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Searching file 26

Message Number 261491
Re: Berkenstocks and planter fascitis View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 10/24/09 at 16:37

The 'sock' you are referring to is called the Strassburg Sock.

Result number: 1

Message Number 261241

Re: Strassburg Sock View Thread
Posted by Sherry P on 10/12/09 at 10:49

I have been wearing the Strassburg socks for the past 4 weeks. Most mornings, everything is fine when I remove the socks (I have bilateral pf). However, some mornings, the pain in my right big toe is so severe for several minutes after removing the sock, that I can barely stand it. What is happening? Am I placing too much tension on the strap when putting the sock on at night? I don't ever get toe pain in my left foot - although the pf is worse in my right foot. Thank you for any help you can give me.
Sherry

Result number: 2

Message Number 260940

Re: Plantar FXT by Swede-O View Thread
Posted by Stacey J on 9/30/09 at 00:51

I wore the Strassburg Sock for 2-3 nights...two nights ago, I put it on quickly and may have either pulled the front strap too hard...or put the strap above the calf too tight...though I didn't think it was too tight above the calf. I didn't wear the Strassburg sock last night because my calf had a dull pain most of the day. My calf had a lot of pain last night and I woke up in the night (now). Is it possible I caused some pain from restricting circulation...or is it more likely I overstretched the calf and have some muscle pain. I'm putting biofreeze on it to help with the pain. I'm not going to ue the Strassburg Sock until the current calf pain resides.
Thanks
Stacey J

Result number: 3
Searching file 25

Message Number 257854

Re: Strassburg Sock View Thread
Posted by Bob on 6/01/09 at 01:27

I am a volunteer fireman, and there are times when I am Paged out for a fire or an accident, at night when I am asleep. The pager goes off, I jump up, and almost hit the floor my heel hurts so bad. It pain makes me very late at times. I bought the SS about 2 weeks ago, and maybe I haven't been wearing it long enough for long term help, but when I am wearing it and I get paged out, I can jump up and go. It is making a difference! My heel is still sore, but at least it can function when I need it to. I just hope it gives me long term relief. Thank You !!!

Result number: 4

Message Number 257730

Heel Pain and Shockwave Therapy View Thread
Posted by James on 5/25/09 at 20:24

Hi Docs,

I have a severe case of plantar fasciitis, had x-rays that show a heel spur had formed. The heel pain is excruciating in the morning and it will be two years this August that I have had a severe case. I always had some minor probs that were totally manageable, even ran a full marathon with no problems. This two year severe stint, I think was mainly because of running a half marathon under trained, it also was a 6 mile downhill start.

I have seen a very reputable sports medicine specialist and they recommended Shockwave therapy, I have had 4 sessions and it has been 8 weeks with no improvement, at the same time I have also started using the Strassburg Sock.

I have low arches and some say I have flatter feet than normal. The calves are tight and my right calf is tighter same side as the problem heel.

Any suggestions?

I want to run again, have avoided running and maybe had 3 3 mile runs on soft trails over the last 6 months, playing hockey, rollerblading and cycling for excercise.

Thanks

James

Result number: 5

Message Number 257503

Re: Plantar FXT by Swede-O View Thread
Posted by Jen R on 5/15/09 at 06:48

Dr. Wander,

I tried the strassburg sock for a couple of nights in a row about a month ago but haven't used it since. The 3rd night I used it I had an indentation around my calf from the strap that took 5 or 6 hours to totally go away. I was concerned that it could have been cutting my circulation off.

Have you ever had a similar concern from others? My foot wasn't numb or tingling when I woke up but it just sort of scared me.

Jen R

Result number: 6

Message Number 257498

Re: Plantar FXT by Swede-O View Thread
Posted by LindaM on 5/14/09 at 21:52

I'm really glad I asked before buying. Thanks, so much, Dr. DSW for your thoughts on this product. My Strassburg socks are getting really worn out, so I'll just replace them when the time comes rather than trying something new.

Result number: 7

Message Number 257495

Re: Plantar FXT by Swede-O View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 5/14/09 at 19:34

In my opinion, this product is a 100% complete waste of money, that accomplishes absolutely NOTHING.

The plantar fascia itself can NOT be stretched. It is simply not possible to actually stretch the plantar fascia, and that is a medical fact. You must stretch the surrounding soft tissue structures, primarily the Achilles Tendon complex.

The FXT product simply pulls the toes back and does NOTHING to actually dorsiflex the foot to allow a true stretch of the Achilles Tendon. It is a very poor copycat of the Strassburg Sock. The Strassburg Sock allows for stretching of the Achilles Complex because is travels up the leg and allows the foot/ankle to dorsiflex AND it allows the toes to pull back which enhances the 'windlass' effect.

The FXT product simply pulls the toes back and does nothing, and that's why it's comfortable.

SAVE YOUR MONEY!!

Result number: 8

Message Number 257468

Plantar FXT by Swede-O View Thread
Posted by LindaM on 5/13/09 at 19:24

Has anyone tried the Plantar FXT bootie by Swede-O? (Here's a link to this product: http://www.swedeo.com/plantarfxt.htm) I've been wearing Strassburg Socks for almost 1.5 years now and they need to be replaced. This Swede-O product looks more comfortable than the Strassburg Socks, but I'm wondering if it is as effective.

Thanks for sharing your thoughts/experiences.

Linda

Result number: 9

Message Number 255730

Re: Pain worse after stretching View Thread
Posted by Alex G on 3/08/09 at 14:03

Hi Dr. DSW,

Thanks again for your time and effort to answer these questions. I see what you're saying about the strassburg sock and this has actually happened to me a bunch of times where I didn't fully dorsiflex my foot. I would wake up in the morning and my foot would feel really wierd. I can't really describe it on here, but it was sort of painful and numb. I also understand exactly what you're talking about with the foottrainer exercises. I've seen this done in the doctors office too where they test the strength I'm guessing. They ask me to push against their hand with my toes as they push back. Do you think the foottrainer exercises you just described would be as effective without the product or not? Also, how often do you think I should do these exercises to achieve some good results if there will be any? I'm going to try wearing the strassburg sock nightly again with your recommendation and see what happens.

Thanks.

Alex G.

Result number: 10

Message Number 255726

Re: Pain worse after stretching View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 3/08/09 at 09:16

#1 Yes, you can perform the same exercises without purchasing the Foottrainer, but it is difficult for me to 'demonstrate' those exercises over the internet. You can do a search on the internet for strengthening the anterior lower leg muscles. You basically place resistance AGAINST the top of one foot, while pushing against the foot. In other words, you place the heel of your left foot on top of your right foot. Then as you push DOWN with your left foot, you attempt to push UP with your right foot. You will feel the anterior muscles in your right lower leg 'fire'. That's the concept of the foottrainer made 'simple'.

#2 The Foottrainer works on a very simple concept that I've 'preached' for many years on this site, that was 'taught' to me by a physical therapist. In order to obtain the best stretch on the posterior muscle groups such as the calf muscles (Achilles, etc.,) you must also strengthen the opposing ANTERIOR muscle groups. Therefore, every time the anterior muscle groups 'fire', they are actually helping to stretch the posterior muscle groups since they are pulling in the opposite direction. So as you are attempting to stretch the posterior muscle groups, if you 'fire' the opposing anterior muscle groups, you will ultimately get a better stretch.

#3 As I've stated before, many people benefit from my 'modification' of the Strassburg Sock instructions. I recommend that patients apply the sock, then MAXIMALLY dorsiflex the foot (pull the foot toward the leg) BEFORE tightening the strap. After you pull your foot up toward your leg, THEN tighten the strap. This will provide the most stretch of the 'calf' muscles, and will decrease the amount of 'toe bending' that occurs.

If you simply put on the sock and tighten the strap, it often results in the toes bending back too much, causing a lot of discomfort and cramping.

Result number: 11

Message Number 255717

Re: Pain worse after stretching View Thread
Posted by Alex G. on 3/07/09 at 22:58

Hi Dr. DSW,

What is your recommendation with the foot trainer? I've never tried the product and I'm a bit skeptical of trying new things that cost some money (since I've spent so much already). Is there any way these exercises can be performed without these devices? I have the strassburg sock too and when I used to wear it at night I would have the same effect the next day with the pain worsening. It may be possible that I'm overstretching. The odd thing is that I'm pretty flexible for a guy in my opinion. Most of the people I know can't even reach their toes and I can touch the bottom of my heel from over the toes. I'm not trying to brag, just trying to describe my flexibility versus how tight I am all the time. Thanks for your time.

Alex G.

Result number: 12

Message Number 255523

Re: ESWT Follow Up View Thread
Posted by SteveG on 2/28/09 at 16:41

Margaret - Your experience sounds similar to mine, except that I had ESWT in 2003. The pain in my heel slowly disappeared. To help eliminate the discomfort throughout the arch and the ball of your foot you should also make sure you stretch your posterior muscle groups (i.e. Achilles tendon). I really benefited from the Strassburg sock you see mentioned on this site.

I am glad you are headed in the right direction. I was in bad shape 6-7 years ago, but I can pretty much do everthing I want now - go shopping, walk my dog, etc, etc.

Result number: 13

Message Number 255104

Re: seeing some relief! View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 2/16/09 at 09:32

That's great news. I've been a strong supporter of the Strassburg Sock on this site and in my office for MANY years. The number one complaint I hear about the Strassburg Sock is that it bends the toes back too much causing discomfort or cramping.

Well, the Strassburg Sock works on a theory called the 'windlass effect' and that includes pulling the toes back to a degree. However, I have a slight 'modification' for those that have tried the sock and can not tolerate their toes being pulled 'back' so much.

I recommend that instead of putting on the sock and pulling back the strap, that FIRST you maximally dorsiflex your foot. That means bend your foot up toward your leg, THEN tighten the strap. That will prevent the toes from being pulled back as much, and will allow the ankle to get a better stretch. It will put more of the stretch on the ankle, and less on the toes.

This modification has worked very well for my patients.

I would recommend that you continue with the Strassburg Sock if you are having success. In addition to the Strassburg Sock, many of my patients have had significant relief when I prescribe a product called a Dyna-Splint. This is a product that is actually prescribed by your doctor and is billed to your insurance company (if it is approved). The rep from the company than fits you either at your doctor's office or at home. It looks like a big night splint, but it is spring loaded and applies a constant force on the foot to dorsiflex the ankle. It can be adjusted to gradually increase the load. My patients have had tremendous success with this product and it's something I highly recommend.

Result number: 14

Message Number 254123

Re: night splint did not work for me View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 1/18/09 at 18:03

Actually, the majority of patients can not sleep in night splints, so don't feel bad. Although many patients also have difficulty with the Strassburg Sock if not used with some of my recommended 'modifications', it's the night splint I often recommended since it's simply a sock and not bulky. Most night splints are bulky and don't allow the patient to move around or sleep.

Some of the newer dorsal night splints (Scott sells one on this site) are much more comfortable, but in my opinion, do not provide enough dorsiflexion.

You may want to wear your night splint when you're simply sitting around eating dinner, doing paper work, watching TV, etc, instead of while sleeping. Additionally, next time you're at your doctor, you may want to ask him/her about the use of a DynaSplint. It's similar to a night splint but places a constant spring loaded force on the area to help stretch the soft tissues. It's billed to your insurance and the majority of insurance companies to cover this item.

Once again, it's way to bulky to sleep with, therefore I recommend it's use while inactive in the house.

Result number: 15

Message Number 254072

Re: Strassburg sock to give away View Thread
Posted by Jen R on 1/16/09 at 10:30

Hi Sofia,

Let me know if you are still interested in giving the sock away. I would be interested in trying it if it's the right size...and I'd be more than happy to pay the shipping.

My email is jenross24 at hotmail.com.

Jen R

Result number: 16

Message Number 254063

Re: Strassburg sock to give away View Thread
Posted by Sofia P on 1/16/09 at 08:45

Thank you Dr DSW, I will give it another try. Also, thank you John for writing again. Sofia

Result number: 17

Message Number 254054

Re: Strassburg sock to give away View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 1/15/09 at 16:30

Before you give up, please try my modification that I often recommend to patients that helps a little, and prevents the toes from being pulled up so drastically. But please remember, the toes being dorsiflexed is one of the reasons the Strassburg Sock works, because it works on the 'windlass' principle.

When you place it on your foot, PRIOR to tightening the strap, maximally dorsiflex your ankle (pull your foot up toward your leg) and THEN tighten the strap. This will help pull your foot up, and not bend the toes as much.

If you simply pull the strap, the toes bend more than the ankle. Give it a try and it may help a little, and you get more stretching of the Achilles like you're supposed to for more relief.

Result number: 18

Message Number 254047

Re: Strassburg sock to give away View Thread
Posted by john h on 1/15/09 at 13:46

Sofia: I used the Strassburg sock many years ago. I really never liked it It seemed to just bend my toes. I found the hard devices worked much better. They apparently work for some people as they are still selling them.

Result number: 19

Message Number 254045

Re: Strassburg sock to give away View Thread
Posted by Sofia P on 1/15/09 at 13:32

Hi Ryan,

The problem is that the strassburg sock keeps the toes bent during the night. The first night it was fine, during the second night I woke up during the night with pain in the big joint of my big toe so I removed the sock. After a few days I tried for a third time, but my big toe started to hurt after about only 10 minutes. For this reason I cannot use it anymore, but I have seen in this website that some people do benefit from wearing it, so I am willing to give it to anyone who wants it.

Regars, Sofia

Result number: 20

Message Number 254014

Re: Strassburg sock to give away View Thread
Posted by Ryan on 1/14/09 at 16:24

Your choice to give it away but giving it only a 3 time trial hardly seems enough to determine that it's not working for you.

Result number: 21

Message Number 254013

Strassburg sock to give away View Thread
Posted by Sofia P on 1/14/09 at 14:58

I have a Strassburg sock to give away. Iíve only used it three times, but it doesnít work for me.

I am giving it away free, but I would like the postage paid. Anyone interested?

Regards, Sofia

Result number: 22

Message Number 253183

Re: Exercising with heel/ankle pain View Thread
Posted by Dr. Wedemeyer on 12/16/08 at 14:50

What type of doctor prescribed and dispensed your orthoses?

Cold laser is controversial to begin with and even more so as an effective treatment for PF.

I suggest you read Scott's book and consider a dorsal night splint or Strassburg sock to passively stretch the GSAT complex. Ice is helpful at the end of the day. I find electrical stimulation with a garment sock and subaqeuous ultrasound indispensable in treating PF along with the appropriate orthoses and shoes.

Result number: 23

Message Number 253068

Re: Dr. Z View Thread
Posted by Paisley on 12/13/08 at 00:10

Thank you so much for following up with my posts. I'm a bit reluctant to post some info on a public message board. I have confidence in my Dr. but have had some conflicting info from him... for example, when I went for my post ESWT he mentioned that retreatment was necessary in 50% of the cases. When I returned for my post EWST 3 week follow up, he didn't really even look at my foot. Plus I feel a bit guilty about going 'over his head.'

My podiatrist did recomment NSAID which in in contradiction to the post EWST in structions I received after the procedure so I am reluctant to take them. Also, NSAID do tend to play havoc with my intestinal system and raise my bp.

I cannot take prednisone -- have had severe reaction to it which, I know, is rare.

The plastic heel cups do not work for me.

I'm not familiar with the Unna boot. Could you provide more info?

I'd be reluctant to try a boot cast due to a history of DVT.

I've had steroid injections which my doctor agreed to try come January when I have a vacation scheduled. The last two injections (given in July and August) did no good. (Done by another podiatrist) In fact, the second one gave me a pretty severe cortizone flare and then only lasted two weeks. In the past, cortizone injections bought me 6-8 months of relief. Not so anymore.

I've tried over-the counter inserts and orthotics. October a year ago, I used Superfeet which I first thought was my miracle cure... 5 months later, another flare up of PF. I also read on this site about ProFeet orthotics which have been recommended by another doctor who frequents this site. However, many reported a problem that the arch support is too high for them. Looking at x-rays, my arch looks high. However, upon standing, it virtually disappears. I've tried using a multitude of OTC orthotics, but they seem to only worsen the severe pain I'm having since the procedure.

I also looked into the Strassburg Sock, but am reluctant to try it. I have a night splint which is very cumbersome -- it seems sometimes it helps, sometimes it doesn't. Let's just say I have 3 shoeboxes of orthotics and inserts. Some helped for awhile, and then the pain returned.

I will, indeed, email you with the info you need. But I need to know that it will remain confidential at least for the time being.

Again, thank you! I am grateful for your interest in my case.

Paisley

P.S. Hopefully, the info I send you will remain confidential.

Result number: 24

Message Number 253063

Arch supports losing effectiveness View Thread
Posted by Chris O on 12/12/08 at 20:08

Is it common to start using a new arch support/shoe combination and find success for a few weeks...and then the pain comes back? I thought I had found a good solution after being fitted with the Brooks Ariel and the Birkenstock Balance insert. I started breaking in the insert slowly. They hurt a bit but gave relief. I was able to wear them about 6 hours, and then took them out. I wore the sneaker without an insert for about 4 hours, then switched to Birkenstocks. I did calf and fascia stretches and wore the Strassburg sock some nights.

My feet felt much better for about 2 weeks but recently the pain has been returning. Any ideas why?

Should I be looking for an insert that I can tolerate all day long?

Result number: 25

Message Number 253012

Re: what next? View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 12/11/08 at 20:13

If you do a search on this site, I mentioned the Strassburg sock MANY times over the past several years, and have also mentioned my 'modification' on applying the sock.

Result number: 26

Message Number 251574

Re: Dr. DSW...splint vs. sock View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 10/28/08 at 19:38

Jen,
It is difficult to determine how any one particular patient will tolerate the Strassburg Sock. Some patient's the sock and of course other's don't.

I've never had patients complain about the sock being too hot. It does take some getting used to, and you can walk with the sock in place. But once again, I can not predict how you will tolerate this particular product.

You may also want to look into some of the new 'dorsal' night splints that are much less bulky. They basically are a plastic shell (with a soft liner) that sits on the TOP of your lower leg and foot and has a strap that wraps under your foot to hold the foot up. So basically, there's nothing under your foot other than the bottom of the strap. The other strap is behind your calf. These are much less bulky and much more comfortable, since they sit on the top of your lower leg/ankle/foot and are relatively low profile and you can walk while wearing them.

And lastly, if you can't tolerate any night splints, you may want to speak with your doctor about finding out if your insurance will cover a Dyna-Splint which you can wear when sitting around the house, watching TV, eating dinner, etc., which is an excellent device to help passively stretch the soft tissues. It's almost impossible to sleep with this device due to bulk.

Result number: 27

Message Number 251547

Dr. DSW...splint vs. sock View Thread
Posted by Jen R on 10/28/08 at 07:47

Hi Dr. Wander...

I have read your suggestions many times for the Strassburg sock. I own several night splints and I've had a couple of problems with them. Because of their bulkiness, they make my back sore to the point where I normally take the splint off in the middle of the night. Most nights I wake up to go to the bathroom and it's not easily manuvered in a half-asleep state. I'm a side sleeper so my heel tends to slide up the back of the splint. I have not worn a splint for years now and actually found that by massaging/stretching my feet before I get out of bed I can significantly reduce that first step pain.

I am wondering if (and how) the Strassburg sock would be better than the night splint. I can guess that it probably would not be a strain on my back...but what else can you tell me? It seems like it would be really hot and I don't want to spend another $40 for something I won't use.

Thanks,

Jen

Result number: 28

Message Number 250515

Re: Night Splints View Thread
Posted by SteveG on 9/26/08 at 23:25

Wendy - many people benefit from night splints. I used the Strassburg sock. I provides a gentle stretch and can be worn at night -

http://www.thesock.com/

Result number: 29

Message Number 250511

A better shoe? View Thread
Posted by Chris O on 9/26/08 at 18:44

I am about a month into a new job where I am on my feet all day and my PF is flaring. I hobble by the end of the day and ice isn't doing much. I am trying to stretch more. The Strassburg sock helps some.

Could a better shoe help? When I wear Birk sandals, the back and lateral outside of my heel ache by the end of the day. When I wear Dansko Prof. clogs, my heel aches by the end of the day and my toes are sore. Today I wore Acsis Gel Kayano running sneakers and again, my heel was killing me by the end of the day. Is there a different shoe that might help?

I am using ice right away when I finally sit down for the end of the day, but boy, those first steps when I get up again are dreadful. I switch shoe types when I get home too, but the pain never goes away.

I guess it might be time to go back to my foot doctor...

Result number: 30

Message Number 250447

Re: night splint View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 9/24/08 at 06:00

In addition to Jeremy's comments, I also recommend the Strassburg Sock as per Chris's comments. However, one little 'adjustment' is often recommended. Prior to tightening the sock, I recommend dorsiflexing your foot (pulling your foot up toward your leg) and then tightening the strap. This prevents your toes from being pulled too much. If you tighten the strap first, it often pulls the toes up too much rather than dorsiflexing the foot/ankle which is the real goal.

Result number: 31

Message Number 250439

Re: night splint. View Thread
Posted by Chris O on 9/23/08 at 19:31

I use the Strassburg sock, which is a sock with a velcro band that pulls your toes back. I find relief with this. It runs around $35 and is sold at running stores. The Strassburg sock is less bulky that the rigid night splints.

Result number: 32

Message Number 250219

Brenda View Thread
Posted by SteveG on 9/15/08 at 19:18

Brenda - I would say that the ESWT was the most beneficial of all of the treatments and should be looked into if you are a good candidate. Other things that helped:

Loosing 30 pounds
Strassburg sock - worn at night for stretching

Surgery is, indeed, the court of last resort; if you spend enough time on the board you will become aware of what a risky procedure it really is. But as I say, don't let it get you down. The posters that were on the board when I was active are long gone. They gradually got better and left the board behind.

Result number: 33

Message Number 250137

Re: Strassburg Sock View Thread
Posted by julie d on 9/12/08 at 23:53

Where did you find the Strassburg Sock for $20 - I really would like to try one. My night splint is not working for me.

Thank you

Result number: 34
Searching file 24

Message Number 248872

Re: Strassburg Sock and toe pain View Thread
Posted by Candace on 8/03/08 at 09:24

I found a solution for me at least--the pain in the toes from the Strassburg Sock was from the pressure on the tips of the toes (that isn't bad at first, but as the night went on). I thought about this. Tried cotton wool (bunches up). A rolled up sock (slid away). Looked at idea of a Teva sandal (won't fit). BINGO. I thought, who else has toe issues? Pointe dancers. Went online and looked at a favorite pad that ballet dancers use--Bunheads original ouch pouch ($22). Bought it--is a gel pouch that fits over the toes and stays on (not too hot) and WAS FABULOUS. No pain in toes. And, though early days--I too think the sock is finally beginning to help. That and ibuprofen cream that my husband uses to massage, and work out the tight plantar fasciitis area. TRY anything that works.

Result number: 35

Message Number 248712

Re: strassborg sock tip View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 7/26/08 at 07:23

Tim you are correct. To prevent the Strassburg Sock from causing too much stress on the toes, I recommend that patients FIRST dorsiflex their feet (bend the foot up toward the ankle) before they adjust/tighten the strap. This helps alleviate the excessive dorsiflexion of the toes and also helps add to the benefits of stretching the Achilles.

Result number: 36

Message Number 247420

anyone been casted?? View Thread
Posted by Kwitsup on 6/06/08 at 14:43

Hi all - here is a synopsis of my struggle with PF... I have been seeing a podiatrist for nearly two years. In that time, I have had two rounds of cortisone injections, have purchase countless pairs of recommended shoes, have purchased custom orthotics (after several attempts at inserts from the doctor or the over thecounter), slept with both a night splint boot and a strassburg sock, received physical therapy for the last four months, iced, heated, stretched, lost 15 pounds, etc., etc., etc.... Although I am not alone, I feel like my options are completely exhausted, and I have been so depressed and frustrated. I am a teacher, and I am on my feet constantly... My doctor recommended that one of my final options before surgery is to be casted and on crutches for 4-6 weeks.... Has anyone utilized this as a treatment? I certainly don't want to be on crutches all summer (one leg followed by the other), but I will think more seriously if I hear positive results. Also... what kind of doctor have all of you been treating PF with? I have seen one podiatrist the entire time, but perhaps there is a better option?? Thanks so much for your input and suggestions. It's so nice to communicate with people who can empathize with me. Thank you, thank you, thank you.

Result number: 37

Message Number 247155

Re: Strasburg Sock Hurts View Thread
Posted by Melissa H on 5/28/08 at 16:03

The Strassburg Sock hurt my big toe also. I've been using the A-Force Dorsal Night Splint, which is comfortable to wear and seems to be helping. I have almost no pain the the morning. After I take off the splint, I lie in bed and gently massage and then stretch both feet and legs before I get up. I wear thick Reef flipflops around the house. Never go barefoot.

Result number: 38

Message Number 246507

Slow resolution of Plantar fasciitis View Thread
Posted by Joanc on 5/02/08 at 20:52

I developed a rather severe case of plantar fasciitis this winter (the second one of my lifetime). Therapy with ice, rest, ibuprofen, stretching and orthotics have resolved a great deal of the pain. That morning 'ouch' is gone, and I have rare pain until I go back to my walking routine. Then I get that 'ball bearing under the heel' sensation again. I'm trying to avoid steroid injections, if possible. I just got a Strassburg Sock and am going to try that. Am I going back to physical activity too soon? It's been 2 months since I got the orthotics and things began to resolve. Or do I simply need to be more patient, and keep up the routine longer? I don't want injections...I have fond memories of that event...but I don't want to be stupid and ignore something at the risk of making it chronic, either. Thank you!

Result number: 39

Message Number 245217

Re: Strassburg Sock View Thread
Posted by Bruno on 3/28/08 at 08:58

I've tried the sock and I also have experienced toe pain. David, I did relax the tension and still felt some pain, so I really don't know what else I can do.

Maybe the sock isn't for me. I did follow all the instructions and couldn't stand the pain for more than 2 hours. I will try wear another sock underneath.

Thanks anyway for the info.

Result number: 40

Message Number 244289

Re: Strassburg Sock View Thread
Posted by Lisa S on 3/08/08 at 17:00

Please tell where did you purchase the sock for $20.00?

Result number: 41

Message Number 243086

Re: Strassburg Sock View Thread
Posted by Jill Renuart on 2/11/08 at 17:54

So my doctor recommends it for me for achilles tendonitis, not PF. How does it work for that? I've tried the night splints and they are like trying to sleep in ski boots with a lot of pain on the ball of my foot. Jill

Result number: 42

Message Number 243000

Re: Atypical Plantar Fasciitis View Thread
Posted by Taylor on 2/09/08 at 21:18

I thank you very much for your response. I don't know where to turn to and my story is so long and involved. I have seen about five podiatrists along the way and have just made an appt to see yet another one who was recommended by my chiropractor. I have also seen about five chiropractors for this and have continued to see the last two because they were certified in Active Release Therapy, which seems to be the ONLY thing that has made a dent in my pain. A brief recap of the things I have tried throughout the course of the last five years:

1. custom-made orthodics (these offered NO relief)
2. ultrasound
3. deep tissue massage
4. strassburg sock
5. A.R.T.
6. physical therapy
7. arch supports (my favorite is the Birkenstock blue footbed. PowerSteps make my feet hurt even worse.)
8. taping
9. icing
10. stretching
11. x-rays
12. evaluations by a rheumatologist, hematologist, endocrinologist, and neurologist (of course, all these evals, with the exception of the endocrinologist, were done quite early on in the process, some 4-5 years ago.)

Stretching seems to be key in keeping my pain at bay. But my calves are SO tight that it doesn't last long and the often excruciating pain returns. Another point to note...the only time I've had a brief pain-free episode in the last 5 years was during the last trimester of a pregnancy, presumably when the relaxin hormone was probably making my entire body, calves included, more limber. I am just 35 years old, but my body feels much, much older than that.

The chiropractor I've been seeing for ART suggested that I might have some underlying issues and gave me the name of an open-minded GP. My plan was to start with her and see what she thinks and it sounds like you might be in agreement?

Result number: 43

Message Number 242829

Re: Strassburg Sock View Thread
Posted by Michael M on 2/05/08 at 19:42

Folks, the instructions say NOT to walk while in your Strassburg sock. But, does anyone know if it hurts your foot (or PF!) to just walks a bit, like to the bathroom? It is a pain to take the sock off, then put it back on again for a 40 foot trip.

Thanks and thanks for this great site.

Result number: 44

Message Number 242205

Strassburg Sock View Thread
Posted by Jenna on 1/20/08 at 12:48

I've had lots of success with the Strassburg sock, but my feet stil get tight sometimes so as prevention I still wear the Strasburg sock... which means I've been wearing it every night for 10 hours for 8 months!

It makes my foot feel better, and doesn't hurt.. I don't think it is as tight as it used to be because the sock has stretched a little..

Just wondering, do you think it's okay to wear the sock long term?
Just wondering if the pullingon-my-toes could cause damage long term

Thanks for your input
peter519 at msu.edu

Result number: 45

Message Number 240472

Re: What kind of Doctor would do Gait Analysis? View Thread
Posted by Michelle on 12/09/07 at 11:52

I forgot to add I also wear the strassburg socks on both feet at night, all night long. I admit it's uncomfortable but it seems to be helping. Good luck to you.

Result number: 46
Searching file 23

Message Number 239694

Re: Strassburg Sock View Thread
Posted by Karen R. on 11/20/07 at 19:24

You mentioned you bought a Strassburg sock for $20. Can you tell me where you purchased it for that price? I have only seen them for $35-40 on websites. I would appreciate any information you could offer. Also, how long did it take to improve your plantar fasciitis once you started wearing the sock?

Result number: 47

Message Number 239633

Look into a splint View Thread
Posted by SteveG on 11/19/07 at 19:11

Tom - Since this is not the Dr. board I will go ahead and post. You should look into a night splint. I had a case that was very similiar to yours. I wore a 'Strassburg sock' for several months and I do believe that it helped with my case.

Result number: 48

Message Number 239251

Re: shoe question Jremy or one of the doctos View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 11/09/07 at 07:44

Jeremy,
I thought that Merrell has been owned by Wolverine for the past several years. It's a shame that you've noticed the decrease in quality of Merrell's, because in the past, I was a big fan of some of their products.

In particular, a lot of my patients found relief with a combination of the Jungle Moc combined with a pair of PowerSteps, and in the summer a lot of my female patients loved the Primo Breeze combined with a pair of PowerSteps. They were a very lightweight shoe that patients found very comfortable and accommodated the PowerSteps nicely.

The Merrell/PowerStep combination provided relief for a significant amount of my patients, combined with stretching or the use of a Strassburg Sock.

I know that on the East Coast Merrell's gained tremendous popularity over the past few years, and maybe in an effort to keep up productivity, they cut costs somewhere.

Have you noticed that the decrease in quality is with all their products or just with certain new product lines?

Result number: 49

Message Number 239161

Re: ASTYM View Thread
Posted by Dr. Wedemeyer on 11/07/07 at 21:27

Mike you may be experiencing some enthesopathy of that Achilles tendon at the insertion due to trauma. If the Achilles is very tight and inflamed, and dorsiflexion is limited, this can contribute to your PF symptoms. Whatever your physician prescribes I would avoid cortisone injection to this site. You should discuss the following with your foot & ankle doctor:

One thing I have found beneficial is the application of 2% dexamethasone in gel delivered with pulsed ultrasound (phonphoresis) or by iontophoresis to the inflamed area followed by cross friction massage across the Achilles and PASSIVE stretches done by the provider (3x/week 4weeks). Passive stretching of the gastrocnemius belly is indicated as well. Later you will perform these activities yourself under supervision. It sounds as though you did not heal appropriately during the ASTYM treatment and I believe that any active soft-tissue technique performed in the acute phase of care can be counter intuitive to proper healing. You may need to 'reinjure' the area so that new collagen is formed and aligned properly.

Why not wear the Strassburg sock during this therapy? I would also consider adding a 1/8' temporary heel lift to your orthotics to take the tension off the Achilles. Also the type of shoes that you wear are important.

This type of complaint is fairly common in tennis elbow as well and I treat it the same way. I recently had a plumber come in with a large exostosis (bump) at the insertion site that was painful follow this regimen and he added 6grams of MSM daily (along with increasing his vitmin C, copper,zinc, selenium and manganese) while he was healing. He no longer has the pain or the defect, his medical doctor was stunned and did not comment. Nutritional adjuncts do help while healing and the above help collagen to 'cross link', I consider their inclusion vital in tendon and ligament healing.

Result number: 50

Message Number 239145

Re: ASTYM View Thread
Posted by mike s on 11/07/07 at 18:48

Thanks
I should state that is was an injury cause from jumping over a creek with my foot stuck in the mud as I continued forward. I felt a sharp pain, in the rear portion of the heel where the achilles attaches to the foot bed. It was diagnosed as PF but had more burning sensation, when my leg hangs off the table. Went to Foot and ankle specialist and said it was soft tissue injury and would heal with PT. I think I have two separate issues. MRI showed no tearing or any type of injure in the rear portion of the foot. It did show there was some bone edema and slight tearing in the PF. ASTYM made the inside portion PF really inflamed and it feels like my heel is broken. That is when they sent me back to Dr. I am 36 Ex-College football player with no leg issues. Very High Arches and have gained 25 plus pounds in last few years. Brutal. Wearing ESoles orthotic which I think are the best yet. Tried 3 different types, casting, foot mold, etc. Both Dr. said Orthotics were great. Did wear a Strassburg sock when rehabbing. Not currently wearing it. I am getting frustrated because I felt like a really worked in PT to get this fixed. Any more Sugguestions.
Thank you.

Result number: 51

Message Number 239116

Re: Night Splints View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 11/07/07 at 13:25

I am personally partial to the Strassburg Sock, but like to recommend some 'modifications' to my patient when they use the product. I believe that many patients don't get the full benefit, because if the 'sock' isn't applied properly, the toes end up bending too much instead of getting adequate dorsiflexion/bending at the ankle. Ideally, you want to stretch the Achilles tendon, but having the ankle bend in addition to the toes.

Therefore, before you give up on the Strassburg Sock, please try this slight modification, (if you haven't already). I like to recommend that after you place the sock on your foot/leg, you maximally dorsiflex your foot/ankle BEFORE you tighten the strap. That means you bend your pull your foot up as much as you can toward your leg and THEN you tighten the strap. This will then place your foot in the maximally 'dorsiflexed' position, with less 'toe bending' and more ankle dorsiflexion. Most patients find this more comfortable in addition to being more effective at stretching the Achilles tendon.

You may want to give this a try for a few weeks to see if it helps prior to trying another night splint. In my particular practice, the Strassburg Sock has been the most effective night splint, and I've tried almost every available product on the market.

Result number: 52

Message Number 239114

Night Splints View Thread
Posted by mike s on 11/07/07 at 12:10

Can you recomend a night splint for a severe case of PF? I have a Strassburg Sock and it doesn't seem like it is doing the job.

Result number: 53

Message Number 238344

Re: Pain this bad? View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 10/23/07 at 19:55

It drives me crazy when patients have MORE pain with the orthoses, and don't discuss this with their doctor. So I truly hope that instead of just suffering, you have discussed the problem with your doctor.

You or your insurance carrier have paid a significant amount of money for the custom orthoses, and it's your doctor's responsibility to do everything in his/her power to make sure you are comfortable. Orthoses are not always the answer, but your doctor must make EVERY attempt to adjust them, pad them or do whatever it takes to make you comfortable. Way too often, orthoses are simply dispensed and that's the end of the story.

I don't know your particular situation. But IF your doctor hasn't made any adjustments, or is not aware that you're still very uncomfortable with the orthoses, there ARE things that can be and should be done.

In addition to the orthoses, there are many other treatment options such an anti-inflammatories, ice massage (I prefer a frozen water bottle rolled under the foot), night splints (I prefer the Strassburg Sock), non weightbearing stretching exercises, strengthening exercises (foottrainer.com), proper shoes/sneakers, etc.

But IF you haven't already, PLEASE speak with your doctor and make sure that he/she gives you the time and attention you deserve.

Result number: 54

Message Number 236060

Re: Strassburg Sock View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 9/13/07 at 15:54

Your mofifications certainly sound reasonable, and if they work for you, that's great. Many of my patients complain that their toes bend back too much, although they get great results with the Strassburg Sock.

A modification I always recommend is that prior to securing the strap, I have the patients manually dorsiflex their foot with their hand, (push the foot up toward the leg) as far and comfortable as possible, and THEN secure the strap. This will allow the Sock to maximally stretch the Achilles, and will not bend the toes as much.

If you simply 'pull' the strap, without FIRST bending the foot toward the ankle (dorsiflexing the foot), then the toes will bend too much and the ankle won't bend as much. The result will be toes that are bent too much and will eventually cramp, and an Achilles that isn't properly stretched.

Result number: 55

Message Number 236037

Strassburg Sock View Thread
Posted by Louis S. on 9/12/07 at 22:04

I love my Strassburg socks (I got two of them). However, I found them to be a bit uncomfortable on my toes, so I made a 'modification'. I cut a piece of cardboard as a base to put under my forefoot, and slid that into the sock. (I also wear socks into the sock because I find it comfortable.) The cardboard redistributes the force more evenly over the foot. I also put a crease into the cardboard so it still bends my toes back a little, but more gently and evenly distributed.

I still find that the Strassburg sock doesn't bend my feet back far enough - only about 90 degrees I'd like a bit more. So I'm going to sew a bit of the strap to take up some 'slack'.

Regards,
Louis S.

Result number: 56

Message Number 235131

Re: QUESTIONNAIRE: Kevin C. View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 8/29/07 at 11:37

I could NOT disagree more regarding Scott's stretching recommendation using 'steps,wedge or the prostretch'. In my experience, with the majority of patients, ESPECIALLY those that are overweight, any weight bearing stretching exercises eventually increase the pain and/or exacerbate the symptoms. I am a strong advocate of non-weight bearing stretching for plantar fasciitis and the use of night splints. My personal favorite is the Strassburg Sock, though there are many night splints available.

So, you can take the advice of Scott, who I don't believe has ever actually treated a patient, or you can consider following my advice, though I've only been in practice for 22 years and only treat this condition about 25 times a week.

Result number: 57

Message Number 234309

How important is the 90 degree angle? View Thread
Posted by Lauren on 8/12/07 at 13:25

I have another related question about the Strassburg sock -- how important is it to get a 90 degree angle?

I think my experimenting with it I've tried everything from an 80 degree angle (pulling back the strap too much), to a 105 degree angle. Is it really best to simply have a 90 degree angle?

Result number: 58

Message Number 234308

Re: Getting WORSE after using the Strassburg Sock?? View Thread
Posted by Lauren on 8/12/07 at 13:18

Thanks for the response. I have tried that, and I've still been having pain, but at this point, I can't tell if I maybe re-injured the fascia when I initially used the sock (with the standard instructions and no insole), and now whatever I do I'll still feel the pain until it heals.

I think I'm going to wait a week or 2 or however long it takes until I at least no longer have pain while just sitting, and then try the sock again with the modifications.

As to Dr. Z's comment, I have tried the plantar fascia stretch, but when I do it I don't really feel that I'm really getting a stretch, and I was also hoping for something that I could use passively (it's hard for me to remember to do the stretches every day, especially on a day when I fortunately don't have pain working as a reminder!).

If I can't get the sock to work I might try a night splint.

Thanks for your responses.

Result number: 59

Message Number 234289

Re: Getting WORSE after using the Strassburg Sock?? View Thread
Posted by Dr. DSW on 8/12/07 at 07:39

I happen to be a be 'fan' of the Strassburg Sock and recommend it to a lot of my patients. But, as with any product it will not be be right for every patient.

However, before giving up on the sock, if you haven't already, one modification that I recommend to my patients involves the initial application.

I recommend that my patients dorsiflex their feet prior to applying the sock. That means that you should bend your foot up toward your leg as much as possible PRIOR to tightening the strap. I found that if you do this, it lessens the amount of bending/pulling back of your toes. If you simply put on the sock and then pull back on the strap, it seems to pull back on the toes too much and cause discomfort.

If you've already tried this modification, the sock may simply not be right for you, but it was certainly worth a try.

Result number: 60

Message Number 234277

Re: Getting WORSE after using the Strassburg Sock?? View Thread
Posted by Dr. Z ( vacation) on 8/11/07 at 21:09

You could switch to the plantar fascia stretch described on this site. Both the pf stretch and the sock are used for first step morning pain.

Result number: 61

Message Number 234275

Getting WORSE after using the Strassburg Sock?? View Thread
Posted by Lauren on 8/11/07 at 21:00

Hi, I'm wondering if anyone has had the experience of their plantar fasciits actually getting worse after using the Strassburg sock?

I've had 4 episodes of pf in the past 3 years, and until this most recent episode, the pain had gone away after rest, stretching, etc.

This time, the pain started about 2 months ago, and I went to a podiatrist who made me custom orthotics, which I've been wearing for about 5 weeks. They've helped, but since I wasn't getting 100% improvement, I ordered the Strassburg sock. I've used it a few times in the past week, but even after adjusting it and reading posts here about how to correctly wear it, I've actually been having more pain that I was before I started using the sock.

I also have bunions (in both feet, but pf in only one), and I read a post where someone said that you shouldn't use the sock if you have bunions, but the pain has been in my arch, where the pf has always been, not in my toes. I also have taken a suggestion I've read here and used an insole (a Superfeet one) with the sock, which has given my toes more room and made the sock more comfortable to wear. I've still been having worse pain walking, standing, and sometimes even sitting, since using the sock, though.

Basically, I'm sort of reluctant to give up on something that seems to have helped so many people, so I'm trying to figure out if I'm doing something wrong. Or is the sock just not something I can use because of my bunions?

Result number: 62

Message Number 231843

Hopefully PF is behind me View Thread
Posted by Dorothy N. on 6/20/07 at 00:38

It's been a while since I've written in, but I've gotten so much help from this site when I was at the height of my PF suffering, and I remember reading about how once people are cured they leave this site and don't come back. So I wanted to let everyone know that I've been able to get my PF under control for a couple months now. I hesitate to say I'm cured only because I can tell my feet are just not exactly the same as they were pre-injury, but I haven't been in any pain for a couple months now. I've gone back to running (I'll get to that later) but I am still vigilant about how my feet feel and taking care of them.

Here's how I got PF: I was training for a half-marathon last year, and after a speed run, my right heel started hurting at the end of the day. Later that weekend, I mistakenly put all my weight on my bare left foot, and I got diagnosed with PF in both feet by the podiatrist the following day. I found out later that the support in my shoes was pretty much shot, and that speed run was also too much too soon. To make a long story short, I had to take 8 months off running, and I tried all the conservative treatments for resolving the PF. The pain was so bad in the beginning that I even considered riding in one of those wheeled carts to do my grocery shopping. I took ibuprofen, bought ibuprofen cream, iced, stretched, rolled a ball under my feet, used orthotics, changed my shoes (got my gait analyzed at a running store), taped my feet, and rested. I never went barefoot. For a long time I hung my feet over the end of the bed to try to stretch them for the morning, and I also used infrared lights on my feet at night. Later I bought 2 Strassburg socks which worked much better than just hanging my feet over the bed edge (I still wear the Strassburg socks at night to this day. Sometimes they do get hot at night, but then I'll take my covers off over my feet. Every night when I put them on, there's this feeling of relief in my feet - I love them).

A few months ago, I started to try to get back into running again. At first the bottom of my feet had a slight burning feeling when I ran just a little, but it was a different feeling than when I first got PF. It was probably from not running for so long. I started running a little bit everyday, and then my left heel started hurting a little bit after a week or so of running. It wasn't bad - the pain went away after 1-1/2 weeks or so. But I talked to a friend who was a strength trainer (who has also had PF) who said I was probably doing too much too quickly, and he gave me tips on easing back into running. I also learned after doing some reading that I shouldn't run everyday - every other day is what's best with cross training in between the running days. I do always run with orthotics or inserts in, and I always stretch beforehand and ice afterwards. The Powersteps that are sold here have been a tremendous help. I also did some research and self-diagnosed myself with mild Morton's toe and so for my running inserts and orthotics, I've put a little padding under the area where the ball of each foot presses down. I don't know if that's made a difference or not since again I don't think I have Morton's too badly, but I haven't had any problems.

I have worked up to running 9 miles/week and I just ran 6 miles last Sunday, no problems. I don't say that to make anyone feel bad or jealous - it's just that I didn't ever think the pain would go away, but it has, so it really is for encouragement. I can tell I need to be a little more careful with my left foot than my right one because the PF in that foot was initially worse than in the right foot, and it took longer for the left foot to get better. But after doing all the conservative treatments, the pain finally subsided. I still have goals for myself, including getting to the point where I don't need to wear shoes around the house (I do sometimes go barefoot here and there on the carpet, but I'm not brave enough to go barefoot all the time around the house like I used to) and eventually not needing the Strassburg socks at night. But I cannot tell you how elated I am just to even be walking without pain because I know how crippling and how devastating PF can be. Thank goodness my husband and family were supportive of me, and I was/am extremely thankful to have this board to turn to. It's amazing to know there are people out there who know exactly what you are going through. I hope this will encourage someone to continue to actively try to resolve any PF issues. Obviously each individual case is different, but there's a reason why all the conservative treatments are recommended. Don't give up - it will get better.

Result number: 63

Message Number 231689

Re: Strassburg Sock View Thread
Posted by sherry M on 6/16/07 at 21:43

Where did you find this sock for $20.00?

Result number: 64
Searching file 22

Message Number 229622

Question on plantar fascia View Thread
Posted by georges on 5/11/07 at 11:49

I have bilateral PF. I have more pain from standing still or walking than from running. First step pain is not bad (I had worn the Strassburg sock for a while and that helped with first-step pain).

After having walked a lot or standing a lot my feet hurt quite a bit in the heel and towards the toes (perhaps where the fascia connects there too?).

My question is, (assuming diagnosis of PF is correct) is that probably due to the microtearing of the fascia at the insertion point? And if so, is the fascia then lengthened/stretched at all or simply torn a little from the bone? I'm wondering if it would be advisable to immediately put on a night splint after having walked or stood a lot to be sure that my foot doesn't heal in a shortened position, rather than waiting to use the night splint at night?

Sorry my post is so long. Any insights/explanations on this? Thanks!

Result number: 65

Message Number 224496

Calf flexibility vs. toe flexibility View Thread
Posted by Glenn on 3/07/07 at 13:52

This website emphasizes calf flexibility too much. I tried calf stretching, over the counter arch supports and the Strassborg sock for 4 months with limited results, still trouble walking, standing and definately could not run.

Went to a foot pediatrist, got custom full length semi-flexible inserts and had some relief. But the salesman in the local running store claimed I must strenghen the plantar tendon to get back to running. I stopped calf stetching, continued the night sock, used an IT rubber band and did toe strenghting exercises by curling my toes with the IT band under them to increase flexibility and strength, IB's and ice for 3 weeks, big improvement, can walk now with no discomfort and can run some with no pain. Still not 100% but much better than with calf stretching and the Strassburg sock alone.

I feel the key to my improvement was the custom orthodics, Strassburg sock and especially IT band toe exercises. When my toe flexibility increased, my plantar facia tendon become much less "thick" on the injured foot. When I curl my toes inwards and press the heel where the pain was, I can feel the tension in the heel become rounder and the pain greatly reduced.

Result number: 66

Message Number 221201

Re: Question - Dr. Wander and others View Thread
Posted by Dr. David S. Wander on 1/31/07 at 06:31

Steve,
If you look back at past posts, I've always advocated the Strassburg Sock as my first choice as a night splint, so I guess it's a case of "I told you so!" The "new stretch" is hardly new. If you also go back and read my posts I've also preached for patients NOT to perform weightbearing stretches. The stretch described in the article has been utilized by many doctors and therapists for many years, and many of my patients have figured that stretch out on their own prior to me even showing it to them! This doctor and his "study" just brought old technology to the media.

Regardless, if it helps more patients than it's great.

Result number: 67
Searching file 21

Message Number 219319

"a lot of posters with intractable PF who have been cured do not come back to post on this site. I wish they would." View Thread
Posted by Auntie on 1/10/07 at 14:34

One of the docs in a previous thread said this (the quote in my subject line)...so I thought I'd chime in. I have been "cured" (I say it like that because of the ever-present, underlying fear that it will happen again!) and have been back several times to offer encouragement and advice on what helped me, but of course, since I'm able to walk around and do the things I need to do, I'm not here as much.

I'm not trying to take sides....here's what helped me the most. Had a shot, didn't help. Never tried taping. Ice helped tremendously with the pain. Halogen didn't help, and I really gave it a good try. Strassburg Sock helped...as a matter of fact, I'm just now getting (past week or two)to where I don't use it at night any more...sometimes if I feel like my muscles are tight or that I overdid it, I'll use it for an hour or so before bed. Powersteps helped for a while, but then stopped working and actually caused pain (discovered this accidentally!). Waldies are the shoes that work for me...it's all I wear as of now (with really thick socks!), haven't been able to find anything else I can tolerate. It should be noted that I also have an arthritic-like condition called ankylosing spondylitis, which causes foot pain, but I definitely had PF for a while in addition to that.

Surprisingly, I think I turned the corner when I took Lemonfeet's advice and started walking. I have a large house and many square feet of very plush carpet...I noticed after one of our "barefoot walking" discussions that my feet actually felt relieved when I would take off my shoes (the ones with powersteps in them) and walk barefoot on the carpet. So I started doing that every day for about 15-20 minutes, and believe it or not, it helped a LOT. After that, and after I started using my daughter's Crocs around the house, is when I really started to get noticeable results. That is what prompted me to order the Waldies, as they were supposed to be softer than Crocs, and they ARE...they are just wonderful. As a matter of fact, all the Crocs I've tried lately in the stores are hard as rocks. They've changed something since my daughter got hers.

Well, that's all I can think of to say right now and I need to get up and do some things...thank God I can do that!! I hope something I said gives hope or help to someone.

Result number: 68

Message Number 218282

Re: Help! View Thread
Posted by Auntie on 12/29/06 at 11:08

I, too, had significant pain for over a year before I decided to get serious about treating it (got to where I could hardly stand to walk). I never used crutches, but would have if I'd had any! I did use a wheelchair a couple of times in the mall, because my kids just had to have clothes.

I did stretching (non weight-bearing), ice, Aleve, night splint (Strassburg sock), power steps (which worked for a while, but then stopped working and actually caused more pain!), tried the halogen that Scott(owner of this site)recommends for about 2 months (no help), and just staying off my feet unless it was absolutely necessary. I did these things all summer, and I'm better now. I also started wearing Waldies almost exclusively...if I put on my old hiking shoes to garden (they are the only other shoes I can wear for more than 3 minutes!), I'm right back in my Waldies as soon as I'm through! I wear them everywhere, even to church.

I half-heartedly tried things before this summer and called myself "trying all the conservative treatments", but I discovered that you really have to be religious about it...every day, several times a day, and even then it can take months. I know it's not very encouraging, but it's the truth. I sympathize with your having to work...I don't work outside my home and my husband is a teacher, so he was home all summer to help me. Keep praying...I did that, too, and still do. :-) I'll say a prayer for you today, also.

Result number: 69

Message Number 217307

Re: Night splint coming off View Thread
Posted by Auntie on 12/16/06 at 10:54

You might want to give the Strassburg sock a try...it never comes off on me. I have become used to it and hardly even notice it anymore. Do a search on the boards and you will find lots of discussions and tips for using it.

Result number: 70

Message Number 216893

Re: Dr. Wander- Question View Thread
Posted by Dr. David S. Wander on 12/07/06 at 16:50

Actually, I have my patients walking in a quality running shoe as soon as they can tolerate it. This allows motion and bending at the toes (metatarsal phalangeal joint), which in turn causes lengthening of the fascia/Achilles complex which in my opinion decreases the chance of contracture and scar tissue formation in a tightened position, hence keeping the "gap" open. I also have the patients sleep with a night splint of their preference, but most opt for the Strassburg Sock.

Result number: 71

Message Number 216821

Re: Some things I've done that have helped View Thread
Posted by Auntie on 12/06/06 at 15:03

Thanks for the positive and informative post! I also found the Strassburg sock to be good, and also put a PowerStep in it for a while. After I got used to the stretch, I found I didn't need the insert anymore. Another idea, if you took the insoles out of a pair of athletic shoes to put powersteps in, is to use the old shoe insoles in the Strassburg sock. That way you don't have to keep putting the powersteps in and taking them out over and over. (I only have one pair of Powersteps. I don't even use them anymore...they quit working for me after I reached a certain level of healing.) I found, with the insoles or powersteps in the Strassburg sock, that I could even walk comfortably on my hard kitchen floor for a limited amount of time...and this was when the pain was at its worst!

Result number: 72

Message Number 216812

Some things I've done that have helped View Thread
Posted by Al L. on 12/06/06 at 11:53

Hi all,

I've been dealing with foot pain for roughly 1 year now, and haven't had much luck. I'd try something different, feel pretty good for a week, then be back where I started with uncomfortable, tight, painful feet.

I made some huge changes to my routine last month and have been feeling fantastic for about 4 weeks! I've had no trouble sleeping and I've felt extremely comfortable since then. I even went on vacation in Newport, walked all over the place, and had no side effects! I've even been able to pick up jogging again.

I don't want to say I'm cured yet, but I feel a ton better. It was so bad at one point I was considering surgery/injections.

So anyway, here's what I've done. I hope it will be helpful to other people.

First, I want to start by describing my feet a bit and how they felt. If you're feeling the same symptoms the following might help!

I have very flat feet. I have a strong arch when my toes are flexed up, but the arch almost completely collapses when the toes are down. They have always been like this.

The pain I felt moved around. I would have a tight and hot feeling on my inner heel on both feet that would spread from the back of the heel (where it hits the ground) up until the start of the arch. Sleeping and laying down were extremely uncomfortable. I would also have shooting pains up and down the arches of both feet. I would feel these mostly at night as I was trying to sleep. The night brace one of my podiatrists gave me didn't help at all, but if it got so bad I couldn't sleep I would usually sleep on the couch because pressing my feet into the arm of the couch felt really good. I would say my feet felt uncomfortable pretty much all the time. They didn't hurt constantly, but felt tight and hot all the time.

So here's the routine:

First, my shoes:

-I got custom orthotics made for my work shoes. I sit down most of the time at work but these made it very comfortable to walk in. They are "soft orthotics" (as the podiatrist explained) and cost $75 for the pair. He used a foam imprint of my feet to make these. They are not full length- they stop just before the toes. I bought a pair of very comfortable Rockport shoes (I think they are the Pro Walker brand). These are great shoes because they are just about as comfortable as a sneaker, but look nice enough that you could wear them to work. I removed the insert that came with it and put my custom insert in. I bought my usual size but wide.

-I wear New Balance sneakers with the insert they come with to work out in. I jog three times a week in these, for 20 minutes a day. Three other days I lift weights in them.

-When I get home from work I put on Strassburg socks, and basically wear them until I put my work shoes on in the morning. Some nights they are uncomfortable and I take them off in the middle of the night. Usually they are comfortable enough where I don't realize I'm really wearing them and sleep without a problem.

These socks are really something! However, by default I found them to be ridiculously uncomfortable. They caused so much pain in my big toes and arches I couldn't believe they were helping! So I tried something- I put a pair of Powersteps in each sock. This way I get the stretch I want, but not at the expense of pulling my big toes so much they hurt.

My stretching routine:

I don't stretch in the morning because my legs get a great stretch at night thanks to the Strassburg socks.

When I go to the gym on my lunchbreak I will do the following stretches:

1) Standing up, place one heel on a hip-height stool or bench or whatever with the other foot pointed 45 degrees away from your body. Lean forward until you feel the stretch and hold for 30 secs. Then repeat but turn the other foot 10 degrees in toward your body. Hold for 30 secs. Then repeat on the other foot

2) Sit down, with one foot leg stretched out ahead, the other tucked in to your thigh. Lean forward until stretch, hold for 30 secs. Repeat on other leg.

When I get home I do the following, roughly 1 hour before I go to bed:

http://www.sportsinjurybulletin.com/archive/plantar-fasciitis-exercise.html

I also do these:

3) Sitting, hold foot out and slightly up. Dorsiflex foot as much as comfortably possible, and curl toes in and out (slowly!) 9 times. Repeat on other foot. Then do both feet together.

4) Sitting, hold foot out and slightly up. Flex foot out and in (dorsiflex and whatever the opposite of that is) 9 times. Repeat on other foot. Then do both feet together.

5) Sitting, hold foot out and slightly up. Rotate ankle clockwise 9 times. Then counterclockwise 9 times. Repeat on other foot. Then do both feet together.

My final piece of advice is to make sure you are eating healthy food, and enough of it!! My big mistake was cutting down on exercise (I was told not to jog or do anything that would put weight/strain on the feet). Why was this a mistake? When I first started working out I went from eating 3 large unhealthy meals per day to earing 6 small healthy meals per day. When I was told to cut my exercise routine down, I cut down my calorie consumption so as to not gain weight (I was also told not to gain weight so as to not put any more stress on my feet). I make sure that I now eat 6 small but healthy meals per day and I can tell you that my feet began to feel better almost overnight! 6 meals sounds like a lot, but even something as simple as a can of tuna fish and a small bowl of pasta would be a meal.

If there's one thing you take away from reading this, it's make sure you take in the right kinds and amount of fuel! The human body is remarkable in how it can repair itself, but only if it is provided with the proper material to do so!

Result number: 73

Message Number 215954

PF Taping Question View Thread
Posted by Denny on 11/21/06 at 15:36

Hey everyone -
I have been researching this site a ton, trying to find the best way to cure my PF. It's a localized pain in my right heel, obviously aggravated by running, etc. Annoying, as I am an Ironman triathlete, heading into training season, and can't run!
I have the Strassburg Sock, and I just ordered the PowerStep inserts. I do daily foot/calf/hammy stretches from the Pain Free book.

As I was reading here yesterday, I came across Scott's taping technique - the one with the simple 3 pieces of tape, sort of emulating the PF itself. I put it on this morning, and I have noticed that my foot hurts considerably LESS today! I sit at a computer all day, and I have gotten used to a nice burst of pain after I stand up -- but not so much today!

Now - I'm extremely happy, don't get me wrong! But I'm a little confused as to HOW this actually works! It seems as if the tape isn't really DOING anything, as there's a ton of slack. How is this effective, or is it - or am I just having a good foot day? ALso - is this something I should do all day, every day - at night?? And what about trying to exercise with the tape on? Good...Bad...Ugly?

Just lookin for some insight here - I'm really hoping this wasnt a fluke today!

thanks in advance -
denny

Result number: 74

Message Number 215172

Re: Walking Night Splint? View Thread
Posted by Dr. David S. Wander on 11/08/06 at 12:53

I highly recommend the Strassburg Sock and I believe it allows for a greater stretch than the dorsal night splint. However, while we are on the topic, I think it's very important to address the fact that some night splints are designed to simply PREVENT contracture, while some are meant to actually allow for passive stretching. Some of the dorsal night splints simply keep the ankle at 90 degrees to prevent the foot from plantar flexing, but don't really allow for any passive stretching. Many night splints actually allow for increased dorsiflexion beyond 90 degrees, to allow for passive stretching while the splint is being worn.

Result number: 75

Message Number 215140

Easy to walk in the Strassburg Sock. nm View Thread
Posted by Auntie on 11/07/06 at 20:39

.

Result number: 76

Message Number 214689

Re: Just came across this...(Dr. Wander) View Thread
Posted by Dr. David S. Wander on 11/01/06 at 06:16

Yes, I am a DPM and as I stated in an earlier post I had chronic plantar fasciitis partially as a result of not following my own advice. The reason is twofold. For years I've played soccer at a pretty high level (though that's winding down quickly) and most soccer shoes offer little if any significant support. Additionally, most soccer players, myself included, prefer their soccer shoes to fit almost like a second skin for ball touch and control. Therefore for years I resisted using orthoses to control my plantar fasciitis. Finally, I gave in and followed my own advice and compromised and started wearing orthoses in my soccer shoes to calm down my plantar fasciitis.

Secondly, my daughter was involved as a highly competitive swimmer for many years and I travelled all over the place for her swim meets. As a result I was always walking around pools barefoot which aggravated my plantar fasciitis. Therefore, I once again wasn't following my own advice and was not wearing any support. I also wasn't wearing a night splint since I hated sleeping with anything on my foot/leg.

When I finally got fed up with the discomfort and started following my own advice and began wearing a Strassburg Sock, started wearing orthoses in my soccer shoes (in addition to all my other footwear) and stopped walking around barefoot at my daughter's swim meets, my plantar fasciitis DID resolve. I FINALLY became a compliant patient.

Now ironically, my son won't step on a soccer field without a pair of orthoses in his soccer shoes (that's HIS idea not mine). When he was young he simply wanted a pair to "look" like me when I played, and now he won't play without a pair in his shoes. So everytime he outgrows a pair, I keep making him new ones. He plays soccer about 11 months a year, so his orthoses get a LOT of wear.

Anyway, I went off on a tangent, but I DID have chronic plantar fasciitis, but once I followed the advice I give to my patients, I was able to get my plantar fasciitis under control, since the etiology of mine was simply mechanical.

Result number: 77

Message Number 214629

Re: Plantar splints. Sock or Box? View Thread
Posted by Auntie on 10/31/06 at 13:09

I use the Strassburg Sock and it works for me. It does pull on the toes, but I have become used to it, I suppose. I just flex my foot toward my shin several times during the night and flex my toes several times to relieve them. I have not found Dr. Wander's modified instructions to make any difference...sorry, Doc. :) Someone else suggested putting some cardboard in the bottom to keep the toes from being pulled so much. This DOES work...but I found that it was more comfortable to use an insole from an athletic shoe that I had put powersteps in, because of the softer surface of the insole. Right now I am using it without anything in it, because, as I said, I suppose I have become used to it.

I have NOT tried any other kind of splint, but I can't imagine that those other, rigid kinds could be very comfortable to sleep in, especially in the wintertime when you have to use heavier covers. Someone else suggested only using them an hour before bed and 30 minutes before you get out of bed in the morning. This may work for you...didn't for me, wasn't enough.

Check out the reviews of the different splints here on the site. Also do a search of this site on night splint, lots of info here to help you make up your mind. If you decide to go with the Sock, try www.runnersroost.com. That's where I got mine, and it was cheaper than anywhere else that I could find.

Result number: 78

Message Number 214561

Re: Plantar splints. Sock or Box? View Thread
Posted by Dr. David S. Wander on 10/30/06 at 13:07

It is really a personal preference. I can tell you that in MY practice, the overwhelming majority of patients have preferred the Strassburg Sock, and my patients have obtained the greatest benefits from the use of the Strassburg Sock. There are many imitations of this product, so if you choose to use a sock type product, I would highly recommend that you purchase the Strassburg Sock. By the way, I have absolutely NO financial interest in the company, I just think it's a great product.

I do however recommend one modification if you purchase the product. Many of my patients complained that they did not feel they obtained enough "stretch" at the ankle when using the sock. I've modified the instructions a little bit and I feel that this makes the sock more effective as well as more comfortable. When applying the sock, I have my patients maximally dorsiflex their foot (bend the foot up toward the ankle) BEFORE they tighten the strap. This allows for more stretch at the ankle, and less pulling of the toes. Anyone that's used the product will understand what I'm talking about. If you don't bend your ankle FIRST, and simply pull the strap, the toes tend to pull back too much and the ankle doesn't bend much, and the more the ankle bends, the better the sock works.

Result number: 79

Message Number 212928

opinions on podiatrist visit please? View Thread
Posted by Susan L on 10/10/06 at 20:33

I am new to the forum and I am enjoying learning about how others are coping with PF and the steps they are using to make this problem more bearable.

What should I expect to happen on an initial consultation with a podiatrist, other than taking an oral history? After reading this information, am I receiving the optimum treatment and knowledge from my podiatrist? Your comments would be really helpful to me.


I have had PF in both feet for 3+ years. I first visited my local shoe store and talked to the staff pedorthist who made some orthotics based on stepping into some foam, fitted me with some good tennis shoes and off I went. The PF pain just came and went sporadically during this time mostly coming after I was on my feet for 8+hours (mostly spent standing in one area on tile). It was the worst, when I got out of the car, after driving home from events even wearing the orthotics. Felt like I was stepping on broken glass! Over a year's time this became more frequent, so I went to see a podiatrist hoping to have him evaluate my original orthotics, and shoes I was wearing. (I also had purchase a pair of heel inserts, which gave me the most relief, so I began wearing those first thing in the morning and most of the day in place of the original orthotics)

During my initial consultation a year ago, I had xrays taken that showed heel spurs in both feet. He did manipulate my feet to ask if I felt pain which I did primarily in the center of my heels. He was not interested in seeing my shoes or other inserts I had been using. He did not ask to watch me walk. His diagnosis was for me to purchase Spenco inserts. He gave me a scrip for an anti-inflammatory. I was to then get back to him in a couple of months. I became sick from the anti-inflammatory during this time, so he switched me to Aleve.

My normal shoes worn during this time were SAS and Traction shoes for work, New Balance 842 and Keenís for all else. I also wear some very supportive Teva thongs for around the house.

My second visit occured two months later as I was experiencing increased pain. He offered to give me cortisone shots, which, to me, is the last resort. I asked if PT could be more beneficial and he wrote a prescription for that. I did go to PT 3xís week for a month, where I had ultrasound and minimal massage. I was instructed to perform the typical runnerís calf/hamstring stretches 1x day; ice my feet using an ice cube directly on the bottom of foot, until the cube melted. I was sold the Strassburg Socks and used them at night for a good two months. I did get a lot of morning relief from using these. I didnít notice any improvement with the ultrasound. I didn't feel the therapist was really all the helpful. On the last visit, I asked if he thought I had made any progress and would there be any visible way or tests to tell. He said "Oh yeah, I guess I can measure your "whatever the word is that means how far foward your foot can bend towards your leg" sorry it escapes me at the moment!

My third visit was in mid spring and I wasnít getting any better, but I was also on my feet more after a slow winter season. It seemed as if the Strassburg Sock wasnít helping that much anymore and I started experiencing pain in ball of foot and in still in the heel; I never really have had a lot of arch pain. He sent me for more PT;told me he would give me cortisone and we talked about orthotics. I did prefer the orthotics, rather than cortisone. I didnít really know any questions to ask regarding types of orthotics and I relied on him to make the best choice knowing my past history. He did a seated casting and I received ¾ís leather orthotics with no instructions on which shoes to use them in, how long to wear etc. I figured I was supposed to wear them all the time right away in whatever shoes. He did tell me if they made my feet feel worse to call him after a months time.

I didnít know anything about the mechanics of my walking, or reasons why I have this (pronation etc), so this leads me to question the care I am receiving from my podiatrist. Itís just since Iíve been to this board, that I have realized the questions I should have asked and why; altho I do feel he should have addressed many of these concerns. I have an appointment to see a CPed tomorrow (original one has since retired) to review my shoes and orthotic situation and just to get a second opinion.

I have now started on a committed plan of yoga stretches, that I found here,prior to getting out of bed, followed by more gentle stretches, followed by icing by wearing socks and placing feet on bag of ice for 10 minutes. Then I do this again in the evening. I still take two Aleve am/pm, but not consistently to be honest.

Thanks for taking the time to read this and respond. I feel this board has many caring people who are willing to share their stories in an attempt to give another person some hope. I realize what works for one person, obviously may not work for another, but I do appreciate reading and sharing ideas.

Result number: 80

Message Number 212148

Re: has anyone used this "splint" product View Thread
Posted by Dr. David S. Wander on 10/03/06 at 17:58

"We don't agree on much". I'm not sure of the basis of your comment. Go back and read the "meat" of most of my posts and then tell me exactly what "we" don't agree with. I've stated over and over again that prescription orthoses are completely over utilized and over prescribed. I've also stated that I'm happy that you've found YOUR nirvana and YOUR cure, but after over 20 years of practice I've seen a lot of patients find their "nirvana", but unfortunately it doesn't work for everyone. That doesn't discredit their finding, nor does it discredit treatments that work for others. There are many reasons for plantar fasciitis and it's not a simple ailment to treat. I hawk no products on this site and have no financial interest in any one treatment or modality. I also give advice on a lot of other conditions in addition to plantar fasciitis, so I challenge you to spend some time, perform a search and then find "much that we don't agree on". I mean after all, you are an expert in the field with your years of expertise and experience.

The one thing I don't agree with is your constant need to attack others and your constant negativity toward treatments that you don't agree with. I've told you many times, channel your energy into what works for YOU, but instead of simply coming on this forum and stating that you agree with me regarding my use of the Strassburg Sock and the modification I recommend, and that the best money you spent was the 30 bucks for the sock, you couldn't end it there........you had to add insult by going after Dr. Kiper. That was purposeless and simply lowers your credibility. What's the point of ending your post with an insult?

Result number: 81

Message Number 212009

Re: has anyone used this "splint" product View Thread
Posted by Roger on 10/02/06 at 13:27

I can also attest to it's problems. I got one, and wore it 2 nights, and that was it. It bent my toes back too much, and I would wake up with my toes hurging like heck. Because of that experience, I have stayed away from the Strassburg Sock, as it looks so similar. The Dr's advice on how to put it on may help.

I have one of the splints that Scott sells here on the site. It's the HealWell. He didn't sell the 'recommended' one then. Healwell was the recommended one when I purchased.

It is a bit cumbersome and takes getting used to. Wearing at night, then for 30 min before getting up works pretty good for me.

Result number: 82

Message Number 211900

Re: has anyone used this "splint" product View Thread
Posted by Dr. David S. Wander on 10/01/06 at 14:07

I do have my patients modify the use of the Strassburg sock prior to application. I recommend that my patients bend the ankle all the way up FIRST/dorsiflex the foot all the way up (bend the foot toward the leg) PRIOR to tightening the strap. This will allow the Achilles to stretch more without the toes bending as much. If you follow the directions from the company, the toes bend more than the ankle. If you do it my way, the ankle bends more than the toes. Hope that's not too confusing!

Result number: 83

Message Number 211885

Re: has anyone used this "splint" product View Thread
Posted by Susan L on 10/01/06 at 11:41

Thanks for such a quick reply. Your comments re the Strassburg sock were interesting because now I understand the mechanics behind this whole splint thing. I do notice however that while my foot does seem to be bent back a little bit, I get the most stretch when I manually extend my heel and bend it back and then feel the pull at my heel. Otherwise, it seems that all I am doing is having my toes bent back and they seem to cramp after a while.

Perhaps I am using this wrong, but according to instructions, I placed my feet on the floor, tightened up the strap so I get a lift of my toes off the floor per the picture and that's it. Do these need to be replaced frequently? I purchased mine in December and wore it at night for months, but didn't really feel any relief probably because I end up sleeping on my side and bending my legs..so now, since I started reading the forum, I use is pretty much when I am sitting on the sofa with straight legs for an hour or so a day.

I am a new reader to the forum and really, really appreciate all of the opinions and information I've received in the past few weeks. I have suffered with this, for over three years. I am a caterer and on my feet constantly, wore SAS shoes with some modification all the time and just thought I was getting older and this is what happens! I do have a few questions regarding my podiatrist, but will post later.

Again, thanks to all.

Result number: 84

Message Number 211876

Re: has anyone used this "splint" product View Thread
Posted by Dr. David S. Wander on 10/01/06 at 11:01

I like and recommend the Strassburg Sock for my patients. The product that you are considering and that you have supplied a link to, I DO NOT recommend. In my personal opinion, it is a very poor "copy"/imitation of the Strassburg Sock. However, this product does not really seem to accomplish much other than bending your toes back. Although the Strassburg sock does pull your toes back, it also dorsiflexes (bends back) your ankle. By doing this, it allows your Achilles tendon to stretch. Bending back your toes, without dorsiflexing your ankle will really not accomplish anything, since the plantar fascia itself can not stretch. The "stretching" has to be accomplished at the level of the Achilles tendon. Bending the toes in conjunction with the ankle does increase the stretch due to the "windlass" effect, however simply bending the toes back by themselves, such as the product in the link you provided, in my mind is a waste of money.

Stick with the Strassburg Sock or a traditional night splint. The one in the picture does not have my vote.

Result number: 85

Message Number 211874

has anyone used this "splint" product View Thread
Posted by Susan L on 10/01/06 at 10:22

I use the Strassburg Sock for PT. Originally used it all night, but then have been using them as suggested in the evening prior to bed or whenever I have an hour to lay around..altho that doesn't happen very often!

The socks are getting a bit worn and I will need to replace them soon
and wondered if anyone has any experience with this product? It would certainly be easier to wear with long pants etc.


http://www.medsupports.com/MedSupports/plantarfxt.html

Result number: 86

Message Number 211371

just for the record....sm View Thread
Posted by Auntie on 9/26/06 at 10:59

I didn't put up with that smart-aleck doc...I never went back to him. But I still had to pay. The only good thing he did for me was tell me about the Strassburg Sock, which I would have found out about anyway on here, eventually. Another ARGH!!! with that doc, not really him, but his office staff -- the lady told me when I made the appt. to bring copies of the x-rays from the pod, which had only been taken a couple of months or so before. She said, "If you don't bring copies of them, we'll have to take more x-rays." So I traipse over to the other place, get the copies, pay $15 for them, and then when I get to the other doc's office, what do they do? You guessed it...they took more anyway, charged me 100+ dollars. I told the nurse who took me to the x-ray room that I'd brought copies and she said, "Well, there may have been some changes since then." ARGH!! Why on God's green earth I didn't just refuse, I don't know. I'm usually a very assertive person, but being in a doctor's office just makes everyone feel more vulnerable, I guess. That was just 300 or so dollars literally flushed down the toilet, which I personally can ill afford!

Which brings me to another reason why lots of people don't do something about bad doctors, besides the one of already having the time and money invested in one...lots and lots of people are just not assertive enough to deal with something like that. It can be very intimidating dealing with doctors, because either the patient feels like doctors are gods, or the doctor himself/herself does, or both.

On a positive note, my urologist is absolutely a treasure...he's personable, funny, very knowledgeable, he gets things done quickly....I wish he could be cloned so that all doctors could be like him (along with you, too, Dr. Wander). :) Once I called his office and asked to speak to his nurse because I had a question, and he answered the phone himself! One day he seemed to be in a sad mood, and I asked him if he was having a bad day...he muttered something about delivering bad news, and I assumed he'd had to tell a patient something bad....and I could tell it had actually affected him! He also has managed to keep his practice from being so huge that you can't get in to see him for months, you don't have to wait long to get in, and he actually remembers your name and what was wrong with you....and it's not because he isn't a popular doctor. Anyway, I've seriously digressed, but I did not want to leave the impression that I hate all doctors. :)

Result number: 87

Message Number 211242

Annm, I read your message below about having AS.....sm View Thread
Posted by Auntie on 9/25/06 at 11:29

I, too, have been told I have AS, not by a rheumatologist, but just as a casual aside from an orthopedic doc, whom I went to for back pain. When I researched it on the internet, it seemed to fit all my symptoms. But I have yet to go to a rheumatologist for an official dx.

Anyway, I have some pain in the balls of my feet also. I first noticed it when I was pregnant with my first child, 16 years ago. When I would get up in the mornings, the balls of my feet would be very painful with my first few steps, then ease up as I walked. It went away after I had the baby, but now, along with all the other foot pain I've been having, it is doing it again, only not as bad. I do a LOT of stretching and massaging of my feet every morning before I get up, and that really does help me.

About night splints...I personally use the Strassburg Sock. I initially went with it because it was cheaper than the others, but now that I've used it and read about what people go through with the other kinds, I'm glad I did. It appears to me that it is MUCH easier to sleep in than those other kinds. Softer, too. If you have not heard of it, just do a web search to get the web site address (I think it's just www.strassburgsock.com) and you can read about it. Maybe it will be better for you, that is, if you really need a night splint. I got mine for $30 (cheapest price I found anywhere) from .....argh, I'm drawing a blank here ....I think it was called Runner's Roost, in Colorado, I think. They have a web site, and I called to order it. Seems like there was no extra shipping charge at that price, also. Anyway, it helps me...I have less stretching to do in the mornings when I wear it. Also, some of the docs here recommend just wearing your night splint for an hour or so in the evenings, while watching TV or reading, and then putting it on about 30 minutes before you get up in the morning. They say that will do as well as wearing it all night. I haven't decided, according to my experience, if that's true or not...need to do more "research". :)

I really feel for you about the AS...I haven't had the eye problems (thank God), but I have back, neck, knee, rib, hip, and foot pain. I also have bouts of sciatica, and when I do, my foot pain is worse. I think I also have some fibromyalgia or something similar, because my muscles are always sore and I have those painful spots they talk about. But all in all, I do ok. I have not had any fusion of joints that I know of, and am still fairly flexible. When I think back over my life, I realize that it started in my early 20s.

Have you been to the AS site? They have a message board for support, also. There are two that I know of, actually...one is spondylitis.org, I think, and the other one is something about kickas...don't know if it's .com or .org.

When I first started posting here about my foot pain, I didn't realize that it was a symptom of AS. Some of the things mentioned here help, but some don't, because the nature of the pain is different...comes from a different source, I guess you'd say. So, while the docs here are great with PF, with us the situation is a little more complicated and kind of out of their "area". I don't want to be insulting at all...they've been very helpful to me. But they are podiatrists, not rheumatologists. I guess what I'm trying to say is, don't expect them to have all the answers to your questions.

Check out the Insoles/Shoes board for great discussions about shoes to wear for foot pain. The pedorthists there are really helpful. I personally used the powersteps for a long while...they helped at first, because I think I really did have some PF (at that time) in addition to the AS, but here lately they are causing me pain instead of relieving it. So I've been searching high and low for some shoes that work...Jeremy recommended the Keen brand, and I tried some on Saturday. You can read about my experience on the Shoe board. (I'm on my way over there now, if nothing interrupts me!)

Something just interrrupted me...but I'll get it on there sometime today!

Result number: 88

Message Number 210974

Re: Long term wearing of Night Splint View Thread
Posted by Dr. David S. Wander on 9/22/06 at 15:01

Although Dr. Goldstein doesn't consider the Strassburg Sock a "true" night splint, I'm not sure of his reason. I know it can't be billed under the code for a night splint for insurance purposes, but I don't bill for the product, I simply recommend it for patients.

Regardless of what anyone wants to call the Strassburg Sock, in my practice, my patients have received greater results than with any other "night" splint that I have tried, and I have tried dozens.

The majority of my patients find it more comfortable, though it does take getting used to since it dorsiflexes the toes more, which is why I believe it works better. It increases the "windlass" effect. If a patient initially feels the toes are being pulled too much he/she can simply loosen the sock.

I recommend a "modification" when applying the Strassburg Sock that seems to help most patients. When applying the sock, I recommend that patients maximally dorsiflex their ankles BEFORE they tighten the strap. This allows for more ANKLE dorsiflexion and less toe dorsiflexion and usually results in greater comfort.

The Strassburg Sock also allows patients to walk on it if they have to get up at night to go to the bathroom. However, just like any product, it's not for everyone and that's why they make chocolate and vanilla.

Result number: 89

Message Number 210826

Been wondering about this myself....sm View Thread
Posted by Auntie on 9/21/06 at 10:34

though I had not heard that about the neuroma.

I've been using it nearly every night for about 3 months now, and I have had concerns about it also. I use the Strassburg Sock, and one thing I've been concerned about is if it may be affecting the circulation in my leg somewhat, enough to maybe cause some problem down the road.

I'll be interested to hear what the docs have to say about this.

Result number: 90

Message Number 210825

Been wondering about this myself....sm View Thread
Posted by Auntie on 9/21/06 at 10:33

though I had not heard that about the neuroma.

I've been using it nearly every night for about 3 months now, and I have had concerns about it also. I use the Strassburg Sock, and one thing I've been concerned about is if it may be affecting the circulation in my leg somewhat, enough to maybe cause some problem down the road.

I'll be interested to hear what the docs have to say about this.

Result number: 91

Message Number 210653

Re: not getting better View Thread
Posted by PaulP on 9/19/06 at 10:33

Here is my morning routine. I have found it helpful, and I'm sure others will add helpful things to do as well. Note that I do all these things from my bed; I do not walk a single step before doing them.

0)Sleep with night splint. I tend to sleep on my back a lot with my leg straight, so I guess I'm getting some benefit.

1)I set my alarm about 10-20 minutes early, and when it goes off, I take the night splint off, grab the electric heat pad I keep near my bed, turn it on and doze while I heat the bottom of my foot, my achilles, and my calf. This helps get those muscles loosened up. While I'm heating, I'll also use the weight of my blankets to bend my toes back, same effect as strassburg sock.

2)After heating I'll sit up in bed and do the foot yoga exercise. This gets the blood moving a little and helps loosen up more.

3)Then I put my foot on my opposite leg and do the Plantar Fascia Stretch. (see link for description)

4)Next, I do the towel stretch in bed (I have the towel in reaching distance of bed). The towel stretch involves looping a towel around my foot and pulling back, stretching the calf and achilles. Some may find it too aggressive, but it works for me. Don't do if it hurts.

5)Then I massage my foot for a minute or two with the Foot Rubz ball, which I keep on my nightstand. At the very least it feels good, but I believe it helps get circulation going as well.

6)Finally, I'm ready to take my first step, but not before I put on shoes or birks. I put out my shoes and socks by my bed the night before so that they are right there, ready to go.

I do this route every day without fail. Yes, it now takes me 10-20 minutes to get out of bed, but it has elimated my morning pain. Now you all know what a freak I am, but it's worth it to be pain free!

Result number: 92

Message Number 210597

Re: not getting better View Thread
Posted by calmom2 on 9/18/06 at 16:33

acutally I wear a special sock not one of the night splints sold on this sight its called "the strassburg sock" does the same thing don't know if that matters or not.
thank you for your advice. I will try it during the day also

Result number: 93
Searching file 20

Message Number 208369

Re: Could Strassburg sock aggravate sciatica? sm View Thread
Posted by Dr. Carl on 8/25/06 at 10:59

Sciatica results from compression or irritation of the sciatic nerve, the branches of which become other named major nerves which supply the lower extremities. This compression can be the result of a disc problem in the spine or nerve root irritation or compression or binding of the nerve well after it has left the spinal cord. Muscular compression of the nerve as it passes through the buttocks area and down the leg may be a cause. Therefore any external
device which causes compression of these areas may contribute to sciatica. But a real diagnosis needs to be made before any real conclusion can be drawn regrading your question.

Result number: 94

Message Number 208200

Could Strassburg sock aggravate sciatica? sm View Thread
Posted by Auntie on 8/23/06 at 10:03

I ordered the smaller sock because I am small. It fits, but when I take it off, there is a small impression left on my leg, mostly in the back. I don't tighten the top strap excessively (I leave it where I can slip a finger under it), but of course, when the leg is extended the toe strap pulls on the leg strap, and all that pressure goes on the back of the leg.

I have problems with sciatica, which seem to be getting worse lately. Could the sock be aggravating it? I've been doing the sock for probably 2 months and it's just now getting really irritating, so I don't know. I've considered just doing the sock for an hour or so in the evenings and not using it at night. Is it really necessary to do it for 8-12 hours, like I've read on here?

Result number: 95

Message Number 208199

Could Strassburg sock aggravate sciatica? sm View Thread
Posted by Auntie on 8/23/06 at 10:03

I ordered the smaller sock because I am small. It fits, but when I take it off, there is a small impression left on my leg, mostly in the back. I don't tighten the top strap excessively (I leave it where I can slip a finger under it), but of course, when the leg is extended the toe strap pulls on the leg strap, and all that pressure goes on the back of the leg.

I have problems with sciatica, which seem to be getting worse lately. Could the sock be aggravating it? I've been doing the sock for probably 2 months and it's just now getting really irritating, so I don't know. I've considered just doing the sock for an hour or so in the evenings and not using it at night. Is it really necessary to do it for 8-12 hours, like I've read on here?

Result number: 96

Message Number 207274

Replies to your questions... View Thread
Posted by Auntie on 8/14/06 at 13:44

Let's see...the bulb is a GE edison spot halogen 75 watt bulb. It says PAR30LN, and light output is 940 lumens. There is a little drawing of a bulb that says PAR30L and an arrow pointing down from it that says SPOT.

I'm using an old milk bottle, very thick glass, 3-1/2 inches in diameter. I put it as close to the light as I can without touching it, and I put my foot right up to the glass.

I'm not sure if I have a lot of inflammation. I don't have a lot of swelling, I don't think. Ankylosing Spondylitis is a condition related to Rheumatoid Arthritis...pain and stiffness in joints. I'm sure that is at least part of my problem, but I have pain in my arches also, which I would say is muscle pain.

I still have the floodlight...I may give it a try again. I'm thinking you said before that I would have to use it about 15 minutes. I'll keep experimenting with them both.

I've used the spotlight for 3 nights now. It does seem to help the pain immediately afterward, but I've got to start paying more attention to the level of pain I have right before I do it to be sure. And every morning since I started with the spot, there has been noticeably less soreness in the mornings. Hard to know exactly what is bringing that about, though, as I am also stretching, using the Foot Rubz ball really hard and then icing, and using the Strassburg sock. Before I started using the halogen, though, I had already been doing all these things for several weeks, except I started using the ball more diligently (every day instead of every other, and pressing harder, and then icing immediately) right about the same time I started with the halogen.

I'm going to keep using the halogen, though, in case it is what is bringing about the changes. I really wasn't expecting an overnight healing, or even in several weeks, because I really had this for about 2 years before I started getting serious about getting rid of it (because I couldn't walk!).

I'll keep reporting back.

Result number: 97

Message Number 206424

Re: Jeff...what's status of your Footballer? View Thread
Posted by Jeff on 8/05/06 at 21:30

I have been very encouraged by the footballer and massage ball which used correctly( a DVD comes with the kit ). once I began using it my attempts at running began to be more succcesful. it all makes sense to me and releasing the trigger point in the muscle that cause the heel/foot/arch pain rather than focus on the symptom (foot pain ) only. i however also have been using the Strassburg socks ( I have PF in both feet..overachiever) which i believe has been beneficial also. Really starts to stretch the calf muscle out of the deep cramped and inflexible position that mine are in after years of running and little stretching. I recommend it...it's working for me, not perfect but I am running again and competing in tri's which I thought impossible in May.

Result number: 98

Message Number 205672

Re: My adventures at REI and the shoes I found there View Thread
Posted by Dr. David S. Wander on 7/28/06 at 14:44

Laurie,

I had a store in my neighborhood start carrying Merrell's just so I could start sending them patients. Several years ago I realized that I was able to provide significant relief to a LARGE number of my patients that had plantar fasciitis with a very simple and relatively inexpensive 3 step approach following my examination:

1) A pair of PowerSteps

2) A pair of Merrell Jungle Mocs

3) A Strassburg Sock Night Splint

It's amazing how many of my patients responded well to this simple "triad" of treatment. The PowerSteps fit perfectly in the Merrell Jungle Mocs once the insole is removed and provide great support for those they don't need custom orthoses. I also have many patients that wear Crocs or Waldies and for those that need extra support, PowerSteps also fit well in either one of these brands.

Result number: 99

Message Number 204627

Re: injection offered no relief. any advice? also- Finn shoes? Birks? Mephisto? View Thread
Posted by Dr.D on 7/18/06 at 23:07

The steroid injection is only an anti-inflammatory. The main goal of the injection is to reduce inflamation. It does not heal the fascia. I think they can work well in conjunction with other therapies, but you have to be really good about therapy.

The stretching is great - are you stretching throughout the day? Every hour? As much as possible. Have you tried a night splint? When people can tolerate the night splint - it can be a very effective treatment - stretching for 6-8 hours straight. Many are available - check with your doctor, your insurance might cover it (but they will be more through the doctor's office than online). The Strassburg Sock is an affordable night splint that tends to be more comfortable.

Continue taping - great.

The Dynastep inserts are probably not doing a whole lot. I typically recommend a more rigid insert or sport orthotic (I prefer Superfeet, but there are many options). Make sure your shoes are rigid on the sole and bend only at the toes. This is so important. To test this, take your shoe and turn it upside down. Grab the toe and the heel and try and bend. If your shoe folds in half - it is too flexible. Think of the fascia on the bottom of you foot as injured, torn.... and you need to protect it. Imagine trying to brace the fascia (like a broken bone) from the heel to the ball of the foot (shoes should bend where the foot bends -at the toes). Birks are not necessarily the best thing for everyone, so don't feel you have to buy them.

If your shoes fold in the middle, they are not protecting the fascia and then every step you take will cause more injury - hence, the never ending cycle of plantar fasciitis.

Good Luck

Christine Dobrowolski, DPM
Northcoast Footcare

Result number: 100

Message Number 204168

Re: BTW, I mentioned this in another post, but some may have missed it (about Strassburg Sock)...sm View Thread
Posted by Gary H. on 7/14/06 at 19:48

The Nice N Stretch is manufactured by Brown Medical. They also manufacture another soft night splint called the Stretch X. Both of these night splints are superior to the strassburg sock IN MY OPINION.

Swede-O Thermoskin has a product that performs like the strassburg sock. GUESS WHAT !! It curls the toes upward also.

Result number: 101

Message Number 204164

Re: BTW, I mentioned this in another post, but some may have missed it (about Strassburg Sock)...sm View Thread
Posted by john h on 7/14/06 at 19:39

Dorothy you are on a roll girl! As the song goes "Come On Baby Light My Fire".

Result number: 102

Message Number 204161

Re: BTW, I mentioned this in another post, but some may have missed it (about Strassburg Sock)...sm View Thread
Posted by john h on 7/14/06 at 19:36

I have tried probably four different night splints over the past ten years. The hard plastic ones which came up rather high on the calf were most uncomfortable and were non adjustable. The amount of stretch was fixed. In my case, the Strausberg Sock was terrible as I have Hallux Limitus. The sock tends to put most of the pressure on the ligiment running to the great toe and if you have hallux limitus this creates major pain and is exactly what you do not want to do. It also would loosen up during the night. The nigh splint that Scott sells (Nice-N-Stretch) is by far the best I have used. It is light weight, adjustable to the amount of stretch you want, and very easy to sleep in. It also can be folded for travel and the price is right.

Result number: 103

Message Number 204113

Re: Modification to Strassburg Sock View Thread
Posted by Esther H on 7/14/06 at 12:30

Hi Auntie,

Yes, I put cardboard in the bottom of my Sock. It really does help keep the toes from turning up. Crazy, I know...good luck.

Result number: 104

Message Number 204104

Modification to Strassburg Sock View Thread
Posted by Auntie on 7/14/06 at 11:25

I read in the archives that someone said they put something stiff in their Sock to keep from pulling on their toes. This morning I slipped one of my Powersteps in mine, and it helped...my toes didn't feel so "bunched up". It felt kinda hot, though, so it would probably be best to wear a very thin sock also. (This is getting ridiculous!) I think I'm going to try that tonight.

Result number: 105

Message Number 204028

Re: BTW, I mentioned this in another post, but some may have missed it (about Strassburg Sock)...sm View Thread
Posted by Gary H. on 7/13/06 at 21:58

Ralph,

You mention that night splints are "hard plastic clunkers".

There are a number of "soft" night splints on the market that you must not be aware of. The strassburg sock is not a soft night splint. It is a SOCK. The soft night splints work just as well if not better and they do not curl your toes upward. The soft night splints do have a code for billing purposes to insurance.

Result number: 106

Message Number 204026

Re: BTW, I mentioned this in another post, but some may have missed it (about Strassburg Sock)...sm View Thread
Posted by Ralph on 7/13/06 at 21:28

I didn't know anyone cared

Result number: 107

Message Number 204025

Re: BTW, I mentioned this in another post, but some may have missed it (about Strassburg Sock)...sm View Thread
Posted by Ralph on 7/13/06 at 21:27

Gary
It's obvious that you may know lots about night splint
codes but you've never worn them or you'd know the comfort level to be had from these hard plastic clunkers. This is especially true when you wear one on each foot.

After you kick yourself in the ankles a few times, while sleeping you'll be looking into purchasing the Strassburg sock. What you need is some experience with them.

Result number: 108

Message Number 204023

Re: BTW, I mentioned this in another post, but some may have missed it (about Strassburg Sock)...sm View Thread
Posted by Gary H. on 7/13/06 at 21:21

There are no telephones where I live, Ralph.

Result number: 109

Message Number 204022

Re: BTW, I mentioned this in another post, but some may have missed it (about Strassburg Sock)...sm View Thread
Posted by Ralph on 7/13/06 at 21:14

I'm sure your phone works just fine.

Result number: 110

Message Number 204020

Re: BTW, I mentioned this in another post, but some may have missed it (about Strassburg Sock)...sm View Thread
Posted by Gary H. on 7/13/06 at 21:01

Dr. Z.

Next time I am in your office remind me to ask you who is Ralf ! Do you know Ralf ?

Result number: 111

Message Number 204017

Re: BTW, I mentioned this in another post, but some may have missed it (about Strassburg Sock)...sm View Thread
Posted by Dr. Zuckerman on 7/13/06 at 20:41

Ralph,
I need Air in my Tire.

Result number: 112

Message Number 204014

Re: BTW, I mentioned this in another post, but some may have missed it (about Strassburg Sock)...sm View Thread
Posted by Ralph on 7/13/06 at 20:07

Dr. Z,
If you are that interested in details contact Dr. Wander privately. You've often said he lives down the street from you. Beside being semi-retired you have the time to bike on over. Please spare us a couch analysis that doesn't even involve you.

Result number: 113

Message Number 204007

Re: BTW, I mentioned this in another post, but some may have missed it (about Strassburg Sock)...sm View Thread
Posted by Dr. Zuckerman on 7/13/06 at 19:34

Dr. Wander,
When have you been pissed off. All the times you and I have met you have just been a real nice guy. Same with Gary . A nice guy. What is going on here

Result number: 114

Message Number 204004

Re: BTW, I mentioned this in another post, but some may have missed it (about Strassburg Sock)...sm View Thread
Posted by Susan on 7/13/06 at 19:13

You should get a job writing for Southpark. You're HILARIOUS!

Result number: 115

Message Number 203939

Re: BTW, I mentioned this in another post, but some may have missed it (about Strassburg Sock)...sm View Thread
Posted by Dorothy on 7/13/06 at 11:07

Speakers Corner -

You wrote:

Posted by speakerscorner on 7/13/06 at 08:44

Dottie why do you need Dr. Wander's help? You are disrespectful to others on this board with the use of your "ten dollar" words and you need Dr. Wander to fight your battles? "TEN DOLLAR WORDS" ARE DISRESPECTFUL? YOU MUST THINK PEOPLE HERE ARE IGNORANT? Give it a rest. OK. I WILL IN JUST A MOMENT. You cannot stand it when people have an opinion that differs from yours. REALLY? PLEASE TELL US WHAT ELSE I THINK AND WHILE YOU'RE AT IT, PLEASE TELL US WHAT EVERYONE ELSE THINKS. As my name says, go stand in Speakers Corner and you can espouse anything you want.ALTHOUGH I WILL DECLINE TO OBEY THE ORDERS OF AN IDIOT, I AM GRATEFUL TO YOU FOR OFFERING THE OPPORTUNITY TO "ESPOUSE ANYTHING (I) WANT". THAT'S VERY GENEROUS OF YOU TO OFFER WHAT IS MY RIGHT AS A CITIZEN. YOU MUST HAVE YOURSELF CONFUSED WITH SOMEONE WHO HAS ANY AUTHORITY OVER ME. Even better go to a political blog and type away. ARE YOU SCOTT R? IF NOT, YOU HAVE NO RIGHT TO TELL ANYONE HERE TO GO AND DO ANYTHING. A NEWS ITEM FOR YOU, IF YOU ARE NOT SCOTT R, THIS IS NOT YOUR WEBSITE.

By the way how is your PF - NONE OF YOUR BUSINESS and if you don't have it why are you still here? ALSO, NONE OF YOUR BUSINESS. IT MAY COME AS A SHOCK TO YOU, BUT NEITHER I NOR ANYONE ELSE HERE HAS TO ANSWER TO YOU FOR OR ABOUT ANYTHING. DON'T YOU HAVE SOMETHING RELEVANT OR INTERESTING OR USEFUL TO OFFER HERE? YOUR NAME WHICH HAS SUDDENLY APPEARED FOR THE SOLE PURPOSE OF HARASSMENT HAS NOT BEEN ASSOCIATED WITH ANYTHING OF THOSE TYPES SO EITHER USE THE NAME YOU USUALLY USE HERE OR FIND ANOTHER HOBBY. PLEASE NOTE - JUST FOR YOU, I'M USING $1.00 WORDS. NOW GO AWAY, KID, YOU BOTHER ME.

Result number: 116

Message Number 203937

Re: BTW, I mentioned this in another post, but some may have missed it (about Strassburg Sock)...sm View Thread
Posted by Dr. Z on 7/13/06 at 10:47

Why not use the plantar fascia stretch first thing in the AM first ?. It is very effective for first step AM pain.

Result number: 117

Message Number 203922

Re: BTW, I mentioned this in another post, but some may have missed it (about Strassburg Sock)...sm View Thread
Posted by SA on 7/13/06 at 10:08

In support of Dr. Wander, I'm one of those people who found "The Sock" much more helpful than any of the 3 prescription night splints I wore consistently over the past year. I think the reason is that in my case the pain was located in the center of the arch and forward (toward the big toe (flexor hallicus)) rather than in the heel. So, while other splints may be better for people with heel pain, they did not do a thing for me. The Sock provided a gentle but noticeable stretch to the right area of my foot. Since "PF" can include such a mixed bag of issues, an individually oriented approach seems like the most reasonable one, and I hope most doctors realize this. (FYI I'm now Sock and Splint-free for the first time in 13 months-I only had to wear the Sock for about 8 weeks).

Result number: 118

Message Number 203914

Re: BTW, I mentioned this in another post, but some may have missed it (about Strassburg Sock)...sm View Thread
Posted by speakerscorner on 7/13/06 at 08:44

Dottie why do you need Dr. Wander's help? You are disrespectful to others on this board with the use of your "ten dollar" words and you need Dr. Wander to fight your battles? Give it a rest. You cannot stand it when people have an opinion that differs from yours. As my name says, go stand in Speakers Corner and you can espouse anything you want. Even better go to a political blog and type away.

By the way how is your PF and if you don't have it why are you still here?

Result number: 119

Message Number 203903

Re: BTW, I mentioned this in another post, but some may have missed it (about Strassburg Sock)...sm View Thread
Posted by Dr. David S. Wander on 7/13/06 at 07:43

Gary, don't feel bad for me,just think BEFORE you write. Not ALL doctors think with their WALLETS. Some actually put the patient's best interest first. I happen to be one of those doctors. So if I feel a Strassburg Sock is the best night splint for one of those patients, I will prescribe it, even though I won't get reimbursed a very high fee for another type of night splint just because I can bill for it using the "L" code to their insurance plan.

There's a little more to being a good doctor than seeing how much you can bill an insurance company. Sometimes it's actually nice to think about the patient.

And while we're on the subject, you've insulted me twice so maybe you should think about who needs help. Maybe you should talk to your shrink about your frustration about not being a doctor.

Now I'd recommend you drop the subject.

Result number: 120

Message Number 203887

Re: BTW, I mentioned this in another post, but some may have missed it (about Strassburg Sock)...sm View Thread
Posted by Dorothy on 7/13/06 at 01:24

Dr. Wander -

I would like to request that you come to my aid and defense against the various fools and jackasses who enjoy attacking me here. I could use the assistance of an able battler against fools! At very least, could you just tell the jerks to put a Strassburg sock in it when it comes to making stupid remarks to and about Dorothy? Thanks for any help you can provide.

Result number: 121

Message Number 203877

Re: BTW, I mentioned this in another post, but some may have missed it (about Strassburg Sock)...sm View Thread
Posted by Gary H. on 7/12/06 at 22:50

I do not determine the codes. These are determined by medicare and most private/commercial carriers follow medicare guidelines. There are a number of soft (not hard) night splints on the market that are equally as comfortable as the strassburg sock. These SOFT night splints I am referring to; do fall under the code which is determined by medicare.

Result number: 122

Message Number 203876

Re: BTW, I mentioned this in another post, but some may have missed it (about Strassburg Sock)...sm View Thread
Posted by Ralph on 7/12/06 at 22:23

Maybe he RX's them because they are more comfortable and patients are more willing to wear them. They also don't hurt when you roll over in bed and accidently kick yourself in the ankle which is a real plus and they don't take nearly as long to get used to wearing them.

I'm not a patient of Dr. Wander I actually purchased mine through a catalog and compared to the expensive pair of hard night splints that my doctor gave me paid for by my insurance company the Strassburg sock worked well for me.

In the last catlog I received I notice that they are making an even shorter version which I think would be an improvment of the pair that I have.

As a P.F. sufferer who had to wear night splints I don't care if my hard ones had a code or not. I was looking for comfort.

The magic word in your post is complient. If a patient isn't going to be complient with anything the doctor RX's your fancy codes are not worth the paper they are written on nor is the appliance he gives to the patient.

Result number: 123

Message Number 203871

Re: BTW, I mentioned this in another post, but some may have missed it (about Strassburg Sock)...sm View Thread
Posted by Gary H. on 7/12/06 at 21:43

I have been called a "fool" by you, and now a "jack ass".
How unprofessional of you. You should be ashamed of yourself. You are acting like a hot head and you think the world is out to take shots at you. There is help available. I feel very bad for you.

Result number: 124

Message Number 203870

Re: BTW, I mentioned this in another post, but some may have missed it (about Strassburg Sock)...sm View Thread
Posted by Dr. David S. Wander on 7/12/06 at 21:30

Gary, once again you attempt to insult me but end up making a jack ass out of yourself. I will remind you of that in person the next time I see you, however I would recommend that if you see me first you RUN in the opposite direction. I'm tired of your "cheap" shots because you're not bright enough to be a doctor and you're a two bit salesman.

FIRST of all, you are making an assumption that I prescribe the Strassburg sock, simply because I answered a question regarding the product. And when you assume.....well you know the rest.

Secondly, I prescribe what I think is BEST for the patient, NOT what is best for my bank account. Just because a Strassburg Sock is not reimbursed by using the L4396, does not mean I will not use it for a patient if I think my patient will benefit from it's use. There are some patients that enter my office that tell me that they have already used a "traditional" night splint and could not tolerate the bulk of the splint, or a host of other reasons. So, there are many reasons that a patient may benefit from the use of a Strassburg Sock, and there are many reasons why I would NOT prescribe a Strassburg Sock for patients and would ONLY prescribe a "traditional" night splint.

The problem with your "astute" businessmen podiatrists, is that they care about their bank account more than the welfare of their patients, and they make the patient fit the treatment, instead of making the treatment fit the patient. Therefore, EVERY patient ends up with the exact some nightsplint, the exact same walking cast, etc., despite the fact that every patient has unique needs and has unique characteristics.

Gary, I'm highly recommending that you think twice before you take shots at me. I don't appreciate it and I definitely won't tolerate it and this will be my last warning. If you think I'm joking or kidding, ask Dr. Zuckerman what happens when I get pissed off. I will guarantee you that you don't want to be my opposition.

Result number: 125

Message Number 203867

Re: BTW, I mentioned this in another post, but some may have missed it (about Strassburg Sock)...sm View Thread
Posted by Gary H. on 7/12/06 at 20:28

A message for Dr. Wander,

I have found that there are NO podiatrists who are also astute businessman that prescribe the Strassburg sock.
The explanation is very plain and simple. There is no L-code for a sock. Period ! Why not prescribe a REAL night splint that has a code and qualifies under the L-4396 code.
Also, I might mention that most of the night splints on the market do work if the patient wears it and is complient.

Result number: 126

Message Number 203862

Re: Got a Foot Rubz ball after reading about it in the archives...see msg. View Thread
Posted by Auntie on 7/12/06 at 19:20

I know what you mean about the relapses for no apparent reason...been there, done that, would buy a t-shirt if they made one. :) I sure sympathize with you.

Anyway, I've been icing a lot today, and it has really helped the very sore spot. I've stayed off my feet as much as possible, also, and have been using my Strassburg Sock while I'm sitting on the couch.

Do be sure and let me know about the deep massage!

Result number: 127

Message Number 203859

Re: BTW, I mentioned this in another post, but some may have missed it (about Strassburg Sock)...sm View Thread
Posted by Auntie on 7/12/06 at 19:12

I really appreciate the time you spend on this board helping us out!

I had read that during a search of the archive, and I went back today and found it again to make sure I was doing it correctly, because it doesn't seem to help me. I'm going to keep experimenting, though, because the thing does seem to help me.

Thanks again! :)

Result number: 128

Message Number 203824

Re: BTW, I mentioned this in another post, but some may have missed it (about Strassburg Sock)...sm View Thread
Posted by Dr. David S. Wander on 7/12/06 at 14:27

One tip regarding the Strassburg Sock. I have found that many patients benefit from a small modification when applying the sock. Instead of following the directions that come with the sock, I recommend that patients place their foot in a dorsiflexed position BEFORE they tighten the strap. This way they get a better stretch, without too much pulling on the toes.

If you tighten the strap FIRST, then it pulls the toes back too much, and it doesn't bend the foot/ankle back as much as you would like.

Result number: 129

Message Number 203807

BTW, I mentioned this in another post, but some may have missed it (about Strassburg Sock)...sm View Thread
Posted by Auntie on 7/12/06 at 12:46

I found mine online at Runner's Roost in Colorado (www.runnersroost.com). You have to call to order (303-759-8455). It was only $30, free shipping, no sales tax (of course, I'll have to pay it when I do my state taxes next year). It was $35, I think, from the Sock website (plus shipping), and some places it found it to be almost $50!

Result number: 130

Message Number 203382

Re: anyone in the minority with atypical symptoms ever find anything that helps? View Thread
Posted by Auntie on 7/08/06 at 14:18

I know what you mean...I kinda feel like this is never going to go away also. Any relief I get so far from anything is temporary...spending time on my feet just brings it all back. I can't spend a month off my feet...I have a big house, yard with flowers, and a husband and two kids which I homeschool! I have to grocery shop, buy clothes for the kids, clean house, etc. You know how that goes. I did actually use a wheelchair for a couple of trips to the mall, but it was very inconvenient, both for me and for my family.

I just got my Strassburg Sock two days ago. It sorta kinda seems to help, although I cannot pull it back very far without my toes going to sleep or hurting. I read in a search of the archives that one of the docs gave a technique to stop that, but it didn't help, or maybe I didn't understand what he was saying. (BTW, for those who are interested, I found mine at runnersroost.com for only $30, free shipping! Lowest price I could find on the internet.)

I'm beginning to believe that my problem is that my foot pain (which is ALL OVER my feet!) is a result of the fact that I supposedly have Ankylosing Spondylitis (I say supposedly because I haven't had a formal diagnosis from a rheumatologist), and that disease is bad to make feet hurt. I'm starting to slowly resign myself to the fact that it is just something I will have to live with, unless God works a miracle on my behalf.

I am presently taking Aleve twice a day. The ortho doc said take two at a time, and I did that for a few days, but I just can't bring myself to take that much for a prolonged period of time. One at a time seems to help just as much anyway. It helps my back more than my feet (also caused by AS), but it does help my feet slightly, and it's cheaper than Vioxx, which I took for a couple of years for my back (it helped), but that was before my feet were constantly hurting.

I haven't tried as many things as you have, though. I feel for you. I read somewhere that PF will go away eventually whether you treat it or not. I'm not so sure I believe that, do you?

Result number: 131

Message Number 202608

Re: plantar fasciitis operation View Thread
Posted by David on 7/01/06 at 03:17

Best options in order I believe are;

custom orthotics or OTC type whichever works for you
Crutches or a cam walker for 6 weeks+ if inflammation is not relieved by orthotics(must wear a strassburg sock if using crutches)
night splints(this takes care of stretching)and proper healing alignment
medications and ice
addtional stretching, roll foot over can & pulling toes back
Taping make work for you, didnt for me

Result number: 132

Message Number 202457

Re: Jeff...did you try the 'Footballer'? View Thread
Posted by Jeff on 6/29/06 at 11:28

Just ordereed it this week as i was hesitant about the money.Bought the Strassburg socks and i think they help quite a bit. The sock is a night splint without the cumbersome hassle of others on market. i think not only does it help with morning pain but teh all night or half night ( whatever I can tolerate) really heals it in teh full stretch position and makes my calves more pliable. Will report back on Footballer and massage ball once I get them and begin my program....hope you are recovering as i am making slow but small steps forward. It's a LONG ROAD.

Result number: 133

Message Number 200928

Re: thermoskin FXT plantar stretch View Thread
Posted by Kevin on 6/10/06 at 19:17

I believe you are all right the Strassburg sock is the best due to mainly it only pulls on the toe, and does not align the foot back as well.
Im ordering a sock now, thanks!

Result number: 134

Message Number 200919

A way to keep the toes from curling up View Thread
Posted by Esther H on 6/10/06 at 18:46

I am extremely flexible (Hyper-flexible, my Dr Says) and so the toes curling up was a major problem for me. (They would go numb) I started putting a stiff orthotic, or even cardboard in the bottom of my Strassburg sock - works like a charm! =)

Result number: 135

Message Number 200908

Re: thermoskin FXT plantar stretch View Thread
Posted by Dr. David S. Wander on 6/10/06 at 17:01

Kevin,
My personal preference is for the Strassburg sock. It can also have the tendency to pull the toes up too much if not worn properly. However, one advantage of the Strassburg sock over "traditional" nightsplints is that in addition to stretching the Achilles tendon, it also dorsiflexes the toes allowing for a greater overall stretch and it also helps stretch the smaller intrinsic muscles of the foot. I believe that it works better than the FXT and I have seen and tried both products. The other product that you looked at that supports the plantar fascia has been around in many different styles for many years with many different names and I have not found these products to be of benefit to my patients. There is a product that reproduces the effects of taping the plantar fascia and supports the plantar fascia and I have used in my practice. Patients often have had significant success with this product and it is very inexpensive. It is called the Pronation Spring Control and is made by a company called Fabrifoam. It basically mimics a taping of the foot and is wrapped around the foot to support the plantar fascia. It is re-usable and does provide excellent support of the plantar fascia.

Result number: 136

Message Number 200786

Re: Thanks Gary - cam walkers View Thread
Posted by Dr. David S. Wander on 6/09/06 at 10:25

I think it's imnportant to note the the term "Cam Walker" is actually a brand, although it is often used interchangeably for other types of removable walking casts. It's like using the term "Band-Aid" no matter what type of adhesive bandages you use. There are many brands including Aircast walkers, Bledsoe boots, DonJoy walkers, Equalizers, Darco Walkers, and dozens of others. Some come in low tops and some in high tops (some are several inches above the ankle and some to the knee). However, many doctors refer to these collectively as "CamWalkers".

Although I may have patients ambulate in these all day, I usually have patients change into a night splint at bedtime, since they don't want to wear a dirty cast into bed, nor do they want to wear the bulky cast to bed. They can use a traditional night splint or a Strassburg Sock.

Result number: 137

Message Number 200225

Re: Wondering I Need Help BAD!!! View Thread
Posted by Linda C on 6/02/06 at 00:40

Michael,
You say you tried it all... have you seen a Dr.? Have you tried orhtotics? If you have tried most everything, have you thought of alternative treatments such as ART (a lot of posts say this is a big help, although I have not tried it) or what about acupuncture? I have PF, pain in my heel. I was slowly getting better with stretches and a night splint (the Strassburg sock) and now that I have had just 3 acupuncture treatments, along with massaging my foot daily, and getting the Powerstep insert, my foot is doing so much better. I have learned from reading the posts here that what works for one does not work for another, you have to keep trying until you find what works for you. Good Luck!

Result number: 138

Message Number 200218

Re: Strassburg Sock View Thread
Posted by Linda C on 6/01/06 at 21:27

Dr. Wander,
Thanks for your input, I appreciate it. The only stretching exercises I do regularly is to put my foot on opposite knee and gently pull the toes and ball of foot toward shin until I feel a slight stretch in the heel. I still need to do this before I get out of bed in AM (even tho using the "sock") to avoid any morning heel pain. I also do stretches with a belt on my foot to stretch the calf before getting out of bed in AM. I was icing my foot, not with bottle as you described tho, until I had my 3rd acupuncture treatment. Along with acupuncture and now the Powersteps, I no longer need to ice and hardly have any discomfort at all by end of day. I am so excited. I feel like I have a new lease on life.

Result number: 139

Message Number 200109

Re: Strassburg Sock View Thread
Posted by Dr. David S. Wander on 5/31/06 at 15:06

Linda,
I'm glad that my recommendations have helped. Be careful when you are doing any stretching exercises, since most people do the wrong exercises, and most weightbearing or standing stretching exercises make plantar fascia pain worse, not better. If you are using the Strassburg Sock diligently, you may not need the stretching exercises. I think you will find the PowerSteps very helpful. Remember to avoid barefoot, slippers and non supportive shoes/sandals.

A great help that many of my patients swear by is to freeze a water bottle and then roll it under your foot for 20 minutes at a time. This ice massage feels great and reduces any local inflammation/discomfort. Good luck.

Result number: 140
Searching file 19

Message Number 199977

Strassburg Sock View Thread
Posted by Linda C on 5/29/06 at 12:11

Dr. Wander,
I want to thank you for your recommendation!
Back in Feb. I discovered this site and asked about night splints. You recommended the Strassburg Sock. I had not heard of it, found it on the internet& purchased it. It did take some getting used to, I would usually take it off after 2 or 3 hrs. at first. I finally got used to it and I have been wearing it every night now since the middle of March and it has helped my PF a lot. I used to feel many lumps and bumps as I would massage the bottom of my foot and after wearing the sock for 6 weeks, it was 80% improved.. hardly any lumps and bumps. I also have been doing stretches and they have helped immensly. Just before I found this site, I had purchased the HTP heel seats and you said you had not heard of them, but recommended the Powersteps. Since I had just purchased the HTP I thought I should give them a try. It has been about 5 months that I have been wearing them and I am not sure they have helped. Just yesterday I purchased the Powersteps and I am excited about wearing them. They feel great. I was seeing my chiropractor for about 2 1/2 months for the PF but did not think anything he was doing helped. I decided to try acupuncture and have had 3 treatmenst so far and do see an improvement each time. My heel pain is so much less than it was back in Jan. And I know the Strassburg Sock has played a large part in that improvement, so Thanks again!

Linda C.

Result number: 141

Message Number 196901

Tight calves - cause PF? View Thread
Posted by Carrie on 4/04/06 at 13:18

I have been running in custom orthotics for 12years, as as result of a pf diagnosis. However, my calves are always tight. Now and then I tear something in my calf as well.

I went on too long of a run a month ago. Now my arches hurt, as well as a bit of one of my heels. I have quit running. At night I ice my feet/calves, take 800 mg ibuprofen, massage my calves with 'the stick', do calf stretches. All of this seems to alleviate my daily pain somewhat, but at night I have to do all of those treatments all over again because of the pain/inflammation. The only shoes I can wear are my running shoes with my orthotics. And those hurt! But the softer the shoe, the worse my feet and calves feel.

I'd like to run again, but every time I test my legs out, going for a half a mile or so with lots of walking, the inflammation skyrockets and the arch/heel pain start again.

Could my orthotics be too old? I haven't had them checked in 12 years. Or should I get a Strassburg sock with the idea that I need to stretch my calves at night? Thank you for any help!!

Result number: 142

Message Number 195682

Re: New to PF... Need Help w/ Indoor Shoes! View Thread
Posted by Dr. David S. Wander on 3/17/06 at 17:30

I'm not familiar with WalMart's "earthshoes" but I hope that they are not like the original "Earth Shoes" of approximately 20-30 years ago. Those shoes had a "negative heel" which meant that the heel was lower than the rest of the shoe and is the ABSOLUTE worst thing you can wear for plantar fasciitis. So buyer beware. If the Walmart "earthshoe" is designed with a heel that is lower than the rest of the shoe, make sure you run in the other direction!. I am NOT a big fan of the Lands End version of the Merrell Jungle Moc. There are a lot of knock offs of the famous Merrell Jungle Moc, but what most people don't understand is that Merrell has a proprietary trademark on the "guts" of the shoe and not on the uppers or "look" of the shoe. The bottoms of the shoe have air chambers which do provide shock absorption and are in my opinion a much better shoe than the LL Bean or Lands End look alikes. I often have patients with plantar fasciitis purchase a pair of Merrells and have them replace the insole with a pair of PowerSteps and also have them purchase a Strassburg Sock as a night splint and it's amazing how this "trio" of products has cured many of my patients for about $150.

Result number: 143

Message Number 195094

For Kate View Thread
Posted by Bob G. on 3/08/06 at 00:50

Like Judy S. I too have recovered. It can be done.

But not over night. That is what you and your sweet boyfriend have to understand. Actually, you do, he doesn't.

If it hurts, don't do it. Then, after making love to your night splints, strassburg socks, etc. for many months, start slowly, then begin gentle stretching, etc.

But you sound too young and anxious to succeed the first time...

Good luck! BG

Result number: 144

Message Number 193319

Re: HTP Orthotics View Thread
Posted by Linda C on 2/12/06 at 00:58

Dr. Wander,
Thank you for your response. Seems a few people on this site have and are using the HTP heel seats, since I read some postings in the archives. You can google them and find their web site and check them out. They say Doctors developed them and more Dr. recommend them. Since I have only had them for 2 weeks, I am going to stick with it a while and see if they help. I think it takes time. The stretching has helped a lot, so I am not sure I need to get a night splint but will look on the internet for the Strassburg Sock since I am not familiar with it.

Thanks again,
Linda

Result number: 145

Message Number 193107

Re: HTP Orthotics View Thread
Posted by Dr. David S. Wander on 2/08/06 at 16:41

I'm not aware of the HTP product, but I've used PowerSteps in my office for years with very high patient satisfaction. I believe they are a great product at a very reasonable price and I highly recommend PowerSteps. Additionally, I also recommend the Strassburg Sock for use as a night splint.

Result number: 146
Searching file 18

Message Number 188299

PF treatments - What next? View Thread
Posted by Cyber on 11/27/05 at 20:07

I am 26 yrs old and I have had a debilitating case of plantar fasciitis (PF) for the past two years. I guess it is atypical PF because my pain is centralized in the arch area and not in my heel. I do not have morning pain, but I experience pain and inflammation (warm burning feeling) with standing and walking 90% of the time. For others with this condition I thought it would be helpful if I posted my experience with the various treatment options.

Rest & ice:

Since my PF became severe over year ago I have avoided any running, walking long distances, or standing and walking for longer than an hour. I swim and cycle to stay in shape. This sucks, but itís worth not having more pain with use. The several times that I have not kept to this protocol I have paid the price. Unfortunately, simply staying off my feet hasnít been enough. After periods of rest for days or weeks, my feet eventually feel better, but with any increased activity walking or standing, the pain and inflammation in the arches returns full force. I ice my feet once a day by rolling them over a frozen water bottle. This is a great way to temporarily reduce the inflammation and pain, but does not prevent it from re-occurring the next day.

Podiatrist:

I have visited three family doctors and two podiatrists for my PF. My first podiatrist cast me for orthotics (more below) and did not suggest any other treatment. My second podiatrist was recommended by the second family doctor I went to see. I have seen him off and on for the past 9 months. His treatment plan was orthotics, and more orthotics, anti-inflammatories and later physical therapy. My pod was successful in breaking me into a pair of orthotics, but sadly, he completely failed to inform me of the various other means of treating my PF. He said he has tried everything and is skeptical about surgery and wonít do ESWT because it has no proven results for arch pain. I feel like the pods I have seen have given me the ďtypicalĒ treatment for someone with PF. I donít have a textbook case, and have run out of treatment options. At my last visit my pod said my PF could be degenerative. It is frustrating that he would speculate on this if he never has even run any tests, just ran me through the protocol for PF sufferers? Very frustrating!

Orthotics:

I have been fitted for 4 different pairs of orthotics. The first few pairs were poorly made and caused severe foot, back and neck pain. I gradually broke into a pair this year. I started out breaking into an pair of Superfeet by gradually doing 15 mins more each day and then eventually breaking into a very non-aggressive rigid orthotic the same way. My pod eventually made an adjustment to my orthotic by adding foam to make the arches more aggressive. This caused excruciating pain for several days. Do not let your pod do this! I was re-casted for a more aggressive arch rigid orthotic and continued to experience pain. I sent it back to add a cushioned pad and that has helped some with comfort. The orthotic has helped some, but considering how long I have been wearing them I have only seen minimal improvement. I am beginning to wander if the orthotic (with its aggressive arch) is exacerbating the problem of my arch pain. I would suggest trying orthotics, but give your body time to adjust! I felt mislead by the pods that this was the ďcureĒ, if we could just get the orthotic right. It could take months to get the orthotic adjusted right for you and may not even help at all. Do not always listen to the pod; pursue other means of treatment as well.

Physical Therapy:

I have been to 2 physical therapists in the past 6 months. The first PT was straight out of college and immediately pushed me into a stretching and strengthening regime that severely agitated my PF. Ask every PT you see how many PF patients they have had! My first PT did not know what she was doing and started me out with aggressive stretches and exercises (e.g. catching a ball one-legged on a trampoline) that made my PF much, much worse. She also did not understand the ultrasound machine and burnt both of my feet in the course of several visits. My next PT was better, the PT treatment consists of ultrasound, stretching and strengthening exercise which are helpful but have only made my PF more manageable. I would suggest finding an experienced PT who knows what the are doing to show you these and figure out what works for you and then you can continue them at home and save thousands of $$$. In my experience, the PT hasnít been a long-term solution.

Stretching:

Every time that I stretched my soleus, gastroc, Achilles tendon, or calf in the Pro-stretch or up against the wall my PF would flare up pretty bad afterwards. For this reason, I have not done much stretching until I found out (via this website) that one should tape and warm up before stretching (no thanks to any of my docs). I believe stretching can be beneficial, but is also dangerous because it can re-tear the plantar ligament; a very cautious and careful approach is the way to do it.

Night Splints:

I have been wearing various night splints off and on for the last year. I first tried the Strassburg Sock because it was cheap and more like a sock. I do not recommend this because it is very uncomfortable since it will pull all of your toes back all night long. I also have used an adjustable boot from the LEEDer Group. This was better than the sock, but the most comfortable boot I have found is made by pro-tec athletics that I picked up at a running store. It takes a while to adjust to sleeping with the boot, but give it time and you will get used to it. Unfortunately, after wearing the boot alternating on each foot for the better part of the year I have seen little improvement. I think this may be more beneficial to PF that is in the heel.

Acupuncture:

I went to see an acupuncturist for six visits. My acupuncturist had fifteen years of experience and was a teacher on the side. I noticed relief from the inflammation after the visits for a day or two, but it did not significantly improve my ongoing arch PF. It is worth a try though since I have heard others have had success. Also, each acupuncturist is different so you may get different results with different ones.

Massage:

Massage feels good afterwards every time I have been. It can be painful during though. For that reason alone it is worth doing. I have tried myofascial release from a therapist with 10+ yrs experience and have seen minor improvement. It has helped mainly with loosening up the fascia in the calf and foot. This is helpful and it is worth trying, but I think ultimately it needs to be combined with other treatment for those of us with severe atypical PF. PF in its early stages could probably be cleared up easily with stretching and massage.

Shoes:

Shoes are very important! I have been wearing New Balance 991. They are a decent shoe, but donít have the motion control and stability that my new New Balance 925ís have. I would recommend asking a podiatrist to analyze your gait and foot pronation to determine what kind of foot you should be wearing. I think everyone should do this, regardless of PF. I have also tried wearing Z-coil shoes for two months. At first these shoes helped me tremendously because they practically eliminate the impact of weight bearing. These shoes were a whopping $200 and allowed me to be on my feet longer than I normally would have. Unfortunately, for me they were only a band-aid and only pushed back the amount of time before I would experience intense pain and inflammation. They certainly provide more short-term relief than NSAIDs, but may not provide the long-term solution for chronic PF. They are easy to wear and didnít bother my knees like others have reported. I did not run in them however.

Anti-inflammatory:

Every anti-inflammatory I have been prescribed by my podiatrist has aggravated my stomach and given me a lot of uncomfortable side effects. I donít recommend them and am frustrated with my pods persistence for me to find one that works. Over the counter ibuprofen in daily doses eventually gives me horrible mouth ulcers so that isnít an option either. Lotís of food, like cherries, have natural anti-inflammatory qualities. Thatís a better choice I think.

Heel Pads:

These did not help me because my PF is centered in the arch. If you have heel pain, they may be beneficial to you.

Taping:

I have tried several different taping methods with limited success. For me it feels about the same as wearing a rigid orthotic and I donít have to deal with the blistering and hassle of taping every day.

Walking cast:

I tried a walking cast for three weeks on my left foot. The complication is that I also have PF in my right foot so this added extra stress to it. Furthermore, it was difficult to get the height level with the good foot and this caused temporary knee, calf, back and neck pain. The pain and inflammation recurred with use after the cast was off and I was not convinced that more time in the cast would have been beneficial. Given that PF reacts to standing, I think you really need to be in a wheel chair or use crutches to completely give the foot a rest and time to heel. I am not convinced that the problem wouldnít simply re-occur after 3-4 weeks without weight-bearing.

Last thoughts:

My next steps are to consider ART and Gastron, based on the suggestion from M. Beck on this message board. I will report back on those. My experiences with the above treatments and remedies have given me little relief from the hell of my PF, but that doesnít mean that they wonít help you. Ultimately, I feel like the conventional medical establishment has little left to offer me beyond surgery. I am 26 years old who feels like an 80 yr. old. I am not going to give up though and will continue to fight the PF until I find something, or a combination of things that allows me to walk again pain-free and enjoy life. If you have any suggestions please post. Thanks.

Result number: 147

Message Number 188298

My experience with PF & treatments - Your advice would help! View Thread
Posted by Cyber on 11/27/05 at 20:05

I am 26 yrs old and I have had a debilitating case of plantar fasciitis (PF) for the past two years. I guess it is atypical PF because my pain is centralized in the arch area and not in my heel. I do not have morning pain, but I experience pain and inflammation (warm burning feeling) with standing and walking 90% of the time. For others with this condition I thought it would be helpful if I posted my experience with the various treatment options.

Rest & ice:

Since my PF became severe over year ago I have avoided any running, walking long distances, or standing and walking for longer than an hour. I swim and cycle to stay in shape. This sucks, but itís worth not having more pain with use. The several times that I have not kept to this protocol I have paid the price. Unfortunately, simply staying off my feet hasnít been enough. After periods of rest for days or weeks, my feet eventually feel better, but with any increased activity walking or standing, the pain and inflammation in the arches returns full force. I ice my feet once a day by rolling them over a frozen water bottle. This is a great way to temporarily reduce the inflammation and pain, but does not prevent it from re-occurring the next day.

Podiatrist:

I have visited three family doctors and two podiatrists for my PF. My first podiatrist cast me for orthotics (more below) and did not suggest any other treatment. My second podiatrist was recommended by the second family doctor I went to see. I have seen him off and on for the past 9 months. His treatment plan was orthotics, and more orthotics, anti-inflammatories and later physical therapy. My pod was successful in breaking me into a pair of orthotics, but sadly, he completely failed to inform me of the various other means of treating my PF. He said he has tried everything and is skeptical about surgery and wonít do ESWT because it has no proven results for arch pain. I feel like the pods I have seen have given me the ďtypicalĒ treatment for someone with PF. I donít have a textbook case, and have run out of treatment options. At my last visit my pod said my PF could be degenerative. It is frustrating that he would speculate on this if he never has even run any tests, just ran me through the protocol for PF sufferers? Very frustrating!

Orthotics:

I have been fitted for 4 different pairs of orthotics. The first few pairs were poorly made and caused severe foot, back and neck pain. I gradually broke into a pair this year. I started out breaking into an pair of Superfeet by gradually doing 15 mins more each day and then eventually breaking into a very non-aggressive rigid orthotic the same way. My pod eventually made an adjustment to my orthotic by adding foam to make the arches more aggressive. This caused excruciating pain for several days. Do not let your pod do this! I was re-casted for a more aggressive arch rigid orthotic and continued to experience pain. I sent it back to add a cushioned pad and that has helped some with comfort. The orthotic has helped some, but considering how long I have been wearing them I have only seen minimal improvement. I am beginning to wander if the orthotic (with its aggressive arch) is exacerbating the problem of my arch pain. I would suggest trying orthotics, but give your body time to adjust! I felt mislead by the pods that this was the ďcureĒ, if we could just get the orthotic right. It could take months to get the orthotic adjusted right for you and may not even help at all. Do not always listen to the pod; pursue other means of treatment as well.

Physical Therapy:

I have been to 2 physical therapists in the past 6 months. The first PT was straight out of college and immediately pushed me into a stretching and strengthening regime that severely agitated my PF. Ask every PT you see how many PF patients they have had! My first PT did not know what she was doing and started me out with aggressive stretches and exercises (e.g. catching a ball one-legged on a trampoline) that made my PF much, much worse. She also did not understand the ultrasound machine and burnt both of my feet in the course of several visits. My next PT was better, the PT treatment consists of ultrasound, stretching and strengthening exercise which are helpful but have only made my PF more manageable. I would suggest finding an experienced PT who knows what the are doing to show you these and figure out what works for you and then you can continue them at home and save thousands of $$$. In my experience, the PT hasnít been a long-term solution.

Stretching:

Every time that I stretched my soleus, gastroc, Achilles tendon, or calf in the Pro-stretch or up against the wall my PF would flare up pretty bad afterwards. For this reason, I have not done much stretching until I found out (via this website) that one should tape and warm up before stretching (no thanks to any of my docs). I believe stretching can be beneficial, but is also dangerous because it can re-tear the plantar ligament; a very cautious and careful approach is the way to do it.

Night Splints:

I have been wearing various night splints off and on for the last year. I first tried the Strassburg Sock because it was cheap and more like a sock. I do not recommend this because it is very uncomfortable since it will pull all of your toes back all night long. I also have used an adjustable boot from the LEEDer Group. This was better than the sock, but the most comfortable boot I have found is made by pro-tec athletics that I picked up at a running store. It takes a while to adjust to sleeping with the boot, but give it time and you will get used to it. Unfortunately, after wearing the boot alternating on each foot for the better part of the year I have seen little improvement. I think this may be more beneficial to PF that is in the heel.

Acupuncture:

I went to see an acupuncturist for six visits. My acupuncturist had fifteen years of experience and was a teacher on the side. I noticed relief from the inflammation after the visits for a day or two, but it did not significantly improve my ongoing arch PF. It is worth a try though since I have heard others have had success. Also, each acupuncturist is different so you may get different results with different ones.

Massage:

Massage feels good afterwards every time I have been. It can be painful during though. For that reason alone it is worth doing. I have tried myofascial release from a therapist with 10+ yrs experience and have seen minor improvement. It has helped mainly with loosening up the fascia in the calf and foot. This is helpful and it is worth trying, but I think ultimately it needs to be combined with other treatment for those of us with severe atypical PF. PF in its early stages could probably be cleared up easily with stretching and massage.

Shoes:

Shoes are very important! I have been wearing New Balance 991. They are a decent shoe, but donít have the motion control and stability that my new New Balance 925ís have. I would recommend asking a podiatrist to analyze your gait and foot pronation to determine what kind of foot you should be wearing. I think everyone should do this, regardless of PF. I have also tried wearing Z-coil shoes for two months. At first these shoes helped me tremendously because they practically eliminate the impact of weight bearing. These shoes were a whopping $200 and allowed me to be on my feet longer than I normally would have. Unfortunately, for me they were only a band-aid and only pushed back the amount of time before I would experience intense pain and inflammation. They certainly provide more short-term relief than NSAIDs, but may not provide the long-term solution for chronic PF. They are easy to wear and didnít bother my knees like others have reported. I did not run in them however.

Anti-inflammatory (NSAID's):

Every anti-inflammatory I have been prescribed by my podiatrist has aggravated my stomach and given me a lot of uncomfortable side effects. I donít recommend them and am frustrated with my pods persistence for me to find one that works. Over the counter ibuprofen in daily doses eventually gives me horrible mouth ulcers so that isnít an option either. Lotís of food, like cherries, have natural anti-inflammatory qualities. Thatís a better choice I think.

Heel Pads:

These did not help me because my PF is centered in the arch. If you have heel pain, they may be beneficial to you.

Taping:

I have tried several different taping methods with limited success. For me it feels about the same as wearing a rigid orthotic and I donít have to deal with the blistering and hassle of taping every day.

Walking cast:

I tried a walking cast for three weeks on my left foot. The complication is that I also have PF in my right foot so this added extra stress to it. Furthermore, it was difficult to get the height level with the good foot and this caused temporary knee, calf, back and neck pain. The pain and inflammation recurred with use after the cast was off and I was not convinced that more time in the cast would have been beneficial. Given that PF reacts to standing, I think you really need to be in a wheel chair or use crutches to completely give the foot a rest and time to heel. I am not convinced that the problem wouldnít simply re-occur after 3-4 weeks without weight-bearing.

Last thoughts:

My next steps are to consider ART and Gastron, based on the suggestion from M. Beck on this message board. I will report back on those. My experiences with the above treatments and remedies have given me little relief from the hell of my PF, but that doesnít mean that they wonít help you. Ultimately, I feel like the conventional medical establishment has little left to offer me beyond surgery. I am 26 years old who feels like an 80 yr. old. I am not going to give up though and will continue to fight the PF until I find something, or a combination of things that allows me to walk again pain-free and enjoy life. If you have any suggestions please post. Thanks.

Result number: 148

Message Number 187905

Re: Night Cast vs Taping View Thread
Posted by Dr. David S. Wander on 11/21/05 at 14:18

I have used the Strassburg Sock for patients in my practice for several years with tremendous success. However, there is one modification that I recommend to my patients to prevent the problems you describe. Prior to pulling the Velcro tab tight, I recommend that patients bend their ankles up and then tighten the Velcro. That allows the ankle to bend which stretches the Achilles more and prevents the toes from bending back as much as you describe.

Result number: 149

Message Number 187896

Re: Night Cast vs Taping View Thread
Posted by Cyber on 11/21/05 at 12:21

I have used the Strassburg Sock and I don't recommend it. The problem is that the velcro piece pulls up from the tip of your toes. This is VERY uncomfortable after 8 hours of sleeping and it is difficult to get your foot at the correct angle, 5 degrees I believe. A good idea, but I believe it is pretty worthless. Go with a boot that is padded and somewhat rigid. That is what I use and it is much more comfortable than the flimsy sock pulling your toes back all night.

Result number: 150

Message Number 187787

Re: Night Cast vs Taping View Thread
Posted by Dr. David S. Wander on 11/19/05 at 10:06

The Strassburg Sock is a night splint that is very effective and is not bulky and relatively inexpensive.

Result number: 151

Message Number 187192

Re: Question for R. Sanfilippo and Dr. Z View Thread
Posted by Sandra.P on 11/12/05 at 06:02

Hi!
I wish I could show my appreciation and all the thanks in person to you two, but it´s too far away. When you respond to me you give me a pusch in my back to hold on to life a little longer. The more time that goes on with my PF, the more often I get really panic and breaking out because NOONE can help me. Once again I´m SO thankful to you. I live in Sweden, but Im ready to travel to one of you if nothing will help over here.

Heres my story about PF:
The doctors seems clear about the diagnos pf. But I have had it for 3,5 years and the first 2 years the doctor who I went to then, said the diagnos was that the fat pads was thin and got ďflatĒ when I was standing/walking. (sorry my english is´nt that goodÖ) But I have the doctor´s journal now, and I get angry when I see he wrote that I was sore/tender in the flexor tendon to the big toes. And he also wrote no plantar fasciit. But I think the tender of the flex. to the big toe maybe was a sign of a beginning of PF. At least he could have told me that there is a diagnos called PF and it could also be what I got (besides the fat pad). We tried several orthotics and antiinflammatory. Nothing helped.
I visited other people, naprapaths, orthopedic technics, chiropractor, doctors etc. I´ve tried the nightsplints, only thing that helped was that it eliminated the pain first in the morning, but the pain was the same anyway when standing or walking the rest of the day. The nightsplint also made me feel pain in my achilles tendon. Tried Strassburg sock, same results as the nightsplint, but I got pain in my toe joints. Tried very deep and hard massage several times, no progress.
I´ve been streching my calfmuscles and the plantar fascia since 3-4 months ago, noone told me about it, I heard it first at this site (very gentle for long time since the calfstrech gave me an inflammation in both achilles tendons) now, since 2 weeks ago I do it to a 6,5 cm high brick with the ball of the foot against the edge. I have increased the height of the brick very slowly. But the combination of the calfstrech 3-4 times a day and the strech of the fascia with my foot flexed 5-10 times a day (this often helps me to reduce the acute ďcuttingĒ pain in the fascia), the foot yoga and water running (with a wetwest) 30 minutes 3 times a week, I now have much pain in my foot ankle and around the lateral tubercle. So today I decided to stop the streches, foot yoga and swimming for a couple of days since the more milder strech of fascia and calf did´nt help.

I strech calf and pf every morning and after prolonged sitting (which is all the timeÖ). NEVER walk without my shock absorber shoes and the orthotics.

About the eswt:
The hospitals here in Sweden do not have shockwave. I have to go private institutes such as to an naprapath. (theres only a total of 3-5 macines in Sweden) I´ve talked to the naprapath and asked for any document or results of it, but he doesnít have anything to send me. But he say they have a success of 90% of pf and a successrate of 70% of severe cases of pf. How do I know that this guy is proficient and perform it correctly? He said this machine donít require exact position when you do it. I asked how do you know where you should shoot? He said that you know because I feel a very strong pain where the fascia is damaged. Is this really a good way of knowing where you should shoot? What do you think?

How much would it cost if I (without insurance) did it in the USA somewhere nearby you?
If I would go to US whats your opinions about treatments? Should I try ART or ESWT? We donít have ART in Sweden.

Today I´m only able to walk a couple of minutes. And I have often pain when I sit and rest.

I hope you have patience enough to read this long message. I would be thankful if you both had the time and could tell me your opinions.

THANK YOU,
Sandra

Result number: 152

Message Number 185445

Re: Night Splint View Thread
Posted by Colleen F on 10/22/05 at 19:39

Personally, I thought the boot or night brace looked too bulky for me. I tried the Strassburg Sock (http://www.thesock.com/). It's much cheaper and seems to help. I am a mom too and it's really been tough. Maybe this will help.

Result number: 153

Message Number 185050

Re: The pain has changed, still PF? View Thread
Posted by Dr. David S. Wander on 10/17/05 at 19:50

I agree that most night splints are cumbersome and uncomfortable. In my office my staff refers to most night splints as great birth control! The night splint that most of my patients seem to tolerate the best and complain about the least is the Strassburg Sock. It is easily adjusted while you are in bed and if you have to get up at night to go to the bathroom you can walk while you're wearing it.

Result number: 154

Message Number 184922

Re: no morning pain - is it pf? View Thread
Posted by SteveG on 10/15/05 at 23:15

Sue - I am not in much pain any more, maybe 1-2. It can be very difficult - believe me, I know. I had a very debilitating case and it took over 2 years before I noticed a lot of improvement. Just follow the advice on this board - stretching, nightsplints, (I used a Strassburg sock every night for months), orthodics or Birks. As I mentioned, I really benefited from ESWT.

Don't get discouraged. I was a regular on the board a few years ago, and the vast majority of people get better - but it can take quite a while.

Result number: 155

Message Number 184506

Re: Plantar Fascilitis View Thread
Posted by Szoo on 10/11/05 at 11:57

Have you ever tried the strassburg sock.. I was thinking that may help at night; I have also found because of the stretching in Pilates it seems to ease the pain the next day...

Have you tried either of those?

Result number: 156

Message Number 184165

Does casting of the feet work? View Thread
Posted by James in ky on 10/05/05 at 17:05

Hello again I don't know if you all remember me I was on here approx 2.5 years ago. I was a mailman for 17 years and I developed Bilateral PF and bilateral TARSAL TUNNEL. I have had ESWT,Cortizone injections.partial pf removal,tarsal tunnel release, phyiscal therapy 3 different times,night splints, strassburg socks,Z COIL shoes,heel the pain insoles, custom orthotics,and so far the best thing for me is rest.I wish I could rest more often but I have to work.I now am on limited duty with restrictions of 1 hour a day on my feet.I was wondering if any of you have tried casting of your feet.My orthopedic has mentioned this as an option. The only problem I have with this is that my symptoms are in both feet so I would be imoblized for 4-6 weeks.I don't mind doing this if it might work.I would appreciate any ideas or comments.

Thanks
james in ky

Result number: 157

Message Number 183758

More feedback for my daughter please View Thread
Posted by Tina H on 9/28/05 at 19:07

Well I'll try to make this short, my 14 year old still has pf, it's been about a year now. On a daily basis I tape her feet, she wears orthotics, does stretches, alternates between feet a strassburg sock and a regular night splint, ices, NSAIDS, etc. Also tried hard casting one foot, pf returned one day after taking off the cast, she also had 2 rounds of PT. We are on our third doctor now. Going to the one Dr. Wishnie recommended. She had an MRI done which showed nothing significant. I asked if it could be plantar fasciosis and not fasciitis, he told me there was no such thing. He suggests cortisone injections next, followed by ESWT if that doesn't work. Comments on this would be welcome and two questions- 1) What about ART for teenagers, would it have a chance of working? 2) A doctor friend recommended I take her to a physiatrist. Never heard of this kind of doctor before. That would make the fourth doctor but frankly no one has helped yet. I truly think I've gotten the best info here and would love some input. Not sure if it's time to throw in the towel and try cortisone, see another doctor, have ESWT etc..
Thank you so much for commenting!!! Tina

Result number: 158

Message Number 180924

Re: night splints View Thread
Posted by cathyr on 8/21/05 at 13:38

Dr. W, I'll look into the Strassburg sock, I need a new splint since the velcro on mine is no longer holding as well. I wake up in the middle of the night with my foot loose in my splint. Thanks!

Result number: 159

Message Number 180813

Re: night splints View Thread
Posted by Dr. David S. Wander on 8/19/05 at 14:30

Unfortunately, the design of the Strassburg sock pulls the toes back, but that is also how it helps stretch some of the smaller muscles of the foot and ankle. A good way to avoid pulling the toes back so much is to apply the sock a little differently. Place the sock on your foot and leg, then bend your ankle up as far as it will go BEFORE you secure the Velcro strap. After your ankle is bent up (dorsiflexed) up as far as it can go, you can then secure the strap. This usually will decrease the amount of pressure on the toes and will decrease the amount of pulling on the toes. If you put the sock on and just pull the strap tight and secure it with the Velcro, the toes tend to pull too much, and that's the problem you and your daughter are experiencing. Try it my way and I'm sure you'll be more comfortable.

Result number: 160

Message Number 180812

Re: night splints View Thread
Posted by Tina H on 8/19/05 at 13:28

Dr. Wander, Both my daughter and I have tried the Strassburg sock but it pulls on our toes. Is this normal? Thanks, Tina

Result number: 161

Message Number 180784

Re: night splints View Thread
Posted by Ralph on 8/19/05 at 09:09

I've never tried the Strassburg Sock, but I've tried walking to the bathroom in night splints and feared I'd fall. I never attempted it again after that.

Result number: 162

Message Number 180779

Re: night splints View Thread
Posted by Dr. David S. Wander on 8/19/05 at 08:42

Most night splints are not designed for walking/weightbearing. I prefer to prescribe the Strassburg Sock for my patients, because it does allow patients to walk and go to the bathroom at night. There is no downside to wearing the nighsplint for 6 months, it will help keep the soft tissues stretched and prevent tightening/contracture.

Result number: 163

Message Number 180751

Re: Relief for heel spurs View Thread
Posted by Dr. David S. Wander on 8/18/05 at 20:47

Lately, apple cider vinegar has been mentioned to heal every ailment from acid reflux to heel pain. Please remember, that heel pain is not caused from calcium deposits. Heel spurs are not calcium deposits and nothing you take internally is going to "dissolve" a heel spur. A heel spur is reactive bone formation from the pulling of the plantar fascia. The term "spur" is a poor term, because most people think it is a sharp pointy protrusion. It is actually a shelf of bone that goes completely across the entire heel bone (calcaneus) and once again it is NOT a calcium deposit. Therefore, even if apple cider vinegar is able to dissolve calcium deposits, it will have no effect on your heel.

In my practice, a significant number of my patients receive relief of their plantar fasciitis pain by purchasing the following 3 items:

1) A pair of Merrell shoes
2) A pair of PowerSteps to be placed in the Merrell's (remove the insole
that came in the Merrell's
3) A Strassburg Sock night splint for passive stretching of the plantar
fascia at night time.

Obviously, this does not work for all patients, or I'd be retired by now. But it's a very economical way to try to treat plantar fasciitis that often helps many patients. Give it a try with you apple cider vinegar and you may get some relief.

Result number: 164
Searching file 17

Message Number 176424

Re: Plantar fasciatis and night splints View Thread
Posted by Tina H on 6/09/05 at 20:57

Christine- We all feel your pain. It is possible to get rid of heel pain even after having it for a few years. Loss of flexibility is the main problem in many people with pf. Have you ever gone to a good physical therapist, one who has success in treating pf? If you find a good one they will thoroughly evalutate your situation and determine the cause. They will show you a few simple stretches to do 3 times/day, they may also manually stretch your calf and hamstring muscles, and do other stretches to strength the ankle and foot. Ultrasound may be used to increase blood flow to the area. They may also use some deep tissue massage. If there is some structural problem they can point that out. Stretching once a day is not enough. If you've never tried a good physical therapist now might be time to find one.
Night splints are helpful because they do the same thing, keep your muscles from tightening during the night. I had luck with the A force night splint. I didn't like the Strassburg sock because it pulled on my toes making them sore in the morning. Good luck! Tina

Result number: 165

Message Number 172007

Re: New product..sort of a night splint View Thread
Posted by Ed Davis. DPM on 3/27/05 at 03:27

Linda:
I may have seen it at a recent convention. Sort of a hybrid between the Strassburg sock and a soft night splint. As time goes by, we are starting to see more of a product "continuuum" as opposed to simply rigid and soft night splints.
Ed

Result number: 166

Message Number 171227

Considering EPF View Thread
Posted by Shannon S on 3/15/05 at 11:09

I have had PF for about two years. I am on my 2nd podiatrist at this point. I have tried cortizone shots (I've had 7 in one foot and 4 in the other), icing, Strassburg sock, orthotics and a TENS unit. I wear only Birkenstocks and New Balance tennis shoes with orthotics.

So I went to my pod yesterday and he suggested that it's time to try surgery. He told me the success rate was around 75%. I asked him about ESWT and he said that the success rate is lower than that of EPF. He didn't come off as a big believer in ESWT. He wants to schedule EPF and he wants to do my feet one week apart.

I've been reading this board and I've come to the conclusion that, at the very least, I shouldn't do my feet so close together. I really am afraid (more like terrified) to have the surgery, and I have a 2nd opinion scheduled for next week.

I am overweight and I know that must be contributing. Can losing the weight cure PF? What else can I do short of surgery to fix this? Can you suggest any specific stretches or exercises? What are my options?

I am a stay-at-home mom to three children 5-and-under. I am able to function throughout the day, but the pain is severe in the morning.

I would appreciate any advice you can offer.

Thanks,
Shannon S

Result number: 167

Message Number 170149

Would wearing a boot help my chronic pf? View Thread
Posted by Jane on 2/28/05 at 13:07

I have had pf for 3 years. Have seen Podiatrist many times. I have tried stretching for months and months.. Julies stretches for many months, cortisone shots, ortho inserts, taping, Strassburg sock and Physical Therapy and nothing seems to help. A friend of mine on advice of her Pod, wore a boot during the day ( not at night) for 6 weeks. Her foot was better. I can use her boot but it is heavy and cumbersome. I wonder if it would be worth it to wear? I am considering going to my Pod next month and seeing if my insurance will cover ESWT. But in the meantime, would wearing a boot help??

Result number: 168
Searching file 16

Message Number 168331

Re: When to seek a second opinion? View Thread
Posted by Dr. David S. Wander on 2/02/05 at 15:12

I am a very strong advocate of PowerSteps. These have been very beneficial to my patients and have made the majority of my patients very comfortable without the need for custom orthoses. My preference has always been for ice, not heat. However, I do believe that ice is often not used correctly. My preferred method for ice involves freezing a water bottle and then rolling the bottle back and forth below the involved foot. This performs an ice massage and prevents the ice from sitting on one area for a prolonged time. I would "ice massage" for a 20 minute time period. Contrasting ice with heat is also an option. However, if you are diabetic, please avoid the use of a heating pad. Additionally, I also recommend night splints and find the Strassburg Sock an excellent product that is easy to use, comfortable and relatively inexpensive. And naturally, a supportive shoe must be worn at all times.

Result number: 169

Message Number 167851

Re: Heel pain 14yr old another question View Thread
Posted by Tina H on 1/24/05 at 18:07

Thank you, that's the dr. said because I remember the word tooth and thought it sounded strange. My daughter is active at certain times of the year. This heel pain started in the fall(both feet) when she was running XC. She also runs track in the spring. It's in the early stages and the pain is only when she walks a lot or runs. I ordered Strassburg socks for her today. The dr. wrote a prescription for orthotics but I am going to try powersteps first considering the mixed feelings on this board about orthotics. Also showed her your stretch. Now that we have a certain diagnosis of pf(no bone spurs yet), I'm hoping to stop this early. I'm also going to research this strange sounding disease. Where did they come up with a name like that?? Thank you, Tina

Result number: 170

Message Number 167701

Re: Do HTP Heel Seats Work? How long? View Thread
Posted by Robin P on 1/21/05 at 21:09

I tried the Strassburg sock and it for several weeks. My problem with it was that my foot only remained in the proper position while I was lying on my back. When I would turn over to sleep on my side (the position I prefer), my toe would eventually slip down in the sock and not remain in the desired position. I stopped using it and began taping my PF foot each morning, as described in Scott's book. I found much greater relief from the PF pain by taping my foot each morning and then removing the tape at night just before going to bed - I have recently been able to walk for an hour or two at time without pain. I do notice that the PF pain recurs if I walk around without the tape on my foot. Have you tried taping?

Result number: 171

Message Number 167694

Do HTP Heel Seats Work? How long? View Thread
Posted by TC on 1/21/05 at 17:57

I just got the HTP Heel Seats. Are they suppose to feel great right away? I think my gel inserts from the grocery store felt just as good? I have PF in my left foot and heard it pop while I was playing tennis. I have been on crutches for the passed week--I could not bear any weight on my left foot. I am desperate, we leave for a ski trip in two weeks. My pod said he would give me a cortisone shot if all else fails.
Anyone have luck with the Strassburg sock or compression socks? I am a very active person who plays tennis and have two small children--5 and 8. I need to get better quickly. Help?????

Result number: 172

Message Number 166047

Re: night splints View Thread
Posted by Marre on 12/23/04 at 16:29

I have the strassburg sock. I think it has helped me, at least it keeps my foot stretched out. You might be able to get away with just stretching your foot with your hand for 30 seconds before you get up. You could probably even make a sock like it--all it is, is a tall sock with a velcro strap on the foot.

The one caveat is if you pull the strap up as far as they tell you to, it's not very comfortable and you end up tearing it off in the middle of the night. I only pull it enough so that it keeps my foot flexed. If you find a way to sleep where your foot isn't hanging down, it would be just as good as the sock.

Those rigid splints just look plain uncomfortable. I'm still using mine, so can't send it to you. Good luck!

Result number: 173

Message Number 162860

Re: Successful PF Treatments and Experience and Some Questions View Thread
Posted by Pauline on 11/03/04 at 10:00

Judy,
If you receive no personal posts about acupuncture you can do a search on this website. Just type in the word after clicking on the "search" box and you should find posts where that word was mentioned.

Perhaps you just need more time with your new orthotics. I think most people find it difficult to sleep with night splits. I know I did, but eventually I was able to sleep the entire night using one on each foot.
Everyone is different. You do what you can.

There is a Strassburg sock that Dr. Wander suggests. Similar idea as using night splints, but maybe more comfortable. You might want to ask others their opinion about that too.

With United an ESWT provider offering lower cost ESWT perhaps there is a chance that you could give that treatment a try. Dr. Ed posted a web site where you can check on locations and doctors to see if there are any in your area.

Result number: 174

Message Number 162674

Re: Night Splints View Thread
Posted by Cathy G. on 11/01/04 at 09:00

My pod. gave me a night splint for my pf, which has helped the pf a little, but caused a sharp shooting pain from the middle of the ball of my foot (where it seems to push against the bottom of the splint) to the tips of my 2nd and 2rd toes. Does anyone have any ideas about what might help? And what about the strassburg sock?

Result number: 175

Message Number 162647

Re: night splints? View Thread
Posted by Dr. David S. Wander on 10/31/04 at 18:00

Lori,

Each doctor has personal preferences for night splints. Basically, there are two types of night splints. Most are a plastic shell with a soft liner that looks like 1/2 of a cast, without the front. It keeps your foot in a specific position to allow stretching of the tissue. My preference is the Strassburg Sock. It is basically an elastic sock with an extension that is brought back up the front of the leg to pull the foot/ankle into a dorsiflexed position. It is relatively inexepensive compared to other night splints and is less bulky and you can walk on it if you get up at night. Check out the website for the Strassburg Sock. My patients have had significant success with this product. I have no personal financial interest in this company.

Result number: 176

Message Number 162323

Re: Successful PF Treatments and Experience and Some Questions View Thread
Posted by SteveG on 10/28/04 at 10:37

Tom - Many people on the board regard the wall and stair stretch as too extreme, and it often seems to make things worse. I rely on the night splint for a gentle and long-lasting stretch. I have had good luck with the Strassburg sock. The New Balance is an excellent shoe and was recommended by both of my pods. I would, however, take it easy and avoid running and hiking until you are pain free. Many of us have had PF for years because we did not change our lifestyle when the problem started.

Result number: 177

Message Number 161370

Re: plantar fasciitis View Thread
Posted by Clara G on 10/12/04 at 19:37

Hi, I have the same problem as you have in my right foot, My doctor gave me three cortozone shots, I used iced every day, did foot exercises, and I went to a massage therapist for treatment of my lower right leg.

After the massage therapist, I got a little better and then I started used a night splint called the Strassburg sock. You wear it when you are watching t.v. at night and it stretches the muscles for a couple of hours.

Maybe you can try a couple of these ideas to get better. Good luck.

Result number: 178

Message Number 160967

Re: Post ESWT and stretching View Thread
Posted by SteveG on 10/04/04 at 15:36

I have used the foot trainer. However, it is designed to strengthen the muscles in the foot, not to provide stretching. I would recommend using a nightsplint for gentle stretching. I have used the Strassburg sock, and I have found that it works quite well

Result number: 179

Message Number 160110

Re: help needed for night splint View Thread
Posted by Dr. David S. Wander on 9/18/04 at 08:11

Having prescribed virtually every type of night splint available, the overwhelming favorite in my office is the Strassburg Sock. It is not bulky, relatively inexpensive (under $40.00) and is very well tolerated. It even allows patients to walk on it if necessary to get up and go to the bathroom, etc. Additionally, it allows for stretching of the gastroc-soleus complex as well as the intrinsic muscles of the foot, since it dorsiflexes the toes. I have absolutely no financial interest in this company, but can tell you of my office experience, having prescribed hundreds of night splints. Do a search on the Strassburg Sock and you'll find more information. No matter which nightsplint you use, you must be patient since the splint is slowly passively stretching the soft tissue structures.

Result number: 180
Searching file 15

Message Number 157270

Re: Bi-lateral PF and night splints View Thread
Posted by Scott Mc on 8/09/04 at 13:33

Where do I get Strassburg socks? How do they compare to splints in terms of efficacy, comfort, and walking to bathroom? Thanks.

Result number: 181

Message Number 157269

Re: No charge to patient for ESWT, if no insurance coverage? View Thread
Posted by Scott Mc on 8/09/04 at 13:30

In addition to my postings here, I have sent United Shockwave Therapies an E-mail documenting my conversation with them. This may serve as some type of protective documentation. I have attorneys here at work and will ask one of them. I sure would hate to cancel; as I have had 2 years of pain and a trip to Britain coming up and will need to walk. I suppose I could try calling someone in United that is not in the billing office. My procedure is Thursday, I am running out of time for making a decision !!

On another thread, either you or the other Doc mentioned using 2 Strassburg socks for bilateral PF, instead of night splints. What's a good source for the socks? In general, how do they compare to splints as far as efficacy, comfort, and walking to bathroom at night?

Result number: 182

Message Number 157145

Re: TTS View Thread
Posted by LARA on 8/07/04 at 11:25

This is something I saved from previous posts - kept adding to it as people mentioned things that worked. Haven't really organized it yet, but if you wait for me to organize it you might have to wait another year to get the information, so I post it as is.

THINGS THAT HAVE WORKED FRO SOME PEOPLE
Medications:
Neurontin, Topamax, Ultracet, Percocet, Vicodin, Mexitil, Benfotiamine, Methylcobalamin, Amitriptyline
Alpha Lioic Acid, Pure Borage Oil, B-Complex,
Ibuprophen, Celebrex,
LIFE STYLE
quit smoking,
meditation
OVER THE COUNTER MEDS
pain patches,
capsaicin cream, BioFreeze, cold packs
orthotics,
compression stockings (my personal favorite -east, cheap and very effective for some people)
massage,
RebuilderMedical
****************************************
TREATMENTS FOR PLANTAR FASCITIS &/OR TARSAL TUNNEL SYNDROME.
(The two are not combined because treatments are interchangeable. They are combined because 1) many treatment do help both conditions 2) some people with diagnosed PF actually have TTS. I donít know if the reverse is true.

TREATMENT #1: never go barefoot
Treatment #2 Ė donít cheat and go barefoot just to run upstairs, or get something from the other room.
Treatments 3. . . . .:


SHOES
Merrill Ė (all Merrill are not created equal Ė check out the particular shoe)
New Balance - (all New Balance are not created equal Ė check out the particular shoe)
Some people have also mentioned Nike.
Dansko clogs
Find a shoe store that is run/owned/managed by the people who make orthotics. They often have 1) the expertise to know which shoes match your symptoms and 2) a good selection of shoes. As bonuses, you donít have to sift through a lot of lousy shoes and the stores are often modest in size and so service is prompt and responsive. (The ones I know about carry Merrill, Dansko & New Balance).


NON INVASIVE
-prayer
-orthotics (traditional, Dr. Kiper),
-compression socks
-taping (see Scotts heelbook, online)
-nightsplints or strassburg sock
-ice (daily and/or after activities. You can get ice packs that fit -nicely to the foot). I've heard reports of this being much more successful than would be anticipated, even 15 min/day at the end of the day
stretching
- (check out thread called ďJulieís stretches in the archives)
-My experience is that direct massage of the inflamed area makes PF MUCH worse. I am currently getting professional massage from arch to toes only, and focussing on trigger points in calf, hammy, and even quads. I have one point on my calf (that thin strappy lateral muscle, talus?) that if you rub across the trigger point it feels like you are rubbing the arch
cast and crutches
. It was not a boot cast, but rather the hard fiberglass kind they use for fractures.
go sockless (PF) Ė several people report relief from PF symptoms Ė no one is sure why


TREATMENTS: Massage (deep friction, ART, deep tissue, w/ biofreeze/ibuprofen cream/Vit 3, Trigger Point on calves/hamstrings, Rolfing, cross-friction), ART, ESWT, surgery
-aggressive stretching
-contrast baths
-Pilates, strengthening, and balance exercises, etc.
-boot cast, cam walker, etc. to immobilize foot
-massage sandals
-Vitamin B/B12 (some people take mega doses - be careful as to which vitamins can cause toxic reactions)

-ESWT (for PF, not TTS?)
-ART (type of massage)
-Trigger Point Massage Therapy

HOME REMEDIES
Ice
hamstring stretches
"aggressive stretching"
taping (see instructions on web site)
rest
Epson salt soak
yoga

-Capsazin cream
-Ibuprofen cream
Oral dose packs of cortisone have helped some. Also there are much more powerful topical creams that can be compounded by a pharmacist at the request of a doctor that can be much more effective than otc ibuprophen cream. They may contain ingredients like ketamine, ketaprophen, gahapentin, etc. A lot of these medications are much better at not only killing pain, but preventing the nerves from over firing. Even simple ibuprofen cream could be compounded by your local pharmacist.
oitin (In the past I experimented with different brands. SOLGAR is the one that works on me. When I first started taking G/C I started with SCHIFF brand from a neighbor who had it (she bought it from Costco). I tried getting a cheaper brand at my health food store, other than Solgar, but it didn't work.)
Oral dose packs of cortisone have helped some. Also there are much more powerful topical creams that can be compounded by a pharmacist at the request of a doctor that can be much more effective than otc ibuprophen cream. They may contain ingredients like ketamine, ketaprophen, gahapentin, etc. A lot of these medications are much better at not only killing pain, but preventing the nerves from over firing. Even simple Ibuprofen cream could be compounded by your local pharmacist.

*************
MINIMALLY INVASIVE (but not necessarily without significant side effects)
-Cortisone shots
-OTC Medications:
Glujcosamine & Chondrotin (person reporting said brand makes a difference)

Antiinflammatories (There are many anti-inflammatory drugs out there with patients responding very differently. What works best for one patient if often not what works best for the next. Ed)

-NSAIDS Ė aspirin, ibuprofen
-COX-2 Inhibitors= Vioxx, Celebrex, . . .

Iím not sure how the following pain relievers are classified. If anyone knows, please let me know.
-Mobic (Mobic is as a drug halfway between a classical anti-inflammatory and a cox-2 inhibitor. Mobic can thus be harder on the GI system.)
Bextra

-Rx Medications: Neurontin, Elavil
-PT like iontophoresis (sp)? with a steroid





DRUGS-RX
neurontin
muscle relaxants
flexril
Jade

INVASIVE
-PF release surgery
-TT release surgery

When NOTHING works:
-consider a pain management clinic/doctor.
(Iím not sure how long you should suffer, or how many things you should try first. If in doubt, call a pain management doctor and ask.
2 things to consider:
1. a pain management doctor will know how to manage pain. She or he wonít necessarily know what treatments you havenít tried for PF/TTS that might work.
2. Many of the the treatments pain management has are heavy duty drugs. This isnít bad. But I would want to be sure Iíd tried lots of other stuff first.


Posted by john h on 3/02/2000
i was thinking today of some possible treatments for PF that no one has tried:
1. Faith healer
2. In some societies they beat your feet with a cane if you do something bad. Might help?
3. Witch Doctor? Hey! Why not it beats a cortisone shot!
4. Radiation. Tie a rod of plutonium 238 around your foot.
5. Bio-feedback. good luck!
5. Break both legs which will force you into bed for 4 or 5 months. (something less drastic which I tried unintentionally but very effectively - get a fungal infection requiring soaking 6x day for a week, or have knee surgery).
6. Psycharisit. some idiots think the pain is in our head.
7. I once had a wart on my hand. my grandmother had me rub it with a dirty wash cloth and then bury the cloth. For real- the wart went away. Unfortunately, my wife does not keep any dirty dishcloths around.
8. Get a boyfriend like Brad Pitt or girlfriend like Julia Roberts and forget your pain.


SURGERY:
As frequently said, a last resort. Most poeple get better. Some aren't
any worse off after the recovery period. Some people are worse off.

Result number: 183

Message Number 157019

Re: Bi-lateral PF and night splints View Thread
Posted by Dr. David S. Wander on 8/05/04 at 18:51

Since the Strassburg sock is relatively inexpensive, I think it is practical to purchase 2 and use them at the same time without a problem and without a financial burden.

Result number: 184

Message Number 156923

Re: Bi-lateral PF and night splints View Thread
Posted by Dr. David S. Wander on 8/04/04 at 15:48

Scott,

There is no problem wearing 2 night splints other than the obvious problem of getting a good nights sleep. As I've stated many times on this site, my preference of night splints is for the Strassburg Sock which is not bulky and is much less of a problem wearing bilaterally. Check out the Strassburg Sock website for more information. (I have no financial interest in the company).

Result number: 185

Message Number 156320

Re: Strassburg sock Dr Wander View Thread
Posted by sean g. on 7/27/04 at 05:02

Is the sock good for treating achilles tendonitis? what are other method? hot and cold contrast? ultrasound?

Result number: 186

Message Number 156294

Re: Dr Wander Thank you Pain is located near.... View Thread
Posted by Dr. David S. Wander on 7/26/04 at 17:28

Tony,

First, I would definitely stop the chiropractic treatments that you have said are expensive and of no benefit. Have you had a second opinion regarding the surgery? Have you seen a physiatrist or pain specialist? Does your doctor have experience with performing this procedure? With the symptoms you've described, I do not believe the Strassburg sock would be beneficial. Has your doctor performed any blood tests to rule out any other disorders? If everything conservative has failed, and you have confidence in your doctor, and your doctor has significant experience with the proecedure, surgery may be the next alternative.

Result number: 187

Message Number 156240

Re: Strassburg sock Dr Wander View Thread
Posted by Dr. David S. Wander on 7/25/04 at 20:08

Tony, that's an excellent question. The Strassburg sock is used for plantar fasciitis to help stretch the Achilles tendon and intrinsic muscles of the foot. You really can not directly stretch the plantar fascia. If you have been diagnosed with FHL tendinitis, stretching it may cause more discomfort. If the discomfort is secondary to tightness of the FHL the Strassburg Sock may be of some benefit. Since I haven't examined your foot and don't know the cause of the tendinitis, you should speak with your doctor or physical therapist. Where is the pain from your FHL? The FHL passes down the back of the ankle and runs down the back of the talus. Often, there is a small fracture at the posterior aspect of the talus, and this is irritated when the FHL tendon passes over the area. Let me know exactly where your pain is along the tendon.

Result number: 188

Message Number 156226

Strassburg sock Dr Wander View Thread
Posted by Tony Graziano on 7/25/04 at 08:01

Dr WAnder,

Would you reccomednd the Strassburg sock for any tendonitis problems , such as Flexor Hallucis longus tendonitis or is it streiclty for plantar faciaits?

Thank you Tony

Result number: 189

Message Number 154479

Dr Wander Can Strassburg sock be effective for FHL FDL tenosynovitits? View Thread
Posted by John Martello on 7/04/04 at 06:24

Hello,

I've had fhl fdl tenosynovits tibial neuritis for 10 months with no improvement and was wondering if the strassburhg sock is worth a try to cure this problem or is it just for Plantar facitis.

Result number: 190

Message Number 154419

Re: Strassburg Sock for FHL tendontis? View Thread
Posted by Dr. Z on 7/02/04 at 18:01

Maybe . Ask Dr. Wander. He uses this sock alot with his patients

Result number: 191

Message Number 154416

Strassburg Sock for FHL tendontis? View Thread
Posted by John Martello on 7/02/04 at 17:47

Would this be worth a try for fhl fdl tendonnitis?

Result number: 192

Message Number 154404

Re: strassburg sock therapy View Thread
Posted by Dr. David S. Wander on 7/02/04 at 13:57

Paula,

As you'll read in my other post (in reply to Martin), I often recommend the Strassburg Sock to my patients. I have found the product very useful and beneficial, with a greater patient compliance than traditional night splints. Every patient is different and responds differently to various treatment options. Have you seen a doctor recently for the pain? If you haven't you should prior to any additional treatments.

Result number: 193

Message Number 154403

Re: Stretching keeps re-injuring me View Thread
Posted by Dr. David S. Wander on 7/02/04 at 13:55

Martin,

It depends on the intensity of your stretching regimen. Some patients seem to over-stretch or do not stretch properly with a proper warm up and cool down period. I find the Strassburg Sock very useful for my patients. The Strassburg Sock allows for slow passive stretching with little risk for injury. A study in the Journal of Foot & Ankle Surgery compared traditional weightbearing stretching exercises vs the Strassburg Sock, and the results indicated that patients had relief sooner with the use of the sock. I have no financial interest in the company, but do believe that this is a very useful and under utilized product.

Result number: 194

Message Number 154357

strassburg sock therapy View Thread
Posted by Paula on 7/01/04 at 21:27

I have been using the strassburg sock for several years (off and on) for PF. Would I be better served buying a night splint? My PF has grown progressively worse, despite use of anti-inflammatories and New Balance tennis shoes.

Result number: 195

Message Number 152919

Re: Post-ESWT pain View Thread
Posted by JenniferL on 6/14/04 at 00:32

Hey Scott D, are you the lithotripsy center guy?

It's been one week now and I've definitely been feeling better. The first three or so days were hard. The shot i was given made me sore, which happens to me whenever I get a shot, anywhere... so my ankle was hurtin' for awhile. BUT I must say, my foot has been feeling better. Of course, if I walk too much it hurts again, so I've been being extra careful. They gave me a Strassburg sock to wear at night and it really helps keep the foot stretched and flexible. We'll get through this girls (and guys)!! Believe in the mind-body connection! Think positive, healing thoughts. Sounds New-Agey, but my worst pain day was a day when I was totally stressed out and negative. So I've been trying to stay positive and believe that this is going to work.......

Result number: 196

Message Number 151316

Re: Night Splints/Atypical PF View Thread
Posted by Carlos N. on 5/26/04 at 13:44

Elyse,

Your not being a pain. Your agony and frustration is real. Take it from me, I was in your situation six months ago. I was so tight and tense from my hips down. AIS was a great way for me to develop a routine to unravel years of strain on my muscles. However, make sure your friend gives you the physical therapy included with AIS. There are many positions/stretches that only a trained therapist can do. My therapist has educated me a lot on PF and the way the rest of my body interacts with PF. I've certainly been "taken to school" with all of this.

I use the Strassburg sock http://www.thesock.com/

I like it but I don't notice a big difference in my overall recovery. My problem is realted more with the hamstrings and gluteus maximus(buttocks) than just the calves.

Result number: 197

Message Number 151282

Re: Night Splints/Atypical PF View Thread
Posted by SteveG on 5/26/04 at 10:04

I have atypical PF and wear a splint (Strassburg sock). The answers to your questions are

1. Yes
2. Yes
3. No

Result number: 198

Message Number 151182

Re: Strassburg Sock View Thread
Posted by Pauline on 5/25/04 at 09:40

Dorothy,
I heard through the grapevine it's good for head hives:* Just had to throw that in. How's the medication working????? Glad you took it?

Result number: 199

Message Number 151170

Re: Strassburg Sock View Thread
Posted by Dorothy on 5/24/04 at 22:23

Are you talkin' to ME? Did I ask about the Strassbug Sock? Maybe someone did and was asking about where to get one and I referred them to footsmart.com. I have no idea otherwise why you are telling me these things. I'm sure your information is fine and will be useful to someone who is looking for it. Just for the record, I shop in small locally owned stores, in the "Marts" and online - and I think all are fine and satisfactory in their own ways. Depends on your "small, locally owned store" - sometimes they're overrated just for being small and local. WalMart used to be small and local in Arkansas and seems like the small and local folks for the most part would not slap ya if you offered them the opportunity to be big and global. Footsmart is one pretty good online company for foot stuff and good about returns. But hey, on behalf of all the Dorothys here: thanks. I prefer small and local if they're good.

Result number: 200

Message Number 151167

Re: Strassburg Sock View Thread
Posted by Dave S. on 5/24/04 at 21:28

Dorothy-
Yes, you can currently purchase the Strassburg Sock through through footsmart.com however the shipping and handling is a bit steep $8 and shipping time is 6-10 days. We recommend rather than purchasing the Strassburg Sock through them (or us) that you visit one of the many local retailers nationwide who carry the Sock. They are listed on our site at http://www.thesock.com/thesock_retail_locations.html. The price tends to be about $30 to $35 dollars and you can start using it ASAP. Many of the stores that we are available in are small locally owned Running/Walking specialty stores that not only carry the Strassburg Sock, also have a trained staff to help you pick the right type of shoe through providing a gait analysis. You can go to a big chain store or mall and pick out a shoe because you like the way it looks, but trust me, take the time to go visit one of them and get a pair of shoes that fits you for the right reasons and your feet'll thank you! Dave

Result number: 201

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