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Custom orthotics

Posted by Sue on 5/12/99 at 00:00 (006767)

I received custom orthotics on Monday and I am terribly disappointed.
I have only worn them an hour at a time but they cause alot of pain in my back and thigh.(they have not helped the PF either) There are three problems.. They are extremely built up in the arch and the ball of my foot. They are 3/4 length and severely hurt the ball of my foot where they stop. They don't have a cloth/leather/foam lining which runs the full length. When I questioned the comfort factor, the office said you don't want a full length lining as you just have to replace it frequently. It needs some sort of tapering. Second, the orthotics don't fit in any shoes. I long ago gave up stylish shoes. However these won't even fit in New Balance running shoes D width. A EE width is to sloppy on my foot. I know it's too early to judge but I cringe when I have to wear them for an hour. My third problem is when I remove the footbed to make room for the orthotics, it is like walking on concrete. Once the footbed is gone there is very little substance to the shoe. The good news is insurance paid but I am considering calling them to advise them not to pay until I get some relief. Any suggestions?

Re: Custom orthotics for Berkinstocks? Why bother?

Diane R. on 5/02/99 at 00:00 (006454)

I would question why anyone would do this - as the birks come with a cork footbed that is better than custom orthotics - at least for many PF people - and just my opinion from experience with custom othotics that cost me $300. Those 'custom orthotics' were totally painful and worsened my PF and the birks have healed me. I don't use 'cured' as the word, as I feel if I would abuse my feet it could bring back the PF with a vengence - but with common sense I am pain free.

All that said, I can't speak for those who have had surgery on their feet because their foot anatomy has been disturbed & with scar tissue, nerve entrapments etc, maybe birks are not for them anymore but if you haven't had a rupture from cortisone shots or surgery, I haven't found anything better than the birk footbed...so why pay more $$ to mess with a good thing?

Also, birks are truly not the greatest looking - as evidenced by so many people saying they aren't allowed to wear them to work - so why spend $$$ to add a different footbed to them so you can wear them? Instead if you are getting a custom orthotic get one that allows you to wear what you need to wear for work that society finds more normal looking. ... but for me, I don't care how ugly anyonelse finds them, the way they help my feet, I think they are beautiful to behold. Also, now, after almost 2 yrs of 100% birks, I am able to wear other fashionable shoes for social occasions up to 4-6 hrs. at a time and then switch right back to the birks with no additional pain.


Re: Custom orthotics-ideas

Leon on 5/12/99 at 00:00 (006772)

Sue,
One question is: who did you get the custom orthotics from (podiatrist, etc.) and what does he/she say about your pain? The first couple of days that I had my orthotics I was feeling a sharp pain up the side of my leg and sharpest in the hip area. I was sure that they had sent me the wrong orthotics but the pain went away after a couple of days. Then, it felt like the orthotics were causing p.f. in my other foot, so at one point I was ready to give up on the orthotics. However, I described what was going on to the podiatrist and he had me stick with them - suggested wearing them less, etc. but you are not wearing them very much so that wouldn't help you. I think you need to find out from whoever you got them from whether this is a normal part of your body adjusting to the orthotics or whether they have been improperly made. Re: not fitting in shoes, my podiatrist had me bring in the shoes I would be wearing (2 pairs of running shoes and a pair of Rockports that I wear to work) and cut out the heel area so the orthotics would sit in the back of the shoes. By doing this, the rest of the shoe liner (or footbed, as you called it) was intact and it doesn't feel like I'm walking on concrete. It's a bit strange to cut into a perfectly good shoe, but hey if it works and takes away the pain, it's worth it. After wearing my orthotics for about 3 months, my podiatrist reduced the orthotics a little bit (1mm) because I was still complaining about some soreness in my arch. At any rate, I would talk to whoever you got them from about properly fitting them into the shoes that you are wearing. Good luck!

Re: Custom orthotics-ideas- suggestion

Yvonne on 5/12/99 at 00:00 (006778)

something I have done to make my 3/4 orthotics fit better in the shoe is: remove the foot bed (sometimes it has an arch in it and will not work well with your custome orthos). and buy a pair of cheap flat replacement shoe liners and put them in the bottom of the shoe then the orthodic on top. This will also eliminate your orthidic from moving around, my shoes are slippery underneath so it helped me.

Cutting them works good, but becareful when doing it...so you get a perfect fit. After wearing the flat liners for a bit, the line will develope in them (where the orthodic stops), then I cut mine if i feel the need--more exact cut.


Re: Custom orthotics

CrabbyAss2 on 5/12/99 at 00:00 (006790)

I suggest You go back to the podiatrist and voice your complaints about the orthotics and demand (or politely insist) that they be re-adjusted, they are suppose to be helping your feet, not hindering you.

Re: Custom orthotics

WANDA on 5/12/99 at 00:00 (006793)

I had the same problem you did but went back and he sent them back to the people who made them and they put a soft extender of some soft cushion stuff and they stopped at my toes go back and tell the problem to the one who sold it to you I feel real sure they'll fix it,but mine still hurt my arch at times and I agree with you on when you take the cushion out of the shoe there goes your comf. zone of the shoe good luck

Re: Custom orthotics

Alison on 5/14/99 at 00:00 (006848)

My reply is under 'Finally a little relief'

Re: Custom orthotics for Berkinstocks? Why bother?

Diane R. on 5/02/99 at 00:00 (006454)

I would question why anyone would do this - as the birks come with a cork footbed that is better than custom orthotics - at least for many PF people - and just my opinion from experience with custom othotics that cost me $300. Those 'custom orthotics' were totally painful and worsened my PF and the birks have healed me. I don't use 'cured' as the word, as I feel if I would abuse my feet it could bring back the PF with a vengence - but with common sense I am pain free.

All that said, I can't speak for those who have had surgery on their feet because their foot anatomy has been disturbed & with scar tissue, nerve entrapments etc, maybe birks are not for them anymore but if you haven't had a rupture from cortisone shots or surgery, I haven't found anything better than the birk footbed...so why pay more $$ to mess with a good thing?

Also, birks are truly not the greatest looking - as evidenced by so many people saying they aren't allowed to wear them to work - so why spend $$$ to add a different footbed to them so you can wear them? Instead if you are getting a custom orthotic get one that allows you to wear what you need to wear for work that society finds more normal looking. ... but for me, I don't care how ugly anyonelse finds them, the way they help my feet, I think they are beautiful to behold. Also, now, after almost 2 yrs of 100% birks, I am able to wear other fashionable shoes for social occasions up to 4-6 hrs. at a time and then switch right back to the birks with no additional pain.


Re: Custom orthotics-ideas

Leon on 5/12/99 at 00:00 (006772)

Sue,
One question is: who did you get the custom orthotics from (podiatrist, etc.) and what does he/she say about your pain? The first couple of days that I had my orthotics I was feeling a sharp pain up the side of my leg and sharpest in the hip area. I was sure that they had sent me the wrong orthotics but the pain went away after a couple of days. Then, it felt like the orthotics were causing p.f. in my other foot, so at one point I was ready to give up on the orthotics. However, I described what was going on to the podiatrist and he had me stick with them - suggested wearing them less, etc. but you are not wearing them very much so that wouldn't help you. I think you need to find out from whoever you got them from whether this is a normal part of your body adjusting to the orthotics or whether they have been improperly made. Re: not fitting in shoes, my podiatrist had me bring in the shoes I would be wearing (2 pairs of running shoes and a pair of Rockports that I wear to work) and cut out the heel area so the orthotics would sit in the back of the shoes. By doing this, the rest of the shoe liner (or footbed, as you called it) was intact and it doesn't feel like I'm walking on concrete. It's a bit strange to cut into a perfectly good shoe, but hey if it works and takes away the pain, it's worth it. After wearing my orthotics for about 3 months, my podiatrist reduced the orthotics a little bit (1mm) because I was still complaining about some soreness in my arch. At any rate, I would talk to whoever you got them from about properly fitting them into the shoes that you are wearing. Good luck!

Re: Custom orthotics-ideas- suggestion

Yvonne on 5/12/99 at 00:00 (006778)

something I have done to make my 3/4 orthotics fit better in the shoe is: remove the foot bed (sometimes it has an arch in it and will not work well with your custome orthos). and buy a pair of cheap flat replacement shoe liners and put them in the bottom of the shoe then the orthodic on top. This will also eliminate your orthidic from moving around, my shoes are slippery underneath so it helped me.

Cutting them works good, but becareful when doing it...so you get a perfect fit. After wearing the flat liners for a bit, the line will develope in them (where the orthodic stops), then I cut mine if i feel the need--more exact cut.


Re: Custom orthotics

CrabbyAss2 on 5/12/99 at 00:00 (006790)

I suggest You go back to the podiatrist and voice your complaints about the orthotics and demand (or politely insist) that they be re-adjusted, they are suppose to be helping your feet, not hindering you.

Re: Custom orthotics

WANDA on 5/12/99 at 00:00 (006793)

I had the same problem you did but went back and he sent them back to the people who made them and they put a soft extender of some soft cushion stuff and they stopped at my toes go back and tell the problem to the one who sold it to you I feel real sure they'll fix it,but mine still hurt my arch at times and I agree with you on when you take the cushion out of the shoe there goes your comf. zone of the shoe good luck

Re: Custom orthotics

Alison on 5/14/99 at 00:00 (006848)

My reply is under 'Finally a little relief'