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I have to say that I disagree with most of these people---

Posted by Carol E. on 9/16/99 at 00:00 (010996)

I think that continually straining and stressing the PF beyond the point of agony can only do more harm and prevent healing to take place. Of course, I feel that stretching and exercising is crucial to healing and I would never recommend that anyone just vegetate in a chair for the next 6 months but I attribute my healing to the fact that I was able to stay off of my foot for the most part and do the things I needed to do around the house in intervals during the day so that when the pain got bad I could sit down and take it easy for a little while. My PF started a year ago and for 6 months the pain was unbearable. After I found this site, I began to take better care of my foot and stayed off of it as much as possible. I did the stretches, the icing, put an arch support in my shoe, didn't go barefoot, etc. This along with my low-carb diet have all but cured my PF. It no longer bothered me to go barefoot around the house and in fact my arch support started to bother me so I took it out of my shoe two weeks ago and my foot has felt wonderful ever since---even in the evenings. Now I just have a bit of tightness and only tiny twinges of pain now and again. I'm on my way!!! Also, I have a neighbor who is a school cook and she is in constant pain all during the school year when she stands all day on those hard floors but her PF vastly improves during the summer when she stays home and spends more time off of her foot. What does this tell you?

I know that everyone who has a job where they are on their feet all day cannot possibly quit their job---but I do think that it prevents or prolongs the healing process.


Re: I have to say that I disagree with most of these people---

Jane B. on 9/17/99 at 00:00 (011011)

I worked in a hard floor environment(tile,cement). I first developed PF in one foot and a few weeks later the other. I worked my job for 8 months after this. I think it was a big mistake!! I had to leave my job because the PF got unbearable. By the time I quit my job I couldnt drive my car because of the pain I experienced pressing on the gas pedal. I believe if I addressed and aggressively cared(the treatments I did including rest) for my PF in the beginning that I might not be where I am today..PF*5 years. I tried to go back to my profession but unable to, so I am now in school again being retrained for desk job. This is just my opinion in looking back on my situation. If you do at some point leave your job I would suggest looking into workmans comp.. I don't know if anyone has ever gotten it for pf but it is worth a try. I regret not doing it.
Again, this is just my opinion whether it would have worked or not who knows.

Re: I have to say that I disagree with most of these people---

Jane B. on 9/17/99 at 00:00 (011011)

I worked in a hard floor environment(tile,cement). I first developed PF in one foot and a few weeks later the other. I worked my job for 8 months after this. I think it was a big mistake!! I had to leave my job because the PF got unbearable. By the time I quit my job I couldnt drive my car because of the pain I experienced pressing on the gas pedal. I believe if I addressed and aggressively cared(the treatments I did including rest) for my PF in the beginning that I might not be where I am today..PF*5 years. I tried to go back to my profession but unable to, so I am now in school again being retrained for desk job. This is just my opinion in looking back on my situation. If you do at some point leave your job I would suggest looking into workmans comp.. I don't know if anyone has ever gotten it for pf but it is worth a try. I regret not doing it.
Again, this is just my opinion whether it would have worked or not who knows.