Home The Book Dr Articles Products Message Boards Journal Articles Search Our Surveys Surgery ESWT Dr Messages Find Good Drs video

Re: Tape

Posted by andi k on 6/15/99 at 00:00 (007837)

Hi Lee, I still have the cloth tape that my physical therapist gave me. We have stores here that sell medical supplies such as braces, wheelchairs, etc. I'm sure they have these stores in every city and although I haven't checked, I bet they carry the tape. Taping takes a little practice. Scott's document shows an example of how to tape. If you do it and you find that the back of your heal hurts, don't fret, it's just too tight. Also, the sole of your foot will eventualy start to hurt if your skin gets folded under the tape. When it's done right, it relieves all of the pain! Good luck!

Re: Tape

Rick R on 2/25/00 at 00:00 (016417)

Annette,

I have sent this to several people and I suspect my description of taping (#3) leaves a bit to be desired. Let me know what you think. You might want to use the pre-wrap stuff that you can buy at the drug store prior to taping. It is easy to use compared to my paper towel technique. If I accuire the technology to scan a photo or video I will. I'm still working on fire. This taping method won't be comfortable but then again you are a runner. I'm thrilled when my knees hurt, because it means the feet are going strong!

Hope this helps.

1) Massage at night and in the morning. I don't know if it helps but it sure feels good. If for no other reason, favoring the heels plays havoc with everything else in the feet. I couldn't massage the bottom of the heels while I was all messed up but I worked in from the sides.

2) Stretch, the calf stretch hands against the wall, step back and get the foot pulled back, don't bounce, steady pull. First thing in the morning before adding any tape that will restrict the motion. Also at night before bed. Be careful not to hit the stretching too hard. It may sound too bizarre to believe but I could handle light running, taped up, before I could stretch much at all.

3) Tape. This one is a hard sell and harder to describe. The absolute key factor for me is arch support I'm a bit flat footed so this may not be as important for others, however, it is my opinion that it is the single most critical factor for many of us. I went through all sorts of magic heel pads and cups that did nothing (alone). When I went to the arch support path I was on to the solution. You have to be ready to go through some real hell here because if you tape up your skin is going to get irritated, even without having the sticky stuff in contact. First I use paper towels as a gauze. I take 3 together and fold the three along the long axis. Then I wrap them around the ankle and foot. You might need help holding the 'gauze' in place first, or have a small piece of tape ready to hold the towels on while you get the duct tape ready. Next the duct tape (that's right 11 mil industrial strength from Home Depot) is wrapped from under the arch around the ankle then 3 - 4 times around the foot pulling the arch in tightly near the heel. This wrap is similar to what is done for a sprained ankle. I skipped a step; I apply Vaseline to the points that get the most irritated, on the front of the ankle and behind the achilles. I used bag balm (for cow udders) to begin with until I ran out and toughened up. If you tape tight enough to help the heel it will hurt the rest of your foot the first couple of days. I pull so hard that I can actually break the tape. I have never felt like I'm cutting the circulation. The tension will ease up a bit after you're on your feet for a while. I may take some time to perfect the technique. I make sure I keep the taping from the middle of the arch back to the heel. I do go around the ankle but not tightly. Don't tape too close to the front of the foot. I don't think the meditarsals(SP?) like to be squeezed together, mine will protest mightily if I invade their territory with my duct tape.

4) Wrap. After the tape I use an ace bandage in a similar manner as the tape. I have some rubber arch supports that I wrap in with the bandage. I have had these since I was my youngest child's age and have not seen anything like them since. I live in fear of loosing these or seeing them eventually disintegrate. I'm certain I can manufacture my own one way or another but what a pain in the neck that will be. I have used just the tape with orthotics but less effectively. I have also wrapped the orthotics in with the bandage but you can only get a couple of wraps in since it gets a bit bulky to pack into a shoe. I also have gel type heel pads that I wrap in with the bandage. These pads don't do anything 99.9% of the time but for that occasional miscalculation or hard cut to avoid a car, causing me to put pressure on the heel/s, I'm glad they are there. This is my running set-up that I still use. I used just the tape and orthotics (not wrapped in) all day every day for about 8 years I guess. This places a premium on stretching in the morning and at night since you are constrained by tape all day. You don't want to shorten the tendon.

5) Running shoes. I don't know if you can wear them at work but if you can do so, if not, use them as much as you can. Don't get cheap here buy the best you can. I am in love with my Asic's. Can't comment on Birks but they sound like a solid daytime alternative. They are so soft and have such good arch support that for the left side after, surgery 3 years ago, I can go to just tape and no orthotic, the shoe is better by itself. For the right side I always go the full tape and wrap for running. Balancing the height isn't a problem since I stay up on the balls of my feet with just about 0 heel contact.

6) Ice. After any physical exertion even PM stretching before bed, ice up. After you stretch and ice at night do not put those sore feet back on the floor. Crawl to bed or whatever else you need to do but stay off the feet. I only used the ice in the first few months of my last return to running. Overall I'm not a big ice fan. Prior to the next attempt to run I would use heat before bed.

7) Drugs. If you are on anti inflamitories you may find as I did that you get 90%+ of the benefit only taking them before bed. The real key here is to attack the inflammation with massage, ice,heat, drugs and then allow as much time as you can for the healing process to work prior to causing any more stress. If you do all of the above only to irritate the darned things by walking before bed you won't get any where near the overnight healing. I have found that ibuprofen works as well or better than the fancy expensive stuff. Ask your Dr. how many you can take, I'm suggesting a prescription level dose from prior to off the shelf availibility. I don't want to play doctor least I contribute to the delinquency of a liver.



Re: Tape

Rick R on 3/08/00 at 00:00 (017005)

Barb,

Check my 2/25 post to Annette. If I can be of any further assistance let me know. That post included my entire bag of tricks that has allowed me to get back to running. I hope things work out for you!

Rick


Re: Tape

Barbb on 3/08/00 at 00:00 (017030)

Thanks Rick...will go and read it....Barbb

Re: Tape

Rick R on 2/25/00 at 00:00 (016417)

Annette,

I have sent this to several people and I suspect my description of taping (#3) leaves a bit to be desired. Let me know what you think. You might want to use the pre-wrap stuff that you can buy at the drug store prior to taping. It is easy to use compared to my paper towel technique. If I accuire the technology to scan a photo or video I will. I'm still working on fire. This taping method won't be comfortable but then again you are a runner. I'm thrilled when my knees hurt, because it means the feet are going strong!

Hope this helps.

1) Massage at night and in the morning. I don't know if it helps but it sure feels good. If for no other reason, favoring the heels plays havoc with everything else in the feet. I couldn't massage the bottom of the heels while I was all messed up but I worked in from the sides.

2) Stretch, the calf stretch hands against the wall, step back and get the foot pulled back, don't bounce, steady pull. First thing in the morning before adding any tape that will restrict the motion. Also at night before bed. Be careful not to hit the stretching too hard. It may sound too bizarre to believe but I could handle light running, taped up, before I could stretch much at all.

3) Tape. This one is a hard sell and harder to describe. The absolute key factor for me is arch support I'm a bit flat footed so this may not be as important for others, however, it is my opinion that it is the single most critical factor for many of us. I went through all sorts of magic heel pads and cups that did nothing (alone). When I went to the arch support path I was on to the solution. You have to be ready to go through some real hell here because if you tape up your skin is going to get irritated, even without having the sticky stuff in contact. First I use paper towels as a gauze. I take 3 together and fold the three along the long axis. Then I wrap them around the ankle and foot. You might need help holding the 'gauze' in place first, or have a small piece of tape ready to hold the towels on while you get the duct tape ready. Next the duct tape (that's right 11 mil industrial strength from Home Depot) is wrapped from under the arch around the ankle then 3 - 4 times around the foot pulling the arch in tightly near the heel. This wrap is similar to what is done for a sprained ankle. I skipped a step; I apply Vaseline to the points that get the most irritated, on the front of the ankle and behind the achilles. I used bag balm (for cow udders) to begin with until I ran out and toughened up. If you tape tight enough to help the heel it will hurt the rest of your foot the first couple of days. I pull so hard that I can actually break the tape. I have never felt like I'm cutting the circulation. The tension will ease up a bit after you're on your feet for a while. I may take some time to perfect the technique. I make sure I keep the taping from the middle of the arch back to the heel. I do go around the ankle but not tightly. Don't tape too close to the front of the foot. I don't think the meditarsals(SP?) like to be squeezed together, mine will protest mightily if I invade their territory with my duct tape.

4) Wrap. After the tape I use an ace bandage in a similar manner as the tape. I have some rubber arch supports that I wrap in with the bandage. I have had these since I was my youngest child's age and have not seen anything like them since. I live in fear of loosing these or seeing them eventually disintegrate. I'm certain I can manufacture my own one way or another but what a pain in the neck that will be. I have used just the tape with orthotics but less effectively. I have also wrapped the orthotics in with the bandage but you can only get a couple of wraps in since it gets a bit bulky to pack into a shoe. I also have gel type heel pads that I wrap in with the bandage. These pads don't do anything 99.9% of the time but for that occasional miscalculation or hard cut to avoid a car, causing me to put pressure on the heel/s, I'm glad they are there. This is my running set-up that I still use. I used just the tape and orthotics (not wrapped in) all day every day for about 8 years I guess. This places a premium on stretching in the morning and at night since you are constrained by tape all day. You don't want to shorten the tendon.

5) Running shoes. I don't know if you can wear them at work but if you can do so, if not, use them as much as you can. Don't get cheap here buy the best you can. I am in love with my Asic's. Can't comment on Birks but they sound like a solid daytime alternative. They are so soft and have such good arch support that for the left side after, surgery 3 years ago, I can go to just tape and no orthotic, the shoe is better by itself. For the right side I always go the full tape and wrap for running. Balancing the height isn't a problem since I stay up on the balls of my feet with just about 0 heel contact.

6) Ice. After any physical exertion even PM stretching before bed, ice up. After you stretch and ice at night do not put those sore feet back on the floor. Crawl to bed or whatever else you need to do but stay off the feet. I only used the ice in the first few months of my last return to running. Overall I'm not a big ice fan. Prior to the next attempt to run I would use heat before bed.

7) Drugs. If you are on anti inflamitories you may find as I did that you get 90%+ of the benefit only taking them before bed. The real key here is to attack the inflammation with massage, ice,heat, drugs and then allow as much time as you can for the healing process to work prior to causing any more stress. If you do all of the above only to irritate the darned things by walking before bed you won't get any where near the overnight healing. I have found that ibuprofen works as well or better than the fancy expensive stuff. Ask your Dr. how many you can take, I'm suggesting a prescription level dose from prior to off the shelf availibility. I don't want to play doctor least I contribute to the delinquency of a liver.



Re: Tape

Rick R on 3/08/00 at 00:00 (017005)

Barb,

Check my 2/25 post to Annette. If I can be of any further assistance let me know. That post included my entire bag of tricks that has allowed me to get back to running. I hope things work out for you!

Rick


Re: Tape

Barbb on 3/08/00 at 00:00 (017030)

Thanks Rick...will go and read it....Barbb