish you a pain free day
Deb RN

Result number: 133

Message Number 261733

Re: cryosurgery for Morton's neuroma in Washington, D.C. area View Thread
Posted by EECI on 11/04/09 at 12:37

Dr. Robert Cohen or Dr. Christina Teimouri (Beaver Valley Foot Clinic)

Result number: 134

Message Number 261614

Re: still in pain View Thread
Posted by gayleh on 10/29/09 at 22:26

Hi Sharon,

Yes, all surgeries were for the same original neuroma. One explanation I was given was that it re-grew formed like a mushroom cap (stump neuroma). My scars on top and on bottom of my foot just kept getting longer (3 surgeries on top, 2 on bottom). I recently started PT again on my foot since I am going there for my knee. The massage and ultra sound are helping with the scar tissue. I need to be more diligent with massaging my foot at home.

After my 4th surgery I tried an Acti-Patch. This is similar to a TENS unit, but it is battery operated and the battery lasts only a month. I applied it to the bottom of my foot when I slept, hoping that the pain would not be as bad when I walked the next day. I tried this for 2 months and I did not see any noticeable improvement.

Regarding pain clinics: They do not put you on drugs, but rather teach you about chronic pain and provide group therapy, exercise, wellness, and in my case, art therapy classes. My pain meds are controlled by my pain doc, and I am not taking anything addictive. Folks addicted to pain meds must de-tox before entering the program. The physical therapists give you exercises specifically addressing your problem(s).

I am sure that there are numerous success stories after additional neuroma surgeries, it's just that I am not one of them (yet?).

Regarding ortho vs. DPM: Years ago I saw two orthos with the same x-ray and they could not diagnose a stress fracture. A DPM did within minutes of looking at the x-ray. I am sure that there are good foot orthos out there, but none came up when I asked my network for recommendations.

Best of Luck to you - I hope that you leave your appt. tomorrow with confidence in the next steps in your journey.

Gayle

Result number: 135

Message Number 261577

Re: still in pain View Thread
Posted by Sharon H. on 10/27/09 at 18:39

gayleh

Thanks for responding. Were all 5 of your surgeries for a neuroma? I can't believe you had to go through so many surgeries. I am terrified at the thought of another surgery. Whose to say that my foot would feel any better? What I experience is not really pain (although I think I could stand that better) What I have, I am told is scar tissue rubbing against a nerve. It feels like I am walking on sandpaper, or like walking on broken up seashells every step I take. Definately a bad nerve entrapment of some kind. Like you the pod who did the surgery has never admitted that anything went wrong. He had me going to therapy, acupuncture, and even suggested a pain clinic. I don't want to go there because I don't want to be doped up with a bunch of drugs that only cover up the problem. What did they do for you at the pain clinic and did it help you at all? I have been seeing a different pod for several months and he has tried different things that I mentioned in my other post. So far nothing is helping me.I go back to see him on Friday and I am going to ask him about prescribing a T.E.N.S Unit (Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulator)that I would use at home.I had tens treatment at his office, but it didn't really help much, and the reason is because you are supposed to use it daily and I only went to see him once a month. There must be some way to get rid of scar tissue.I did have one injection that was suppose to help soften the scar tissue. He said it did help a little to soften. It just seems that someone somewhere could come up with a solution to our ongoing foot probems. I wonder sometime if I should have went to an orthopedic Dr.

Result number: 136

Message Number 261554

Re: still in pain View Thread
Posted by gayleh on 10/27/09 at 02:07

Hi Sharon,

I certainly sympathize with you. I wish that I never had surgery #5 in May 2008 and could go back to my pain level after surgery #4 since the pain is so much greater now. On a scale of 1-10 my pain level prior to surgery #5 was a 6, and now it is an 8 (of course I really hate this scale system and recognize that our pain recalibrates after some interventions, etc.). I, too, have had all that you mention and have found that the low profile MBT's are better than the higher (and older) profile soles. The one sneaker that I now wear all the time (and bought 6 pairs in case I can't find them anymore) is the Reebok DMX Crosstown walking shoe. It is available at Kohls.com in more sizes than you will find in their stores. The 'pods' at the bottom of the shoe act in a similar fashion as a rocker bottom shoe and helps keep pressure off of the forefoot. This model Reebok has more natural padding inside than the MBT's. I have a wide foot, so many other makes of shoes that may work for some will not work for me.

My first podiatrist could not admit that his operation did not fix me. Surgeries 2-4 were done by an instructor at a local podiatry school. He thought that my issue was solvable, and sent me to a plastic surgeon to do a more intensive surgery. I see my pain doctor more frequently than I see my new podiatrist. I have just finished an 8 week program at a pain clinic. I understand chronic pain a lot more, but I still don't want to accept it.

So the sneaker is all that I can recommend right now. I am about to have another MRI (have not had one since surgery #3), to see why a recent lidocaine-type (can't remember the exact name) injection into the 2nd-3rd metatarsal space traveled up and then around the bottom of my foot out to the base of my pinky toe. Not what the doctor was expecting, but totally validating where my pain is under my foot. My second and third toes are now splaying, indicative of another neuroma (and why he injected there). If the diagnostic tests confirm a neuroma anywhere in my foot I will concede to another operation as I am not handling this pain well at all. I realize that I am very lucky not to have RSD after having so many surgeries, but the risk for me is worth it.

Result number: 137

Message Number 261501

Re: still in pain View Thread
Posted by Sharon H. on 10/25/09 at 10:18

I had neuroma surgery in May 2008 and now my foot feels worse than it did before surgery. What I am experiencing is numbness and annoying feeling in ball of foot. The pod I am going to now says it is scar tissue rubbing against the nerve. I have had tens treatments, an injection to help soften the scar tissue, padding to get the weight off ball of foot,orthotics, just to mention a few. I just purchased a pair of mpt shoes that I was told might help (they do help to get the weight off ball of foot a little) This feeling is driving me insane, I want it to stop, but no one seems to be able to come up with a solution. I also wish I would never have had the surgery in the first place. I am terrified with the thought of cutting into my foot again to remove scar tissue or a possible stump neuroma. Whose to say my foot wouldn't feel even worse? If there is anyone who has had a similiar experience who has found relief I would welcome any suggestions. Nothing worse than having a continual, never ending nerve problem in your foot that you feel with every step you take.

Result number: 138

Message Number 261375

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by gayleh on 10/19/09 at 02:09

A warning to all using a rollabout or turning leg caddy: I have had 5 surgeries over the past 6 years for a neuroma and subsequent regrowth. The past 3 surgeries I have used a TLC ('got addicted' since I did not have to weight bear on my painful foot), and now have knee problems. If your foot pain becomes chronic please save your knee and get a seated piece of equipment to use.

Result number: 139

Message Number 261293

Re: Morton's Neuroma View Thread
Posted by ROSE ANN on 10/14/09 at 13:37

I HAVE HAD MORTONS NEUROMA SURGERY
I HAVE MORE PAIN NOW THAN EVERY
I AM INTERESTED IN THE CRYSURGERY

I LIVE IN SO ILLINOIS
ARE THERE ANY DOCTORS IN MY AREA THAT WOULD PERFORM
THIS PROCEDUURE

Result number: 140

Message Number 261265

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Joni on 10/13/09 at 08:45

Podiatrists are not MD's, but neither are D.O.,s. My point is that Podiatrists have undergone extensive medical and surgical training similar to Physicians but including extensive attention to the foot and lower extremeties. A good D.P.M. will be much more successful than a poor MD/DO almost always.

Result number: 141

Message Number 261261

Re: cryosurgery for neuromas in IL View Thread
Posted by Mary Ann on 10/13/09 at 00:24

Don't have it done in Lombard, il It doesn't work.

Result number: 142

Message Number 261213

Re: Alpha Lipoic Acid View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 10/10/09 at 05:31

Norm,

I agree with Dr. Wedemeyer, but as per your thoughts, it certainly can't 'hurt'. Although Metanx is really indicated for diabetic neuropathy, I have prescribed Metanx for my patients with varying nerve related symptoms including tarsal tunnel symptoms, 'Morton's' neuroma symptoms, other peripheral neuropathy symptoms, nerve injuries, etc., and the vast majority of these patients have responded positively with successful results.

As you may already know, Metanx is simply a prescription of B vitamins, therefore patients ask why they can't take B vitamins without the RX. If you visit the Metanx website (PamLabs) there's an excellent explanation.

I have no financial interest in this company, but have seen excellent results in my patients.

There is an excellent doctor that used to post a lot on this site, Dr. Greg Mowen (Dr. G), but unfortunately doesn't post anymore. He's a DPM who has practice with a specialty in nerve related disorders. I believe that Dr. Mowen also utilizes Metanx on many of his patients with nerve related disorders of various etiologies, although I certainly can not speak for Dr. Mowen.

I personally have no experience with alpha lipoic acid, and Dr. Wedemeyer has a stronger background with nutrition/vitamins and may be able to tell you if you can take both alpha lipoic acid and Metanx. (I don't see any contra-indications).

Result number: 143

Message Number 261147

Re: years of foot pain View Thread
Posted by Jewel on 10/07/09 at 23:33

1. Have you ever seen this type of pain and tendonitis in a patient? If so, was there an underlying rheumatic/autoimmune disease? Was there anything done to help the patient?

2. What is the horseshoe area just around the edge of the heel? What is it and what would cause horrible pain there? What helps the pain/problem?

3. How do you tell the difference between neuroma and capsulitis/inflammation of ball of toe joint? If MRI is negative for neuroma? Ultrasound - would that show a neuroma? What are the chances of it being a neuroma if negative on MRI?

Thank you.... I would be so grateful for your opinion.

Jewel

Result number: 144

Message Number 261146

years of foot pain View Thread
Posted by Jewel on 10/07/09 at 23:31

First let me say that I have some sort of autoimmune disease. I've been to many doctors and none of them agree. The latest being where 2 highly regarded rheumatologists took a look at my records and gave their determination and both completely contradicted each other. The possible diagnosises are RA, Undifferentiated Spondy, CPPD, Reiters/Reactive arthritis, Lupus and fibromyalgia. So, really who knows. I'm partial to the spondyloarthoapathies due to my foot problems.

I've gotten this foot pain on and off since 97. It has come and gone of it's own accord despite treatment. But now, I've had pain in feet constant for the last 5 years. Terrible, excrutiating pain that has now rendered me immobile. No, I wasn't overweight when it started, yes I am now. The one podiatrist I went to kept saying it was PF. I did the stretching, PT, night splints, injections, custom oththodics and none of it worked. He finally said he couldn't help me. Yes, I do have heel spurs - quite large ones. Floated between several other doctors, had EMG's = negative. Finally the one I have now has Dx'd a haglunds (doesn't hurt unless you press on it) and achillies insertion tendonitis. PT isn't really helping much.

The pain is in the back heel in a horse shoe shape - just along the edge of the foot. Yes it hurts when you squeeze the heel. In addition, there's a bone on the side of the foot by the tarsals on one side of the 'tuberosity' and according to the PT and Podiatrist it's where another tendon attaches and its super painful too. The achillies is sore in the ankle areas going up the ankle sides into the calf. The peroneous tendons (?) are very sore from the foot all the way up to the knee.

The ball of the R foot has issues. Podiatrist thought there was a neuroma between toes 2 & 3 as it was super painful too. He injected it there 3 times now (cortisone, over the past 1.5yrs) and it has helped. However, MRI showed no neuroma. Now toe 2 has very quickly deformed curving toward the big toe and hammering out. The last time I was at the podiatrist he mentioned capsulitis in that toe. So, could it really be the autoimmune arthritis and not a neuroma? I don't know whether to let him cut me open or not.

Went to an orthopedic doctor who specializes in feet/ankle. He said I have tendonitis all over my foot/feet. Took an xray of the R foot ball and you can see that the toe has hammered, said he couldn't do surgery due to the inflammation in the feet = too much scar tissue would develope in my current state. I asked him if he ever saw something like this before. He said 'just a couple times and that I need to tell my rheumatologist to get my inflammation under control.'

Result number: 145

Message Number 261125

Re: Mortons Neuroma and Alcohol Shots View Thread
Posted by ShannonW on 10/07/09 at 14:21

What type of alcohol is used for the chemical sclerosis ?
I have had orthotics for years and been receving corizone shots with some relief but would love to be rid of Mortons Neuroma once and for all. My family doctor has been giving me the cortizone shots but is not familiar with the alcohol shots.
Any help would be appreciated..
I live in Canada and having said that it will be about a year before I see an orthopeodic surgeon and the possiblity for cryo...

Result number: 146

Message Number 261108

When to say no to a cortisone injection View Thread
Posted by Robbie on 10/06/09 at 14:28

I am non-weight bearing for 4 weeks now and no change in pain in the sesamoid area and for morton's neuroma. My doctor mentioned doing a cortisone shot at 6 weeks if not better. Two questions

1. If the MRI shows no inflammation (in my case), should a cortisone injection be given? Isn't it for inflammation? Podiatrist says inflammation is at cellular level which is why the MRI is not showing the inflammation.

2. Can two cortisone shots be received in the same visit? One for neuroma and other for sesamoid in the same foot.

Thanks. I'm just having trouble thinking a cortisone shot will help if no inflammation or neuroma is showing up on the MRI. Non-weight bearing has not improved my pain at all (pain when sitting too).

Thanks!

Result number: 147

Message Number 261082

Capsulitis...Help View Thread
Posted by MDUBS on 10/05/09 at 17:50

I have capsulitis in both of my feet. I've had it for 2 years now and nothing seems to be helping. Here's my timeline
-Went to Internal Medicine, doctor and he said to see a Ortho
-Ortho said its a Neuroma and gave me cortisone injections
-Couple of months passed, went back, another round of cortisone injections
-Now I'm seeing a double certified podiatrist/ortho-podiatrist and he said after more xrays and an ultrasound he said it was capsulitis
-I have taken Diclofenac, Celebrex, used anti-infalmmatory creams, lidocaine patches, and taped my 2nd toe down
-I am picking up my orthotics tomorrow, but honestly I cant imagine that they are going to miraculously take my pain away after all the above did nothing but temporarily relieve the pain (and I'm talking about 30-45 minutes relief)

I am 29 years old, expecting my first child I would like to be able to run after him/her if I have to....What else can I do!?!?

Result number: 148

Message Number 261081

Re: Doctors, any comments? View Thread
Posted by MDUBS on 10/05/09 at 17:47

I found this site searching for answers to this exact question. I'm over two years now with the same pain in the bottom of my BOTH of my feet. I train in Mixed martail arts and think this is what caused the capsulitis. Here's my timeline
-Went to Internal Medicine, doctor and he said to see a Ortho
-Ortho said its a Neuroma and gave me cortisone injections
-Couple of months passed, went back, another round of cortisone injections
-Now I'm seeing a double certified podiatrist/ortho-podiatrist and he said after more xrays and an ultrasound he said it was capsulitis
-I have taken Diclofenac, Celebrex, used anti-infalmmatory creams, lidocaine patches, and taped my 2nd toe down
-I am picking up my orthotics tomorrow, but honestly I cant imagine that they are going to miraculously take my pain away after all the above did nothing but temporarily relieve the pain (and I'm talking about 30-45 minutes relief)

I am 29 years old, expecting my first child I would like to be able to run after him/her if I have to....What else can I do!?!?

Result number: 149

Message Number 261080

Re: complicated.....more refined questions View Thread
Posted by Jewel on 10/05/09 at 17:14

I should have worded this so you know exactly what I'm looking for.

1. Have you ever seen this type of pain and tendonitis in a patient? If so, was there an underlying rheumatic/autoimmune disease? Was there anything done to help the patient?

2. What is the horseshoe area just around the edge of the heel? What is it and what would cause horrible pain there? What helps the pain/problem?

3. How do you tell the difference between neuroma and capsulitis/inflammation of ball of toe joint? If MRI is negative for neuroma? Ultrasound - would that show a neuroma? What are the chances of it being a neuroma if negative on MRI?

Thank you....yes, I know it's complicated and would be so grateful for your opinion.

Jewel

Result number: 150

Message Number 261070

Re: Pars defect in L5 vertebral body causing foot pain? View Thread
Posted by Curt on 10/05/09 at 14:45

Hello Alex

I was just curious what kind of foot pain you have. In my case i was diagnosed with morton's neuroma, a condition where one of the nerves get pinched between the bones in your foot. I get this pain when I wear some shoes. When the pain starts it becomes unbearable until I take off my shoes and wait for the pain to subside.

Result number: 151

Message Number 261039

complicated..... View Thread
Posted by Jewel on 10/04/09 at 14:10

Hello Doctors!

Gosh am I glad I found you. First let me say that I have some sort of autoimmune disease. I've been to many doctors and none of them agree. The latest being where 2 highly regarded rheumatologists took a look at my records and gave their determination and both completely contradicted each other. The possible diagnosises are RA, Undifferentiated Spondy, CPPD, Reiters/Reactive arthritis, Lupus and fibromyalgia. So, really who knows. I'm partial to the spondyloarthoapathies due to my foot problems.

I've gotten this foot pain on and off since 97. It has come and gone of it's own accord despite treatment. But now, I've had pain in feet constant for the last 5 years. Terrible, excrutiating pain that has now rendered me immobile. No, I wasn't overweight when it started, yes I am now. The one podiatrist I went to kept saying it was PF. I did the stretching, PT, night splints, injections, custom oththodics and none of it worked. He finally said he couldn't help me. Yes, I do have heel spurs - quite large ones. Floated between several other doctors, had EMG's = negative. Finally the one I have now has Dx'd a haglunds (doesn't hurt unless you press on it) and achillies insertion tendonitis. PT isn't really helping much.

The pain is in the back heel in a horse shoe shape - just along the edge of the foot. Yes it hurts when you squeeze the heel. In addition, there's a bone on the side of the foot by the tarsals on one side of the 'tuberosity' and according to the PT and Podiatrist it's where another tendon attaches and its super painful too. The achillies is sore in the ankle areas going up the ankle sides into the calf. The peroneous tendons (?) are very sore from the foot all the way up to the knee.

The ball of the R foot has issues. Podiatrist thought there was a neuroma between toes 2 & 3 as it was super painful too. He injected it there 3 times now (cortisone, over the past 1.5yrs) and it has helped. However, MRI showed no neuroma. Now toe 2 has very quickly deformed curving toward the big toe and hammering out. The last time I was at the podiatrist he mentioned capsulitis in that toe. So, could it really be the autoimmune arthritis and not a neuroma? I don't know whether to let him cut me open or not.

Went to an orthopedic doctor who specializes in feet/ankle. He said I have tendonitis all over my foot/feet. Took an xray of the R foot ball and you can see that the toe has hammered, said he couldn't do surgery due to the inflammation in the feet = too much scar tissue would develope in my current state. I asked him if he ever saw something like this before. He said 'just a couple times and that I need to tell my rheumatologist to get my inflammation under control.'

I don't know what to do. I've lost my ability to walk. The wheelchair/scooter people came on Friday..... I'm hoping you can help.

Thank you,
Jewel

Result number: 152

Message Number 260718

Re: cryosurgery for Morton's neuroma in Washington, D.C. area View Thread
Posted by Pat F on 9/20/09 at 19:33

also looking for more cryosurgery locations. I live near Pittsburgh PA

Result number: 153

Message Number 260612

Foot Pain in both feet View Thread
Posted by Karen on 9/16/09 at 08:55

Dear Dr.,

I am at my wits end. My foot history is extensive, unfortunately. I am wondering if one thing could really be causing all of my problems. I have had ingrown toenails in the big nails at the cuticle, morton's neuroma removal, implant put into right ankle, cyst removal out of left ankle entwined in nerves, I currently have capsulitis in my left second toe, etc. I have various foot pain at various times and am wondering what it could be. Currently I am getting intermittent pain on the top of my right foot, toward the outside of the top under the toes. I have had neuroma removal, so I know it's not that. I also sometimes get pain in my left ankle, causing me to limp because it hurts so bad but then it too goes away, comes back, etc. Any ideas??? THANK YOU.

PLEASE HELP. Thank you.

Result number: 154

Message Number 260557

Re: cryosurgery for neuromas in IL View Thread
Posted by ROSEANNA on 9/14/09 at 12:38

I AM ALSO TRYING TO FIND SOMEONE IN ILLINOIS
I LIVE IN SO ILL
HAVE YOU GOTTEN A NAME OF SOMEONE

Result number: 155

Message Number 260554

Re: Immobilization for Sesamoiditis and Morton's Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 9/14/09 at 06:07

Your question is case dependent. In some cases six weeks may help, in other cases 6 weeks may not be beneficial and in some cases a patient may need more time in a cast. Unfortunately, there really is no single answer to your question since every case and every individual is unique.

Result number: 156

Message Number 260546

Immobilization for Sesamoiditis and Morton's Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Robbie on 9/13/09 at 18:13

My doctor put me in a cam boot for sesamoiditis and morton’s neuroma and said no weight bearing for 6 weeks. I am removing the boot several times a day to ice and am taking 5 days of anti-inflammatories to hopefully jump start the healing process. I’ve had these problems for about 4 months now.

I suffer from other foot problems (arch pain for 5 years) and wanted to treat this aggressively. Before the boot we tried rest, ice, physical therapy (ultrasound and iontopheresis), custom orthotics – all this right at the beginning as I didn’t want another chronic foot pain. None of these helped and the pain continued to get worse.

Question, is 6 weeks long enough in this boot and a treatment for sesamoiditis and morton's neuroma? Should I be doing something else besides resting and icing? Does this treatment have success for these issues? I should add a MRI was done to confirm a fracture did not exist. I do realize when I come out of the boot I will need to continue with shoe modifications to avoid this problem again (problem is not from injury). I did ask these questions of my doctor, but would like the opinions of the doctor's here too.

Thanks for your input.

Result number: 157

Message Number 260536

Re: Functional leg length discrepancy View Thread
Posted by BrianPK on 9/12/09 at 12:22

I do have a scoliosis present that is causing the misalignment. It took 50 years to get this bad and I assume it is going to take some time to resolve. I also have Morton's Neuroma bilaterally (worse on the 'short side'). I think that the buttock pain and the Morton's pain are connected. The Morton's pain alters my gait at toe off and I think that it is affecting the whole leg. I have been stretching my calves and doing exercises to strengthen the muscles in the hip area but there is still pain. On a positive note the pain is no longer so severe that I have to take motrin or celebrex. I can make the day without 90% of the time. I am in the process of relocating to the Carolina's and am planning to visit an excellent clinic in Ashville, NC as soon as I am settled to try & resolve the orthotic and morton's problems once & for all.

Result number: 158

Message Number 260383

Re: cryosurgery for Morton's neuroma in Washington, D.C. area View Thread
Posted by Ben on 9/07/09 at 07:36

Ellen,

Just reading your somewhat dated inquiry about looking for cryosurgery in D.C. I am doing the same and I'm wondering what success you may have had. I am willing to go just about anywhere at this point if this is a successful approach to my foot issue.

Ben

Result number: 159

Message Number 260329

chronic foot pain after steroid injection View Thread
Posted by jb on 9/03/09 at 20:34

I am looking for some help. Over a year ago I received a total of 4 steroid injections (over a 9 week period) into the top of my foot for what was an assumed neuroma. After seeking out a new doctor when I wasn't getting any answers or pain relief and MRI showed a torn interosseous muscle. The pain had always been in the ball of my foot. The torn muscle was diagnosed in March of this year. I was subsequently given a soft cast and a cam walker and was out of work for 12 weeks. During that time I did physical therapy twice a week for a total of 20 sessions. Before PT I had lost the ability to bend my first three toes but am now able to do so. I have gotten orthotics and MBT shoes to offload pressure to the fore foot. My problem now is that I seem to have chronic pain. The arch of the affected foot and the heel are so painful that it had made walking very difficult. The physical therapist told me that I had a lot of atrophy to the foot which I don't think will ever get better but I would like your opinion on steroid damage to soft tissue if you are able to give it and if there is anythng to reverse it. I live an hour north of New York City and am looking for a highly experienced foot doctor to see if there is any treatment for what I have going on since the doctors in the small town where I live really don't know what to do next and keep telling me that this will get better. I have trid NSAIDS but they don't do much to help the pain.

Result number: 160

Message Number 260321

Re: Morton's Neuroma sonographically guided alcohol injections View Thread
Posted by mitch b on 9/03/09 at 16:12

i am looking for a doc in oregon who uses this method or
some guidance system rather than sticking in the needle
and relying on the patient to tell the doc oh youve hit the nerve ,
my doc in eugene tells me the success rate is only about 50%
for alcohol injections this scares me, but surgery to remove
the nerve scares me more plus its hard to get time off work,i have had this condition for 8 years its getting really bad and i have to do
something soon
any feedback would be great
thanks
mitch b

Result number: 161

Message Number 260301

Re: Morton's Neuroma Steroid Injection View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 9/02/09 at 19:36

Your foot should not feel cold and clammy, but that is a subjective complaint. Never-the-less, ALL your questions concerning any procedure recently performed by your doctor should be addressed to that doctor, since he/she will ultimately have to care for your foot. If you are truly concerned you should call his/her office at any time, since every doctor's office I know has some form of system to reach the doctor in case of an emergency, or go to the emergency room if you are really concerned.

Result number: 162

Message Number 260298

Morton's Neuroma Steroid Injection View Thread
Posted by Lauren A. on 9/02/09 at 19:30

I got an injection in my foot yesterday between the 3rd and 4th metatarsals. I don't recall everything in the injection. I know it was 3cc and contained lidocaine and marcan(sp?) I do not remember what steroid was used. I went home and propped my foot up and iced it as directed. This morning I had a slight bruise, but expected that. This afternoon I had deep purple bruising along the bottom of my toes and am very sore to move my toes. The bruise has spread a bit more this evening and the top of my foot feels cold and clammy. Is this normal?

Result number: 163

Message Number 260248

Re: going to try acupuncture tomorrow, any suggestions on what to ask for? View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 9/01/09 at 07:22

First of all, although I don't advocate repeated cortisone injections, I also believe that when used judiciously, cortisone injections can be of significant benefit. I also believe that cortisone injections get a 'bad rap' and are completely misunderstood.

I've treated many high level athletes with cortisone, and I've been an extremely competitive soccer player and have received cortisone injections. Cortisone is a potent anti-inflammatory that can often provide significant relief, though it does not 'cure' the problem. It is one step is helping the problem in addition to the other steps you have attempted.

Repeated cortisone injections CAN be a problem because they can weaken the tissue or cause atrophy of the tissue. That's only when the injections are abused or too many are given. If you received one or two injections over a several week or month period, that's not going to have an impact on your performance as an athlete.

I'm not sold on acupuncture for plantar fasciitis. If you perform a search on this site you'll see that the success rate for plantar fasciitis and acupuncture hasn't been that great. Ironically, I treated a patient in my office yesterday for a neuroma and plantar fasciitis and her occupation was that she IS an acupuncturist!!!

Given the fact that you have failed the majority of conservative therapies, in my opinion your diagnosis must be reconsidered. Plantar fasciitis is not the only condition that causes heel pain, but it's the only condition you seem to be considering.

Result number: 164

Message Number 260218

CRPS/MORTENS NEUROMA View Thread
Posted by Janice H on 8/31/09 at 02:09

I HAVE RECENTLY BEEN DIAGNOSED WITH LOW GRADE CRPS FOLLOWING ANKLE FRACTURE. IHAVE A VERY PAINFUL AREA AT THE BASE OF MY 3RD TOE, THE AREA IS SWOLLEN,WARM,AND MY FOOT IS PINK. COULD I HAVE A MORTENS NEUROMA,ARE THE SYMPTOMS AT ALL SIMILAR TO CRPS. MY ANKLE FRACTURE WAS TREATED IN A MOON BOOT THE VELCROSE STRAP DID COVER THE AREA WHERE THE PAIN NOW IS. WOULD IT BE POSSIBLE FOR A NEUROMA TO FORM FROM THAT IRRITATION( BOOT ON 5-6 WKS BUT OFF AT NIGHT). Thanks Janice H

Result number: 165

Message Number 260217

CRPS/MORTENS NEUROMA View Thread
Posted by Janice H on 8/31/09 at 02:05

I HAVE RECENTLY BEEN DIAGNOSED WITH LOW GRADE CRPS FOLLOWING ANKLE FRACTURE. IHAVE A VERY PAINFUL AREA AT THE BASE OF MY 3RD TOE, THE AREA IS SWOLLEN,WARM,AND MY FOOT IS PINK. COULD I HAVE A MORTENS NEUROMA,ARE THE SYMPTOMS AT ALL SIMILAR TO CRPS. MY ANKLE FRACTURE WAS TREATED IN A MOON BOOT THE VELCROSE STRAP DID COVER THE AREA WHERE THE PAIN NOW IS. WOULD IT BE POSSIBLE FOR A NEUROMA TO FORM FROM THAT IRRITATION( BOOT ON 5-6 WKS BUT OFF AT NIGHT). Thanks Janice H

Result number: 166

Message Number 260216

CRPS/MORTENS NEUROMA View Thread
Posted by Janice H on 8/31/09 at 02:01

I HAVE RECENTLY BEEN DIAGNOSED WITH LOW GRADE CRPS FOLLOWING ANKLE FRACTURE. IHAVE A VERY PAINFUL AREA AT THE BASE OF MY 3RD TOE, THE AREA IS SWOLLEN,WARM,AND MY FOOT IS PINK. COULD I HAVE A MORTENS NEUROMA,ARE THE SYMPTOMS AT ALL SIMILAR TO CRPS. MY ANKLE FRACTURE WAS TREATED IN A MOON BOOT THE VELCROSE STRAP DID COVER THE AREA WHERE THE PAIN NOW IS. WOULD IT BE POSSIBLE FOR A NEUROMA TO FORM FROM THAT IRRITATION( BOOT ON 5-6 WKS BUT OFF AT NIGHT). Thanks Janice H

Result number: 167

Message Number 260212

Re: Swellen on top of foot View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 8/30/09 at 16:43

It is technically a perineural fibrosis or thickening of the nerve as it runs between the metatarsals. It is most common between the 3rd and 4th metatarsals, but can occur between any of the metatarsals. The pain is usually described as an aching, throbbing or burning in the area of the 'ball' of the foot or shooting into the bottom of the foot or into the toes. However, each patient can describe the pain differently, and some feel as if their socks are bunched up. Often the pain is worse in tight shoes and is relieved when taking off the shoe.

The pain is from the 'neuroma' pressing up against the transverse metatarsal ligment, which connects the adjacent metatarsal bones. The pressure on the nerve can cause the pain to shoot into the toes, stay localized or into the bottom of the foot or even back into the foot.

You can perform a 'google' search for more information or simply ask your doctor.

Result number: 168

Message Number 260210

Swellen on top of foot View Thread
Posted by kg on 8/30/09 at 14:42

What is Mortens neuroma.

Result number: 169

Message Number 260172

Re: 042 View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 8/29/09 at 11:17

A neuroma is always a possibility and it may have nothing to do with your ankle problem. I really don't know what your use of the symbol '#' is supposed to represent, so please speak in words, not symbols. Thanks.

But once again, a neuroma can occur despite any other problems. It can exist independently, therefore you should bring it to the attention of your doctor(s).

Result number: 170

Message Number 260167

042 View Thread
Posted by Janice H on 8/29/09 at 08:18

Have recently posted questions ,re diagnosis of crps post # ankle. As I have a lot of pain and some swelling in the forefoot particularly below my 3rd toe, is it possible I could have aMortens Neuroma.My whole foot continues to be warm and pink. Could a neuroma form post ankle # treated in a moon boot. My ortho spec has stated I only need to see physio,but have had advice from P4P doctor to try and get experienced help ASAP. I am working on getting a referral but it just doesn't happen as quickly as one would like. Can someone please quote on the possibility of neuroma.Thanks JH

Result number: 171

Message Number 260161

Re: chronic regional pain sydrome post fractured ankle View Thread
Posted by Janice H on 8/28/09 at 20:11

Thanks for previous comments,have since spoken to a GP about my problems, she has started me on amitriptyline 20mg.Also trying to find someone who understands the prob, I live in Nth QLD AUST not to many specialists, dont spose you know of anyone in Aust. My Dr made the suggestion that it could be A Mortons Neuroma. I have a very painful area at the base of my 3rd toe thou the pain is also over the forefoot, I still have warmth and discolouration of the whole foot, does that sound possible.

Result number: 172

Message Number 260152

tarsal tunnel syndrome View Thread
Posted by peg c on 8/28/09 at 14:30

How can you diagnose difference between tarsal tunnel syndrome and morton's neuroma? Also, I cannot point my big toe or 2nd toe of my right foot. Could this be peroneal nerve entrapment?

Result number: 173

Message Number 260036

Re: Cryoanalgesia: Outcomes for heel pain & Morton's Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Erik on 8/24/09 at 13:04

Ive been battling mortons neuroma for some time now and heard success stories with cold laser treatment. I live in SE Washington State. Any idea of how to get a hold of someone who does cold laser therapy in my area?

Result number: 174
Searching file 25

Message Number 259620

Re: Neuroma Cryosurgery Repeat timing View Thread
Posted by richard lanham on 8/11/09 at 18:26

i have had cryosurgy. the only thing it did was froze the front part of my foot. it
has been this way since oct. 2008. the doctor does'nt know what to do.

Result number: 175

Message Number 259594

Re: To Dr Ed & Dr DSW View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 8/11/09 at 14:29

You made some comments that are in my opinion completely inaccurate. First of all, you stated that 'cryo ablates the nerve in the same manner as alcohol but carries none of the toxic risk'.

I strongly disagree with that statement. The cryosurgery is an INVASIVE surgical procedure. Please don't forget that cryosurgery is a SURGICAL procedure. It is freezing the nerve and is not the same as the alcohol sclerosing the nerve. If the alcohol sclerosing injections are successful, the procedure is completed and the nerve is 'sclerosed', However, cryoablation can and does result in regeneration of the nerve and that's why the procedure often has to be repeated.

And I'd like to know what are the 'toxic risks' of the alcohol injections????? And although you are set on having these performed under ultrasound guidance, I personally believe that is an overkill and not necessary. The TOTAL injection for each sclerosing alcohol injection in 0.5 cc, which is a mixture of local anesthetic and alcohol. It is not 'rocket science' to determine the correct location to give the injection. The doctor simply needs to place the needle at the area where the clinical symptoms are present and then injects at the area WHEN the patient feels a reproduction of the symptoms. Ultrasound guidance is not necessary, simple feedback from the patient is all that is needed and works as well if not better than ultrasound. I have performed these injections both ways, and I will take patient feedback over ultrasound guidance anyday.

I don't know who your doctor in Milwaukee is, but I'm not very impressed by his comments. Although it's true that often those on the lecture circuit blow a lot of smoke, to state that the docs in your are aren't innovators is an insult to himself and his colleagues. There's nothing wrong with being on the 'cutting edge' of medicine. Additionally, I find it embarrassing and extremely unprofessional that he would refer to Dr. Dockery and Dr. Fallat as 'quacks'. Both of these doctors are brilliant and have done a lot for the profession and are FAR from quacks. I would personally have no problem myself utilizing the services of Dr. Dockery or Dr. Fallat and have referred patients to both of these doctors.

I believe the 'funniest' comment that you made was that the only doctors that gave you any 'guarantee' was the cryosurgeons, who told you that they 'assured you' that they would do you no further harm'.

I would personally tell you to stay AWAY from ANY doctor that gave you ANY guarantee or assurances, simply because in medicine, we can't do that, because you never know how a patient will react or respond.

If you spend some time on this site and perform a 'search' on cryosurgery, you will find that there were plenty of patients that have attempted the procedure for neuromas, etc., and DID have 'harm' following the procedure. I'm not attempting to say anything negative about cryosurgery, but once again it IS a surgical procedure and any surgical procedure definitely has the potential to cause harm post procedure. Therefore, no doctor can give you an 'assurance' that it won't be worse after the procedure. Patients can have increased pain, scar tissue from the probe, etc. No procedure is without risk.

Once again, I believe that of all the procedures you've discussed, the sclerosing alcohol injections are the simplest and safest and least invasive. I personally do not believe that ultrasound guidance is necessary, since once the needle is placed and before the medication is injected, the patient's feedback can accurately determine whether you are 'in the right spot' as well or as accurately as any ultrasound machine.

Result number: 176

Message Number 259583

To Dr Ed & Dr DSW View Thread
Posted by BrianPK on 8/11/09 at 11:18

Thanks,

You both are making me feel a lot better about the surgery, as to your comment about Doctors & Procedures, My orthopedic surgeon will not perform a neuroma removal. He is completely against removing nerves from the body and has in a 25 year career done 3 'revision' surgeries where he had to try & bury the nerve in bone to stop the stump pain.
It is my understanding that professional athletes (basketball & hockey players, golfers) get these removed all the time and so I am looking for a surgeon that does these operations for the local professional sports teams.

As to the sclerosing injections it is my understanding that if the sclerosing agent leaks into the surrounding tissues collateral damage and pain can be present. I am not opposed to trying the alcohol injections but would only have them done if they were ultrasound guided. I have read the technical paper on this procedure.

Before trying the alcohol I would prefer one more shot with Cryo. The cryo ablates the nerve in the same manner as the alcohol but carries none of the toxic risk. Cryo surgery has been used in pain management for back pain for many years. There is some debate however as to the timing of a repeat procedure should pain relief not be gained, some say 3 weeks, some say 10 I would like to know if it still hurts do we try again in 3 weeks or 10. What is the real answer.

Interestingly enough a local podiatrist who is highly regarded told me that both procedures (alcohol & cryo) 'are for lecture circuit doctos & innovators. Here in Milwaukee we are not innovators.'
This podiatrist fells that Dr. Dockery and Fallat are both quacks.

This doctor gave me a cortizone injection that sent me off the roof with pain for 3 months in january. So yes, after just a cortizone injection. I know what greater pain can be and I FEAR it. The cortizone basically disabled me for 6 weeks.

I'm really sick of dealing with this thing however, and am almost ready to have it cut out. It is ruining my life. Many posts both here and on other boards from podiatrists say that they have quit doing nerve removals and just use alcohol or cryo. And thost that use cryo basically say that they quit using the alcohol because of bad reactions.

I know that there is a lot of conflicting information out there and unfortunately Doctors are prevented by HIPPA to even tell you about patients that they have treated. I find it almost ridiculous that you can get a mechanic, plumber, or electrician to give you referrals to jobs done previously, but not medical professionals.

When a customer askes me to resolve an issue I can tell them how I will resolve the problem, how much it will cost and give them a guarantee of success and I deal with very complicated industrial systems. So far the only Doctors that can at least assure me that they will do no further harm are the cryosurgeons.

Result number: 177

Message Number 259582

Re: Question to your response Dr. Ed and other Doctors View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 8/11/09 at 09:54

Brian,

I agree with Ed. However, you seem to ask questions, but don't want to respond positively to any of the answers you receive. There has been a difference of opinions, but an excellent discussion. I prefer not to remove a neuroma or surgically intervene until I have attempted sclerosing alcohol injections, and obviously Dr. Ed feels that surgical removal when indicated is his preference.

However, you seem to have this horrible 'fear' that you may end up with some catastrophic result if you have a surgical intervention. Therefore, I don't understand why you wouldn't entertain the idea of sclerosing alcohol injections???

You keep asking about referring you to a doctor that has a tremendous success rate with surgical excision. Well, to be honest with you, I don't know of ANY doctor that will tell you that he/she doesn't have a high success rate. I doubt if you pick up the phone and call a lot of offices, the doctor will tell you that his/her success rate is not very high!!

Therefore, I wouldn't place too much emphasis on a particular doctor telling you how high his/her success rate is with a particular procedure, since I've rarely if ever heard a doctor tell a patient that he/she wasn't very good at a procedure!!

It appears as if you're looking for almost a guarantee that you won't have complications, and that's never going to happen, even in the most experienced/best hands. Complications occur, but as Dr. Ed stated, neuroma surgery really is not that complicated.

However, as I've already stated, if you really fear a post operative complication, why not ATTEMPT to avoid surgery by at least trying sclerosing alcohol injections? These often provide significant relief and in the worst scenario, if they don't work, you can still have surgery.

Result number: 178

Message Number 259576

Re: Question to your response Dr. Ed and other Doctors View Thread
Posted by Dr. Ed on 8/10/09 at 21:48

Brian:

I never will talk anyone into surgical treatment nevertheless, for the record, you are relating a lot of information here that is far from accurate.

First of all you reference a post from a fellow who used to frequent this site and post a lot of negative information. The study you have listed is one of many. One small study does not establish a fact.

What exactly do you mean by a 'failed removal.' One cannot fail to remove a neuroma. Some patients have surgical complications with this procedure as they can with any surgical treatment. Your hyperbole about a 'life of pain and disability' is a bit over the top. Yes, some patients have some pain after the neuroma is removed but it is generally far less than before removal.

Yes, there is a 'stump' by definition at the end of any cut nerve but the stump is rarely symptomatic. If the nerve stump is not resected sufficiently proximal or excessive scar tissue is allowed to form around the stump, there can be prolonged discomfort.

This discussion is about placing things in realistic and proper perspective.

Dr. Ed

Result number: 179

Message Number 259541

Re: Question to your response Dr. Ed and other Doctors View Thread
Posted by BrianPK on 8/09/09 at 18:45

Dr Ed,

By definition when a nerve is cut a stump neuroma is created. If someone were to give ma a better than 95% chance of success I probably would take it. The published rates on neuratectomys were documented on a heelspurs thread. http://heel.server327.com/bbs/bbt.cgi?n=170374.

A failed removal would be a crushing experience resulting in a 'changed life' of pain & disability.

As I move forward I am looking for the 'right surgeon'. Anyone reading these posts please respond with names of surgeons that have tremendously high success rates. My pain is grating but I refuse to move in a path that could cause greater disability.

Thanks everyone for your opinions, they are important and respected.

Result number: 180

Message Number 259519

Re: Question to your response Dr. Ed and other Doctors View Thread
Posted by Dr. Ed on 8/09/09 at 01:47

Brian:

I am puzzled by what you have heard about surgical removal of a Morton's neuroma. It is my belief that there is a size threshold at which attempts to deaden and sclerose the nerve are less successful so it is important to know the size of the lesion before beginning treatment. I prefer to make the measurement via sonography. Injecting the the neuroma with a sclerosing solution hurts just as much as injecting it to numb it for removal. So are multiple sclerosing injections or one injection of local anesthetic worse?

The nerve in question is a sensory nerve so its removal involves no loss of motor function. If it was my own foot and if the neuroma is of significant size I would have it removed. I too would be concerned if the surgeon related a poor success rate. I would consider my sucess rate with the procedure to be better than 95 percent. As far as finding the right surgeon, perhaps asking questions about success rates. Experiences vary but I believe that those who have a good success rate must be doing something right.

Dr. Ed

Result number: 181

Message Number 259518

Re: Question to your response Dr. Ed and other Doctors View Thread
Posted by Dr. Ed on 8/09/09 at 01:44

Brian:

I am puzzled by what you have heard about surgical removal of a Morton's neuroma. It is my belief that there is a size threshold at which attempts to deaden and sclerose the nerve are less successful so it is important to know the size of the lesion before beginning treatment. I prefer to make the measurement via sonography. Injecting the the neuroma with a sclerosing solution hurts just as much as injecting it to numb it for removal. So are multiple sclerosing injections or one injection of local anesthetic worse?

The nerve in question is a sensory nerve so its removal involves no loss of motor function. If it was my own foot and if the neuroma is of significant size I would have it removed. I too would be concerned if the surgeon related a poor success rate. I would consider my sucess rate with the procedure to be better than 95 percent. As far as finding the right surgeon, perhaps asking questions about success rates. Experiences vary but I believe that those who have a good success rate must be doing something right.

Dr. Ed

Result number: 182

Message Number 259496

Re: Question to your response Dr. DSW and other Doctors View Thread
Posted by Dr. Z on 8/07/09 at 20:09

I agree with Dr. Wander. 4% multiple alcohol injections can be very successful for the treatment of neuroma pain. I just saw a patient today that I treated three years ago with injections and is still pain free. If it were my foot I would treatment myself with 4% alcohol injections I used this protocol for the past 10 years plus

Result number: 183

Message Number 259483

Re: Question to your response Dr. Ed and other Doctors View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 8/07/09 at 16:29

I am also of the school that nerves should not simply be 'removed', if at all possible. I will perform a neuroma excision, but certainly not as 'quickly' as I did in the past.

I (actually my patients) have had tremendous success utilizing sclerosing alcohol injections with very few if any significant complications, while allowing the patients to still go about their daily business.

This is an option I would strongly recommend prior to surgical excision. If the injections aren't successful, you can always move forward with surgery, but not vice versa.

Result number: 184

Message Number 259468

Question to your response Dr. Ed and other Doctors View Thread
Posted by BrianPK on 8/07/09 at 08:26

Dr Ed,

I am terrified of the prospect of a failed neuroma surgery. Having read much on the subject the 50-80% reported success rate terrifies me. Knowing the neuroma pain I cannot imagine a higher level of pain from a stump neuroma. The 'couple of weeks' recovery seems short. People who have recently had the surgery report 3-6 weeks on crutches and 3 to 18 month recovery times.

My orthopedic surgern will not perform the surgery. He indicates that removal of a nerve from the body is never a good choice and will not do it. He has served me well for many years and I respect his opinion. He is a surgeon who keeps his knife in the sheath until no other option is available.

Many podiatrists report that they will no longer perform neuratectomy, that they use the sclerosing alcohol or cryo to ablate the nerve.

Even given the 'fear' that I have, none the less, I am starting to look at the removal. The pain is ruining my life, I am crabby and generaqlly not pleasant to be around. I've spent thousands on orthotics, shoes, Celebrex, Cryosurgery, Chiropractic, yet the pain remains.

How do I find a surgeon who is an expert at this procedure. Who has a large number of successful surgeries. If I am to have this procedure I need to have a better assurance than 'well it usually turns out pretty good'.

Please provide suggestions as to how to have a better confidence level in this matter. The pain has eroded the quality of my life, stressed out my family relationships, and impacted my ability to perform at a high level at work.

I am literally at my wits end but terrified of a failed neuratectomy. I would literally spend anything to end the pain knowing that the result was guaranteed.

Result number: 185

Message Number 259464

Re: Neuroma Cryosurgery Repeat timing View Thread
Posted by Dr. Ed on 8/07/09 at 00:02

Brian:
I do not have experience with repeat cryosurgery procedures for Morton's neuroma as the logic behind such a procedure, let alone the need for repeat procedures tends to escape me. There are other doctors whom I am sure will disagree. Surgical removal of an Morton's neuroma, while not right for everyone, for the most part is curative, providing good relief in a couple of weeks. Why drag out such treatment for weeks or months? I am an 'early adopter' of many new technologies but only if the technologies make sense, that is, if they offer higher success rates, are safer and/or faster healing.
Dr. Ed

Result number: 186

Message Number 259459

Neuroma Cryosurgery Repeat timing View Thread
Posted by BrianPK on 8/06/09 at 21:40

If a patient has cryosurgery to relieve Morton's Neuroma pain what is the recommended 'wait time' before performing a second procedure if the patient reports no significant pain relief? I have heard time frames from two to ten weeks, with some reporting that their standard treatment for neuroma is to repeat the procedure at about the two week time frame. Is it appropriate to wait the ten weeks or go in again quickly for a second ablation? Do any of the Doctors have experience with 'repeat' Cryo procedures?

Result number: 187

Message Number 259354

Re: 2 Surgeries and Sclerosing - and still so much pain... View Thread
Posted by pdc on 8/03/09 at 21:11

I have been down that exact same road of foot pain and in fact I am still there. I had a Mourton's Neuroma removed after steroid shots and seven sclerosing shots did not work on my left foot. I then was told by the doctor who did the foot surgery that he felt it was not a foot problem but a back problem. I have been to three neurologists, 4 orthopedic surgeons, and numerous general practitioners to no avail. I could star on the Missed Diagnosis show!!

I went to a University Hospitol and had a complete work up done and they discovered I have spinal stenosis- a narrowing of the spinal canal- an arthritic condition that causes pinching of the nerve root that goes all the way to the foot. My left leg and foot hurt constantly. I take Lyrica for pain and can function fairly well. I just had an MRI of my back again today - don't know results yet. I feel your pain!!! My advice - don't have any more foot surgery - it may actually be something else causing the foot pain. Hope this helps - pdc.

Result number: 188

Message Number 259346

Jeremy, can orthotics stop working View Thread
Posted by BrianPK on 8/03/09 at 17:43

I got a pair of orthotics on 6/9 to try & correct overpronation to help my morton's neuroma. They are hard, 3/4 length similar to 'solesupports'. I broke in the orthotics on a conservative schedule and by 7/21 was wearing them almost full time and actually feeling that they were helping the neuroma pain. Last week my feet started to feel worse and my lower back really started to give me trouble. Yesterday, my back & feet were killing me, the neuroma felt as big as a golf ball, my whole lower back on my right side was sore. When I get up in the morning I am virtually pain free. This morning I put on the shoes with the orthotics and took out the garbage. After walking up and down the driveway 3 times I was starting to feel the pain. I took off those shoes and in desperation put on a pair of clarks unstructured shoes with an older pair of orthotics that dont have as much arch support. Here it is at the end of the day, and I'm not feeling like dying, the neuroma doesn't hurt so much and my back isn't anywhere near as sore.

Can orthotic correction go bad ? Was the orthotic wrong in the first place ? I'm at a loss, I've spent thousands on orthotics, and haven't had a pair that don't hurt my feet or back. I don't know what to do. I don't want to hurt my feet or back further but I do realize that the bad biomechanics must be corrected to help ease the stress on my forefoot. Can you shed any light on what is happening ?

Result number: 189

Message Number 259156

Re: Crocs, Waldies, Nothinz, Airwalks.....AAAAAARRRRGH! Experiential info, please! View Thread
Posted by mandy m on 7/27/09 at 05:32

I suffer from flat feet with plantar fascitis and now a morton's neuroma on the right! I bought a pair of Nothinz in despair of ever finding foot comfort again. I have tried Crocs but don't find them supportive enough or really shock absorbing. Like you I can't wear strapless due to toe pain but the new strap design on the Nothinz is great as it's stretchy so gives as you walk so doesn't push your toes forward. I bought a size bigger than my normal shoe size and haven't taken them off!!!
My vote is for the nothinz even if they are really difficult to get in the uk!
Good luck

Result number: 190

Message Number 258929

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by Marie B on 7/18/09 at 09:23

You ask what kind of Shoes to waer for Comfort I had Neuroma removed 2 years ago and about 6 months later had a Stump Neuroma I was never right from day one after the Surgery.I find that the only Shoes that i can walk for quite a while in are CROCS they are the ugliest shoes i have ever worn but the relief i get when wearing them is worth it I can walk for about 2 hours in them,but if i put anything with a small heel on within 15 minutes i am in AGONY
Hope this helps you as I know what its like we love going for long walks and I was never able to walk for very long until i got my CROCS Try them and see if they help you as much as they have helped me
Marie

Result number: 191

Message Number 258928

Re: Stump Neuroma View Thread
Posted by MarieB on 7/18/09 at 09:20

You ask what kind of Shoes to waer for Comfort I had Neuroma removed 2 years ago and about 6 months later had a Stump Neuroma I was never right from day one after the Surgery.I find that the only Shoes that i can walk for quite a while in are CROCS they are the ugliest shoes i have ever worn but the relief i get when wearing them is worth it I can walk for about 2 hours in them,but if i put anything with a small heel on within 15 minutes i am in AGONY
Hope this helps you as I know what its like we love going for long walks and I was never able to walk for very long until i got my CROCS Try them and see if they help you as much as they have helped me
Marie

Result number: 192

Message Number 258849

Sneakers 1 motion 1 neutral View Thread
Posted by vsmith on 7/14/09 at 20:47

I have been running for. In the past I have had PF and a neuroma. I purchased othotics from podiatrists which were not successful. I purchased the Blue Powerfeet they seem to work. But my question is:

I have medium arches with very very rigid feet which is whyt I wear nuetral sneakers. But for years I have had ITB which i am convinced is because my right foot rolls a bit to the outside.

My question to the good doctors or pedorthists can you wear 1 stability sneaker or motinlo control sneaker on 1 foot and a neutral on the other? If I trade up to stability or motion control I have to give up cushioning. It is a dilemma and my ITB's are short.

Thanks for any help

Result number: 193

Message Number 258847

Re: transmetatarsal amputation is a podiatrist or orthopedic surgeon the better choice? View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 7/14/09 at 19:57

In my opinion and experience it is not necessary to 'wrap' the nerves to the top of the foot as the orthopedic surgeon recommended. As a matter of fact, performing that procedure could potentially cause the nerves to become entrapped in tissue or scar tissue.

During the surgery, it is usually common to resect the nerves as far back proximally as possible specifically to address the concern of not developing a post operative neuroma or neuritis.

Result number: 194

Message Number 258843

transmetatarsal amputation is a podiatrist or orthopedic surgeon the better choice? View Thread
Posted by m. mills on 7/14/09 at 18:54

I have went to both doctors and both agree on the surgery however, the ortho surgeon is not that experienced in feet but said he would not sever the nerves but wrap them to the top of the foot. Where as the podiatrist said he would sever the nerves. In retrospect, I am concerned that I will form a neuroma and the feet be more hypersensitive than they are now. Also, is there any support web sites for amputation that I can view?

Result number: 195

Message Number 258831

Neuroma. View Thread
Posted by Hoopa7p on 7/13/09 at 19:17

Hi,

I have been having pain and numbness in the feet for quite some time now. Recemtly, I changed doctors because I was not happy with the doctor that I had been seeing. Last week I went to a new Podiatrist. He actually agreed with the first doctor's diagnosis of Plantar Fascitis. However, he did an ultra sound on my right foot and found that the Plantar tendon is swollen from 8 to a 12. I am not sure what that means. He gave me a shot in the right foot which only lasted one day. I just went back to him today. He diagnosed me with Neuroma in both feet. The only thing he used for a diagnosis was examining my feet with hands. He also put a machine on both feet that uses vibration to relax the tendons and the muscles. Next week, I go for a test to determine if there is any nerve damage to my feet.

My questios are: What is a Neuroma? Shouldn't this doctor have done a scan to determine the presence of a Neuroma? Can the Neuroma cause the symptoms that I have? I have always thought the symptoms were from my heel spurs.

Thank you very much.

Hoopa7p

Result number: 196

Message Number 258830

Re: Plantar Fascitis/Heel Spurs. View Thread
Posted by Hoopa7p on 7/13/09 at 19:04

Just to update everyone, my doctor diagnosed me with Neuroma in both feet. He did it just by feeling and pushing in on the top part of the foot. My bloodwork came back normal showing no Diabetes. I was very happy about that. I go back on July 25th to have a nerve test done. The doctor seems to feel that the Neuromas are the cause of most of my pain and numbness. However, on the right foot, most of the pain seems to be in the heel where the spur happens to be. There is a major pulling sensation and numbness in both feet. Could the Neuromas be causing this?

Result number: 197

Message Number 258814

Re: CRYO INFO View Thread
Posted by scooter on 7/13/09 at 00:15

I'm in good hands a The Univ of Penn. They have run more tests than I can remember Blood work, x-rays Nerve tests etc. I am 43 year old man in otherwise good health. All my tests came back fine. Sugar levels great. So They don't know what caused it but the pain is real. Very real. Now how is it possible that I have two very painful conditions. The neuromas from five years ago and the neurpathy. Could the neuroma caused the nuropthy ? So I have idiopathic small fiber neuropathy and a neuroma that are ruining my life. Lyrica and tramadol work some and the cryo worked for 11 months. Every day is a challenge. Something always hurts.

Result number: 198

Message Number 258791

Re: Misdignosed Neuroma is now plantar plate rupture-options View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 7/12/09 at 07:51

Why don't you return to the podiatrist that made the correct diagnosis?

If not, Dr. Alan Banks in Atlanta is top notch.

Result number: 199

Message Number 258789

Misdignosed Neuroma is now plantar plate rupture-options View Thread
Posted by maryo on 7/12/09 at 01:50

Hello, I went to an orthopedic doctor in atlanta and his PA took x-rays and said my pain under the 2nd toe was a neuroma. Apparently it wasn't (from my reading of all the materials across the internet). I have a hammertoe and am an avid run, dancer and yogi.

The PA at the Orthopedic's office shot the area with Coritesone and then the pain moved into the top of my foot and my toe was moving all over. I went to the podiatrist that said it is a plantar plate rupture given that the toe is over 2 milimeter off the foot and moves around and back into the foot when I walk.

I've padded the toe and have taped it to avoid it crossing over. Do you think this is a plantar plate rupture? Any doctors in Atlanta that you would trust? And should this be looked at immediately. The podiatrist said 'You should probably get this done since you are young (late 30s) versus in my 80s. But it isn't your heart or anything'. And, she didn't say it would get worse or it was urgent. I am assuming this will get worse as I walk on it everday and it is painful...and the other foot has the pain under the 2nd toe as well. More of a burning pain and not bone pain.

Am I making sense?

Result number: 200

Message Number 258788

Misdignosed Neuroma is now plantar plate rupture-options View Thread
Posted by maryo on 7/12/09 at 01:49

Hello, I went to an orthopedic doctor in atlanta and his PA took x-rays and said my pain under the 2nd toe was a neuroma. Apparently it wasn't (from my reading of all the materials across the internet). I have a hammertoe and am an avid run, dancer and yogi.

The PA at the Orthopedic's office shot the area with Coritesone and then the pain moved into the top of my foot and my toe was moving all over. I went to the podiatrist that said it is a plantar plate rupture given that the toe is over 2 milimeter off the foot and moves around and back into the foot when I walk.

I've padded the toe and have taped it to avoid it crossing over. Do you think this is a plantar plate rupture? Any doctors in Atlanta that you would trust? And should this be looked at immediately. The podiatrist said 'You should probably get this done since you are young (late 30s) versus in my 80s. But it isn't your heart or anything'. And, she didn't say it would get worse or it was urgent. I am assuming this will get worse as I walk on it everday and it is painful...and the other foot has the pain under the 2nd toe as well. More of a burning pain and not bone pain.

Am I making sense?

Result number: 201

Over 100 records returned. Search was stopped

© heelspurs.com LLC

Powerstep Night Splints Ibuprofen Cream ProStretch LED Light Therapy