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Re: Piriformis Syndrome (long answer)

Posted by Mike W on 3/08/00 at 00:00 (017024)

Hello Kim B,

Sorry I missed your question.

You should check out http://www.rice.edu/~jenky/sports/piri.html .

In the second paragraph I like the first stretch (on the back) and do not like the second (dangerous) and don't know about the pretzel stretch. You could do this with (the first) with PFT's, but if you are flexible enough I would try this stretch on your own first.

In the second to last paragraph note 'that it is important that any abnormal biomechanical problems such as over pronation of the foot
(a common PF promoter)or other coexisting conditions, are treated.'

My Kinesiology view of this is; this hip muscle is very important in posture, especially the position of the sacrum. It is the upper most
of the hip rotators. In the seated position it allows the leg to move outward. Weakness on one side can cause the sacrum to twist, making the ankle on that side turn in, the knees 'knock', and the opposite foot turns out. The piri is located right beside the sciatic nerve, which is the largest and longest nerve in the body. Therefore if there is a problem with the piri the sciatic nerve could be affected. There may be pain down the leg, numbness and tingling of the legs, burning urination, and other bladder problems.

They say that foods rich in vitamin E (wheat germ, green peas, green leafy vegetables should be enphasized.

If the piri is tight or painful,also include stretching and strenghtening the hamstrings, gluteus medius, and the adductors, especially if you have trouble placing your ankle on the opposite knee when sitting.

RE Will PFT's provide a good stretch for the piris? I think that the stretch above is probably a good start. PFT's could do the same thing but are not necessary. As you know (or are painfully aware)I am a big proponent of combining stretching and strenghtening so I would learn and be comfortable with the stretch and then gradually add a bit of resistance in both directions (so you will work the opposing muscle as well).

PFT's are really effective for stretching and strengthening the hamstrings, quads, adductors/abductors and gluteus muscles.

I had an Xray of my spine taken last summer and it showed that my right hip was twisted up about 1/2 an inch. The chiro said there was nothing I could do and he thought that adding a lift would do nothing.

This explained why my right hip was sore and my left lower back pain which are both affected by golf. I think this was caused by tight quadriceps, weak hamstrings and weak abdutors/adductors. I have worked on these areas over the past few months and notice a big improvement.

What is FM?

Regards,

Mike Wilmot Physical Therapist, Principal Personal Foot Trainers and former sufferer of chronic PF and sore hips.


Re: Piriformis Sydrome and FM (Fibromyalgia Sydrome)

Kim B. on 3/08/00 at 00:00 (017031)

Hi Mike,

Thanks for the helpful information and the link. There is so much to learn about the human body. I have problems with my sciatic nerve and am hoping (and wondering) if that by properly stretching the piriformis muscle, I can minimize sciatica flair ups.

This may be more information than you really care to know, but as a complication, I get Shingles outbreaks along my sciatic nerve. So you see, I have a double interest in keeping the sciatic nerve calmed down and un-irritated.

For now, I am assuming that my PF problems would also benefit from anything I do that is good for my muscles, tendons and nerves, particularly those of the hips, legs and feet.

I am still considering your PFT, it seems like a good product. As a side note, I once bought a 'sacro wedgie' device via the internet and it turned out to be a disappointment for me. The sacro wedgie is suppose to help with sciatica pain, but for me, the results were inconsistant. Somtimes it helped (a little) and sometimes it actually made things worse. Live and learn.

'FM' stands for Fibromyagia Syndrome. It is a chronic pain illness that currently falls under the arthritis family of illness. However, recent research indicates that for some people, there could be a neurological connection involved. There is so much that modern medicine doesn't know about this mysterious illness. I am providing a couple of links for you or anyone else who is interested in knowing more about Fibromyalgia Syndrome(FM).

National Fibromyalgia Research Association:
http://www.teleport.com/~nfra/

Fibromyalgia Network News:
http://www.fmnetnews.com/pages/basics.html


Best Regards,
Kim B.
PF sufferer,
Fibromyalgia (FM) sufferer,
Sciatica pain sufferer,
Shingles pain sufferer,
Previous Endometriosis sufferer, but cured by hystertomy. (One down, four to go! :)



Re: Piriformis Sydrome and FM (Fibromyalgia Sydrome)

wendyn on 3/08/00 at 00:00 (017037)

Hi Kim...have you tried acupuncture or massage? I know if your sciatica is flared up, a massage would be out of the question - but what about as a preventative? I've had problems with sciatica before as well. Maybe it would help with this piriformis syndrome? I started going for the odd theraputic massage last summer, and I've been going to acupuncture lately too.

I'm an extremley rational, skeptical person - and I usually take an 'I'll believe it when I see it' attitude. I have no idea why, but I seem to be better off with yoga/massage/acupuncture than I have from anything else like drugs/physio/orthotics.

This of course goes against the more logical part of my brain that a few years ago would have passed all this off as a lot of 'Placebo effect'. Whatever...but it seems to be working for me. For now.

(I'll only do this once but I can't resist)

Wendyn
(aka 'Walks Like a Duck')
-Former runner/walker/aerobics active type person
-Current couch-potatoe-in-training with PF/TTS/Sciatica/CTS/Bunions/Flat feet and eye strain from too much time on the internet


Re: Piriformis Sydrome and FM (Fibromyalgia Sydrome)

Kim B. on 3/08/00 at 00:00 (017031)

Hi Mike,

Thanks for the helpful information and the link. There is so much to learn about the human body. I have problems with my sciatic nerve and am hoping (and wondering) if that by properly stretching the piriformis muscle, I can minimize sciatica flair ups.

This may be more information than you really care to know, but as a complication, I get Shingles outbreaks along my sciatic nerve. So you see, I have a double interest in keeping the sciatic nerve calmed down and un-irritated.

For now, I am assuming that my PF problems would also benefit from anything I do that is good for my muscles, tendons and nerves, particularly those of the hips, legs and feet.

I am still considering your PFT, it seems like a good product. As a side note, I once bought a 'sacro wedgie' device via the internet and it turned out to be a disappointment for me. The sacro wedgie is suppose to help with sciatica pain, but for me, the results were inconsistant. Somtimes it helped (a little) and sometimes it actually made things worse. Live and learn.

'FM' stands for Fibromyagia Syndrome. It is a chronic pain illness that currently falls under the arthritis family of illness. However, recent research indicates that for some people, there could be a neurological connection involved. There is so much that modern medicine doesn't know about this mysterious illness. I am providing a couple of links for you or anyone else who is interested in knowing more about Fibromyalgia Syndrome(FM).

National Fibromyalgia Research Association:
http://www.teleport.com/~nfra/

Fibromyalgia Network News:
http://www.fmnetnews.com/pages/basics.html


Best Regards,
Kim B.
PF sufferer,
Fibromyalgia (FM) sufferer,
Sciatica pain sufferer,
Shingles pain sufferer,
Previous Endometriosis sufferer, but cured by hystertomy. (One down, four to go! :)



Re: Piriformis Sydrome and FM (Fibromyalgia Sydrome)

wendyn on 3/08/00 at 00:00 (017037)

Hi Kim...have you tried acupuncture or massage? I know if your sciatica is flared up, a massage would be out of the question - but what about as a preventative? I've had problems with sciatica before as well. Maybe it would help with this piriformis syndrome? I started going for the odd theraputic massage last summer, and I've been going to acupuncture lately too.

I'm an extremley rational, skeptical person - and I usually take an 'I'll believe it when I see it' attitude. I have no idea why, but I seem to be better off with yoga/massage/acupuncture than I have from anything else like drugs/physio/orthotics.

This of course goes against the more logical part of my brain that a few years ago would have passed all this off as a lot of 'Placebo effect'. Whatever...but it seems to be working for me. For now.

(I'll only do this once but I can't resist)

Wendyn
(aka 'Walks Like a Duck')
-Former runner/walker/aerobics active type person
-Current couch-potatoe-in-training with PF/TTS/Sciatica/CTS/Bunions/Flat feet and eye strain from too much time on the internet