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personal foot trainer

Posted by john h on 3/29/00 at 00:00 (017980)

i recently purchased The Personal Foot Trainer advertised on this board. A unique device that certainly makes it easy to isolate and stretch muscles,etc. Good instruction manual. A word of caution: as usual i am not patient and did not start into this gradually. I stretched my toes to my brain a lot more than a sane person would do. Result: it hurt. I like the device and if used properly makes stretching a lot easier.

Re: personal foot trainer

john a on 3/29/00 at 00:00 (017985)

A question to Mike W and anyone else who has one of his PFTs: how does it generate resistance? Is it rigid throughout its length (as appears to be the case from the pictures I've seen), or does it use springs and/or elastic bands of some sort? I also worry about the handles apparently being just straight and broom-like, requiring the wrists to be put in an unnatural twisted position during use, and under considerable force too, if your own arms are generating the resistance that is working your feet. I worry because I have weak wrists to begin with, with half-cured carpal tunnel syndrome in one, just itching for a chance to become full-blown again.

Hmmm, I think a pogostick-like design would be an ideal configuration for a PFT: handles perpendicular to the arms during use, centered on a spring-loaded pole that ends in two apparatuses that look like what Mike W has now on his PFT. Perhaps with a strap that you could wrap around your back to take the pressure off your arms and hands. (hey Mike, how 'bout a 25% cut of your future profits on the sales of a second generation PFT based on this brilliant idea? :-)


Re: personal foot trainer

VickiJ on 3/29/00 at 00:00 (017995)

I purchased the pft from Mike and have been using it for about five days....the handle is rigid with rubber pads for the toes and foot to press against...the exercises are isometric type so not alot of strain is necessary...though I overdid it...pushed harder than is necessary and increased the reps to soon...it's been too many years since I had done any isometric exercises and they are easy and I'm over eager...so I was really going to it. It didn't hurt my legs or feet though. JohnH is absolutely right...the book provides a lot of valuable information and the exercises are written very clearly..and the other great thing is that Mike W answers all of my questions very promptly...I tend to be a little obsessive about exercises and want to make sure I do everything correctly and Mike has been extremely patient and helpful.

Re: personal foot trainer

Mike W on 3/29/00 at 00:00 (017996)

Hello John,

I am glad that they got to you so fast.

Like any other new stretching or strengthening routine starting slowly and gradually building up resistance and repetition is very important, especially with neglected muscles.

Many of these LL muscles have never been worked so they need time to get used to the new routine. I recommend starting with 5 reps and gradually adding 1 or 2 as they get stronger and more flexible.

Make sure you try to concentrate on making the isolated muscles contract and not over power them with your arms.

There should never be any pain while performing an exercise.

If you have any questions please email me.

Regards,

Mike Wilmot Physical therapist, Principal PFT'S Email (email removed)


Re: personal foot trainer

Mike W on 3/29/00 at 00:00 (018000)

Hello John,

The way you generate resistance is by gently and slowly moving your toes/feet away/towards your body until you feel a contraction in the muscle that is being isolated, therefore the isolated muscle is doing the work. The arms provide the resistance like a shock absorber not by pulling or pushing them with any force. The toe and foot muscles will generally not be as strong as your arms especially with the mechanical advantage the PFT'S provide. For those who have problems with wrists, arms or shoulders I would recommend using two hands on one PFT. One side benefit I have noticed is that gradual and consistent use improves the upper body muscles as well.

The bottom rubber pad is rigid (because the bottom of the foot is fairly flat) not exactly as shown in my pictures (a recent improvement) and the top pad does give a bit(because the top of the foot is slanted) but is still fairly rigid too.

The wrists should not be unnaturally twisted. The handle is a golf grip and you can grip it in a manner with the handle running through the palm of the hand with your index finger like on a trigger of a pistol under the bottom, the thumb on top, the 3rd to 5th fingers on the side and your wrist parallel to the handle.

I never thought how you grip them would be an issue. I will include a better description in my document. If you wrapped them around your back than there would be complaints about them hurting the back so it is a tough call.

If you email me I would be happy to fax you some helpful carpal tunnel stretches that do not reqiure any devices.

I hope this answers your questions/concerns.

Regards,
Mike Wilmot, Physical Therapist, Principal PFT'S,
email (email removed)


Re: personal foot trainer

john h on 3/29/00 at 00:00 (018009)

mike: you have to really concentrate not to let your arms overwork doing the exercises. i stretched the h---out of feet the first day and deserved what i got. it sure beats the towell method i had been using. i am having trouble keeping my cat away from the rubber bands on the device. i am going to stretch him if he keeps on chewing on it.

Re: personal foot trainer

Mike W on 3/30/00 at 00:00 (018032)

Hello John,

To help with not over working with your arms try to concentrate on feeling the contraction on the muscle that is being isolated. The diagram beside each position shows the highlighted muscle. Cat problems are another first.

Regards,

MIke W Physical Therapist, Principal PFT's, Email maxhealth@nucleus


Re: personal foot trainer

Susan S on 3/30/00 at 00:00 (018050)

It's nice to hear positive comments about the PFT after all the criticism Mike W recieved. It is apparent he is very knowledgable about the anatomy of the foot/leg, and very interested in helping others get relief from PF. I am a nurse and have taken anatomy and physiology and can tell you I knew very little of the muscles of the foot leg. So thank you Mike for your information and I for one look forward to your posts.

Re: personal foot trainer

john a on 3/29/00 at 00:00 (017985)

A question to Mike W and anyone else who has one of his PFTs: how does it generate resistance? Is it rigid throughout its length (as appears to be the case from the pictures I've seen), or does it use springs and/or elastic bands of some sort? I also worry about the handles apparently being just straight and broom-like, requiring the wrists to be put in an unnatural twisted position during use, and under considerable force too, if your own arms are generating the resistance that is working your feet. I worry because I have weak wrists to begin with, with half-cured carpal tunnel syndrome in one, just itching for a chance to become full-blown again.

Hmmm, I think a pogostick-like design would be an ideal configuration for a PFT: handles perpendicular to the arms during use, centered on a spring-loaded pole that ends in two apparatuses that look like what Mike W has now on his PFT. Perhaps with a strap that you could wrap around your back to take the pressure off your arms and hands. (hey Mike, how 'bout a 25% cut of your future profits on the sales of a second generation PFT based on this brilliant idea? :-)


Re: personal foot trainer

VickiJ on 3/29/00 at 00:00 (017995)

I purchased the pft from Mike and have been using it for about five days....the handle is rigid with rubber pads for the toes and foot to press against...the exercises are isometric type so not alot of strain is necessary...though I overdid it...pushed harder than is necessary and increased the reps to soon...it's been too many years since I had done any isometric exercises and they are easy and I'm over eager...so I was really going to it. It didn't hurt my legs or feet though. JohnH is absolutely right...the book provides a lot of valuable information and the exercises are written very clearly..and the other great thing is that Mike W answers all of my questions very promptly...I tend to be a little obsessive about exercises and want to make sure I do everything correctly and Mike has been extremely patient and helpful.

Re: personal foot trainer

Mike W on 3/29/00 at 00:00 (017996)

Hello John,

I am glad that they got to you so fast.

Like any other new stretching or strengthening routine starting slowly and gradually building up resistance and repetition is very important, especially with neglected muscles.

Many of these LL muscles have never been worked so they need time to get used to the new routine. I recommend starting with 5 reps and gradually adding 1 or 2 as they get stronger and more flexible.

Make sure you try to concentrate on making the isolated muscles contract and not over power them with your arms.

There should never be any pain while performing an exercise.

If you have any questions please email me.

Regards,

Mike Wilmot Physical therapist, Principal PFT'S Email (email removed)


Re: personal foot trainer

Mike W on 3/29/00 at 00:00 (018000)

Hello John,

The way you generate resistance is by gently and slowly moving your toes/feet away/towards your body until you feel a contraction in the muscle that is being isolated, therefore the isolated muscle is doing the work. The arms provide the resistance like a shock absorber not by pulling or pushing them with any force. The toe and foot muscles will generally not be as strong as your arms especially with the mechanical advantage the PFT'S provide. For those who have problems with wrists, arms or shoulders I would recommend using two hands on one PFT. One side benefit I have noticed is that gradual and consistent use improves the upper body muscles as well.

The bottom rubber pad is rigid (because the bottom of the foot is fairly flat) not exactly as shown in my pictures (a recent improvement) and the top pad does give a bit(because the top of the foot is slanted) but is still fairly rigid too.

The wrists should not be unnaturally twisted. The handle is a golf grip and you can grip it in a manner with the handle running through the palm of the hand with your index finger like on a trigger of a pistol under the bottom, the thumb on top, the 3rd to 5th fingers on the side and your wrist parallel to the handle.

I never thought how you grip them would be an issue. I will include a better description in my document. If you wrapped them around your back than there would be complaints about them hurting the back so it is a tough call.

If you email me I would be happy to fax you some helpful carpal tunnel stretches that do not reqiure any devices.

I hope this answers your questions/concerns.

Regards,
Mike Wilmot, Physical Therapist, Principal PFT'S,
email (email removed)


Re: personal foot trainer

john h on 3/29/00 at 00:00 (018009)

mike: you have to really concentrate not to let your arms overwork doing the exercises. i stretched the h---out of feet the first day and deserved what i got. it sure beats the towell method i had been using. i am having trouble keeping my cat away from the rubber bands on the device. i am going to stretch him if he keeps on chewing on it.

Re: personal foot trainer

Mike W on 3/30/00 at 00:00 (018032)

Hello John,

To help with not over working with your arms try to concentrate on feeling the contraction on the muscle that is being isolated. The diagram beside each position shows the highlighted muscle. Cat problems are another first.

Regards,

MIke W Physical Therapist, Principal PFT's, Email maxhealth@nucleus


Re: personal foot trainer

Susan S on 3/30/00 at 00:00 (018050)

It's nice to hear positive comments about the PFT after all the criticism Mike W recieved. It is apparent he is very knowledgable about the anatomy of the foot/leg, and very interested in helping others get relief from PF. I am a nurse and have taken anatomy and physiology and can tell you I knew very little of the muscles of the foot leg. So thank you Mike for your information and I for one look forward to your posts.