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Thank you, John a

Posted by Helene M on 2/21/00 at 00:00 (016157)

I checked the Edmond scientific website. However, I am wondering if their magnets are indicated for use on the body, since they seem to be for industrial purposes. Perhaps it doesn't make any difference?

Re: Thank you, John a

john a on 2/22/00 at 00:00 (016182)

Well, I'm certainly no expert on magnetic therapy. In fact, I'm barely able to entertain the notion that it may help at all! But here's what I do know: these small NIB supermagnet discs have just one north pole on one side and one south pole on the other. There is a school of thought that says it matters which pole you place against the skin -- I can't see why it would. There are those who believe that you must place a substance that has alternating north and south poles over its surface against your skin for best results -- that would seem to just reduce the net magnetic effect to me.

One thing for sure is that these Edmund NIB magnets are 'bare', and not encased in any protective coating (like nickle, for instance) that would protect it from shattering: they are apparently very brittle. The magnetic therapy sites usually offer some sort of protective casing for the magnets. For myself, I am just going to sew small felt-lined pockets for them in an elastic Ace bandage and wear one overnight right over the plantar fascia's insertion point into the calcaneous. I am going to buy two of the .75' ones today for $15 a piece, and maybe two of the .5' ones for $9.50 each.

Also, these powerful magnets, because they are so strong, can actually be dangerous: you can get fingers pinched between two of them for example, and they can propel small fragments of themselves at high speed if two of them slam together. And you can easily erase credit cards and floppy disks if they get too close. (see http://www.eskimo.com/~billb/neodemo.html for more interesting info)

Finally, if these magnets don't help my PF, I will at least have some cool toys to play with!


Re: Thank you, John a

john a on 2/22/00 at 00:00 (016182)

Well, I'm certainly no expert on magnetic therapy. In fact, I'm barely able to entertain the notion that it may help at all! But here's what I do know: these small NIB supermagnet discs have just one north pole on one side and one south pole on the other. There is a school of thought that says it matters which pole you place against the skin -- I can't see why it would. There are those who believe that you must place a substance that has alternating north and south poles over its surface against your skin for best results -- that would seem to just reduce the net magnetic effect to me.

One thing for sure is that these Edmund NIB magnets are 'bare', and not encased in any protective coating (like nickle, for instance) that would protect it from shattering: they are apparently very brittle. The magnetic therapy sites usually offer some sort of protective casing for the magnets. For myself, I am just going to sew small felt-lined pockets for them in an elastic Ace bandage and wear one overnight right over the plantar fascia's insertion point into the calcaneous. I am going to buy two of the .75' ones today for $15 a piece, and maybe two of the .5' ones for $9.50 each.

Also, these powerful magnets, because they are so strong, can actually be dangerous: you can get fingers pinched between two of them for example, and they can propel small fragments of themselves at high speed if two of them slam together. And you can easily erase credit cards and floppy disks if they get too close. (see http://www.eskimo.com/~billb/neodemo.html for more interesting info)

Finally, if these magnets don't help my PF, I will at least have some cool toys to play with!