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trying to be cautious-not always succeeding!

Posted by GinaC on 3/26/00 at 00:00 (017841)

I'm trying to let pain be my guide. Unfortunately, sometimes the pain is after the fact. Was doing better again after a setback last week and for the first time, attempted a walk around the block yesterday (one-half mile?). Felt OK walking, OK when I returned, but had an increase in pain today, so I'm sure it's from the walk. Apparently I wasn't ready for that distance, so I won't attempt it again for a few weeks. I'm not trying to push myself; I am trying to listen to what my feet are telling me. Unfortunately, our feet often use pain as their language. I seem to be doing fairly well with daily activities, but am not ready for distance walking yet. And I will definitely baby my feet until I'm over this self-induced flare-up; in the future I hope I can be more careful not to induce another flare. Next time I attempt a walk, it will be shorter in length and duration (even if that means the distance I can cover in 5 minutes rather than 10 or 15 minutes. Hope you are feeling better. Gina
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Re: trying to be cautious-not always succeeding!

Karen K on 3/26/00 at 00:00 (017850)

I'm with you Gina being very careful. I can go only about 5-10 min. before I look for a seat. For me, this is actually a great improvement. I know we're supposed to give our feet 12 weeks to heal but, do these twelve weeks seem like eternity to anyone else or is it just me? It seems like forever since the treatment and we're not even half way there yet! Uggg!!
Take care,
KK
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Re: trying to be cautious-not always succeeding!

Martha B. on 3/26/00 at 00:00 (017857)

I had ossatron in Sept. and I too thought 12 weeks was 12 years. I was fortunate that I only had 2 'episodes' that made me wonder if I had spent alot of time and $$$$ for nothing. I stretched faithfully and let my feet be the boss. I am thrilled to say that all has been well for quite sometime. I baby my feet but I pretty much do whatever I want to now. I no longer take anti inflams or ice. I stretch and wear my orthotics most of the time. My sincere wish is for all my fellow PF pals can find relief-PF is a nasty,painful thing. My heart goes out to the long time sufferers as I only had it bad for 18 months
and that was 18 months too long. Best wishes!

posted to the eswt board

Re: trying to be cautious-not always succeeding!

Matt L on 3/27/00 at 00:00 (017869)

Not succeeding either. Was at a family reunion over the weekend and played nine holes of golf with cart and am now paying the price. Hopefully only a short-term setback.

Have a question. PF causes pain via the series of micro-tears of the fascia which can occur throughout the length of the entire fascia. I know most if not all had the part of the fascia which connects to the heel treated by eswt. Has anyone heard of eswt being used to treat further up the fascia where it connects to the metatarsals? I have pain there too presumably from the reoccuring tears.

posted to the eswt board


Re: trying to be cautious-not always succeeding!

Rob on 3/27/00 at 00:00 (017873)

Hello Matt. I am curious if the person treating you used any type of imaging modality like ultrasound? If they did then that person would have seen thickening of the PF from the heel that extended towards the metatarsals and could have treated the affected area. I was wondering if the Sonocur or Ossatron sites use ultrasound to see what the PF looks like because I know Dornier uses it with the EPOS to help target the area that needs shock delivery the most. Sometimes clinical palpatation is not acurate in determining how much area needs to be treated because the patient becomes desensitised while the treatment is happening. Just something to think about
posted to the eswt board

Re: trying to be cautious-not always succeeding!

Martha B. on 3/27/00 at 00:00 (017887)

Galea requires an ultrasound or MRI prior to having the ossatron done. As I had not had an MRI, I waited til I got to Toronto and they scheduled the ultrasound there the day before the ossatron.
posted to the eswt board

Re: trying to be cautious-not always succeeding!

Rob on 3/27/00 at 00:00 (017890)

It is nice that he requires an image before he treats but The EPOS uses ultrasound as you are being treated so that the operator can see where the shockwaves are going while the treatment is in progress. This allows for better control of the treatment and more acurate targeting to the tissue that is inflamed.
posted to the eswt board

Re: trying to be cautious-not always succeeding!

Dr. Zuckerman on 3/27/00 at 00:00 (017891)

I don't understand how you could have an ultrsound study at the same time that you can have shockwaves treating an area. I can see where you can do both on an intermittent treatment and then an ultrasound.

I treat the entire medial tubercle at the insertion of the plantar fascia. I don't know of any ESWT machine that can treat the entire tubercle where the plantar fasica inserts. You can do this by doing more then one spot after finishing another spot. I did one patient where I did the entire medial tubercle and some of the lateral tubercle. The first time I only did part of the medial tubercle and she gone no relief. The second time she got improvement immediately and then drastic improvement (95% ) afte six weeks. Just because I don't know how you can do both ultrasound and ESWT at the saem time doesn't mean it can't be done. I just don't understand how. I will be talking to Dornier in the near futute and will ask them.
posted to the eswt board


Re: trying to be cautious-not always succeeding!

Rob on 3/28/00 at 00:00 (017906)

Hello Dr. Zuckerman. There is an ultrasound transducer that is connected to the therapy head on the EPOS. The probe comes out 90 degrees from the shock wave. Dornier and others have been using ultrasound as an option for stone localization for years and they applied the same method to ESWT. The probe has a sensor that tells it where it is in relation to the focus point and the image is seen on a monitor that sits on top of the EPOS.
posted to the eswt board

Re: trying to be cautious-not always succeeding!

Karen K on 3/26/00 at 00:00 (017850)

I'm with you Gina being very careful. I can go only about 5-10 min. before I look for a seat. For me, this is actually a great improvement. I know we're supposed to give our feet 12 weeks to heal but, do these twelve weeks seem like eternity to anyone else or is it just me? It seems like forever since the treatment and we're not even half way there yet! Uggg!!
Take care,
KK
posted to the eswt board

Re: trying to be cautious-not always succeeding!

Martha B. on 3/26/00 at 00:00 (017857)

I had ossatron in Sept. and I too thought 12 weeks was 12 years. I was fortunate that I only had 2 'episodes' that made me wonder if I had spent alot of time and $$$$ for nothing. I stretched faithfully and let my feet be the boss. I am thrilled to say that all has been well for quite sometime. I baby my feet but I pretty much do whatever I want to now. I no longer take anti inflams or ice. I stretch and wear my orthotics most of the time. My sincere wish is for all my fellow PF pals can find relief-PF is a nasty,painful thing. My heart goes out to the long time sufferers as I only had it bad for 18 months
and that was 18 months too long. Best wishes!

posted to the eswt board

Re: trying to be cautious-not always succeeding!

Matt L on 3/27/00 at 00:00 (017869)

Not succeeding either. Was at a family reunion over the weekend and played nine holes of golf with cart and am now paying the price. Hopefully only a short-term setback.

Have a question. PF causes pain via the series of micro-tears of the fascia which can occur throughout the length of the entire fascia. I know most if not all had the part of the fascia which connects to the heel treated by eswt. Has anyone heard of eswt being used to treat further up the fascia where it connects to the metatarsals? I have pain there too presumably from the reoccuring tears.

posted to the eswt board


Re: trying to be cautious-not always succeeding!

Rob on 3/27/00 at 00:00 (017873)

Hello Matt. I am curious if the person treating you used any type of imaging modality like ultrasound? If they did then that person would have seen thickening of the PF from the heel that extended towards the metatarsals and could have treated the affected area. I was wondering if the Sonocur or Ossatron sites use ultrasound to see what the PF looks like because I know Dornier uses it with the EPOS to help target the area that needs shock delivery the most. Sometimes clinical palpatation is not acurate in determining how much area needs to be treated because the patient becomes desensitised while the treatment is happening. Just something to think about
posted to the eswt board

Re: trying to be cautious-not always succeeding!

Martha B. on 3/27/00 at 00:00 (017887)

Galea requires an ultrasound or MRI prior to having the ossatron done. As I had not had an MRI, I waited til I got to Toronto and they scheduled the ultrasound there the day before the ossatron.
posted to the eswt board

Re: trying to be cautious-not always succeeding!

Rob on 3/27/00 at 00:00 (017890)

It is nice that he requires an image before he treats but The EPOS uses ultrasound as you are being treated so that the operator can see where the shockwaves are going while the treatment is in progress. This allows for better control of the treatment and more acurate targeting to the tissue that is inflamed.
posted to the eswt board

Re: trying to be cautious-not always succeeding!

Dr. Zuckerman on 3/27/00 at 00:00 (017891)

I don't understand how you could have an ultrsound study at the same time that you can have shockwaves treating an area. I can see where you can do both on an intermittent treatment and then an ultrasound.

I treat the entire medial tubercle at the insertion of the plantar fascia. I don't know of any ESWT machine that can treat the entire tubercle where the plantar fasica inserts. You can do this by doing more then one spot after finishing another spot. I did one patient where I did the entire medial tubercle and some of the lateral tubercle. The first time I only did part of the medial tubercle and she gone no relief. The second time she got improvement immediately and then drastic improvement (95% ) afte six weeks. Just because I don't know how you can do both ultrasound and ESWT at the saem time doesn't mean it can't be done. I just don't understand how. I will be talking to Dornier in the near futute and will ask them.
posted to the eswt board


Re: trying to be cautious-not always succeeding!

Rob on 3/28/00 at 00:00 (017906)

Hello Dr. Zuckerman. There is an ultrasound transducer that is connected to the therapy head on the EPOS. The probe comes out 90 degrees from the shock wave. Dornier and others have been using ultrasound as an option for stone localization for years and they applied the same method to ESWT. The probe has a sensor that tells it where it is in relation to the focus point and the image is seen on a monitor that sits on top of the EPOS.
posted to the eswt board