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not me

Posted by Kellie on 2/15/99 at 00:00 (004834)

Hello everyone! I don't have a heelspur but my mom does
I was surfing the net and found this
My mom can't walk on her heel in the moring without being in alot of pain
Sandy where in Ohio?? I live in Canton! My mom says i might develope one since she has one! I hope not
well thanks bye

P.S.
I'm 25 so do u think i might develope one???
w/b....

Re: not me

Sarah on 2/17/99 at 00:00 (004887)

I have high arches and PF. I tried burks and found they weren't
comfortable. Can you recommend a brand of shoes for someone with high arches?

Re: not me

Sue on 2/17/99 at 00:00 (004891)

I have the same question. Tried Birks and Mephistos (the arch starts too far forward in the toe box) I don't think the Eccos have the firm support needed. The Sas Freetime did not look particularily well made. I am now contemplating New Balance 586 runnig shoes. Any comments??

Re: not me

Rick on 2/17/99 at 00:00 (004897)

I have fairly high arches, and in my personal experience, Birkenstock and Ecco are probably the best. Birkenstock particularly has a contoured footbed that should fit pretty well in the arch area. Keep in mind that every foot is different. Some people swear by Birks. Some swear by Mephisto. Others, such as yourself, have not had good results with these shoes (were you properly fitted?). The acid test is really what feels comfortable for you.

On the subject of running shoes, there are several different categories of running shoes. Runner's World magazine categorizes them as follows: motion control, cushioned shoes, and stability shoes. Motion control shoes are designed to counteract overpronation. Cushioned shoes are designed to provide little if any motion control and lots of cushioning against impact. Stability shoes are typically neutral (no motion control) and not quite as protective as cushioned shoes, but allow the foot to move dynamically without 'turning over' too much. I don't know specifically about New Balance 586, but I would say choose whatever feels best for you. It might behoove you to get a gait analysis and see which type of running shoe would be most appropriate. A good fitter can look at the bottom and sides of your shoes and see where they have been worn and at least tell you what tendency you may have. Also, the current edition of Runner's World has their annual shoe review. It's worth a look. My personal choice for running is Brooks. I wear the Radius model.

Other shoes that have worked well for me are Rockport Pro Walkers, and Timberland low cut casuals. For dress shoes, Allen Edmonds in my opinion are without equal.

My mother chose Easy Spirits when she had her PF problem; and they worked great for her. She got fitted with a pair of Thorlos and the Easy Spirits, and within 6 weeks she was back doing aerobics again.
Being a man, it's difficult for me to recommend specific shoes for women. But, again, from what I know Birks and Eccos are as good as, if not better than anything available. Best advice I can give is to keep looking and trying until you find something that works, then stick with it.

I hope this helps. You can e-mail me if you want to discuss further.


Re: not me

Shelby on 2/17/99 at 00:00 (004906)

HI.....I can only give you my own experience....athletic shoes and my orthodics are the most uncomfortable and painful thing I can wear.



Re: not me

Sandy in Ohio on 2/15/99 at 00:00 (004836)

Hi Kellie! I live in Columbus, Ohio; small world, isn't it? Sounds like your mom definitely has what everyone else on this board has. I just get up slowly in the mornings. I don't think this is inherited, so you don't have to worry. No one in my family has had this. Most members are deceased, but to those that are left of my family, no one can recall anyone in my family having this. Has she been to the podiatrist yet? Keep reading the messages on here. It's more educational than the podiatrist. Feel free to e-mail me at (email removed)

Re: not me

Sue on 2/15/99 at 00:00 (004837)

I used to live in Columbus. Have been in California 22 years.

Re: not me

Bea on 2/16/99 at 00:00 (004845)

I don't know if this is hereditary or not but I suggest you be very careful about the shoes you wear. Make sure the heels are not too high and have good support. It might be a good idea to see a podiatrist and make sure you don't have aany structural weakness in your feet so that you can take care of them before there is damage.

Re: not me

Helene on 2/16/99 at 00:00 (004848)

I don't think PF is inherited but I think that certain people are more prone to it due to their foot structure. I have a chronic case of it, & my sister developed a mild case after skiing. (Coincidence?) She's doing ok now, probably because I warned her to be very careful or she might end up like me!

Re: not me

Dayna on 2/16/99 at 00:00 (004867)

My father had heel spurs, he got them when he did too much golfing but they went away again (or so he says, they stopped hurting anyway).

I had heel spurs for years and they never hurt, then I got PF, but the pain isn't from the heel spurs, it's from the tendon that attaches to the heel spurs.

I have to agree that you should see a podiatrist or orthopedic foot doctor as a preventative measure, there may be things they can do now to reduce the chances of you developing PF later.


Re: not me

KELLIE on 2/16/99 at 00:00 (004877)

HIYA EVERYONE
!THANKS FOR WRITING BACK TO ME SO SOON! I TOLD MY MOM BOUT THIS BOARD AND SHE IS GOING TO START COMING ON HERE
I'M SO HAPPY MOST OF YOU DON'T BELIVE I'LL GET ONE JUST CAUSE MY MOM HAS ONE
BEING 25 AND HAVING A KID ON THE WAY REALLY ISN'T EASY ON BACK OR YOUR FEET! SANDY I THINK I WILL EMAIL YOU SOMETIME
I DON'T GET ON HERE ALOT BECAUSE OF MY JOB AND STUFF
I MOVED TO CALIFORNIA FOR 3 YEARS BUT IT WAS TO CROWDED
YES IT IS A SMALL WORLD NEVER NEW SO MANY PEOPLE DEALED WITH THIS
NO ONE ELSE HAS HAD A HEELSPUR IN FAMILY, BUT MY MOM SO I'M HOPING I WON'T GET ONE
WELL THANKS FOR WRITTING BACK SO SOON
SEE YA TOMMOROW
I ENJOY HEARING FROM U ALL
!
BYE SINCERLY AND GOOD LUCK TO U ALL,
KELLIE...

Re: not me

BJ on 2/17/99 at 00:00 (004881)

My father and brother both have had heel spurs - neither to the point I have - both went to ORTHO. - both had relief in just a few months - and experience no pain after about 5 months. Mine has gone on for over 1 year. I think seeing a Orthopedic NOW is the answer. I would not waste time with a POD.

Re: not me

Rick on 2/17/99 at 00:00 (004883)

The key to preventing PF is getting good support for your feet, especially in the arch area. According to a podiatrist with whom my company has been associated, '[PF occurs for] one simple reason: the arch of the foot is not getting enough support.'

You can practice 'preventive' foot health - Some general rules are (1) Make sure you always get properly fitted with shoes. Choose and purchase your shoes and the socks you wear with them as a 'system.' Most people wear their shoes too small. Make sure the shoes give you plenty of support in the arch area [if you have 'high' arches, you will be at risk for PF]. (2) Get plenty of exercise, but don't increase your frequency or your intensity more than about 10% in any one-week period. (3) Be sure to stretch properly before AND after exercising. (4) If you experience pain in your feet or legs (or any part of your body for that matter) during or immediately after exercising, notice where it is and what you have been doing. If it doesn't subside within several days, see a doctor.

Another factor is important to note: As you age, the fatty pads on the bottom of your feet break down. This degeneration makes you more susceptible to foot injuries. Protecting your feet and taking care of them while you are young can help mitigate this degenerative effect of aging.

Good luck. I hope you DON'T get PF.


Re: not me

Sarah on 2/17/99 at 00:00 (004887)

I have high arches and PF. I tried burks and found they weren't
comfortable. Can you recommend a brand of shoes for someone with high arches?

Re: not me

Sue on 2/17/99 at 00:00 (004891)

I have the same question. Tried Birks and Mephistos (the arch starts too far forward in the toe box) I don't think the Eccos have the firm support needed. The Sas Freetime did not look particularily well made. I am now contemplating New Balance 586 runnig shoes. Any comments??

Re: not me

Rick on 2/17/99 at 00:00 (004897)

I have fairly high arches, and in my personal experience, Birkenstock and Ecco are probably the best. Birkenstock particularly has a contoured footbed that should fit pretty well in the arch area. Keep in mind that every foot is different. Some people swear by Birks. Some swear by Mephisto. Others, such as yourself, have not had good results with these shoes (were you properly fitted?). The acid test is really what feels comfortable for you.

On the subject of running shoes, there are several different categories of running shoes. Runner's World magazine categorizes them as follows: motion control, cushioned shoes, and stability shoes. Motion control shoes are designed to counteract overpronation. Cushioned shoes are designed to provide little if any motion control and lots of cushioning against impact. Stability shoes are typically neutral (no motion control) and not quite as protective as cushioned shoes, but allow the foot to move dynamically without 'turning over' too much. I don't know specifically about New Balance 586, but I would say choose whatever feels best for you. It might behoove you to get a gait analysis and see which type of running shoe would be most appropriate. A good fitter can look at the bottom and sides of your shoes and see where they have been worn and at least tell you what tendency you may have. Also, the current edition of Runner's World has their annual shoe review. It's worth a look. My personal choice for running is Brooks. I wear the Radius model.

Other shoes that have worked well for me are Rockport Pro Walkers, and Timberland low cut casuals. For dress shoes, Allen Edmonds in my opinion are without equal.

My mother chose Easy Spirits when she had her PF problem; and they worked great for her. She got fitted with a pair of Thorlos and the Easy Spirits, and within 6 weeks she was back doing aerobics again.
Being a man, it's difficult for me to recommend specific shoes for women. But, again, from what I know Birks and Eccos are as good as, if not better than anything available. Best advice I can give is to keep looking and trying until you find something that works, then stick with it.

I hope this helps. You can e-mail me if you want to discuss further.


Re: not me

Shelby on 2/17/99 at 00:00 (004906)

HI.....I can only give you my own experience....athletic shoes and my orthodics are the most uncomfortable and painful thing I can wear.