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How do you keep going,,with tremendous pain!!!

Posted by Valerie on 3/20/99 at 00:00 (005663)

For those of you that experience tremendous pain 24 hours a day 7 days a week what do you do?
How do you keep going?
It is horrible,,I find myself not wanting to even get out of bed cause I know once my feet hit the floor,,,thats it for me,,for the rest of the day.
The idea of going to the store,shopping anything that involves walking I absolutely cant bear at all.
If anyone who shares this same problem please reply
It will be greatly appreciated

Re: How do you keep going,,with tremendous pain!!!

Mary on 3/20/99 at 00:00 (005664)

Valerie,

It's Mary (11 weeks post surgery). I know how you feel. Prior to surgery, I was late for work almost every day because I could not bear getting out of bed. I knew once my feet touched the ground, like you said, they were going to hurt the rest of the day. It was a horrible life. I could not find anyone to do surgery, they all seemed afraid of it until I went to this doctor. He is a good surgeon, I just do not know what happened. As much as I hurt at this time, I do not regret the surgery (I think) because I felt like I had no other choice. I could not live like I was and I felt like I wanted to take the chance. Now I wish I could get back to work. I called a PT yesterday, and will try him next week. Will let you and all know. Hang in there. We're with you.


Re: How do you keep going,,with tremendous pain!!!

debbie on 3/20/99 at 00:00 (005675)

Dear Mary,
I too had tremendous pain and even tried surgery in one foot. I finally did acupuncture and am cured. You heard me, CURED!! I do aerobics 4 times a week and whatever else I want to do. acu gave me back my life. If you haven't looked into it , why don't you? No side effects. you have nothing to lose. I recommend this before any surgery. Debbie

Re: How do you keep going,,with tremendous pain!!!

Alicia on 3/20/99 at 00:00 (005677)

Valerie: I've had PF for 8 years - extremely bad for 6 months. I have stopped weight bearing aerobic activities and only wear Reebok crosstrainers with my custom made orthotics whenever I'm on my feet (except in tub or shower). I also had trouble getting up in morning due to pain. About three weeks ago, I began taking 3-4000 mg. of vitamin C a day, aerobic exercise on a recumbent stationary bike almost every day for 30 minutes, upper body strengthening 2-3 times a week,and I've been a vegetarian for almost 6 years (a piece of chicken or fish now and then). I also take a multivitamin. I have begun to see a decrease in the pain. The only thing different in the last three weeks is the vitamin C. Read Gordon's story and suggestions on this message board - see follow up to my recent message. It is important to follow all these suggestions - one pill, or surgery or treatment will not cure PF in most cases. Good luck and keep your spirits up.

Re: How do you keep going... Why is Alicia so anti-surgery?

Michael on 3/22/99 at 00:00 (005707)

I am curious as to why Alicia is so down on surgery as a method to get relief from PF. Did you have a bad experience with surgery? Every post I have read from her belittles the sugical solution. Obviously, non-surgical methods should be explored first, but if all else fails... The worst success rates you hear/read about surgery are at 60%. Most are closer to the 80-90% range.

I just went through a partial release of the PF 2 weeks ago. My D.P.M tried the gamut - orthotics, cortisone injections, taping, more orthotics, night boot - and nothing helped long term. Maybe time will temper my enthusiasm, but right now I am very optomistic that the surgery will provide a full recovery.


Re: How do you keep going... Why is Alicia so anti-surgery?

Alicia on 3/23/99 at 00:00 (005737)

Michael: Please don't think I am belittling surgery. I have read EVERYTHING I can find on PF and the alternatives for treatment. I've tried everything but the surgery. From what I can gather from all the information (every message about it on this message board) functional success with surgery is the exception, not the rule. I also know that surgery is traumatic and to go through it, only to have the problem return seems so depressing. To me, the Ossatron makes more sense for an actual release of the plantar fascia, and I would be interested in trying that if it were more accessible to me. With the chance of scar tissue forming from the surgery, I have just decided, that for me, surgery is not the answer. I would support anyone who wants to try it after everything else has been exhausted. I also have tried to make that clear in my messages - encouraging people to try the other alternatives first, before thinking about the surgery. I hope this clears up my opinion ( which is ALL it is...) Wishing us all less pain.

Re: How do you keep going... Success Stories

Michael on 3/23/99 at 00:00 (005743)

Alicia, Thank you for taking my comment in the spirit it was offered. I did not mean for it to come across as a personal attack. After rereading it, I was afraid it might be interpreted as such. You seem to be very well-informed.

My guess would be that the majority of people who have success with a surgical solution (or maybe success with ANY method) go on about their lives and do not dwell here. I think if that is happening, it would mean that most of the people who continue to post here are those who continue to have problems. Success stories are rare here, not because they don't happen, but because they don't get reported. It is human nature to make note of the bad things that happen to us, and gloss over successes, again because we are anxious to move on with our lives. You know the old saying - 'If you have a good experience you will tell one person, if you have a bad experience you will tell ten people.' That would skew the majority of messages here to make them seem negative. I know that people are not complaining here, they are looking for help to find the best solution to a significant health problem.

Maybe I'm wrong about this whole thing, but I really don't think so in this case. I agreee that the surgery is fairly traumatic (although I enjoyed watching mine) and that to go through it and have the pain recur is definitely discouraging. I have worked in IS in the healthcare field for the past 13 years, and could be easily accused of being biased in favor of healthcare professionals. But for the most part, I find them to be honest, compassionate individuals who truly care about their patients.

I too simply wish everyone well. Godspeed on their road to recovery.


Re: How do you keep going,,with tremendous pain!!!

Mary on 3/20/99 at 00:00 (005664)

Valerie,

It's Mary (11 weeks post surgery). I know how you feel. Prior to surgery, I was late for work almost every day because I could not bear getting out of bed. I knew once my feet touched the ground, like you said, they were going to hurt the rest of the day. It was a horrible life. I could not find anyone to do surgery, they all seemed afraid of it until I went to this doctor. He is a good surgeon, I just do not know what happened. As much as I hurt at this time, I do not regret the surgery (I think) because I felt like I had no other choice. I could not live like I was and I felt like I wanted to take the chance. Now I wish I could get back to work. I called a PT yesterday, and will try him next week. Will let you and all know. Hang in there. We're with you.


Re: How do you keep going,,with tremendous pain!!!

debbie on 3/20/99 at 00:00 (005675)

Dear Mary,
I too had tremendous pain and even tried surgery in one foot. I finally did acupuncture and am cured. You heard me, CURED!! I do aerobics 4 times a week and whatever else I want to do. acu gave me back my life. If you haven't looked into it , why don't you? No side effects. you have nothing to lose. I recommend this before any surgery. Debbie

Re: How do you keep going,,with tremendous pain!!!

Alicia on 3/20/99 at 00:00 (005677)

Valerie: I've had PF for 8 years - extremely bad for 6 months. I have stopped weight bearing aerobic activities and only wear Reebok crosstrainers with my custom made orthotics whenever I'm on my feet (except in tub or shower). I also had trouble getting up in morning due to pain. About three weeks ago, I began taking 3-4000 mg. of vitamin C a day, aerobic exercise on a recumbent stationary bike almost every day for 30 minutes, upper body strengthening 2-3 times a week,and I've been a vegetarian for almost 6 years (a piece of chicken or fish now and then). I also take a multivitamin. I have begun to see a decrease in the pain. The only thing different in the last three weeks is the vitamin C. Read Gordon's story and suggestions on this message board - see follow up to my recent message. It is important to follow all these suggestions - one pill, or surgery or treatment will not cure PF in most cases. Good luck and keep your spirits up.

Re: How do you keep going... Why is Alicia so anti-surgery?

Michael on 3/22/99 at 00:00 (005707)

I am curious as to why Alicia is so down on surgery as a method to get relief from PF. Did you have a bad experience with surgery? Every post I have read from her belittles the sugical solution. Obviously, non-surgical methods should be explored first, but if all else fails... The worst success rates you hear/read about surgery are at 60%. Most are closer to the 80-90% range.

I just went through a partial release of the PF 2 weeks ago. My D.P.M tried the gamut - orthotics, cortisone injections, taping, more orthotics, night boot - and nothing helped long term. Maybe time will temper my enthusiasm, but right now I am very optomistic that the surgery will provide a full recovery.


Re: How do you keep going... Why is Alicia so anti-surgery?

Alicia on 3/23/99 at 00:00 (005737)

Michael: Please don't think I am belittling surgery. I have read EVERYTHING I can find on PF and the alternatives for treatment. I've tried everything but the surgery. From what I can gather from all the information (every message about it on this message board) functional success with surgery is the exception, not the rule. I also know that surgery is traumatic and to go through it, only to have the problem return seems so depressing. To me, the Ossatron makes more sense for an actual release of the plantar fascia, and I would be interested in trying that if it were more accessible to me. With the chance of scar tissue forming from the surgery, I have just decided, that for me, surgery is not the answer. I would support anyone who wants to try it after everything else has been exhausted. I also have tried to make that clear in my messages - encouraging people to try the other alternatives first, before thinking about the surgery. I hope this clears up my opinion ( which is ALL it is...) Wishing us all less pain.

Re: How do you keep going... Success Stories

Michael on 3/23/99 at 00:00 (005743)

Alicia, Thank you for taking my comment in the spirit it was offered. I did not mean for it to come across as a personal attack. After rereading it, I was afraid it might be interpreted as such. You seem to be very well-informed.

My guess would be that the majority of people who have success with a surgical solution (or maybe success with ANY method) go on about their lives and do not dwell here. I think if that is happening, it would mean that most of the people who continue to post here are those who continue to have problems. Success stories are rare here, not because they don't happen, but because they don't get reported. It is human nature to make note of the bad things that happen to us, and gloss over successes, again because we are anxious to move on with our lives. You know the old saying - 'If you have a good experience you will tell one person, if you have a bad experience you will tell ten people.' That would skew the majority of messages here to make them seem negative. I know that people are not complaining here, they are looking for help to find the best solution to a significant health problem.

Maybe I'm wrong about this whole thing, but I really don't think so in this case. I agreee that the surgery is fairly traumatic (although I enjoyed watching mine) and that to go through it and have the pain recur is definitely discouraging. I have worked in IS in the healthcare field for the past 13 years, and could be easily accused of being biased in favor of healthcare professionals. But for the most part, I find them to be honest, compassionate individuals who truly care about their patients.

I too simply wish everyone well. Godspeed on their road to recovery.