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i wonder

Posted by john h on 1/18/00 at 00:00 (014875)

i wonder if one were to stay totally off a foot for 1-2 months if healing could take place for pf? i mean totally off the foot: no walking cast not anything that would put any pressure on the foot. stay in a wheelchair, in bed, or whatever it takes. when i was on crutches for 3 weeks and first started to use my foot i thought i was cured for a few weeks but went back to my ways and some recurrence of pain. even when i was on crutches i would ocassionaly put some pressure on the foot.

Re: i wonder

Janet on 1/18/00 at 00:00 (014876)

I was in a wheelchair for three weeks in the fall of 1998. No change in my condition. I did walk a little though but only in my house.

Re: i wonder

john h on 1/18/00 at 00:00 (014878)

janet: my thoughts are that even slight pressure on the foot in or out of the house could cause microtears. it would take total concentration to never put any pressure on the foot as most of us have to work, take care of the family or just get around the house. i could not even do it for 3 weeks on crutches as when i got to steps or some other akward situation i would invariable get my bad foot in a pressure situation. if inflamation was the problem with pf you would sort of think that 2 months of total immobility and lack of of weight support would allow reduction of inflamation for some time anyway.

Re: i wonder

john a on 1/18/00 at 00:00 (014880)

That's why I recently only half-jokingly wondered about checking in to a hospital and being put in a coma for a few weeks.

Re: i wonder

Laurie R on 1/18/00 at 00:00 (014882)

Hi I have offen though the same thing to be totally off your feet if it would help.Thats if you only have pf and not TTS ot a entraped nerve.My therapist seems to think if you just have pf that it could be cured if you do for therapy right away.My thing is I have been going to pt now for a while but I also got this nerve thing going on I get better than all the pain back plus more.Laurie R

Re: i wonder

john h on 1/18/00 at 00:00 (014889)

the coma idea sounds great john a. at the same time they could do a lobotomy and you would forget you had pf when you awakened.

Re: i wonder

john a on 1/19/00 at 00:00 (014912)

I don't think a lobotomy would make you forget you had PF. You just wouldn't _care_ that you had it, which might be better still! :)

Re: i wonder

janet on 1/19/00 at 00:00 (014913)

Hi John,

My thoughts currently are that total rest can result in decrease in inflamation but also conaction in the PF from the inactivity. I wonder if total non-wt bearing plus daily gentle stretching in a warm bath might be the best approach. Maybe add massage and night splints too.


Re: i wonder

Dan W on 1/19/00 at 00:00 (014931)

This statement is very close to the truth.

Re: i wonder

alan k on 1/20/00 at 00:00 (014937)

I think you could be right, but only if you add many different strengthening exersizes throughout the day, plus an major total body conditioning through swimming, to keep total body circulation at its peak.
I wish I had pf and the time and patience and oppurtunity to try that. I think it might be good for tts too, but I can't see how I'ld would do it.

alan k


Re: i wonder

Rick R on 1/20/00 at 00:00 (014938)

john,

It my sound counterintuitive but I didn't start to improve until I quit being too careful and went back to physical activity. I believe initial rest is a crucial factor. However, I believe rest is the proverbial double edged sword. As you rest you lose strength in the arch and flexibility. The longer you rest the more you heal but the more vulnerable you become to damage as crucial structures weaken. Perhaps the right balance would involve a return to activity far more gradual than is generally tried. I don't think walking without several days of stretching and strengthening would be appropriate following a long rest. I wonder if there is a correlation between PF and people that have been off their feet for some time for other reasons, and then return to walking rather suddenly. Did any of us first see symptoms after a period of reduced activity and a subsequent return to normal activity levels? Prior to surgery on the left heel I had a spur on the right that hadn't bothered me much in a decade. When I was able to start being active again (to pre-surgery levels not pre-PF levels) the right heel gave more trouble than it ever had. Could the month on crutches and 6 months of quite limited activity been the culprit, I think so. My mistake was pacing my return to action based on what I felt my surgically repaired left heel could handle, not recognizing that my right side became much more of a weakness. Good luck!

Rick


Re: i wonder

Susan S on 1/20/00 at 00:00 (014948)

So what is the balance between exercise and 'extreme rest'? I had Monday off and spent as much time off my feet as possible. They were much better when I returned to work but now I'm back to square one again. I also had the shots Friday and really can't tell that they helped enough to warrant doing them again. (And mine were just slighlty uncomfortable. No horror story here.)

Kudos to Scott. I've learned more here than at any doctor's visit!


Re: i wonder

Janet on 1/18/00 at 00:00 (014876)

I was in a wheelchair for three weeks in the fall of 1998. No change in my condition. I did walk a little though but only in my house.

Re: i wonder

john h on 1/18/00 at 00:00 (014878)

janet: my thoughts are that even slight pressure on the foot in or out of the house could cause microtears. it would take total concentration to never put any pressure on the foot as most of us have to work, take care of the family or just get around the house. i could not even do it for 3 weeks on crutches as when i got to steps or some other akward situation i would invariable get my bad foot in a pressure situation. if inflamation was the problem with pf you would sort of think that 2 months of total immobility and lack of of weight support would allow reduction of inflamation for some time anyway.

Re: i wonder

john a on 1/18/00 at 00:00 (014880)

That's why I recently only half-jokingly wondered about checking in to a hospital and being put in a coma for a few weeks.

Re: i wonder

Laurie R on 1/18/00 at 00:00 (014882)

Hi I have offen though the same thing to be totally off your feet if it would help.Thats if you only have pf and not TTS ot a entraped nerve.My therapist seems to think if you just have pf that it could be cured if you do for therapy right away.My thing is I have been going to pt now for a while but I also got this nerve thing going on I get better than all the pain back plus more.Laurie R

Re: i wonder

john h on 1/18/00 at 00:00 (014889)

the coma idea sounds great john a. at the same time they could do a lobotomy and you would forget you had pf when you awakened.

Re: i wonder

john a on 1/19/00 at 00:00 (014912)

I don't think a lobotomy would make you forget you had PF. You just wouldn't _care_ that you had it, which might be better still! :)

Re: i wonder

janet on 1/19/00 at 00:00 (014913)

Hi John,

My thoughts currently are that total rest can result in decrease in inflamation but also conaction in the PF from the inactivity. I wonder if total non-wt bearing plus daily gentle stretching in a warm bath might be the best approach. Maybe add massage and night splints too.


Re: i wonder

Dan W on 1/19/00 at 00:00 (014931)

This statement is very close to the truth.

Re: i wonder

alan k on 1/20/00 at 00:00 (014937)

I think you could be right, but only if you add many different strengthening exersizes throughout the day, plus an major total body conditioning through swimming, to keep total body circulation at its peak.
I wish I had pf and the time and patience and oppurtunity to try that. I think it might be good for tts too, but I can't see how I'ld would do it.

alan k


Re: i wonder

Rick R on 1/20/00 at 00:00 (014938)

john,

It my sound counterintuitive but I didn't start to improve until I quit being too careful and went back to physical activity. I believe initial rest is a crucial factor. However, I believe rest is the proverbial double edged sword. As you rest you lose strength in the arch and flexibility. The longer you rest the more you heal but the more vulnerable you become to damage as crucial structures weaken. Perhaps the right balance would involve a return to activity far more gradual than is generally tried. I don't think walking without several days of stretching and strengthening would be appropriate following a long rest. I wonder if there is a correlation between PF and people that have been off their feet for some time for other reasons, and then return to walking rather suddenly. Did any of us first see symptoms after a period of reduced activity and a subsequent return to normal activity levels? Prior to surgery on the left heel I had a spur on the right that hadn't bothered me much in a decade. When I was able to start being active again (to pre-surgery levels not pre-PF levels) the right heel gave more trouble than it ever had. Could the month on crutches and 6 months of quite limited activity been the culprit, I think so. My mistake was pacing my return to action based on what I felt my surgically repaired left heel could handle, not recognizing that my right side became much more of a weakness. Good luck!

Rick


Re: i wonder

Susan S on 1/20/00 at 00:00 (014948)

So what is the balance between exercise and 'extreme rest'? I had Monday off and spent as much time off my feet as possible. They were much better when I returned to work but now I'm back to square one again. I also had the shots Friday and really can't tell that they helped enough to warrant doing them again. (And mine were just slighlty uncomfortable. No horror story here.)

Kudos to Scott. I've learned more here than at any doctor's visit!