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be aggressive if your pf is new

Posted by michael s on 12/17/99 at 00:00 (013867)

I meant to put this with the other comments I put on the new questionnaire, but looking back after twelve years I think anyone who has fairly recently been diagnosed with pf should try to treat it as quickly and energetically as possible. I suspect that for some of us failing to quickly find a helpful treatment contributed to the length of time we would suffer. Certainly the chiropractor who is trying ART therapy on me now has said he'd be more confident of helping me if I'd come to him years before, when I had much less scar tissue and maybe less inflammation. I'm probably just being wistful- I don't actually know what I could have done differently,since I did not hesitate when I first had pain to seek help. But I am sorry that it was ten months before my (second) podiatrist got me custom orthotics, the only thing that has helped me significantly. Back then of course there was no wonderful cyberspace message board to seek advice. So,though I think this has been mentioned many times before, for those of you who are new DON'T let any doctor take a casual attitude toward your pain. I'd suggest that if a standard treatment - ice, rest, stretching, massage or the like - doesn't work for you within a few weeks, go try other things right away, until you start getting some relief.

Re: be aggressive if your pf is new -- YES!

Nancy S. on 12/18/99 at 00:00 (013894)

Yes, that IS excellent advice. In my 8 months since PF with heel spur began, my podiatrist tried a cortisone shot, generic inserts, night splint, custom orthotics (the only thing that helped a little), and then had me scheduled for a now-canceled surgery. About rest, good shoes, icing, massage, stretching, taping, etc. -- HE SAID NOTHING! For eight months I could have been trying these basic things, and he taught me nothing. I have been continuing to injure my foot during all that time because of his silence or lack of interest. Scott's site and all the helpful message-writers have me now taking care of my foot in ways I didn't even know exist. I have so much more hope now. I've left that podiatrist and got my primary to refer me to a highly recommended osteopath who does physical therapy oriented treatments, so I'm hoping to learn more from him. In any case, there's no question that we have to educate ourselves and give many things a try, and leave any dr. who shows no interest in helping you do that. Good luck everyone.

Re: be aggressive if your pf is new -- YES!

Dawn F. on 12/18/99 at 00:00 (013901)

Thank God for this site!! I just recently diagnosed myself with PF. I am a very active person and started having heel pain the day after I went out for a longer-than-usual run in September. Small aches and pains have never been unusual, but when this heep pain never went away, and just kept getting worse, I began to feel depressed (no need for happy pills yet :))

Is there really hope?? For one week I have been wearing running shoes or walking shoes 24 hours a day (yes, even while sleeping) and my foot hasn't felt this good since September!! My calves are rather over developed due to aggressive weight training when I was in my early 20's (15+ years ago). Does anyone know if the muscular calves are a plus or a minus as far as recovery goes? I am a bit traumatized by the drastic change in lifestyle I've has to under go in so short a time. I am hopeful in the last week, but is this really going to take 6 months or more to recover?


Re: be aggressive if your pf is new -- YES!

Nancy S. on 12/18/99 at 00:00 (013904)

Hi Dawn -- Yes, the change in lifestyle is traumatizing. I think we all are experiencing that, and it's hard. If you've already had improvement by wearing running shoes all the time, your case may be a faster cure than some others, I think it's a hopeful sign. But 6 months can even be a conservative guess. My impression is that even when caught early, many cases can take a year to get better. If you've just found this site, spend a lot of time reading through it, because many other things mentioned here may help you along a lot -- e.g., custom orthotics, stretching, rest and more rest, icing, night splint, etc. You'll find lots of info. about these things on this message board and in Scott's 25-page treatise from the home page. Best of luck to you -- Nancy S.

Re: be aggressive if your pf is new -- YES!

Nancy S. on 12/18/99 at 00:00 (013894)

Yes, that IS excellent advice. In my 8 months since PF with heel spur began, my podiatrist tried a cortisone shot, generic inserts, night splint, custom orthotics (the only thing that helped a little), and then had me scheduled for a now-canceled surgery. About rest, good shoes, icing, massage, stretching, taping, etc. -- HE SAID NOTHING! For eight months I could have been trying these basic things, and he taught me nothing. I have been continuing to injure my foot during all that time because of his silence or lack of interest. Scott's site and all the helpful message-writers have me now taking care of my foot in ways I didn't even know exist. I have so much more hope now. I've left that podiatrist and got my primary to refer me to a highly recommended osteopath who does physical therapy oriented treatments, so I'm hoping to learn more from him. In any case, there's no question that we have to educate ourselves and give many things a try, and leave any dr. who shows no interest in helping you do that. Good luck everyone.

Re: be aggressive if your pf is new -- YES!

Dawn F. on 12/18/99 at 00:00 (013901)

Thank God for this site!! I just recently diagnosed myself with PF. I am a very active person and started having heel pain the day after I went out for a longer-than-usual run in September. Small aches and pains have never been unusual, but when this heep pain never went away, and just kept getting worse, I began to feel depressed (no need for happy pills yet :))

Is there really hope?? For one week I have been wearing running shoes or walking shoes 24 hours a day (yes, even while sleeping) and my foot hasn't felt this good since September!! My calves are rather over developed due to aggressive weight training when I was in my early 20's (15+ years ago). Does anyone know if the muscular calves are a plus or a minus as far as recovery goes? I am a bit traumatized by the drastic change in lifestyle I've has to under go in so short a time. I am hopeful in the last week, but is this really going to take 6 months or more to recover?


Re: be aggressive if your pf is new -- YES!

Nancy S. on 12/18/99 at 00:00 (013904)

Hi Dawn -- Yes, the change in lifestyle is traumatizing. I think we all are experiencing that, and it's hard. If you've already had improvement by wearing running shoes all the time, your case may be a faster cure than some others, I think it's a hopeful sign. But 6 months can even be a conservative guess. My impression is that even when caught early, many cases can take a year to get better. If you've just found this site, spend a lot of time reading through it, because many other things mentioned here may help you along a lot -- e.g., custom orthotics, stretching, rest and more rest, icing, night splint, etc. You'll find lots of info. about these things on this message board and in Scott's 25-page treatise from the home page. Best of luck to you -- Nancy S.