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minimal invasive surgery

Posted by john h on 1/18/00 at 00:00 (014894)

i was at a health club today and a respected poditrist clinic had a free clinc set up, which they do once a year. i stopped by to visit and she looked at my incision and said 'i see you have had surgery from dr ________'. she said his surgery is easy to identify. she said her clinc used 'minimal invasive surgery for a pf release and that they did not use the socpe anymore. further stated the incision was about 1 1/2' for a pf release and that they released typically 30-50% of the fascia. i know that as early as 2 years ago their clinc was using the endoscope so they must have decided minimal invasive surgery was better or safer.

Re: minimal invasive surgery

wendyn on 1/18/00 at 00:00 (014901)

John, I seem to recall being told about the same thing by my podiatrist regarding bunion surgery...that they do a smaller incision, less recovery time, less pain etc than an orthepedic surgeon. Always makes me wonder...why the difference? Who do you trust? Why does one type of doctor do this one way, and other specialists do it another? Why, if my podiatrist way is better, isn't he allowed to do surgery in a hospital? Why won't insurance cover his work? I have a lot more questions than answers.



Re: minimal invasive surgery

john h on 1/19/00 at 00:00 (014917)

wendy i was always leary of the endoscope as i have read that the surgeon is operating in the blind sometimes as he pushes the probes thru the foot. chance of nerve damage is increased. with a small
1 1/2' incision on the edge of the foot to just release a band of the fascia seems as simple as it can get. my only concern would be the amount of fascia that is released. i am not for releasing much more than 20-40% unless there is a very good reason to release more. this group of poditrist must have a very good reason to abandon endoscopic surgery in favor of minimal invasive surgery. certainly less pain,down time, and chance of complications.

Re: minimal invasive surgery

wendyn on 1/18/00 at 00:00 (014901)

John, I seem to recall being told about the same thing by my podiatrist regarding bunion surgery...that they do a smaller incision, less recovery time, less pain etc than an orthepedic surgeon. Always makes me wonder...why the difference? Who do you trust? Why does one type of doctor do this one way, and other specialists do it another? Why, if my podiatrist way is better, isn't he allowed to do surgery in a hospital? Why won't insurance cover his work? I have a lot more questions than answers.



Re: minimal invasive surgery

john h on 1/19/00 at 00:00 (014917)

wendy i was always leary of the endoscope as i have read that the surgeon is operating in the blind sometimes as he pushes the probes thru the foot. chance of nerve damage is increased. with a small
1 1/2' incision on the edge of the foot to just release a band of the fascia seems as simple as it can get. my only concern would be the amount of fascia that is released. i am not for releasing much more than 20-40% unless there is a very good reason to release more. this group of poditrist must have a very good reason to abandon endoscopic surgery in favor of minimal invasive surgery. certainly less pain,down time, and chance of complications.