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Scar tissue disintegration using ESWT

Posted by Paul M. on 4/23/00 at 00:00 (019286)

Dr Zuckerman and other knowledgeable colleagues: My feet problems of ten years exhibit small lumps about half the size of a pencil eraser very close to the heel bone. They are not visible on MRI's or X-Rays but can be felt by therapists with deep massage. I can easily feel them when the therapist rolls his thumbs over them. Do you believe that these could be candidates for Orbasone treatment?? ...many thanks for your response...
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Re: Scar tissue disintegration using ESWT

Dr. Zuckerman on 4/24/00 at 00:00 (019328)

Here is my criteria for the use of the orbaone treatment for PF and or heel spur syndrome.

1. limping in the morning or when you first get up after sitting. The limping does go away or greatly improve after walking it off.

2. Relief to some degree with either a local anesthesia and or steriod injection to the area that is painful on palpation

3. Pin point pain of the pf at the insertion of the medial tubercle of the heel bone ( calcaneus)

4. No stress fracture has been diagnosed. Usually this can be ruled out with an examination but for some patients you need either a bone scan and or mri.

Sincerely yours,

Dr. Zuckerman
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Re: Scar tissue disintegration using ESWT

Dr. Zuckerman on 4/24/00 at 00:00 (019328)

Here is my criteria for the use of the orbaone treatment for PF and or heel spur syndrome.

1. limping in the morning or when you first get up after sitting. The limping does go away or greatly improve after walking it off.

2. Relief to some degree with either a local anesthesia and or steriod injection to the area that is painful on palpation

3. Pin point pain of the pf at the insertion of the medial tubercle of the heel bone ( calcaneus)

4. No stress fracture has been diagnosed. Usually this can be ruled out with an examination but for some patients you need either a bone scan and or mri.

Sincerely yours,

Dr. Zuckerman
posted to the eswt board . . . keyword: