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Personal Foot Trainer - New question for Mike W

Posted by Helene M on 3/01/00 at 00:00 (016672)

You have been posting about the PFT in various places on this board. Although I'm not doubting the efficacy of this device, I'd like to know if there is a chance of re-injury with it. Lately my stretching has been unsuccessful, even harmful, as I keep re-injuring myself. Yes, I know, you've been saying it is wrong to stretch when weight-bearing. However, even with the PFT, knowing my history with stretching, I am afraid I would re-injure myself with this, too. Anyway, how does one know when they are healed enough to gently stretch without risking re-injury?

Re: Personal Foot Trainer - New question for Mike W

salina on 3/01/00 at 00:00 (016675)

That is such a good question. I have been wondering the same thing. I am very interested in strengthening my feet, and stretching. But at this point, I have cut out all stretching routines (I was doing daily) because I guess I tend to overdo it and actually will feel something pull too far. You know, you can just tell it. So now I am afraid to do anything. I have started to do foot exercises like the towel roll and trying to pick things up with my feet (can't explain). The morning after the first day of this, my feet were sore. But a good sore, not like PF injury. So I have continued for the past week. Maybe it is in my mind, but I actually feel my feet getting stronger. When I massage I can massage more parts of my feet that used to be too painful, especially along the arch. Now I am just left with one small area that can still withstand no pressure. I am thinking I should just keep exercising for strength some more before I try to stretch again. I AM still sitting on the floor and stretching my calves, but i don't involve my feet in any way (as much as possible). But i do try to keep my calves stretched and I at least flex my toes (mine sort of curled up with this PF) just once a day to see how that is going. And they are maintaining pretty good.
I am more afraid of reinjury than anything else. Don't think I could handle that. Not only would my children have a mother that can't walk, but they would also get to see her being hauled off to the looney house.

Re: Personal Foot Trainer - New question for Mike W

Sue B. on 3/01/00 at 00:00 (016682)

I, too, am afraid of reinjuring from using the personal foot trainer. From the picture of the personal foot trainer, it looks like there is a band that goes under your foot and would pull on the fascia when stretching. I can't be sure, but I think I developed the PF because I had been cycling on an exercise bike in bare feet and pushing constantly on the fascia.

Re: Personal Foot Trainer - New question for Mike W

Mike W on 3/01/00 at 00:00 (016691)

Hello Helene Sue and Salina,

I am a physical therapist who designed and developed Personal Foot Trainers.

Regarding your concerns about reinjuring your feet using PFT's, I made a post on this subject 2/27/00 RE. Pf pain in the ball of the foot that should answer your questions. If not email me directly (my address is on my link.

The PFT technique is the key that allows you to safely relax your painful forefoot flexor muscles by contracting your opposing forefoot extensor muscles. By doing this you will be applying no pressure on the inflammed forefoot flexor tendons because the pressure will be from the top of your foot. If you concentrate on this for a week or so it has been my experience that the pain should be gone and you can then begin to gently improve your flexor muscle strength.

The picture and position that Sue is referring to is designed for the anterior and posterior LL muscles and I would not recommend doing anterior exercise until your forefoot extensors are healed and pain free. When they are healed I would recommend starting slowly and wearing shoes for added protection for this position.

I hope this answers your concerns.

Regards

Mike W


Re: Personal Foot Trainer - New question for Mike W

salina on 3/01/00 at 00:00 (016675)

That is such a good question. I have been wondering the same thing. I am very interested in strengthening my feet, and stretching. But at this point, I have cut out all stretching routines (I was doing daily) because I guess I tend to overdo it and actually will feel something pull too far. You know, you can just tell it. So now I am afraid to do anything. I have started to do foot exercises like the towel roll and trying to pick things up with my feet (can't explain). The morning after the first day of this, my feet were sore. But a good sore, not like PF injury. So I have continued for the past week. Maybe it is in my mind, but I actually feel my feet getting stronger. When I massage I can massage more parts of my feet that used to be too painful, especially along the arch. Now I am just left with one small area that can still withstand no pressure. I am thinking I should just keep exercising for strength some more before I try to stretch again. I AM still sitting on the floor and stretching my calves, but i don't involve my feet in any way (as much as possible). But i do try to keep my calves stretched and I at least flex my toes (mine sort of curled up with this PF) just once a day to see how that is going. And they are maintaining pretty good.
I am more afraid of reinjury than anything else. Don't think I could handle that. Not only would my children have a mother that can't walk, but they would also get to see her being hauled off to the looney house.

Re: Personal Foot Trainer - New question for Mike W

Sue B. on 3/01/00 at 00:00 (016682)

I, too, am afraid of reinjuring from using the personal foot trainer. From the picture of the personal foot trainer, it looks like there is a band that goes under your foot and would pull on the fascia when stretching. I can't be sure, but I think I developed the PF because I had been cycling on an exercise bike in bare feet and pushing constantly on the fascia.

Re: Personal Foot Trainer - New question for Mike W

Mike W on 3/01/00 at 00:00 (016691)

Hello Helene Sue and Salina,

I am a physical therapist who designed and developed Personal Foot Trainers.

Regarding your concerns about reinjuring your feet using PFT's, I made a post on this subject 2/27/00 RE. Pf pain in the ball of the foot that should answer your questions. If not email me directly (my address is on my link.

The PFT technique is the key that allows you to safely relax your painful forefoot flexor muscles by contracting your opposing forefoot extensor muscles. By doing this you will be applying no pressure on the inflammed forefoot flexor tendons because the pressure will be from the top of your foot. If you concentrate on this for a week or so it has been my experience that the pain should be gone and you can then begin to gently improve your flexor muscle strength.

The picture and position that Sue is referring to is designed for the anterior and posterior LL muscles and I would not recommend doing anterior exercise until your forefoot extensors are healed and pain free. When they are healed I would recommend starting slowly and wearing shoes for added protection for this position.

I hope this answers your concerns.

Regards

Mike W