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ketoprofen cream

Posted by johnv on 11/13/99 at 00:00 (012576)

Several messages have discussed difficulties in obtaining ibuprofen cream--a podiatrist prescribed some ketoprofen (10%) cream, which seems to provide some relief. Not all pharmacies carry it--I think they mix it up in a sink in the back room or something.

Re: ketoprofen cream

Rick on 11/15/99 at 00:00 (012680)

I have checked with several Doctors and Pharmacists all agree that you cannot absorb ibuprofen through the skin. I was hoping it would help but I'm always double checking for useless remedies and wasted money.

Re: ketoprofen cream

Scott R on 11/15/99 at 00:00 (012698)

Did the doctors and pharmacists say why they think it cannot absorb through the skin? In reviewing the messages posted here, the ibuprofen cream has a higher success rate than anything else reported anywhere. The only problem is that there aren't enough responses to be sure that it's not a statistical error. If it's not the ibuprofen, then it could be the carrier compound the product is using (like DMSO in veterinary medicine) and the ibuprofen is just a marketing gimmick. Are ketaprofen and ibuprofen so different that one can absorb and one not? When the chemical names end the same way, they are of the same class of compounds, with similar biological properties.

Re: ketoprofen cream

Rick on 11/15/99 at 00:00 (012680)

I have checked with several Doctors and Pharmacists all agree that you cannot absorb ibuprofen through the skin. I was hoping it would help but I'm always double checking for useless remedies and wasted money.

Re: ketoprofen cream

Scott R on 11/15/99 at 00:00 (012698)

Did the doctors and pharmacists say why they think it cannot absorb through the skin? In reviewing the messages posted here, the ibuprofen cream has a higher success rate than anything else reported anywhere. The only problem is that there aren't enough responses to be sure that it's not a statistical error. If it's not the ibuprofen, then it could be the carrier compound the product is using (like DMSO in veterinary medicine) and the ibuprofen is just a marketing gimmick. Are ketaprofen and ibuprofen so different that one can absorb and one not? When the chemical names end the same way, they are of the same class of compounds, with similar biological properties.