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Thanks

Posted by Helen on 2/25/00 at 00:00 (016400)

Hi Martha. Thanks for the information. I will push myself to stretch. I really like Dr. Galea; he is so compassionate and really let me set the pace of the treatment. That helped so much, as the emotional support was there from him during the treatment. That made it easier for me to tolerate the pain of treatment -- which was somewhat high on the left foot -- it never really froze!

Helen

posted to the eswt board


Re: Thanks

alan k on 1/01/00 at 00:00 (014291)

You ask good questions.

If I were you I wouldn't be satisfied with a doctor's offhand answer. Why now indeed!

I think the answer to that question would be enlightening to many of us in our thirties-- I can think of two handfuls of regular posters who are in their thirties.

I spent Christmas with my aging parents. My 78 year-old father had to carry in my things out from the car for me. Too much for my tired old self.

At least I am regular.


alan k


Re: Thanks

Robin B. on 1/01/00 at 00:00 (014308)

Like Nancy, I don't like to be too harsh about docs I don't know. But I truly don't think muscles come in 'long,' 'average' and 'too short.'

However, if you are a former constant high-heel wearer, you already know about the constriction of muscles that high heels can lead to. Since I'm the person Nancy cited -- my own orthopedic surgeon told me not to let anyone cut on my feet, not until I had exhausted every possibility and then some -- I obviously have some very cautious and watchful thoughts about surgery, regardless of what length your calf muscles are.

So, the harsh reality is that any doc -- orthopod, podiatrist, GP -- who is telling you that surgery is the remedy if massaging and stretching don't work is a doc who hasn't done his homework. Operating on your feet isn't going to do a tad to help 'short calf muscles.' T

There are oodles of approaches to try. Dozens. Tons. The tough part isn't uncovering all the different treatments and approaches. The tough part is having the time, patience and money to wade your way through them, give them sufficient time to work, and then either adopt them or discard them as you pursue a rememdy. Curing PF reminds me of all those get-rich-quick schemes. You don't get rich quick -- and you don't cure PF overnight either.

I've had PF for nearly 2 years and I have been staggering along with this and that and the other thing, trying to achieve the right combination. I'd probably be doing it for another few years, making progress in degrees and inches, not yards. I'd eat dirt if it would cure PF.

A few people on this board have achieved success and help with casting, particularly a removable cast. Cortisone, however, is not a lasting remedy, and often is not even part of a good treatment plan. Doctors rely heavily on injections because they are trained to treat -- not to try, watch, measure, evaluate and decide whether to retain or discard. In short, most are 'quick fix' folks.

So Tammy -- I hope like many here, you will be proactive on behalf of yourself and your own treatment plan. When one of the top orthopedic surgeons in town (I was consulting him for an MCL tear, not my feet)tells me not to let anyone operate on my feet unless I'm beyond desperate -- that's advice worth listening to. Just remember -- oodles of things to try prior to surgery. Massage, exercise and stretching aren't even the tip of the iceberg. My advice would be to tell your doc to visit Scott's main heelspurs.com site and then WORK WITH YOU on finding an appropriate remedy. Good luck.


Re: Thanks

VLJ on 1/04/00 at 00:00 (014359)

Just had another thought about this: One of the inserts I tried before I got the custom orthotics was made by one of the 'shoe men' that builds an arch support by just drawing a tracing around the foot...maybe, if you have one of these shops in your area, maybe one of those craftsmen could use your Birks as a model for a custom shoe insert for your walking shoes...I payed 'only' $85 for mine. And the only reason I wasn't able to use them was because it was at the very beginning of my PF problem. They supported my arches, etc very well, but I still had the pain and thought they weren't helping...I hadn't learned all about PF yet, wasn't stretching, nor even had a diagnosis at that point. I'm actually thinking that if I continue to progress the way I have I won't have my custom orthotics replaced when they wear out, I might have this guy make me a pair again....and I would take my Birks in for him to use as a model. Anyway, it is an alternative...not as cheap as OTC, but equivalent to a pair of Arizona Birks.

Re: Thanks

john a on 1/04/00 at 00:00 (014371)

Oh god, you said it! That's one of the worst things about PF: feeling like you can't do a damn thing! And in what is supposed to be the prime of your life (I'm 37) My 72 year old mom who had a hip replacement 20 years ago, and has smoked heavily all her life is infinitely more mobile than I am. And my 74 year old dad is a wonder of self-reliance, having been jogging daily since his 30s. I somehow feel like I've failed them both. After all, at this time in their lives, _I_ should be helping them, not the other way around! At least my 33 year old sister is still healthy as a horse, and despite no working out at all, her doctor recently said she had the heartbeat of an athlete! (not quite sure what that means, but I presume it's a good thing :-)

PS - I'm feeling especially depressed after having rehurt my worst foot (the one with the spur) two weeks ago (during an hour of wrapping presents in my relatively new soft footbed birks, which, prior to this, had felt pretty nice), and having seemingly TOTALLY ERASED 9 months of glacially slow improvement. Someone please take me home, I'm tired and I want to go to sleep :-(


Re: Thanks

alan k on 1/01/00 at 00:00 (014291)

You ask good questions.

If I were you I wouldn't be satisfied with a doctor's offhand answer. Why now indeed!

I think the answer to that question would be enlightening to many of us in our thirties-- I can think of two handfuls of regular posters who are in their thirties.

I spent Christmas with my aging parents. My 78 year-old father had to carry in my things out from the car for me. Too much for my tired old self.

At least I am regular.


alan k


Re: Thanks

Robin B. on 1/01/00 at 00:00 (014308)

Like Nancy, I don't like to be too harsh about docs I don't know. But I truly don't think muscles come in 'long,' 'average' and 'too short.'

However, if you are a former constant high-heel wearer, you already know about the constriction of muscles that high heels can lead to. Since I'm the person Nancy cited -- my own orthopedic surgeon told me not to let anyone cut on my feet, not until I had exhausted every possibility and then some -- I obviously have some very cautious and watchful thoughts about surgery, regardless of what length your calf muscles are.

So, the harsh reality is that any doc -- orthopod, podiatrist, GP -- who is telling you that surgery is the remedy if massaging and stretching don't work is a doc who hasn't done his homework. Operating on your feet isn't going to do a tad to help 'short calf muscles.' T

There are oodles of approaches to try. Dozens. Tons. The tough part isn't uncovering all the different treatments and approaches. The tough part is having the time, patience and money to wade your way through them, give them sufficient time to work, and then either adopt them or discard them as you pursue a rememdy. Curing PF reminds me of all those get-rich-quick schemes. You don't get rich quick -- and you don't cure PF overnight either.

I've had PF for nearly 2 years and I have been staggering along with this and that and the other thing, trying to achieve the right combination. I'd probably be doing it for another few years, making progress in degrees and inches, not yards. I'd eat dirt if it would cure PF.

A few people on this board have achieved success and help with casting, particularly a removable cast. Cortisone, however, is not a lasting remedy, and often is not even part of a good treatment plan. Doctors rely heavily on injections because they are trained to treat -- not to try, watch, measure, evaluate and decide whether to retain or discard. In short, most are 'quick fix' folks.

So Tammy -- I hope like many here, you will be proactive on behalf of yourself and your own treatment plan. When one of the top orthopedic surgeons in town (I was consulting him for an MCL tear, not my feet)tells me not to let anyone operate on my feet unless I'm beyond desperate -- that's advice worth listening to. Just remember -- oodles of things to try prior to surgery. Massage, exercise and stretching aren't even the tip of the iceberg. My advice would be to tell your doc to visit Scott's main heelspurs.com site and then WORK WITH YOU on finding an appropriate remedy. Good luck.


Re: Thanks

VLJ on 1/04/00 at 00:00 (014359)

Just had another thought about this: One of the inserts I tried before I got the custom orthotics was made by one of the 'shoe men' that builds an arch support by just drawing a tracing around the foot...maybe, if you have one of these shops in your area, maybe one of those craftsmen could use your Birks as a model for a custom shoe insert for your walking shoes...I payed 'only' $85 for mine. And the only reason I wasn't able to use them was because it was at the very beginning of my PF problem. They supported my arches, etc very well, but I still had the pain and thought they weren't helping...I hadn't learned all about PF yet, wasn't stretching, nor even had a diagnosis at that point. I'm actually thinking that if I continue to progress the way I have I won't have my custom orthotics replaced when they wear out, I might have this guy make me a pair again....and I would take my Birks in for him to use as a model. Anyway, it is an alternative...not as cheap as OTC, but equivalent to a pair of Arizona Birks.

Re: Thanks

john a on 1/04/00 at 00:00 (014371)

Oh god, you said it! That's one of the worst things about PF: feeling like you can't do a damn thing! And in what is supposed to be the prime of your life (I'm 37) My 72 year old mom who had a hip replacement 20 years ago, and has smoked heavily all her life is infinitely more mobile than I am. And my 74 year old dad is a wonder of self-reliance, having been jogging daily since his 30s. I somehow feel like I've failed them both. After all, at this time in their lives, _I_ should be helping them, not the other way around! At least my 33 year old sister is still healthy as a horse, and despite no working out at all, her doctor recently said she had the heartbeat of an athlete! (not quite sure what that means, but I presume it's a good thing :-)

PS - I'm feeling especially depressed after having rehurt my worst foot (the one with the spur) two weeks ago (during an hour of wrapping presents in my relatively new soft footbed birks, which, prior to this, had felt pretty nice), and having seemingly TOTALLY ERASED 9 months of glacially slow improvement. Someone please take me home, I'm tired and I want to go to sleep :-(