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ultrasound

Posted by john h on 10/23/99 at 00:00 (011990)

having been to 3 orthopedic surgeons and 3 poditrist and read a lot i never once heard anyone mention 'ultrasound' to me. can someone tell me what they are looking for with an ultrasound and why are physicians in the U.S. not suggesting it? My daughter is a x-ray tech at a large hospital and i asked her to inquire with the radiologist and technicians as to whether they ever perform ultrsound on the feet and for what purpose. my worry is this may be just another revenue producer

Re: ultrasound

Trish on 10/23/99 at 00:00 (011991)

I would also like to know about ultrasound as a diagnostic tool.....I've had PF for almost 8 yrs., and seen numerous dr.'s and not ONE has suggested ultrasound for this purpose. I'm curious as to Dr. Galea's (ossatron Dr. in Toronto) use of it. I've had ultrasound at a physiotherapist's and chiropractor to relieve symptoms (not much success), but never used to tell whether or not I have PF. I am Canadian, so in response to John H., from what I know, the Canadian Dr.,s aren't using it either (except Dr. Galea).

Re: ultrasound

Doug P on 10/23/99 at 00:00 (011993)

Ultrasound being used as a means of detecting plantar fascitis seems to be a very new thing and not many people have the equipment. I spoke to Dr. Galea's nurse about it and she said not many people have the machinery. Basically it seems to detect the thickness of the plantar fascia. Those people with Plantar Fascitis seem to have a thicker plantar fascia than those who don't (perhaps this is inflammation or maybe scar tissue?). I am going to see someone in the Chicago area who does it so some American doctors do it. If you live in the area, I can give you his name. I can maybe tell you more about it after I get the procedure done.

Re: ultrasound

Doug P on 10/23/99 at 00:00 (011994)

I wanted to add that the clinical term for the test is a 'Musculo-skeletal ultrasound' I believe I have the spelling correct.

Re: ultrasound

Martha B. on 10/23/99 at 00:00 (011996)

The ultrasound doctor Galea sent me to, showed me the sonogram(ultrasound) screen and showed me how he read it.He informed me this is the same machine they do sonograms for pregnant women.It just that alot of techs and Drs. dont know how to use it for PF.He measures the thickness of the facia with 2-3 mm being normal.The test was simple and I know it cost around $75.How long has it been since u had any kind of test in the states for that price??

Re: ultrasound

Linda K. on 10/23/99 at 00:00 (011998)

I have had several ultrasound treatments with no relief at all.

Re: ultrasound

Gordon on 10/24/99 at 00:00 (012002)

My wife develops software at Siemens where they make ultrasound imaging equipment that allows a doc to see tissue with extreme clarity. Compared to what they had just a few years ago it is a major improvement and I think it will be much quicker and cheaper to use than an MRI(not sure). I think that the latest and greatest stuff is not available to a lot of docs yet but it will be coming soon.

I have tried ultrasound therapy where they use a different type of ultrasound tool to basically heat up deep tissue to promote blood flow and healing. It seemed to help but I think that deep massage and exercise has similar results.

One thing to keep in mind is that the foot has the poorest circulation of any part of your body yet it undergoes the highest stress and abuse loads. So it is often the first thing to go when your body is out of wack. In order to heal, exercise and oxygen must be stimulated to the foot by some means, stress must be lowered by reducing weight or ellimating foot stressing activity, but first you must elliminate what caused your body to go out of wack --- what you stick in your mouth, and your state of mental/physical health.



Re: ultrasound

Sarah on 10/24/99 at 00:00 (012004)

They didn't do ultrasound during my physical therapy at a diagnostic tool, but as a treatment. The warm elictical currents would go deep into the foot providing relief. I was surprised when I read Lee M.'s treatment of 30 minutes. It felt so great that I asked my physical therapist why she couldn't do it longer. Her reply was that it would'cook' my foot. The heat goes deep into your foot and they can't see if they are burning you internally, I guess, until it is too late. Lee's treatments sound similar to my physical thereapy experiemce, only I didn't want to pay out of pocket for massage and the thought of someone massaging the most painful part of my body sounded tourturous.

Sarah


Re: ultrasound

Caryne on 10/24/99 at 00:00 (012005)

I to had the ultrasound treatments last May for 3 weeks. I went in to Pt 3 times a week for the treatments. THey really did not help me at all...felt ok but not much improvement

Re: ultrasound

Lee H on 10/25/99 at 00:00 (012027)

I also had ultrasound done as a treatment. It did absolutely nothing. I had massage by a pt. The first few minutes were extremely painful, then it felt ok. About an hour after each massage therapy my feet would be throbbing.

Re: ultrasound

Trish on 10/23/99 at 00:00 (011991)

I would also like to know about ultrasound as a diagnostic tool.....I've had PF for almost 8 yrs., and seen numerous dr.'s and not ONE has suggested ultrasound for this purpose. I'm curious as to Dr. Galea's (ossatron Dr. in Toronto) use of it. I've had ultrasound at a physiotherapist's and chiropractor to relieve symptoms (not much success), but never used to tell whether or not I have PF. I am Canadian, so in response to John H., from what I know, the Canadian Dr.,s aren't using it either (except Dr. Galea).

Re: ultrasound

Doug P on 10/23/99 at 00:00 (011993)

Ultrasound being used as a means of detecting plantar fascitis seems to be a very new thing and not many people have the equipment. I spoke to Dr. Galea's nurse about it and she said not many people have the machinery. Basically it seems to detect the thickness of the plantar fascia. Those people with Plantar Fascitis seem to have a thicker plantar fascia than those who don't (perhaps this is inflammation or maybe scar tissue?). I am going to see someone in the Chicago area who does it so some American doctors do it. If you live in the area, I can give you his name. I can maybe tell you more about it after I get the procedure done.

Re: ultrasound

Doug P on 10/23/99 at 00:00 (011994)

I wanted to add that the clinical term for the test is a 'Musculo-skeletal ultrasound' I believe I have the spelling correct.

Re: ultrasound

Martha B. on 10/23/99 at 00:00 (011996)

The ultrasound doctor Galea sent me to, showed me the sonogram(ultrasound) screen and showed me how he read it.He informed me this is the same machine they do sonograms for pregnant women.It just that alot of techs and Drs. dont know how to use it for PF.He measures the thickness of the facia with 2-3 mm being normal.The test was simple and I know it cost around $75.How long has it been since u had any kind of test in the states for that price??

Re: ultrasound

Linda K. on 10/23/99 at 00:00 (011998)

I have had several ultrasound treatments with no relief at all.

Re: ultrasound

Gordon on 10/24/99 at 00:00 (012002)

My wife develops software at Siemens where they make ultrasound imaging equipment that allows a doc to see tissue with extreme clarity. Compared to what they had just a few years ago it is a major improvement and I think it will be much quicker and cheaper to use than an MRI(not sure). I think that the latest and greatest stuff is not available to a lot of docs yet but it will be coming soon.

I have tried ultrasound therapy where they use a different type of ultrasound tool to basically heat up deep tissue to promote blood flow and healing. It seemed to help but I think that deep massage and exercise has similar results.

One thing to keep in mind is that the foot has the poorest circulation of any part of your body yet it undergoes the highest stress and abuse loads. So it is often the first thing to go when your body is out of wack. In order to heal, exercise and oxygen must be stimulated to the foot by some means, stress must be lowered by reducing weight or ellimating foot stressing activity, but first you must elliminate what caused your body to go out of wack --- what you stick in your mouth, and your state of mental/physical health.



Re: ultrasound

Sarah on 10/24/99 at 00:00 (012004)

They didn't do ultrasound during my physical therapy at a diagnostic tool, but as a treatment. The warm elictical currents would go deep into the foot providing relief. I was surprised when I read Lee M.'s treatment of 30 minutes. It felt so great that I asked my physical therapist why she couldn't do it longer. Her reply was that it would'cook' my foot. The heat goes deep into your foot and they can't see if they are burning you internally, I guess, until it is too late. Lee's treatments sound similar to my physical thereapy experiemce, only I didn't want to pay out of pocket for massage and the thought of someone massaging the most painful part of my body sounded tourturous.

Sarah


Re: ultrasound

Caryne on 10/24/99 at 00:00 (012005)

I to had the ultrasound treatments last May for 3 weeks. I went in to Pt 3 times a week for the treatments. THey really did not help me at all...felt ok but not much improvement

Re: ultrasound

Lee H on 10/25/99 at 00:00 (012027)

I also had ultrasound done as a treatment. It did absolutely nothing. I had massage by a pt. The first few minutes were extremely painful, then it felt ok. About an hour after each massage therapy my feet would be throbbing.