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Symptom's

Posted by Paula on 3/10/99 at 00:00 (005440)

I really dont know if I have a Heel Spur and was wondering if anyone can tell me if my symptoms are similar to theirs.
After i have been standing or walking for a while my left heel feels like i have a stone bruise on the bottom of it and it is very sore even to rest on the floor.
I hope someone may be able to give me some info
Thanks Paula

Re: Symptom's

Dayna on 3/11/99 at 00:00 (005448)

You may or may not have a heel spur but I'd bet you have the start of PF. Get yourself to a doctor Now. Some people have heel spurs with no PF, some people have PF but no heel spurs, some people like me have both. In my case I grew heel spurs to take the strain off the tendon, had them for years with no symptoms and no pain, then one day the tendon just couldn't take the strain any more, ripped and PF became my daily companion.

Until you can get to a doctor (orthopedist or podiatrist, we each have our favorite, to my mind more important is whether they do anything for you rather than what their title is) do the following.

Use ice to ease the pain, a bag of frozen peas works well or some slightly mashed ice cubes in a ziploc bag, just snuggle your heel into it, use a towel in between if it's too cold all at once. Chemical gelpacks for picnics and etc. can be too much cold, advise staying away from them.

Stretch your feet before you stand, scrunch your toes under then flex like you're on tippy-toes, point your foot like ballet then pull your feet back flat and feel the stretch in the calf. Do this several times to gently exercise the tendon so it stretches rather than strains when you stand up. Do this in bed too.

Don't go barefoot, wear good supportive shoes always, get some cheap sandals or plastic thongie things to wear in the shower, make sure they have an arch support or wrap your arch up in an ace bandage first. If you have no arch, stay out of high heels, if you have a high arch wear a medium (1 1/2 inch heel).

Try over the counter inserts, Birkenstock blue is very popular here, get them fitted by someone knowledgable not the kids clerking at Foot Locker or a mall store. I have nothing against mall stores, but these folks aren't trained to fit shoes for problem feet, it's not fair to expect them to do a good job at it. Once you know what size you need and what brand, go ahead and buy them where you can, but get fitted properly first.

If your doctor tells you to live with it or wants to immediately put you into custom orthodics or surgery, leave and go to another doctor. Cortizone shots should be given close to a last resort, and only three times maximum, don't expect them to be a cure.

Come back and tell us how it's going, we care, even if we can't help ourselves we feel better if we can help someone else.


Re: Symptom's

Sharon on 3/11/99 at 00:00 (005451)

I have just been told I have PF. I have been reading up on everything about this on the internet. My pain starts when I put my foot down right out of bed and gets worse as the day goes on. By the end of the day I have pain up to my knee and up to my hip that only goes away with a pain pill and bed rest. Is this part of PF? Do people get pain up to their knee and hip?

Re: Symptom's

BillC on 3/11/99 at 00:00 (005453)

Yes it is part of PF, I have ankle, leg, and hip pain sometimes. The pain in the heel makes you stress other parts of you body to compensate.

Re: Symptom's

Dayna on 3/11/99 at 00:00 (005460)

Yes, this is part of PF, it is caused by compensating for the pain in the foot by walking on your toes, limping, etc. which throws the rest of the body out of whack. Correcting the PF via the methods I've described above will return your walk to more normal and relieve the unusual stresses in your knees and hips, reducing that pain. Let us know if there is any improvement anywhere after using the stretch/ice/etc. for a few weeks. One or two days won't do it, PF didn't come on overnight regardless of how it seems, it won't go away overnight either.

Re: Symptom's

Dayna on 3/11/99 at 00:00 (005448)

You may or may not have a heel spur but I'd bet you have the start of PF. Get yourself to a doctor Now. Some people have heel spurs with no PF, some people have PF but no heel spurs, some people like me have both. In my case I grew heel spurs to take the strain off the tendon, had them for years with no symptoms and no pain, then one day the tendon just couldn't take the strain any more, ripped and PF became my daily companion.

Until you can get to a doctor (orthopedist or podiatrist, we each have our favorite, to my mind more important is whether they do anything for you rather than what their title is) do the following.

Use ice to ease the pain, a bag of frozen peas works well or some slightly mashed ice cubes in a ziploc bag, just snuggle your heel into it, use a towel in between if it's too cold all at once. Chemical gelpacks for picnics and etc. can be too much cold, advise staying away from them.

Stretch your feet before you stand, scrunch your toes under then flex like you're on tippy-toes, point your foot like ballet then pull your feet back flat and feel the stretch in the calf. Do this several times to gently exercise the tendon so it stretches rather than strains when you stand up. Do this in bed too.

Don't go barefoot, wear good supportive shoes always, get some cheap sandals or plastic thongie things to wear in the shower, make sure they have an arch support or wrap your arch up in an ace bandage first. If you have no arch, stay out of high heels, if you have a high arch wear a medium (1 1/2 inch heel).

Try over the counter inserts, Birkenstock blue is very popular here, get them fitted by someone knowledgable not the kids clerking at Foot Locker or a mall store. I have nothing against mall stores, but these folks aren't trained to fit shoes for problem feet, it's not fair to expect them to do a good job at it. Once you know what size you need and what brand, go ahead and buy them where you can, but get fitted properly first.

If your doctor tells you to live with it or wants to immediately put you into custom orthodics or surgery, leave and go to another doctor. Cortizone shots should be given close to a last resort, and only three times maximum, don't expect them to be a cure.

Come back and tell us how it's going, we care, even if we can't help ourselves we feel better if we can help someone else.


Re: Symptom's

Sharon on 3/11/99 at 00:00 (005451)

I have just been told I have PF. I have been reading up on everything about this on the internet. My pain starts when I put my foot down right out of bed and gets worse as the day goes on. By the end of the day I have pain up to my knee and up to my hip that only goes away with a pain pill and bed rest. Is this part of PF? Do people get pain up to their knee and hip?

Re: Symptom's

BillC on 3/11/99 at 00:00 (005453)

Yes it is part of PF, I have ankle, leg, and hip pain sometimes. The pain in the heel makes you stress other parts of you body to compensate.

Re: Symptom's

Dayna on 3/11/99 at 00:00 (005460)

Yes, this is part of PF, it is caused by compensating for the pain in the foot by walking on your toes, limping, etc. which throws the rest of the body out of whack. Correcting the PF via the methods I've described above will return your walk to more normal and relieve the unusual stresses in your knees and hips, reducing that pain. Let us know if there is any improvement anywhere after using the stretch/ice/etc. for a few weeks. One or two days won't do it, PF didn't come on overnight regardless of how it seems, it won't go away overnight either.