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i.e. the floor

Posted by alan k on 3/26/00 at 00:00 (017835)

The typo is possibly conflusing:

the 'floot' could mean foot but it means floor, press the top of the foot against the floor. While I'm here: you should vary the exercise by doing it with foot straight and emphasizing the inner foot and big toe, and with foot, heal angled out, emphasizing the outer foot and little toes. This isolates two different muscles.


alan k


Re: i.e. the floor

Nancy S. on 3/26/00 at 00:00 (017851)

Alan, I want to try this top-of-the-floot (I mean foot) exercise. But I haven't done anything of the sort before, and don't want to do anything foolish like going for immediate cure-all with that twist/stretch the ungodly osteopath told me to do, leading to a major pity party. So do you have any recommendation about how hard to press and how long to press, for a beginner at it like me? --Nancy

Re: i.e. the floor

alan k on 3/27/00 at 00:00 (017867)

This does not involve the heel hotspot so it should be okay. Would you mind describing precisely the thing the oseopath did which was not good?

Of course with training you have to take some chances but since this does not involve the heel or calf I don't see how it could effect you negatively. I would recommend pressing on a carpet rather than a hard floor, for comfort and relaxation sake.


You should press in 2-3 second intervals until you feel a little burning (should be on top of foot not bottom). Then sit down hold foot in one hand other on ankle and gently pull the top of the foot back (like pointing it) to stretch the muscles that have been contracting in the exercise. Then massage by running your fingers through the 'channels' between the tendons. That should feel good.

(and I was only kidding about looking/reading into your past)

alan k


Re: i.e. the floor

Nancy S. on 3/27/00 at 00:00 (017889)

Thanks for the details, Alan. I'm going to try this tomorrow, sounds like it should be fine.
The osteopath told me to do this: take my PF foot in both hands, one hand cupping the heel and the other gripping around the ball/toes of the foot. Then I was to pull the heel in one direction (left or right) and sort of up, while pushing the ball/toes in the other direction and sort of down -- amounting to sort of a twisting stretch of the fascia. As soon as I did this, I found myself in a 2- to 3-week setback. (At the time I thought it might be a months-long setback; it was lousy and scary.)
(I know you were kidding; I simply saw an opportunity to blather on about myself and reminisce, and I grabbed it like any nostalgia freak has the duty to do.)
--Nancy

Re: i.e. the floor

Nancy S. on 3/26/00 at 00:00 (017851)

Alan, I want to try this top-of-the-floot (I mean foot) exercise. But I haven't done anything of the sort before, and don't want to do anything foolish like going for immediate cure-all with that twist/stretch the ungodly osteopath told me to do, leading to a major pity party. So do you have any recommendation about how hard to press and how long to press, for a beginner at it like me? --Nancy

Re: i.e. the floor

alan k on 3/27/00 at 00:00 (017867)

This does not involve the heel hotspot so it should be okay. Would you mind describing precisely the thing the oseopath did which was not good?

Of course with training you have to take some chances but since this does not involve the heel or calf I don't see how it could effect you negatively. I would recommend pressing on a carpet rather than a hard floor, for comfort and relaxation sake.


You should press in 2-3 second intervals until you feel a little burning (should be on top of foot not bottom). Then sit down hold foot in one hand other on ankle and gently pull the top of the foot back (like pointing it) to stretch the muscles that have been contracting in the exercise. Then massage by running your fingers through the 'channels' between the tendons. That should feel good.

(and I was only kidding about looking/reading into your past)

alan k


Re: i.e. the floor

Nancy S. on 3/27/00 at 00:00 (017889)

Thanks for the details, Alan. I'm going to try this tomorrow, sounds like it should be fine.
The osteopath told me to do this: take my PF foot in both hands, one hand cupping the heel and the other gripping around the ball/toes of the foot. Then I was to pull the heel in one direction (left or right) and sort of up, while pushing the ball/toes in the other direction and sort of down -- amounting to sort of a twisting stretch of the fascia. As soon as I did this, I found myself in a 2- to 3-week setback. (At the time I thought it might be a months-long setback; it was lousy and scary.)
(I know you were kidding; I simply saw an opportunity to blather on about myself and reminisce, and I grabbed it like any nostalgia freak has the duty to do.)
--Nancy