Home The Book Dr Articles Products Message Boards Journal Articles Search Our Surveys Surgery ESWT Dr Messages Find Good Drs video

Rebellious PF suffer

Posted by Jo Anne T on 5/08/00 at 16:28 (020018)

I feel like I'm breaking in line but I want to cut to the chase. This month is 1 yr of PF. I'd never heard of it before. I've been to 3 Drs. They all say it's common and will get better. Here's the deal. I'm a tennis player; where I use to play 4-6 times a wk, now I'm down to 1 or 2 and only because these are team matches. I have it in both feet with the right the very worse. Since about Nov. I've noticed very uncomfortable pain in my behind (can't spell gluedious maximus) It seems to be in sink with the foot pain; the right side worse than the left. Has anyone heard of this? I got discouraged with the Vioxx and Advil; I took Vioxx about 10 days; not long enough? Ice does nothing. I've always gone bare-footed and now they say I can't?????? Give me some more suggestions for good shoes. Those Birk????were awful. Isn't hard soles bad? Now even vaccuming starts the pain; walking the grocery store. It never goes away. How do people stay off their feet? Is that reasonable?

Re: Rebellious PF suffer

ChrisO on 5/08/00 at 16:52 (020019)

Hey JoAnne - believe me, you're no more rebellious than the rest of us! The most common advice you'll find here is one, seriously consider removing tennis, et.al, from your life for awhile. I know what a huge shocking idea that is but believe me, those of us who are chronic are so, to a degree, because we DIDN'T stop running, hiking, tennising, etc. when we first got the pain. We ran through it - that's bad. PF is extremely difficult to heal because you're on your sore feet most of the time so you have to limit where you can. I know too that your immediate thought is probably 'I can't limit tennis, period. It's my life's blood.' Am I right? But seriously, if you don't eliminate it for the short-term, you'll be forced to in the long term. Some people do get related pain because their natural 'gate' is off in order to relieve the pain - that could explain your extra pain in the behind. (pun!) And two, barefootin' is quite the absolute no-no. You may want to read Scott's entire publication re: PF - it's a perfect education (See top of page). You may want to see one doctor consistently so your progress can be monitored consistently. Last, re: the Birks - just a month ago I was complaining here that I couldn't handle them because they're hard. I was encouraged to stick with them as one's feet must become accustomized to them. I did and they are - but, unlike many here, I don't see them as a panacea of relief. I'm also working on orthotics and finding shoes or slip-ons that feel perfect. For instance, I read that Reebok Fusion runners were good for high-arched folks so I got some. (nope, haven't run in them yet!) And most orthotics take time to break in - it's easy to get discouraged too quickly with them.

Keep reading this board and don't be afraid to take charge of your treatment. Just remember that there are two key ingredients, one, be patient (icing, etc. really will help in the long run) and two, maintain a take-charge, positive attitude.


Re: Rebellious PF suffer

Susan S on 5/08/00 at 17:00 (020021)

Welcome, Jo Anne! Sorry that you are here.... BUT you have found the greatest resource available. Read Scott's book and try anything and everything til you find the treatment that works well for you.

Wondering about your pain in the rear....Have you considered that favoring one foot will throw everything out of balance? This happened to me too. Even if you think you aren't, you have to be favoring one foot and it will tell in the end (sorry, couldn't help myself). You haven't mentioned stretching which is an absolute must or nightsplints which have done well for me. Trust 'em on the no barefootin'. They are right. Good luck and keep us posted. We are all anxious for someone to stumble (or limp) upon the cure for us all.


Re: Rebellious PF suffer

Nancy S. on 5/08/00 at 17:09 (020023)

Hi Jo Anne. Hmmm . . . rebelling against standard PF treatment doesn't usually get a person too far, except maybe in the wrong direction (i.e., worse, and then chronic). Believe me, I know it's tough, we all know, but you can't merely cut down on tennis and go barefoot, etc. etc., and expect to get better. Your feet are injured, and for starters they need absolutely as much rest as you can give them. Icing is a long-term thing; it may not provide immediate relief, but over the long term works at keeping the inflammation down.
I am a Birks lover, but I also find good supportive hiking shoes helpful as I seem (finally) to be in a good strong recovery phase. Do a search (above) on the word shoe; it will turn up about 4 hours of reading on the subject, if you can stand it (I do suggest you do it).
I haven't tried Vioxx, but lots of people on this board have. So I can only guess, but 10 days doesn't seem like enough time to give it.
Jo Anne, you sound like an active and energetic person, and I can tell you wanted to get this PF over with quickly from the start -- and you might have if you'd slowed to a screeching halt and begun serious treatment right away. Start now, and you'll be on the road. Otherwise, I'm afraid you'll find yourself slipping backward for another year.
Are you using nightsplints? Do you heat up and massage your calves to keep them from getting tight and pulling on the fascia? Please read up here, there is an ocean of information with which you can help yourself. I wish you well --Nancy S.

Re: Rebellious PF suffer

Linda K on 5/08/00 at 17:24 (020025)

Your note sound just like me but I'm a bit ahead of you. I too have been an avid tennis player and experience my first bout about 4 years ago. I got perscription orthodics and there were a miracle at the time. I thought I was cured. Unfortunately about 6 months ago the condition came back even worse. I even had toe surgury a couple months ago and was off my feet for over 6 weeks while taking anti inflammatory's. No success. My feet hurt horribly in the morning and I stay in mild to moderate pain all through the day. I actually found this site through a search engine looking for answers. I am 52 and about 35 lbs overweight. I am making a very concerted effort to lose this weight hoping that will be of some help. What about you, normal weight? Age? I also am down from 4-5 times of tennis a week to about 2. One lesson and one team match. Miserable, but if the pain gets any worse I feel like I may become a crippled and tennis won't be a option at all. My podiatrist said stay away from surgury and I'm a little afraid of the steriod shots (complications and very painful). Well, let us all know if someting helps. I'm going to look into that night brace, sounds like it helps some people.

Re: Rebellious PF suffer

Bob Gayle on 5/08/00 at 20:21 (020043)

Welcome, Jo Anne!

I can only ditto the above posts. If you are in pain, tennis will re-injure and set you back worse. You must rest it so that it can heal. Then, after it heals, you may work yourself back into shape.

The sooner you stop and take control, the sooner you will be back out on the court. I have been pain-free for nine weeks now and I'm relatively lucky - I had to rest it for (only) ten months! I just bought a new tennis racquet, too!

Hang in there!


Re: Rebellious PF suffer

Beverly on 5/09/00 at 13:04 (020087)

JoAnne,
Take it easy. Rest has been the best thing for me.

About shoes. I have tried on lots of shoes now. I think it all depends on your foot. My shoe advice might not do anything for you.
My doctor says to stay consistant with heel height. My Aasic running shoes are about 2 inches; so my others shoes should have that heel height also. I have not been totally good there, but it does make me think twice when trying on shoes.

Personally, I like Ecco sandals. The pods seem to like them too. Be careful not to get the ones that are too flat. I like 'The New Cosmo' sandal and for just around the house, the so soft line (which isn't enough support for out in the world but works for me around the house.)
(But this is the feedback from a person with a narrow foot and high arch.)

Worst thing you can do besides overdoing it is going barefooted. Nancy taught me that, and I have become a believer.

I wish you well.
Beverly


Re: Try Teva's Circuits

Kim B. on 5/09/00 at 19:41 (020129)

Dear Rebellious, :-)

Try the 'Teva Circuits' blue and grey sandal. (Do a keyword search on 'Teva' for more info, I've posted on them before.) I got mine at 'Just For Feet' about 9 months ago, end of summer sale. But for a PF sufferer, they are worth FULL price. They are absolutely great! I wear them with socks when the weather is cold. I look rediculous, but, what the hell! They're great. The footbed is unique. Doesn't look like they would give much arch support but they do. They provide just the right amount for my feet, especially when they are flaired up bad, I think it is because they give so well where the foot print 'lives', and therefore it creates more support than they look like they would. Hard to explain. They are my best shoes for comfort. Second is my SAS Freetime walking shoes.

Teva has a website at http://www.teva.com You can check out what they look like.

I recently bought a pair of Teva's 'Ventura' (in black) to have something a little more dressy to wear this summer, but the foot bed is different. They are not as comfortable for me, so I'm planning to return them, (I bought them over the internet. Postal returns... what a pain in the butt!) So, even within the Teva family, all styles are not created equal.

Good luck, hope this helps,
Kim B.


Re: Rebellious PF suffer

ChrisO on 5/08/00 at 16:52 (020019)

Hey JoAnne - believe me, you're no more rebellious than the rest of us! The most common advice you'll find here is one, seriously consider removing tennis, et.al, from your life for awhile. I know what a huge shocking idea that is but believe me, those of us who are chronic are so, to a degree, because we DIDN'T stop running, hiking, tennising, etc. when we first got the pain. We ran through it - that's bad. PF is extremely difficult to heal because you're on your sore feet most of the time so you have to limit where you can. I know too that your immediate thought is probably 'I can't limit tennis, period. It's my life's blood.' Am I right? But seriously, if you don't eliminate it for the short-term, you'll be forced to in the long term. Some people do get related pain because their natural 'gate' is off in order to relieve the pain - that could explain your extra pain in the behind. (pun!) And two, barefootin' is quite the absolute no-no. You may want to read Scott's entire publication re: PF - it's a perfect education (See top of page). You may want to see one doctor consistently so your progress can be monitored consistently. Last, re: the Birks - just a month ago I was complaining here that I couldn't handle them because they're hard. I was encouraged to stick with them as one's feet must become accustomized to them. I did and they are - but, unlike many here, I don't see them as a panacea of relief. I'm also working on orthotics and finding shoes or slip-ons that feel perfect. For instance, I read that Reebok Fusion runners were good for high-arched folks so I got some. (nope, haven't run in them yet!) And most orthotics take time to break in - it's easy to get discouraged too quickly with them.

Keep reading this board and don't be afraid to take charge of your treatment. Just remember that there are two key ingredients, one, be patient (icing, etc. really will help in the long run) and two, maintain a take-charge, positive attitude.


Re: Rebellious PF suffer

Susan S on 5/08/00 at 17:00 (020021)

Welcome, Jo Anne! Sorry that you are here.... BUT you have found the greatest resource available. Read Scott's book and try anything and everything til you find the treatment that works well for you.

Wondering about your pain in the rear....Have you considered that favoring one foot will throw everything out of balance? This happened to me too. Even if you think you aren't, you have to be favoring one foot and it will tell in the end (sorry, couldn't help myself). You haven't mentioned stretching which is an absolute must or nightsplints which have done well for me. Trust 'em on the no barefootin'. They are right. Good luck and keep us posted. We are all anxious for someone to stumble (or limp) upon the cure for us all.


Re: Rebellious PF suffer

Nancy S. on 5/08/00 at 17:09 (020023)

Hi Jo Anne. Hmmm . . . rebelling against standard PF treatment doesn't usually get a person too far, except maybe in the wrong direction (i.e., worse, and then chronic). Believe me, I know it's tough, we all know, but you can't merely cut down on tennis and go barefoot, etc. etc., and expect to get better. Your feet are injured, and for starters they need absolutely as much rest as you can give them. Icing is a long-term thing; it may not provide immediate relief, but over the long term works at keeping the inflammation down.
I am a Birks lover, but I also find good supportive hiking shoes helpful as I seem (finally) to be in a good strong recovery phase. Do a search (above) on the word shoe; it will turn up about 4 hours of reading on the subject, if you can stand it (I do suggest you do it).
I haven't tried Vioxx, but lots of people on this board have. So I can only guess, but 10 days doesn't seem like enough time to give it.
Jo Anne, you sound like an active and energetic person, and I can tell you wanted to get this PF over with quickly from the start -- and you might have if you'd slowed to a screeching halt and begun serious treatment right away. Start now, and you'll be on the road. Otherwise, I'm afraid you'll find yourself slipping backward for another year.
Are you using nightsplints? Do you heat up and massage your calves to keep them from getting tight and pulling on the fascia? Please read up here, there is an ocean of information with which you can help yourself. I wish you well --Nancy S.

Re: Rebellious PF suffer

Linda K on 5/08/00 at 17:24 (020025)

Your note sound just like me but I'm a bit ahead of you. I too have been an avid tennis player and experience my first bout about 4 years ago. I got perscription orthodics and there were a miracle at the time. I thought I was cured. Unfortunately about 6 months ago the condition came back even worse. I even had toe surgury a couple months ago and was off my feet for over 6 weeks while taking anti inflammatory's. No success. My feet hurt horribly in the morning and I stay in mild to moderate pain all through the day. I actually found this site through a search engine looking for answers. I am 52 and about 35 lbs overweight. I am making a very concerted effort to lose this weight hoping that will be of some help. What about you, normal weight? Age? I also am down from 4-5 times of tennis a week to about 2. One lesson and one team match. Miserable, but if the pain gets any worse I feel like I may become a crippled and tennis won't be a option at all. My podiatrist said stay away from surgury and I'm a little afraid of the steriod shots (complications and very painful). Well, let us all know if someting helps. I'm going to look into that night brace, sounds like it helps some people.

Re: Rebellious PF suffer

Bob Gayle on 5/08/00 at 20:21 (020043)

Welcome, Jo Anne!

I can only ditto the above posts. If you are in pain, tennis will re-injure and set you back worse. You must rest it so that it can heal. Then, after it heals, you may work yourself back into shape.

The sooner you stop and take control, the sooner you will be back out on the court. I have been pain-free for nine weeks now and I'm relatively lucky - I had to rest it for (only) ten months! I just bought a new tennis racquet, too!

Hang in there!


Re: Rebellious PF suffer

Beverly on 5/09/00 at 13:04 (020087)

JoAnne,
Take it easy. Rest has been the best thing for me.

About shoes. I have tried on lots of shoes now. I think it all depends on your foot. My shoe advice might not do anything for you.
My doctor says to stay consistant with heel height. My Aasic running shoes are about 2 inches; so my others shoes should have that heel height also. I have not been totally good there, but it does make me think twice when trying on shoes.

Personally, I like Ecco sandals. The pods seem to like them too. Be careful not to get the ones that are too flat. I like 'The New Cosmo' sandal and for just around the house, the so soft line (which isn't enough support for out in the world but works for me around the house.)
(But this is the feedback from a person with a narrow foot and high arch.)

Worst thing you can do besides overdoing it is going barefooted. Nancy taught me that, and I have become a believer.

I wish you well.
Beverly


Re: Try Teva's Circuits

Kim B. on 5/09/00 at 19:41 (020129)

Dear Rebellious, :-)

Try the 'Teva Circuits' blue and grey sandal. (Do a keyword search on 'Teva' for more info, I've posted on them before.) I got mine at 'Just For Feet' about 9 months ago, end of summer sale. But for a PF sufferer, they are worth FULL price. They are absolutely great! I wear them with socks when the weather is cold. I look rediculous, but, what the hell! They're great. The footbed is unique. Doesn't look like they would give much arch support but they do. They provide just the right amount for my feet, especially when they are flaired up bad, I think it is because they give so well where the foot print 'lives', and therefore it creates more support than they look like they would. Hard to explain. They are my best shoes for comfort. Second is my SAS Freetime walking shoes.

Teva has a website at http://www.teva.com You can check out what they look like.

I recently bought a pair of Teva's 'Ventura' (in black) to have something a little more dressy to wear this summer, but the foot bed is different. They are not as comfortable for me, so I'm planning to return them, (I bought them over the internet. Postal returns... what a pain in the butt!) So, even within the Teva family, all styles are not created equal.

Good luck, hope this helps,
Kim B.