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to nancy s.-my long(and probably a bit boring) saga-answers to your questions

Posted by dfeet on 4/16/00 at 00:00 (018796)

Hi, Nancy. You had asked a few posts back how I developed PF and TTS. Well, I'll try to be brief(especially that my typing is so poor!). I was an avid tennis player(5plus times a week-1.5-3hours at a time),and was pretty good about getting new shoes every three to four months. Well, I pushed it with a pair that I could feel was breaking down, but I had never had a problem before with letting things go for a little while. I began to develope slight heel pain every morniing upon rising, but continued to play tennis-obsessive/compulsive about my sports,well, about most things. Then the pain got to be so bad that during the day ,I could no longer put my heel down(this was only on one foot at the time). At the same time, I was adding hours to my work schedule-my profession requires that I be on my feet a lot.
Went to first pod because I was preparing a vacation to tennis camp, and was concerned that this heel thing would interfere. Well, he examined me said I had PF,wrote me for Naproxen, injected me with cortisone, and booked a follow up upon my return from tennis camp.
While at tennis camp, I ruptured my Plantar faces-oh, the pain! Stupid me, I pLayed on. Went back for follow up but now other foot started to ache a little. Went through a round of taping. Changed pods.
Second pod-after a two second exam rx'd rigid orthotics,second cortisone shot and PT. This pod did not even address the other foot-said well that sometimes happens when you favor the bad foot. Orthotics was this guy's panacea for everything. Was told to stop playing tennis and limit my time spent on my feet. Rigid orthotics-well you know that story-bad, very bad. Semi-rigid orthotics came next-better. Within four days of wearing the rigids-on a very limited basis to 'break' them in-I developed severe cramping of my feet,actual bruising of my arches, the burning became unbearable, and my back was killing me. Also, previously I had developed and informed the pod about the involuntary curling of my toes when in certain positions. Through out this my PT was the most help.
Demanded, after consult with PT, for further evals from the pod-MRI's, Emg,neuro study. Bi-lateral TTS diagnosed and confirmed along with the PF rupture. Changed docs to current orthopod. Found this message board. And here I am.
This situation is so new to me. I'm not used to something so resilient. And now I'm faced with deciding on surgery-which,right now I cannot fathom.
As for rigid orthotics. Please be very careful. My current orthopod suspects that they strongly contributed to my developing TTS. So that's my story. Thanks for listening and being there-dfeet

Re: to nancy s.-my long(and probably a bit boring) saga-answers to your questions

Laurie R on 4/16/00 at 00:00 (018799)

Hi dfeet,
Wow what a story,It is good you posted cause we like to know how everyone starts with this so we can maybe help or see how close our symptoms are ,thank you for sharing your story...So how do you like your doctor you have now? and how long have you had PF and TTS? I got PF first and than after a few months I got TTS It has been a long 9 months.I wish you well .Laurie R

Re: to nancy s.-my long(and probably a bit boring) saga-answers to your questions

dfeet on 4/17/00 at 00:00 (018836)

Hi, laurie. I love my new doc-orthopedic surgeon who specializes in the foot and ankle. He's very conservative and listens well. Although he has recommended surgery, he did not hide the stats about how surgery is not very effective in TTS. He said that I would have to beg him before he would perform the surgery, because the success rate is not very favorable. Well, I'm not about to beg, even though it appears to be my only option at this time-or so I've been told.
I've had TTS for about 7mos. I now realize that this isn't a very long time compared to many on this board. But, I'm just not used to having something that is so resilient to cure or progress.
I've had two knee surgeries(on the same knee)-skiing bumps- and had to learn to walk again. But that was a piece of cake compared to this. I just want to thank you for your encouragement, questions, and info. This board has been very helpful, because of yours and others input. It helps alot.Thank you-dfeet

Re: to nancy s.-my long(and probably a bit boring) saga-answers to your questions

Nancy S. on 4/17/00 at 00:00 (018841)

Hi, dfeet, thanks for posting your story. You've had a tough time. Many if not most of us seem to be here either because we didn't take the PF seriously enough when it first hit or because the doctor didn't take it seriously enough. If your first pod didn't try to stop you from going to tennis camp, I'm pretty amazed by that. Of course, mine didn't mention anything either -- and got me my $300 rigid orthotics.
I don't know what to make of those orthotics anymore. They seemed to help a little at first, but after I got Birks I realized how little the orthotics were helping -- and then started noticing that my non-PF foot was developing soreness when I wore them, right at the dreaded spot. I'm going shoe hunting tomorrow and can't figure out whether to try to buy some with my orthotics or without. Do you always wear the semi-rigid ones you got, and how are they? And what are they like (made of)? For a long time I thought, 'Well I paid $300 for these, they MUST be right!' But I don't think they can be right. What kind of shoes are you wearing? My biggest hope for tomorrow is that I can find a walking or running shoe that I don't need orthotics in -- but maybe that's a pie in the sky dream. At least you now have a doctor you like and trust, that's a major plus, and I wish you the best of luck with all of this --Nancy

Re: to nancy s.-my long(and probably a bit boring) saga-answers to your questions

Laurie R on 4/16/00 at 00:00 (018799)

Hi dfeet,
Wow what a story,It is good you posted cause we like to know how everyone starts with this so we can maybe help or see how close our symptoms are ,thank you for sharing your story...So how do you like your doctor you have now? and how long have you had PF and TTS? I got PF first and than after a few months I got TTS It has been a long 9 months.I wish you well .Laurie R

Re: to nancy s.-my long(and probably a bit boring) saga-answers to your questions

dfeet on 4/17/00 at 00:00 (018836)

Hi, laurie. I love my new doc-orthopedic surgeon who specializes in the foot and ankle. He's very conservative and listens well. Although he has recommended surgery, he did not hide the stats about how surgery is not very effective in TTS. He said that I would have to beg him before he would perform the surgery, because the success rate is not very favorable. Well, I'm not about to beg, even though it appears to be my only option at this time-or so I've been told.
I've had TTS for about 7mos. I now realize that this isn't a very long time compared to many on this board. But, I'm just not used to having something that is so resilient to cure or progress.
I've had two knee surgeries(on the same knee)-skiing bumps- and had to learn to walk again. But that was a piece of cake compared to this. I just want to thank you for your encouragement, questions, and info. This board has been very helpful, because of yours and others input. It helps alot.Thank you-dfeet

Re: to nancy s.-my long(and probably a bit boring) saga-answers to your questions

Nancy S. on 4/17/00 at 00:00 (018841)

Hi, dfeet, thanks for posting your story. You've had a tough time. Many if not most of us seem to be here either because we didn't take the PF seriously enough when it first hit or because the doctor didn't take it seriously enough. If your first pod didn't try to stop you from going to tennis camp, I'm pretty amazed by that. Of course, mine didn't mention anything either -- and got me my $300 rigid orthotics.
I don't know what to make of those orthotics anymore. They seemed to help a little at first, but after I got Birks I realized how little the orthotics were helping -- and then started noticing that my non-PF foot was developing soreness when I wore them, right at the dreaded spot. I'm going shoe hunting tomorrow and can't figure out whether to try to buy some with my orthotics or without. Do you always wear the semi-rigid ones you got, and how are they? And what are they like (made of)? For a long time I thought, 'Well I paid $300 for these, they MUST be right!' But I don't think they can be right. What kind of shoes are you wearing? My biggest hope for tomorrow is that I can find a walking or running shoe that I don't need orthotics in -- but maybe that's a pie in the sky dream. At least you now have a doctor you like and trust, that's a major plus, and I wish you the best of luck with all of this --Nancy