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Not yoga too?!?!?!?

Posted by wendyn on 10/30/99 at 00:00 (012177)

I have had PF in the past, now I have TTS. Others have both at the same time so I would suspect that whatever causes one, can contribute to the other.

PLEASE don't tell me that Yoga is a problem. I have had TTS for about a year now - and I was hoping to take up yoga after Christmas since there is so little now that I can do. Can't walk, jog, do aerobis, bike and I even have to watch what I do in the pool. I will be careful if I start Yoga.

My most recent specialist listed options for treating TTS as follows:

Rest and/or change in activity
Orthotics
Herbal Medicine
Anti-inflammitories
Physio with or with out accupuncture
Cortisone
Surgery

I'm moving into the final three (although I've tried Physio with no results, I am going to try accupuncture). I have already decided that I will not have cortisone - so surgery may be my final option.

I have good days and bad. Have had many better since switching to Birks - but still too many bad.

Today was bad. Had to stand in line at the drug store. Someone was exchanging merchandise. After about 5 minutes, I debated whether or not anyone would step on me if I just sat down on the floor and whether or not being stepped on was actually worse than having to stand up for even another second. If I hadn't gotten through when I did - I would have been sitting on the floor waiting. Cried all the way to the van. Don't know how I will tackle Christmas shopping. Had to go to the hardware store - used my cane for the first time in months.

At 30 years old, using a cane is humiliating. I constantly have to remind myself that there are young children that will never walk at all - and that my situation could always be worse. But somedays it's hard not to fall into the well of self pity.

I guess the only thing we can all do is hang in and keep believing we'll find the answer.



Re: Not yoga too?!?!?!?

alan k. on 10/31/99 at 00:00 (012183)

Dear Wendyn and others-- (questions of general interest are at end of message, preceeded by my personal blabbering)

I don't know if yoga is bad or not. The form I practice, which is related to what is called Astanga, has a lot of standing floor work and also some jumping around a bit, though if you are adept (I'm not) that jumping is supposed to be very soft.

I am still just trying to figure out what's wrong with me. Every theory I get is equally convincing, thus none of them are. I was at a website of a TTS sufferer who explained he got it from hiking, which he did for a living as a guide. He cannot hike again. So I, in the morbid state that neophytes to this scott's website might fall into, started thinking if he got it from his favorite activity, maybe I got it from mine (because of the repetitiveness). I am still not sure if I have TTS. Today I can't seem to reproduce the tingling in my toe by doing the tinnel test. It seems to me, though I am new to TTS, that it is much worse than PF in terms of prognosis. Is this true?

More on Yoga-- it really depends on what the class is like. You might tell the instructor about your condition, and avoid holding any standing poses for more than a few seconds. All the floor poses, by contrast, are likely to be beneficial for your condition, and also the peripheral problems of bad conditioning that your feet have brought on you. Better circulation, flexibility, and state of mind can't hurt your chances of recovery either. In general, take the gentlest class available, and immediately run from any teacher that doesn't appreciate or believe in your problem (should be rare).
Above all, I would recommend sitting meditation, which doesn't tax feet at all, and might help with keeping a level state of mind.

My mind has been pretty level for the last three months. The first two were a killer though. Still, I can't say I actually regret getting this since I got a good look-- especially the first two months when I was in shock-- at what it might be like to be paralyzed. I know what we have is only a tiny fraction of that, but still the disappointment and longing to be 'normal' must be similar. It is interesting and valuable to me to realize these things-- other stuff that used to bother me doesn't seem as big a deal anymore. I bet you may have experienced this and it is important to keep that in mind when you feel bad.

It's only since hearing about TTS that I have a new thing to feel bad about and adjust to. I wonder if I am seeing TTS in the right light-- it seems like something very difficult to be rid of, and the release surgery has been reproted to have much lower success rates than the surgeons claim. I hope TTS is not as bad as it looks. Acupuncture, for a nerve problem, however, seems like a likely direction to go in. I'm already out $2,000 (not my money- Visa's) since starting the fun, and don't know about the investment in acupuncture. It's important to get a good practicioner, and very rare, I imagine, to find anyone who has treatd TTS.

Anyway, I had some questions for you, wendyn, and any one else. Do you mind explaining your TTS symptoms for my comparison? I have generalized pain that gets to burning by the end of the day. I feel little in the arch and mostly where my feet hit the ground, around the edges, the ball, and the heel. I think I feel a little tingling and warmth at night, but I'm not sure, and I do feel morning ache as in PF. Ice provides temporary relief. I have made no, or negligible progress in five months. Is this similar to your symptoms? Have you gotten any better at all?

Secondly, you mentioned 'physio.' Is that physical therapy? If so, what exersizes do they do? I noticed you didn't mention stretching. Is that unrelated to TTS then (I'll still do it in case)? Is massage good or bad for TTS? What are the herbal therapies? (but I do have a pile of herbal pill bottles on my counter already). The TTS website guy recommends LIGA-tend, from Bio-chem, which is part of Country Life. IT has muccopolysacharides which I think are in aloe, and I found a bottle easily in the health food store. I have only taken three, but I have never, despite all the herbal remedies I've taken, ever experienced a single thing from any of them.

Finally, I had a question about TTS which I can't find in any of the literature, though it seems obvious to me. Why exactly do the feet hurt if the nerve is at the ankle? I can see why the nerves would be connected, but I don't see why standing on the feet and pressure on the sole of the foot would do anything to a nerve in the ankle. Why would icing the soles of the feet do anything for the ankle? I suppose there might be something about standing which puts pressure in the ankle, so then is the pain in the feet a sort of 'phantom' pain? Or is the whole nerve system there rendered extra sensitive so that the pressure on the soles actually also kicks in? I guess I can believe in the big PF monster but this little TTS thing is hard to fathom.

Anyway, thanks to anyone and everyone who might help me get to the bottom of this. I have doctors and podiatrists but they have not helped me in anyway. I have heard that neurologists are the people to see about TTS, though.

take care, alan


Re: Not yoga too?!?!?!?

lisa z on 10/31/99 at 00:00 (012210)

wendyn,

don't know about you but i have been getting christmas catalogs since september. i have no interest in standing in lines and limping through weeks of christmas shoping. using plastic and a 1-800 number while sitting in a chair is how i will be doing my shopping.


Re: Not yoga too?!?!?!?

alan k. on 10/31/99 at 00:00 (012183)

Dear Wendyn and others-- (questions of general interest are at end of message, preceeded by my personal blabbering)

I don't know if yoga is bad or not. The form I practice, which is related to what is called Astanga, has a lot of standing floor work and also some jumping around a bit, though if you are adept (I'm not) that jumping is supposed to be very soft.

I am still just trying to figure out what's wrong with me. Every theory I get is equally convincing, thus none of them are. I was at a website of a TTS sufferer who explained he got it from hiking, which he did for a living as a guide. He cannot hike again. So I, in the morbid state that neophytes to this scott's website might fall into, started thinking if he got it from his favorite activity, maybe I got it from mine (because of the repetitiveness). I am still not sure if I have TTS. Today I can't seem to reproduce the tingling in my toe by doing the tinnel test. It seems to me, though I am new to TTS, that it is much worse than PF in terms of prognosis. Is this true?

More on Yoga-- it really depends on what the class is like. You might tell the instructor about your condition, and avoid holding any standing poses for more than a few seconds. All the floor poses, by contrast, are likely to be beneficial for your condition, and also the peripheral problems of bad conditioning that your feet have brought on you. Better circulation, flexibility, and state of mind can't hurt your chances of recovery either. In general, take the gentlest class available, and immediately run from any teacher that doesn't appreciate or believe in your problem (should be rare).
Above all, I would recommend sitting meditation, which doesn't tax feet at all, and might help with keeping a level state of mind.

My mind has been pretty level for the last three months. The first two were a killer though. Still, I can't say I actually regret getting this since I got a good look-- especially the first two months when I was in shock-- at what it might be like to be paralyzed. I know what we have is only a tiny fraction of that, but still the disappointment and longing to be 'normal' must be similar. It is interesting and valuable to me to realize these things-- other stuff that used to bother me doesn't seem as big a deal anymore. I bet you may have experienced this and it is important to keep that in mind when you feel bad.

It's only since hearing about TTS that I have a new thing to feel bad about and adjust to. I wonder if I am seeing TTS in the right light-- it seems like something very difficult to be rid of, and the release surgery has been reproted to have much lower success rates than the surgeons claim. I hope TTS is not as bad as it looks. Acupuncture, for a nerve problem, however, seems like a likely direction to go in. I'm already out $2,000 (not my money- Visa's) since starting the fun, and don't know about the investment in acupuncture. It's important to get a good practicioner, and very rare, I imagine, to find anyone who has treatd TTS.

Anyway, I had some questions for you, wendyn, and any one else. Do you mind explaining your TTS symptoms for my comparison? I have generalized pain that gets to burning by the end of the day. I feel little in the arch and mostly where my feet hit the ground, around the edges, the ball, and the heel. I think I feel a little tingling and warmth at night, but I'm not sure, and I do feel morning ache as in PF. Ice provides temporary relief. I have made no, or negligible progress in five months. Is this similar to your symptoms? Have you gotten any better at all?

Secondly, you mentioned 'physio.' Is that physical therapy? If so, what exersizes do they do? I noticed you didn't mention stretching. Is that unrelated to TTS then (I'll still do it in case)? Is massage good or bad for TTS? What are the herbal therapies? (but I do have a pile of herbal pill bottles on my counter already). The TTS website guy recommends LIGA-tend, from Bio-chem, which is part of Country Life. IT has muccopolysacharides which I think are in aloe, and I found a bottle easily in the health food store. I have only taken three, but I have never, despite all the herbal remedies I've taken, ever experienced a single thing from any of them.

Finally, I had a question about TTS which I can't find in any of the literature, though it seems obvious to me. Why exactly do the feet hurt if the nerve is at the ankle? I can see why the nerves would be connected, but I don't see why standing on the feet and pressure on the sole of the foot would do anything to a nerve in the ankle. Why would icing the soles of the feet do anything for the ankle? I suppose there might be something about standing which puts pressure in the ankle, so then is the pain in the feet a sort of 'phantom' pain? Or is the whole nerve system there rendered extra sensitive so that the pressure on the soles actually also kicks in? I guess I can believe in the big PF monster but this little TTS thing is hard to fathom.

Anyway, thanks to anyone and everyone who might help me get to the bottom of this. I have doctors and podiatrists but they have not helped me in anyway. I have heard that neurologists are the people to see about TTS, though.

take care, alan


Re: Not yoga too?!?!?!?

lisa z on 10/31/99 at 00:00 (012210)

wendyn,

don't know about you but i have been getting christmas catalogs since september. i have no interest in standing in lines and limping through weeks of christmas shoping. using plastic and a 1-800 number while sitting in a chair is how i will be doing my shopping.