Home The Book Dr Articles Products Message Boards Journal Articles Search Our Surveys Surgery ESWT Dr Messages Find Good Drs video

Re: HEEL PAIN - me too

Posted by TL on 12/20/98 at 00:00 (002762)

I too experienced a specific injury (now 2 years ago). I broke and dislocated my ankle which resulted in surgey and 4 screws to put my ankle back together again. I started running about 2 months ago and have started to experience pain in my heel after running about 3k. The pain intensifies to the point where I must quit running. It lasts anywhere from a couple of hours to a couple of days. I have started to receive physiotheraphy for PF and notice some improvement until I run again. I too have soreness in the heel with sometimes a sharp pain shooting upwards. I do not experience stiffness or soreness in the morning or evening either. I am questioning whether this is PF or not. Any suggestions?



Re: HEEL PAIN - me too

DK on 12/24/98 at 00:00 (002820)

I've had physical therapy and received custom orthotics. The orthotics didn't help, in fact they caused more pain if anything. I've also received a cortoisone shot which helped for a few days. I just had the foot x-ray'd this past week. They showed no injury. I have another doctor's appt Monday. Running is definately out for me. I can go for a few minutes and then it's like someone pushed a button and I feel an intense pain in the heel, like I stepped on a spike or something. It definately lets me know when I've done too much. I don't know what else to do except keep trying to find the cause of the pain.

Re: HEEL PAIN - ALI FROM PAKISTAN

Dr. Biehler on 3/18/01 at 12:12 (041779)

Voltagesic is not listed in my resourses. Norgesic, as far as I can tell is aspirin with caffeine. A good place for you to start is to read Scott's introductory book on PF by pressing on the link at the top of this page. After you have read the book we might be able to direct you in the right direction. Dr. B.

Re: HEEL PAIN - ALI FROM PAKISTAN

Dr. David S. Wander on 3/18/01 at 18:12 (041802)

Norgesic is a muscle relaxant. This is not a commonly used medication for plantar fasciitis, since relaxing the muscles will not have any real effect on the plantar fascia, since it is not a muscle. The pain from plantar fasciitis is from the inflammation, not a muscle spasm.

Re: HEEL PAIN - ALI FROM PAKISTAN

paula g on 3/18/01 at hrmin (041820)

i've recently been thinking about muscle relaxers for the calf muscle. does it rexax your calf at all ali?

Re: HEEL PAIN - ALI FROM PAKISTAN

Julie on 3/19/01 at 03:26 (041829)

Hello Ali

It sounds as though you have been given a very incomplete treatment plan for your plantar fasciitis! Medicine, whether painkillers, anti-inflammatories, or relaxants (which as Dr B says will have no effect on the PF though it may make you feel better generally) are only a tiny part of the answer, and certainly not a cure. Dealing with the symptoms of PF is not enough, you need to deal with the causes.

You've come to the right place. First, please read the Heel Pain Book - you'll find links on the home page - for general and detailed information about PF, and ideas for dealing with it. Also, keep reading the boards on this website, and keep asking questions. There are many people who have been through it and can help.

Above all, you really need to see a doctor who specializes in feet: a podiatrist, or a sports medicine physician, or, possibly, an orthopaedic doctor. (Do you live in one of the big cities in Pakistan? If so, you should be able to find someone.) You need to have your gait (how you walk) fully evaluated and your condition accurately diagnosed. Depending on what has caused your PF, you may need orthotics.

Conservative treatments help most people. Stretching for some, icing, taping, physical therapy -- there are many, many avenues of treatment and help before the more invasive ones like steroid injections and surgery need to be considered. Familiarize yourself with them, and involve yourself actively in getting better. Medicine isn't going to be the whole answer for you.

Keep in touch - all good wishes

Julie

Re: HEEL PAIN - ALI FROM PAKISTAN

Dr. Biehler on 3/18/01 at 12:12 (041779)

Voltagesic is not listed in my resourses. Norgesic, as far as I can tell is aspirin with caffeine. A good place for you to start is to read Scott's introductory book on PF by pressing on the link at the top of this page. After you have read the book we might be able to direct you in the right direction. Dr. B.

Re: HEEL PAIN - ALI FROM PAKISTAN

Dr. David S. Wander on 3/18/01 at 18:12 (041802)

Norgesic is a muscle relaxant. This is not a commonly used medication for plantar fasciitis, since relaxing the muscles will not have any real effect on the plantar fascia, since it is not a muscle. The pain from plantar fasciitis is from the inflammation, not a muscle spasm.

Re: HEEL PAIN - ALI FROM PAKISTAN

paula g on 3/18/01 at hrmin (041820)

i've recently been thinking about muscle relaxers for the calf muscle. does it rexax your calf at all ali?

Re: HEEL PAIN - ALI FROM PAKISTAN

Julie on 3/19/01 at 03:26 (041829)

Hello Ali

It sounds as though you have been given a very incomplete treatment plan for your plantar fasciitis! Medicine, whether painkillers, anti-inflammatories, or relaxants (which as Dr B says will have no effect on the PF though it may make you feel better generally) are only a tiny part of the answer, and certainly not a cure. Dealing with the symptoms of PF is not enough, you need to deal with the causes.

You've come to the right place. First, please read the Heel Pain Book - you'll find links on the home page - for general and detailed information about PF, and ideas for dealing with it. Also, keep reading the boards on this website, and keep asking questions. There are many people who have been through it and can help.

Above all, you really need to see a doctor who specializes in feet: a podiatrist, or a sports medicine physician, or, possibly, an orthopaedic doctor. (Do you live in one of the big cities in Pakistan? If so, you should be able to find someone.) You need to have your gait (how you walk) fully evaluated and your condition accurately diagnosed. Depending on what has caused your PF, you may need orthotics.

Conservative treatments help most people. Stretching for some, icing, taping, physical therapy -- there are many, many avenues of treatment and help before the more invasive ones like steroid injections and surgery need to be considered. Familiarize yourself with them, and involve yourself actively in getting better. Medicine isn't going to be the whole answer for you.

Keep in touch - all good wishes

Julie