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that is classic tts, as far as I know

Posted by alan k on 12/15/99 at 00:00 (013796)

That is classic tts symtpoms. Running up to the toe, and the numbness and the continued sensation even off your feet.

You should have an electric conduction test done also.

The sensations come from the entrapped nerve, they say.

Sounds like you are in my boat. Actually, I remember we had a lot in common before this too.

Let us all know what happens when you pursue this with medical practicioner. I can't find anyone yet who knows a thing about tts in any complicated or honest way, except on this board.

Your symptoms are even more classic tts than mine. Definitely pursue this.

alan k


Re: that is classic tts, as far as I know RE Alan

Laurie R on 12/15/99 at 00:00 (013797)

I did ask my doctor ( Podiatrist) if I had TTS and he said no because I did'nt have pain going up my leg.I seem to think I do have it .Now my question is can you have TTS without having the pain going up your leg? What do you think. Let me know. Thanks very much Laurie R

Re: that is classic tts, as far as I know RE Alan

wendyn on 12/15/99 at 00:00 (013799)

Laurie, as you know, I am not a doctor....

BUT....when I had a 'positive Tinnel's sign'...I never had pain up the back of my leg. Only shooting pain into my foot and toes. This, as I understand, is what they're looking for (feels like mild electric shocks). Although I have had pain in my leg, it has never come on as a result of whacking the inside of my ankle. And I must caution, if you try smashing all over the inside of your ankle in search of a positive sign, you may end up with a VERY sore foot.

Laurie, I really, really, think it's time you got another opinion. Try a sports doctor, or preferably an orthepedic surgeon...I wouldn't start out by telling him/her what YOU think you have...but describe your symptoms and see if he/she picks it up. It IS a rare condition, but your symptoms sound exactly like mine and Alan's (classic). Not that you want TTS, but better to know than not know....and I have NEVER been asked if the pain was going up my leg from Tinnel's sign.

ps...I have to emphasize what John H has been saying, the nerve conduction tests are subjective at best. It is entirely possible to have TTS and a normal test (so be ready for this possibility Alan). I even read one site that said that it is very rare to find someone with TTS WITH a positive test (the exception rather than the rule. My results are still up the air...most of you will recall my ridiculous episode when the doctor and I disagreed on how many feet I have problems with....you'd think that the ability to count higher than one would be a prerequisite to passing medical school..NO...I'M not bitter...

I am having the test redone in February, it is not 'painful', but I am not looking forward to having it done again!!!!! It's much like sticking body parts in an electrical socket and measuring the response....things to look forward to in the new year...


Re: that is classic tts, as far as I know RE Laurie

alan k on 12/16/99 at 00:00 (013803)

No one ever asked me about pain up my leg either. Judging from what I hear on this board, and even my two podiatrists(and believe me I don't think very highly of them), this person you are seeing may be seriously misinformed, even worse than my quacks.

Defintely get another opinion.

alan k



Re: that is classic tts, as far as I know RE Alan

john h on 12/16/99 at 00:00 (013825)

it is my opinion that TTS which might require surgery is much more difficult to diagnos that PF. The electric condution test is not a gold standard and its results are very subjective. if i suspected tts and or PF i would go the pf surgery (conventional) first or as i did in real life did them both at the same time. i think a large percentage of tts surgeries are at best a shot in the dark. compared to a simple fascia release (15-20% of fascia release) the tts seems much more complex with a much less chance of a fix. i realize that most poditrist now use an endoscope to perform the fascia release. most surgeons use the open procedure as they can better see the neves and what they cutting. i chose the surgeon and open procedure and would do so again.

Re: that is classic tts, as far as I know RE Alan

Janet on 12/17/99 at 00:00 (013845)

Laurie,

My orthopod told me that with nerve entrapment, pain and discomfort always occurs distal to the entrapped nerve. That is, the pain occurs below where the nerve is trapped--not above.


Re: that is classic tts, as far as I know RE Alan

Laurie R on 12/15/99 at 00:00 (013797)

I did ask my doctor ( Podiatrist) if I had TTS and he said no because I did'nt have pain going up my leg.I seem to think I do have it .Now my question is can you have TTS without having the pain going up your leg? What do you think. Let me know. Thanks very much Laurie R

Re: that is classic tts, as far as I know RE Alan

wendyn on 12/15/99 at 00:00 (013799)

Laurie, as you know, I am not a doctor....

BUT....when I had a 'positive Tinnel's sign'...I never had pain up the back of my leg. Only shooting pain into my foot and toes. This, as I understand, is what they're looking for (feels like mild electric shocks). Although I have had pain in my leg, it has never come on as a result of whacking the inside of my ankle. And I must caution, if you try smashing all over the inside of your ankle in search of a positive sign, you may end up with a VERY sore foot.

Laurie, I really, really, think it's time you got another opinion. Try a sports doctor, or preferably an orthepedic surgeon...I wouldn't start out by telling him/her what YOU think you have...but describe your symptoms and see if he/she picks it up. It IS a rare condition, but your symptoms sound exactly like mine and Alan's (classic). Not that you want TTS, but better to know than not know....and I have NEVER been asked if the pain was going up my leg from Tinnel's sign.

ps...I have to emphasize what John H has been saying, the nerve conduction tests are subjective at best. It is entirely possible to have TTS and a normal test (so be ready for this possibility Alan). I even read one site that said that it is very rare to find someone with TTS WITH a positive test (the exception rather than the rule. My results are still up the air...most of you will recall my ridiculous episode when the doctor and I disagreed on how many feet I have problems with....you'd think that the ability to count higher than one would be a prerequisite to passing medical school..NO...I'M not bitter...

I am having the test redone in February, it is not 'painful', but I am not looking forward to having it done again!!!!! It's much like sticking body parts in an electrical socket and measuring the response....things to look forward to in the new year...


Re: that is classic tts, as far as I know RE Laurie

alan k on 12/16/99 at 00:00 (013803)

No one ever asked me about pain up my leg either. Judging from what I hear on this board, and even my two podiatrists(and believe me I don't think very highly of them), this person you are seeing may be seriously misinformed, even worse than my quacks.

Defintely get another opinion.

alan k



Re: that is classic tts, as far as I know RE Alan

john h on 12/16/99 at 00:00 (013825)

it is my opinion that TTS which might require surgery is much more difficult to diagnos that PF. The electric condution test is not a gold standard and its results are very subjective. if i suspected tts and or PF i would go the pf surgery (conventional) first or as i did in real life did them both at the same time. i think a large percentage of tts surgeries are at best a shot in the dark. compared to a simple fascia release (15-20% of fascia release) the tts seems much more complex with a much less chance of a fix. i realize that most poditrist now use an endoscope to perform the fascia release. most surgeons use the open procedure as they can better see the neves and what they cutting. i chose the surgeon and open procedure and would do so again.

Re: that is classic tts, as far as I know RE Alan

Janet on 12/17/99 at 00:00 (013845)

Laurie,

My orthopod told me that with nerve entrapment, pain and discomfort always occurs distal to the entrapped nerve. That is, the pain occurs below where the nerve is trapped--not above.