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I need help on these - however...

Posted by johnw on 1/18/00 at 00:00 (014881)

Question #2 is easier, therefore...

my first thought is that the nerve block was inadequate. A proper block should alleviate the pain. I'll refer this to one of our clinicians and get back.

The test that many of our docs use to rule out nerve entrapment is to inject local anesthetic into the primary/most painful site. There should be at least a temporary relief of pain. if there is not, nerve entrapment is suspected.

Until now, I had never heard of prolotherapy. My first thought is that there is some overlap as to the 'principle'. The injected fluid causes an injury and the body's response is to regenerate healthy tissue. The ossatron not only stimulates/effects the soft tissue, but causes microfractures and bleeding in the adjoining bone. The ossatron delivers up to 6000psi of pressure in a very small focus. This energy is substantially different from the injectible fluid which attacks the soft tissue.

For an intelligent answer, have your dr. call our clinical monitor, Dr John Ogden at 404-522-3023. Please post his intelligent response so that I can better answer this question next time.


Re: I need help on these - however...

Irene M on 1/18/00 at 00:00 (014896)

John,
I appreciate your help. I am not currently under medical care and thus cannot have my doc call Dr. Ogden. I have been thru the medical mill with this problem for many years, and at this point I hardly know where to turn, what to try, or how to make sense of the various opinions and test results.

All I can say about the nerve block is that it was done by a pain specialist, very carefully and methodically. He first gave me a small local injection in the ankle, then used some sort of probe to locate the right nerve in order to inject it accurately. I did not completely understand the process of locating the nerve, but he did it twice on the same foot with a lapse of about 20 minutes in the interim. The skin on the bottom of my foot was numb afterwards, but the pain, which is deeper in the arch of my foot, was unaffected. My doctor was very surprised, and he came to the conclusion was that the source of my pain is not in the foot itself, but possibly in the spine or even the brain.

Thank you for checking with your clinicians on this. I would very much like their take on this issue.

Regards,
Irene


Re: I need help on these - however...

Irene M on 1/18/00 at 00:00 (014896)

John,
I appreciate your help. I am not currently under medical care and thus cannot have my doc call Dr. Ogden. I have been thru the medical mill with this problem for many years, and at this point I hardly know where to turn, what to try, or how to make sense of the various opinions and test results.

All I can say about the nerve block is that it was done by a pain specialist, very carefully and methodically. He first gave me a small local injection in the ankle, then used some sort of probe to locate the right nerve in order to inject it accurately. I did not completely understand the process of locating the nerve, but he did it twice on the same foot with a lapse of about 20 minutes in the interim. The skin on the bottom of my foot was numb afterwards, but the pain, which is deeper in the arch of my foot, was unaffected. My doctor was very surprised, and he came to the conclusion was that the source of my pain is not in the foot itself, but possibly in the spine or even the brain.

Thank you for checking with your clinicians on this. I would very much like their take on this issue.

Regards,
Irene