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The most dangerous thing about you Dave...

Posted by VickiJ on 2/20/00 at 00:00 (016107)

...is exactly what you did with this post...you list what was good for you as 'the solutions' instead of 'this is what worked for me'...and you continue to post wrong info...atrophy is not the 'biggest cause of PF'(where on earth did you ever come up with that silly idea?)....overuse is.(If you refuse to believe the info that Scott and others have shared regarding the cause maybe you'll believe Runner's World http://www.runnersworld.com the click on injuries)

I guess you think that all the rest of us here who do advocate rest along with stretching and exercising, all of us who used to love walking, running, hiking, etc were thrilled when the doctors told us to rest our injury and we immediately became a bunch of couch potatoes, letting our muscles atrophy, saying 'the doctor told me to do it'. Why do you think we are here...we didn't get what we needed from the doctors and have taken things into our own hands. I'm puzzled at why you think when someone says 'you have to rest your foot' that we are advocating complete inactivity and no exercising of the feet at all. The majority of us here are dying to get back on our feet and are looking for strengthening exercises that will help our feet so we can get back to our lives.

You're right Dave, you are dangerous.


Re: The most dangerous thing about you Dave...

Scott R on 2/20/00 at 00:00 (016108)

I also think 'atrophy' is a major cause. Desk jobs leading to muscles, ligaments, tendons, and fascia that get injured with increases in activity. But rest has been the only thing that has helped mine.

Re: The most dangerous thing about you Dave...

alan k on 2/20/00 at 00:00 (016111)

In fact I have read medical journal articles where the authors suggest that pf is a deterioration condition rather than an acute injury. I think that is a gross oversimplification, but could be all or part of the problem in some cases. Still, runners are not mouse potatoes. Yet they do not ordinarily get a balanced workout for their feet, since running is only one of the things a foot can do.

Atrophy is a real danger, sometimes a cause or the main cause, and strengthening should be done to counter it. As Scott implied, that does not mean that rest is not called for, only that there is another side to the question.

alan k


Re: The most dangerous thing about you Dave...

Nancy S. on 2/20/00 at 00:00 (016114)

May I just point out that the main problem that I and, I believe, Vicki have with Dave's approach here is the downplaying to a newcomer of something that most everyone else agrees -- in literature and in experience -- is an important part of treatment. These loose-cannon shots at rest for injured feet need to be challenged at the very least, if not corrected. I can't sit here and let a newcomer believe that rest is not called for. I feel like I'm watching a murder (of feet, and maybe a way of life) in the street and doing nothing about it.
--Nancy.

Re: The most dangerous thing about you Dave...

john a on 2/21/00 at 00:00 (016143)

For the record, I think dang dave has a lot of good ideas. As do scott, alan k and many others. Perhaps the truth about PF's relationship to overuse and atrophy is that overuse is most often the cause of PF, but that prolonged rest and subsequent atrophy is most often the cause of the persistence of PF?

Re: The most dangerous thing about you Dave...

Scott R on 2/20/00 at 00:00 (016108)

I also think 'atrophy' is a major cause. Desk jobs leading to muscles, ligaments, tendons, and fascia that get injured with increases in activity. But rest has been the only thing that has helped mine.

Re: The most dangerous thing about you Dave...

alan k on 2/20/00 at 00:00 (016111)

In fact I have read medical journal articles where the authors suggest that pf is a deterioration condition rather than an acute injury. I think that is a gross oversimplification, but could be all or part of the problem in some cases. Still, runners are not mouse potatoes. Yet they do not ordinarily get a balanced workout for their feet, since running is only one of the things a foot can do.

Atrophy is a real danger, sometimes a cause or the main cause, and strengthening should be done to counter it. As Scott implied, that does not mean that rest is not called for, only that there is another side to the question.

alan k


Re: The most dangerous thing about you Dave...

Nancy S. on 2/20/00 at 00:00 (016114)

May I just point out that the main problem that I and, I believe, Vicki have with Dave's approach here is the downplaying to a newcomer of something that most everyone else agrees -- in literature and in experience -- is an important part of treatment. These loose-cannon shots at rest for injured feet need to be challenged at the very least, if not corrected. I can't sit here and let a newcomer believe that rest is not called for. I feel like I'm watching a murder (of feet, and maybe a way of life) in the street and doing nothing about it.
--Nancy.

Re: The most dangerous thing about you Dave...

john a on 2/21/00 at 00:00 (016143)

For the record, I think dang dave has a lot of good ideas. As do scott, alan k and many others. Perhaps the truth about PF's relationship to overuse and atrophy is that overuse is most often the cause of PF, but that prolonged rest and subsequent atrophy is most often the cause of the persistence of PF?