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tips on icing and nightsplints?

Posted by sherri mc on 5/16/00 at 08:57 (020431)

Can anyone tell me who orders the nightsplints? Alot of people talk about these and I am wondering if these may help me.

Is there any possibility of permanently stretching out this tendon or causing any damage by the long stretching. Some people have posted about casuing furthre damage by stretching. Any comments are appreciated. Sorry, I'm referrring to the night splints.

Also, where are ya'll icing at? I've tried this on the bottom of my foot before and found it to be very sensitive to cold. I don't have much padding on the bottom. How long, and how many times are ya'll icing? I really appreciate the info.


Re: tips on icing and nightsplints?

ChrisO on 5/16/00 at 10:08 (020433)

Hi Sherri - I would imagine that BobG will give you very thorough description of the use of a nite splint as he has been very successful with it. It's not really meant to stretch the plantar, per say, rather it's meant to prevent the plantar from 'shortening', yet again, in it's non-nite-splint natural droop!
re: the ice - my method is to fill a gallon-size zip lock baggie about 3/4 full (actually I have 3 layers of bags so I can use that supply many times without worrying about tears in the baggie), then layer a dishtowel over that, put it in a BIG stainless steel bowl and rest my feet in that for ten minutes. If I don't have socks on, I fold that towel over for a double layer of protection. The great thing is that I can sort of 'nestle' my feet in to the ice and force the ice to contact all of the bottom of my feet. Hope this helps a bit.

Re: tips on icing and nightsplints?

charles t on 5/16/00 at 10:11 (020434)

I ice when overstrain. Use a small dixie cup, fill with water and freeze. Peel back top to expose ice and start with small circular motion on heel, foot will adjust to temp. Then for 5 min I massage foot from heel to ball. Like to do small area, then move on and repeat. This is what PT folks did.
Of course it feels cold at first, very sensitive, but it does adjust.
After icing I like to remain motionless for 20 min, and if I am going to be active, will soak in warm water 1 hour after the ice massage.

Re: tips on icing and nightsplints?

Susan S on 5/16/00 at 12:14 (020438)

I got my splints at the doctor's office although several people here have ordered them online. The major benefit from the doctor's office is that they were covered under insurance. It is very difficult to adjust to sleeping in them but they were worth all the night's of frustration that I went through at first.

Regarding the icing, when I'm not in a lot of pain (and then the ice is a blessing) I use one of those cups with the double layer with some type of liquid inside that you keep in the freezer and you are not suppose to need ice in your drink. I lay it on it's side and place a towel over it and then roll my foot over the side. My own version of the Foot Thing. You might also try freezing a plastic coke bottle filled with water. That's what I use at work and it's wonderful!

Good Luck!


Re: tips on icing and nightsplints?

Nancy S. on 5/16/00 at 13:37 (020440)

Hi Sherri. It's true, no need to worry about the 'stretch' of a nightsplint. It mainly keeps the fascia from contracting during the night and so eases the first-steps morning pain and re-tearing. I use a blue cushiony nightsplint by Johnson&Johnson, which I got from a pod. It's very comfortable.
I have tended in the past to be a bit of a slacker with icing, but am now doing it regularly, usually in the morning (after warming, massaging, and a little stretching) and at the end of the day when I know I won't be on my feet much anymore. I use the Coke bottle with water frozen in it, rolling it back and forth with the bottom of my foot. (If it's too cold for you, wear a thin sock.) To this I've also added a freezer pack, because I've developed stiffness and a little swelling around my achilles tendon. I tie the pack around my achilles and ankles (with a bathrobe sash, have to be resourceful in this house), and keep it on there while I'm rolling the frozen Coke bottle. I do this for 10 minutes.
Well, Sherri, now you have a variety of different people's methods to choose from; have a great time! --Nancy

Re: tips on icing and nightsplints?

Beverly on 5/16/00 at 14:08 (020441)

Sherri,

Ice is one of my main sources for pain relief. It doesn't help everyone, and yes, sometimes it stings, but overall, I believe I feel better later.

I use ice wraps that have been made for other parts of the body and strap them around my heel and arch with velcro. My favorite ice pack is one I found that was made for the knee. When unfolded it has a cross shape, with four corners. First, I bring two of the sections together and have it wrapped around my arch. This also means that it covers the top of my foot as well. Then, I wrap the other two sections around my heel. It is very cold, but I like it that way. Since it is not ice, I have not worried about getting a freezer burn. But I'm sure it would also work by wearing a sock underneath.

I leave this on anywhere from 15 minutes to 45 minutes. Then I let my feet warmup before I put them on the ground and walk. This is important not to walk on cold muscles. I do this anywhere from once a day to twice a day.

I have not tried night splints.

My doctor says ice therapy works best if you massage your foot with the baggie of ice - about ten minutes. I confess, I have not tried that.

Beverly


Re: tips on icing and nightsplints?

Bob G. on 5/16/00 at 21:44 (020469)

Hello, Sherri!

Don't worry about stretching concerns with the nightsplint. As Nancy pointed out, it does not stretch. What it does do is prevent re-injury (while you sleep) by preventing the natural contraction that takes place during sleep.

If icing hurts or is uncomfortable - don't do it! I ice ocasionally now, but only after a long hard day on the feet or after exercising it to the limit. Personally, I would not ice just to ice. Just my own opinion.

Feel good soon!


Re: tips on icing and nightsplints?

Jill P on 5/16/00 at 22:56 (020475)

I agree with Nancy that the Johnson and Johnson night splint is cushiony and pretty comfortable. It looks big and intimidating at first sight but don't be scared off. I got that one from my podiatrist and had immediate improvement in my morning pain level. I only wear one as the Dr said that it is hard to sleep with two. My right heel is way worse than my left so I wear the slpint on the right foot and in the morning, the right foot feels better than the left which has been not been in the splint.

Also I sleep on my side with a pillow between my legs which I think really helps make the night splint more comfortable too. Someone else also has mentioned this on the boards here so I am not alone with that trick. Good luck! Jill P


Re: tips on icing and nightsplints?

ChrisO on 5/16/00 at 10:08 (020433)

Hi Sherri - I would imagine that BobG will give you very thorough description of the use of a nite splint as he has been very successful with it. It's not really meant to stretch the plantar, per say, rather it's meant to prevent the plantar from 'shortening', yet again, in it's non-nite-splint natural droop!
re: the ice - my method is to fill a gallon-size zip lock baggie about 3/4 full (actually I have 3 layers of bags so I can use that supply many times without worrying about tears in the baggie), then layer a dishtowel over that, put it in a BIG stainless steel bowl and rest my feet in that for ten minutes. If I don't have socks on, I fold that towel over for a double layer of protection. The great thing is that I can sort of 'nestle' my feet in to the ice and force the ice to contact all of the bottom of my feet. Hope this helps a bit.

Re: tips on icing and nightsplints?

charles t on 5/16/00 at 10:11 (020434)

I ice when overstrain. Use a small dixie cup, fill with water and freeze. Peel back top to expose ice and start with small circular motion on heel, foot will adjust to temp. Then for 5 min I massage foot from heel to ball. Like to do small area, then move on and repeat. This is what PT folks did.
Of course it feels cold at first, very sensitive, but it does adjust.
After icing I like to remain motionless for 20 min, and if I am going to be active, will soak in warm water 1 hour after the ice massage.

Re: tips on icing and nightsplints?

Susan S on 5/16/00 at 12:14 (020438)

I got my splints at the doctor's office although several people here have ordered them online. The major benefit from the doctor's office is that they were covered under insurance. It is very difficult to adjust to sleeping in them but they were worth all the night's of frustration that I went through at first.

Regarding the icing, when I'm not in a lot of pain (and then the ice is a blessing) I use one of those cups with the double layer with some type of liquid inside that you keep in the freezer and you are not suppose to need ice in your drink. I lay it on it's side and place a towel over it and then roll my foot over the side. My own version of the Foot Thing. You might also try freezing a plastic coke bottle filled with water. That's what I use at work and it's wonderful!

Good Luck!


Re: tips on icing and nightsplints?

Nancy S. on 5/16/00 at 13:37 (020440)

Hi Sherri. It's true, no need to worry about the 'stretch' of a nightsplint. It mainly keeps the fascia from contracting during the night and so eases the first-steps morning pain and re-tearing. I use a blue cushiony nightsplint by Johnson&Johnson, which I got from a pod. It's very comfortable.
I have tended in the past to be a bit of a slacker with icing, but am now doing it regularly, usually in the morning (after warming, massaging, and a little stretching) and at the end of the day when I know I won't be on my feet much anymore. I use the Coke bottle with water frozen in it, rolling it back and forth with the bottom of my foot. (If it's too cold for you, wear a thin sock.) To this I've also added a freezer pack, because I've developed stiffness and a little swelling around my achilles tendon. I tie the pack around my achilles and ankles (with a bathrobe sash, have to be resourceful in this house), and keep it on there while I'm rolling the frozen Coke bottle. I do this for 10 minutes.
Well, Sherri, now you have a variety of different people's methods to choose from; have a great time! --Nancy

Re: tips on icing and nightsplints?

Beverly on 5/16/00 at 14:08 (020441)

Sherri,

Ice is one of my main sources for pain relief. It doesn't help everyone, and yes, sometimes it stings, but overall, I believe I feel better later.

I use ice wraps that have been made for other parts of the body and strap them around my heel and arch with velcro. My favorite ice pack is one I found that was made for the knee. When unfolded it has a cross shape, with four corners. First, I bring two of the sections together and have it wrapped around my arch. This also means that it covers the top of my foot as well. Then, I wrap the other two sections around my heel. It is very cold, but I like it that way. Since it is not ice, I have not worried about getting a freezer burn. But I'm sure it would also work by wearing a sock underneath.

I leave this on anywhere from 15 minutes to 45 minutes. Then I let my feet warmup before I put them on the ground and walk. This is important not to walk on cold muscles. I do this anywhere from once a day to twice a day.

I have not tried night splints.

My doctor says ice therapy works best if you massage your foot with the baggie of ice - about ten minutes. I confess, I have not tried that.

Beverly


Re: tips on icing and nightsplints?

Bob G. on 5/16/00 at 21:44 (020469)

Hello, Sherri!

Don't worry about stretching concerns with the nightsplint. As Nancy pointed out, it does not stretch. What it does do is prevent re-injury (while you sleep) by preventing the natural contraction that takes place during sleep.

If icing hurts or is uncomfortable - don't do it! I ice ocasionally now, but only after a long hard day on the feet or after exercising it to the limit. Personally, I would not ice just to ice. Just my own opinion.

Feel good soon!


Re: tips on icing and nightsplints?

Jill P on 5/16/00 at 22:56 (020475)

I agree with Nancy that the Johnson and Johnson night splint is cushiony and pretty comfortable. It looks big and intimidating at first sight but don't be scared off. I got that one from my podiatrist and had immediate improvement in my morning pain level. I only wear one as the Dr said that it is hard to sleep with two. My right heel is way worse than my left so I wear the slpint on the right foot and in the morning, the right foot feels better than the left which has been not been in the splint.

Also I sleep on my side with a pillow between my legs which I think really helps make the night splint more comfortable too. Someone else also has mentioned this on the boards here so I am not alone with that trick. Good luck! Jill P