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John E. Sarno

Posted by Teresa on 3/27/99 at 00:00 (005788)

Has anyone read this guys book called 'Mindbody Perscription:Healing the Body, Healing the Pain'? There was a program on 20/20 last night plus from a little bit of research I have done today, his program is helping alot of people who have chronic pain. It's a little bit bazaar but I am going to try it because I have tried everything else. It has to do with the mind causing pain. Sounds strange but the he says the pain is real and the mind causes it to avert rage, anger, stress etc...

Re: John E. Sarno

Dayna on 3/27/99 at 00:00 (005792)

I watched that show too and came away with a few different thoughts.

1) Oh great, now the people who think our feet are all in our heads will be even worse, because according to this program we're doing it to ourselves.

2) It could be stress that kicks it off, my first horrid episode was when I was having a rotten soul-crushing time at my job, which I finally left and got somewhat better, thought it was the change in location/physical layout/stairs. My second horrid episode which lasted nearly six months was a month or so after my mother unexpectedly died. My third and most recent nearly drove me to despair episode had no physical trigger, went to bed 'normal' level of pain and woke up crippled, but I was having a hard time dealing with things in my life, third Xmas without my mom, a known grief trigger. When the abnormality of being without a loved one becomes normal, the mind rejects it so maybe the doctor had a point, the body kicked in to give me something else to think about, didn't work by the way.

3) People with abnormality in their x-rays either have pain or don't, no correlation. People without abnormality in their x-rays either have pain or don't, no correlation. Doesn't that sound a lot like heel spurs, some have them without symptoms, some don't have them and have symptoms, some have both, some neither. Maybe there's hope that this will support our point, just because you can't see anything doesn't mean it doesn't hurt.

Conclusion,

There may be some physical or emotional reason for PF to start, in the absence of an obvious physical trigger it wouldn't hurt to try to think if there is something else going on that could contribute. I don't believe we can just 'will ourselves well', but it gives us something else to try, something else to think about. Rebuttal anyone?


Re: John E. Sarno

Dayna on 3/27/99 at 00:00 (005792)

I watched that show too and came away with a few different thoughts.

1) Oh great, now the people who think our feet are all in our heads will be even worse, because according to this program we're doing it to ourselves.

2) It could be stress that kicks it off, my first horrid episode was when I was having a rotten soul-crushing time at my job, which I finally left and got somewhat better, thought it was the change in location/physical layout/stairs. My second horrid episode which lasted nearly six months was a month or so after my mother unexpectedly died. My third and most recent nearly drove me to despair episode had no physical trigger, went to bed 'normal' level of pain and woke up crippled, but I was having a hard time dealing with things in my life, third Xmas without my mom, a known grief trigger. When the abnormality of being without a loved one becomes normal, the mind rejects it so maybe the doctor had a point, the body kicked in to give me something else to think about, didn't work by the way.

3) People with abnormality in their x-rays either have pain or don't, no correlation. People without abnormality in their x-rays either have pain or don't, no correlation. Doesn't that sound a lot like heel spurs, some have them without symptoms, some don't have them and have symptoms, some have both, some neither. Maybe there's hope that this will support our point, just because you can't see anything doesn't mean it doesn't hurt.

Conclusion,

There may be some physical or emotional reason for PF to start, in the absence of an obvious physical trigger it wouldn't hurt to try to think if there is something else going on that could contribute. I don't believe we can just 'will ourselves well', but it gives us something else to try, something else to think about. Rebuttal anyone?