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Re: Will Personal Foot Trainers work if TTS is involved?

Posted by Kim B. on 2/24/00 at 00:00 (016322)

Glad to hear of the success your family is having. I wonder if the PFT will work for someone if Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome is a co-exhisting condition. What other ailments is the PFT known to diffuse? Anyone?

Re: Will Personal Foot Trainers work if TTS is involved?RE Kim B

Laurie R on 2/24/00 at 00:00 (016326)

Hi Kim, I was just wondering do you also have TTS as well as PF?If so what are you doing for treatment. Thanks Laurie R

Re: Will Personal Foot Trainers work if TTS is involved?

Mike W on 2/24/00 at 00:00 (016344)

Hi Kim,

It is my understanding that the tendons of the posterior tibialis, the flexor digitorum longus and the flexor halcius longus as well as the posterior tibial nerve, artery amd vein all pass through a space called the tarsal tunnel. I believe that if any of these tendons are short, tight or weak (inelastic)they will place excessive pressure in the tunnel causing inflammation and pain. The only natural way to decrease the tension on a tendon is to improve the elasticity (strength and flexibility) of the related muscles. This may sound complicated but it is not difficult to isolate these muscles and the opposing muscles with PFT's.

I think that PFT's will work for someone with TTS because of the above however, to my knowledge none of my clients have had TTS.

Did you know that anyone who tries my PFT's and is not happy with them can return them for a full refund with no question asked? The only people who have not had results with PFT's were those who did not use them.


Heelspurs are a symptom of PF and therefore you need to first eliminate PF. Once the PF is gone (in my document)I recommend and explain how to use friction massage to deal with heelspurs.

PFT's have helped people with hammertoes, shin splints, achilles tendonitis,and hamstring,quadricep,hip and lower back injuries.

I hope this has been helpful for you.

Mike W


Re: Will Personal Foot Trainers work if TTS is involved?

john a on 2/25/00 at 00:00 (016385)

Mike W, the more you talk intelligently about these PFTs of yours, the closer I'm coming to buying them! (the only competition right now being alan k's forthcoming device)

About a month ago, I switched from wearing my hard-as-rocks $400 incompetantly-adjusted custom orthotics to the $30 Superfeet 'green capsule' inserts. I have also cut off the back two inches of the non-supportive but cushiony insle that came with my New Balance 800 shoes, and put them under the heel of the Superfeet inserts to haise the heel a little.

This has allowed me to walk semi-normally heel-to-toe for the first time in 10 months. Unfortunately, I have developed achilles tendinitis, and some strained muscles in my outer calves, probably as a consequence of the change in orthotics and the fact that I didn't start the heel-to-toe walking until about a week ago. This heel-to-toe walking is definitely putting less strain on my AT and calves, but I still find that almost any attempt at stretching or strengthening the calves causes more pain.

I do the towel toe scrunches, which I love because they cause good-feeling foot muscle fatigue without bad-feeling pain, and some seated PF/hamstring/calf stretches, but that's about all I can handle without pain. Any recommendations Mike W?


Re: Will Personal Foot Trainers work if TTS is involved?

Mike W on 2/25/00 at 00:00 (016416)

Hi John A,

My passion is helping people. I developed my Personal Foot Trainers because I was fed up with the traditional treatments that did not help me. I have been in the natural health business for over 5 years and have used my experience and contacts to develop a device and a technique that addresses the underlying cause not just the symptoms. I can appreciate your concerns with my product because it is new and many of the other devices are ineffective. However, if you are hestitant to try PFT's that have a track record, (at no finacial risk)than why would you consider something that is unproven and experimental? It took me over 2 years to develop a quality product. I had input from Podiatrists, Sport Medicine Doctors, Research Scientists and positive results from numerous clients before I felt comfortable to introduce it publicly. (sorry if this sounds like a lecture)


Orthotics can be good at transferring weight from a painful area and allow your body's natural healing ability the chance to heal. They do not address the underlying cause of PF and their long term sucess is patient specific. I am not sure what type of seated PF/hamstring/calf stretches you are doing but assume you are using a rope, towel or elastic bands. Non weight bearing is good but you are probably not isolating all of the flexors and neglecting the extensors altogether. It is not enough to just stretch your muscles you need to strenghten them too.

Why do most people develop PF between age 35 and 50? A natural aging process that causes the gradual loss of muscle mass throughout the body is called sarcopenia and may be a factor. It usually starts at age 30 and by age 50 the average person will lose 30% of their muscle mass and flexibility and 10% every decade therafter. Neglected muscles will be the first ones to cause us problems. The good news is that although we can't be as strong as we were in our 20's we can build up muscle strength and flexibility regardless of our age.
This is what PFT's do in a safe and effective manner.

I hope this answers your questions and that you will find a solution to your PF.

Regards,

Mike W


Re: Will Personal Foot Trainers work if TTS is involved?RE Kim B

Laurie R on 2/24/00 at 00:00 (016326)

Hi Kim, I was just wondering do you also have TTS as well as PF?If so what are you doing for treatment. Thanks Laurie R

Re: Will Personal Foot Trainers work if TTS is involved?

Mike W on 2/24/00 at 00:00 (016344)

Hi Kim,

It is my understanding that the tendons of the posterior tibialis, the flexor digitorum longus and the flexor halcius longus as well as the posterior tibial nerve, artery amd vein all pass through a space called the tarsal tunnel. I believe that if any of these tendons are short, tight or weak (inelastic)they will place excessive pressure in the tunnel causing inflammation and pain. The only natural way to decrease the tension on a tendon is to improve the elasticity (strength and flexibility) of the related muscles. This may sound complicated but it is not difficult to isolate these muscles and the opposing muscles with PFT's.

I think that PFT's will work for someone with TTS because of the above however, to my knowledge none of my clients have had TTS.

Did you know that anyone who tries my PFT's and is not happy with them can return them for a full refund with no question asked? The only people who have not had results with PFT's were those who did not use them.


Heelspurs are a symptom of PF and therefore you need to first eliminate PF. Once the PF is gone (in my document)I recommend and explain how to use friction massage to deal with heelspurs.

PFT's have helped people with hammertoes, shin splints, achilles tendonitis,and hamstring,quadricep,hip and lower back injuries.

I hope this has been helpful for you.

Mike W


Re: Will Personal Foot Trainers work if TTS is involved?

john a on 2/25/00 at 00:00 (016385)

Mike W, the more you talk intelligently about these PFTs of yours, the closer I'm coming to buying them! (the only competition right now being alan k's forthcoming device)

About a month ago, I switched from wearing my hard-as-rocks $400 incompetantly-adjusted custom orthotics to the $30 Superfeet 'green capsule' inserts. I have also cut off the back two inches of the non-supportive but cushiony insle that came with my New Balance 800 shoes, and put them under the heel of the Superfeet inserts to haise the heel a little.

This has allowed me to walk semi-normally heel-to-toe for the first time in 10 months. Unfortunately, I have developed achilles tendinitis, and some strained muscles in my outer calves, probably as a consequence of the change in orthotics and the fact that I didn't start the heel-to-toe walking until about a week ago. This heel-to-toe walking is definitely putting less strain on my AT and calves, but I still find that almost any attempt at stretching or strengthening the calves causes more pain.

I do the towel toe scrunches, which I love because they cause good-feeling foot muscle fatigue without bad-feeling pain, and some seated PF/hamstring/calf stretches, but that's about all I can handle without pain. Any recommendations Mike W?


Re: Will Personal Foot Trainers work if TTS is involved?

Mike W on 2/25/00 at 00:00 (016416)

Hi John A,

My passion is helping people. I developed my Personal Foot Trainers because I was fed up with the traditional treatments that did not help me. I have been in the natural health business for over 5 years and have used my experience and contacts to develop a device and a technique that addresses the underlying cause not just the symptoms. I can appreciate your concerns with my product because it is new and many of the other devices are ineffective. However, if you are hestitant to try PFT's that have a track record, (at no finacial risk)than why would you consider something that is unproven and experimental? It took me over 2 years to develop a quality product. I had input from Podiatrists, Sport Medicine Doctors, Research Scientists and positive results from numerous clients before I felt comfortable to introduce it publicly. (sorry if this sounds like a lecture)


Orthotics can be good at transferring weight from a painful area and allow your body's natural healing ability the chance to heal. They do not address the underlying cause of PF and their long term sucess is patient specific. I am not sure what type of seated PF/hamstring/calf stretches you are doing but assume you are using a rope, towel or elastic bands. Non weight bearing is good but you are probably not isolating all of the flexors and neglecting the extensors altogether. It is not enough to just stretch your muscles you need to strenghten them too.

Why do most people develop PF between age 35 and 50? A natural aging process that causes the gradual loss of muscle mass throughout the body is called sarcopenia and may be a factor. It usually starts at age 30 and by age 50 the average person will lose 30% of their muscle mass and flexibility and 10% every decade therafter. Neglected muscles will be the first ones to cause us problems. The good news is that although we can't be as strong as we were in our 20's we can build up muscle strength and flexibility regardless of our age.
This is what PFT's do in a safe and effective manner.

I hope this answers your questions and that you will find a solution to your PF.

Regards,

Mike W