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Who diagnosed you???

Posted by MaryAnn on 2/19/00 at 00:00 (016059)

How did you find out you had Plantar Fasciitis, did you go to an actual foot doctor??? I have only been to a general practioner and she was not sure I had Plantar Fasciitis as my pain is more in the sole of the foot and not the heel.
I have been doing stretching excercises for about 2 months now, my foot got somewhat better but it is still there. How long does it take to go away, if it ever does??? My doctor said if the excercises don't help that I either need to go the physical therapy or a foot doctor. Neither one, can I really afford but.....
My left foot seems to ache all over these last few days, like what you would call growing pains when you are growing up, remember them??
I really would like to figure out why I am having these problems with my foot, do you all have to go to a foot doctor to be properly diagnosed???
Thanks!

Re: Who diagnosed you???

BJC on 2/19/00 at 00:00 (016061)

I was first diagnosed by a family practitioner as having a bone spur, but referred to a podiatrist immediately. The podiatrist diagnosed plantar fasciitis, using x-rays to back up the no bone spur decision. Surgery revealed thickened fascia. 4 1/2 weeks post-op, I'm doing very well!

Re: Who diagnosed you???

Nancy S. on 2/19/00 at 00:00 (016071)

Hi MaryAnn. Yes, I think an ortho. dr. or podiatrist definitely needs to diagnose you, especially with some atypical symptoms as you have. I have the usual PF, in one foot, and first went to my primary care dr. She suspected plantar fasciitis, took an x ray, but referred me to a podiatrist even before getting the result (x ray did show heel spur, it turned out). The podiatrist confirmed the diagnosis by pressing hard on the well-known spot toward the front inside on the bottom of the heel. (You REALLY feel that if you have PF.) It's important to get properly diagnosed -- to rule out other possibilities, and to get going on a good all-around treatment plan if you do have PF. The fact that your pain is not in the typical spot means you especially need to get a proper diagnosis, I think. You may be treating yourself for plantar fasciitis and not even have it, or possibly be neglecting some other problem. Even if short on funds, you really need to see a doctor and take care of this -- it can get a lot more expensive if you worsen the problem in the meantime, can't work as a result, etc.
Have you read through this message board, and especially Scott's PF Book? Educate yourself on this and arm yourself with information for when you see the doctor -- so you know what questions to ask and can evaluate for yourself how good the doctor seems at diagnosing and treating. Some foot doctors are a lot better than others. You want someone who encourages you to take an active part in your treatment, teaches you how to take care of your feet when you're not in the doctor's office, and has experience and a lot of knowledge that he or she is willing to impart! The sooner the better, MaryAnn -- we need our feet! Good luck, and let us know what happens. --Nancy S.

Re: Who diagnosed you???

BJC on 2/19/00 at 00:00 (016061)

I was first diagnosed by a family practitioner as having a bone spur, but referred to a podiatrist immediately. The podiatrist diagnosed plantar fasciitis, using x-rays to back up the no bone spur decision. Surgery revealed thickened fascia. 4 1/2 weeks post-op, I'm doing very well!

Re: Who diagnosed you???

Nancy S. on 2/19/00 at 00:00 (016071)

Hi MaryAnn. Yes, I think an ortho. dr. or podiatrist definitely needs to diagnose you, especially with some atypical symptoms as you have. I have the usual PF, in one foot, and first went to my primary care dr. She suspected plantar fasciitis, took an x ray, but referred me to a podiatrist even before getting the result (x ray did show heel spur, it turned out). The podiatrist confirmed the diagnosis by pressing hard on the well-known spot toward the front inside on the bottom of the heel. (You REALLY feel that if you have PF.) It's important to get properly diagnosed -- to rule out other possibilities, and to get going on a good all-around treatment plan if you do have PF. The fact that your pain is not in the typical spot means you especially need to get a proper diagnosis, I think. You may be treating yourself for plantar fasciitis and not even have it, or possibly be neglecting some other problem. Even if short on funds, you really need to see a doctor and take care of this -- it can get a lot more expensive if you worsen the problem in the meantime, can't work as a result, etc.
Have you read through this message board, and especially Scott's PF Book? Educate yourself on this and arm yourself with information for when you see the doctor -- so you know what questions to ask and can evaluate for yourself how good the doctor seems at diagnosing and treating. Some foot doctors are a lot better than others. You want someone who encourages you to take an active part in your treatment, teaches you how to take care of your feet when you're not in the doctor's office, and has experience and a lot of knowledge that he or she is willing to impart! The sooner the better, MaryAnn -- we need our feet! Good luck, and let us know what happens. --Nancy S.