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just found out

Posted by Sue on 5/23/00 at 14:36 (020728)

Hi all....I am new to this board. Just found out today I have plantar fasciitis in both feet. Now I know what is causing the pain I am having in the morning and in lesser degrees throughout the day. Got my first shot of cortisone in the heel (ouch) this morning and hope to get relief from it. Just wondered if I could get some advice from some of you on best ways to get relief or maybe some information on how long this usually lasts. Doctor tells me to stay off my feet but I am a teaching assistant in a first grade class AND I have two active teenagers...how can I do that?

Sue


Re: just found out

dannielle d on 5/23/00 at 15:24 (020729)

Isn't it amazing what doctors will tell you? My doctor gave me materials that said 'stay off your feet and don't exercise' yet in the same paragraph it says 'lose weight'...now how do I do both? If I could sit in bed all day and lose weight, I'd become a multi-millionaire and all those diet books would come off the shelves! I find that I really need to try and sit as much as possible and make sure to take ibuprofen if the pain gets bad. Plus, make sure you have properly fitting shoes (good quality support)...I know the rotten shoes I was wearing didn't help matters any.

Re: just found out

Steve P on 5/23/00 at 15:40 (020730)

Sue -- Minimizing time on your feet is probably the single most important thing you can do. Yes, I know it won't be easy in your case! But here are a few questions..... Could you set up a stool in the classroom & sit on it at least part of the time? How about a chair or stool on the playground? Could your duties somehow be reassigned to spend more time seated .... for example, tutoring, grading papers, planning, or perhaps helping in the office rather than the classroom?
Same thing goes at home. Try to fix dinner sitting down, take baths rather than showers, & get those teenagers to do the dishes! You've got to be serious about this to get the best results. Good luck & keep on the Board!

Re: just found out Re Sue

Laurie R on 5/23/00 at 16:43 (020733)

Hello,
Welcome to the board......We do understand how you are feeling.Their are so many caring people on this board so many have helped me.We are very good listeners also.I have has PF for almost a year and I also got TTS due to the PF ,I have been off work for 8 months now,I am a bartender and their is no way I could do my job at this point.I am getting better I am in a hard cast for the second time I will wear this one for 5 weeks.It has helped so much with the pain.

Have your kids help you and some times you just have to make easy things for dinner.I have two daughters ,it is still hard for them to understand what is going on with my feet.One of my daugthers is in first grade so I can understand how hard it must be for you to teach I don't think you can sit down to much.

Also read Scotts PF book at the top of this page,I found so many good things there .Also ask us what ever you need to know I know someone will have the answer for you.Try to rest as much as you can....Ice is also good.

My very best to you.......Again welcome......Laurie R


Re: just found out

Nancy S. on 5/23/00 at 18:19 (020737)

Hi Sue -- I know it must sound ludicrous when a doctor tells you to stay off your feet, but how I wish mine had told me that! He didn't bother to mention that, nor a host of other things that probably would have helped. As a result, I just continued trying to walk through the pain and trying to be stoical about it, even as it got worse and worse and my ability to work dwindled to near zero over the course of eight months. Then I found this board.
Steve and Laurie are right (not to mention Scott in his PF Book): Rest is important (I think crucial), because your feet are injured and every day that you use them too much and feel pain causes reinjury. So the healing process can't begin. A major rest for your feet would probably help -- it has helped many people on this board -- but if you simply can't do that, please be sure not to underestimate the importance of the smaller, daily ways to rest your feet, such as the things Steve and Laurie mentioned. As another example, which others here have already heard (and made some good jokes about!), I used to clean up the cat litter box by squatting down on my toes -- ouch, I could feel the fascia tear, but I thought Well, I HAVE to do this! But it finally dawned on me, duh, that I could do it by sitting down on the floor totally and leaving my feet out of the procedure. These little saving-feet-from-pain compromises can add up and speed your recovery.
The majority of people who get PF recover with conservative treatment, especially if you're catching it early. Some of us have a harder time, and that is mostly who you'll find on this board. But there are also success stories here -- For example, do a search above on Robin B. and Bob G.
Top quality shoes with excellent arch support are important, as is never going barefoot. Also, did your doctor mention the night splint?
I hope the shot helps you. It's a pretty controversial topic, and appears not to help many, so don't be discouraged if you get only temporary relief from it. If you read Scott's PF Book and read through this message board, you'll find many other options that may be more helpful. Best of luck to you, Sue. --Nancy S.
Any calf-stretching exercises?

Re: just found out

Bob G. on 5/23/00 at 18:45 (020739)

Hi, Sue! Welcome aboard. There is much information here for you to sort through as you search to find the right combination of remedies that work for you. The first step towards recovery is REST. Don't continue doing the things that injure. And be patient. Think long-term.

I am icing right now after a good jog on the beach. It took me ten months of rest to get into pain-free recovery.

Best wishes for your recovery!


Re: just found out

Beverly on 5/23/00 at 19:38 (020741)

Hi Sue!

Welcome to the Board. It is a challenge to stay off one's feet, but I have found that to help me more than anything else. One of the teachers on the board spends most of her teaching time in a chair with wheels. I work at home on my computer, and in that sense I'm lucky, but I too have found scooting around my home office on the chair with wheels to be helpful.

I've learned to make other changes. I never thought I'd ride the handicap cart at the grocery store, but on bad days I do, and it allows me to shop without added injury.

Everyone has different feet and so we all different opinions about shoes and inserts, but my experience is that the green Superfeet inserts are the best ready made ones. I found mine at an athletic shoe store. (I now have custom orthodics.)

I have had this for two months. Rest has helped me more than anything.
I also have found using a massage ball (looks like a golf ball, hard, has nodules) very helpful. I have two of them... one by my bed for first thing in the morning and one by my recliner. I've seen them in health food stores as well as athletic stores. (Some people just use a plain hard ball, but I think the little massage bumps make a difference.) It is helpful to do some kind of a.m. ... first thing out of bed massage, because it helps reduce morning pain.

I use ice packs. Don't get up until your foot has warmed back up. Some nights I just put them on at night. Other times I'll do am and pm.

Not going barefooted is critical... not even for a little while. I keep shower shoes by my bathtub. One day around the house barefooted can ruin weeks of recovery.

Some people like Birks. I personally like Ecco Shoes because they are not as hard as Birks. The pods like Birks, Eccos, Mephisto, and in some cases Teva sandals. Most of the time I stay in my good running shoes. Mine are Aasics. Other good brands are: New Balance and Brooks. My pod says staying with a consistant heel height helps.
Running shoes are better than walking shoes because of the extra support and heel height. But realize we all have different opinions about shoes, because we have different feet. One thing to stay away from are shoes that are real flat.

This takes alot of patience. If I could redo anything, I would have taken it easy when I first started feeling better. The mistake I made was getting excited about feeling better and then overdoing it... sent me way, way backwards.

Some people like stretching ... some don't. I have not decided how I feel about that yet.

Best of luck,
Beverly


Re: just found out

Pat M on 5/23/00 at 20:17 (020745)

Hi Sue,
Guess what? I am one of those rolling teachers. I actually went to Walmart and bought me a nice rolling chair. I don't keep it behind my desk. It stays out in the classroom where there is plenty of room to roll. I don't actually use the chair to roll around, I found that to be a little painful, but it so easy to take it anywhere I need to be in the classroom. My kids love to make sure that my chair is where it is supposed to be for me. (I teach second grade.)

I have found, that when I am able to sit more, it is not as bad at the end of the day. I have found the people on this board to be very helpful. I am pretty new here, too. I went to my first POD visit knowing more(I'm sure) than the doctor did. I did let him give me that shot, though. I thought it might help. Don't be upset if it doesn't work. My relief lasted about 24 hrs. :-(

Listen to these guys. They've been there and have the experience. When they say that not all things work for all people, it's true. I just starting out on this journey. Hope it's a short one, but if not, I know that I have support.
Feel better soon, Pat M


Re: just found out

Angie on 5/23/00 at 21:40 (020746)

Sue- Hi. Welcome to the board. I too have PF in both feet. 8 months now. I also have a type A personality. Always on the run-always busy. I wish I had stayed off my feet when this first occured. But as soon as I felt better -I would go back to my old routine again- and the pain always came back. I have been good the last week (honestly the first week since this all began that I have been faithful to taking it easy). I have to honestly say I feel really good. The trick is gonna be for me to stay resting as much as possible. Just sit whenever you can do it. Not complete rest but your lifestyle will have to change for awhile.

Re: just found out

dannielle d on 5/23/00 at 15:24 (020729)

Isn't it amazing what doctors will tell you? My doctor gave me materials that said 'stay off your feet and don't exercise' yet in the same paragraph it says 'lose weight'...now how do I do both? If I could sit in bed all day and lose weight, I'd become a multi-millionaire and all those diet books would come off the shelves! I find that I really need to try and sit as much as possible and make sure to take ibuprofen if the pain gets bad. Plus, make sure you have properly fitting shoes (good quality support)...I know the rotten shoes I was wearing didn't help matters any.

Re: just found out

Steve P on 5/23/00 at 15:40 (020730)

Sue -- Minimizing time on your feet is probably the single most important thing you can do. Yes, I know it won't be easy in your case! But here are a few questions..... Could you set up a stool in the classroom & sit on it at least part of the time? How about a chair or stool on the playground? Could your duties somehow be reassigned to spend more time seated .... for example, tutoring, grading papers, planning, or perhaps helping in the office rather than the classroom?
Same thing goes at home. Try to fix dinner sitting down, take baths rather than showers, & get those teenagers to do the dishes! You've got to be serious about this to get the best results. Good luck & keep on the Board!

Re: just found out Re Sue

Laurie R on 5/23/00 at 16:43 (020733)

Hello,
Welcome to the board......We do understand how you are feeling.Their are so many caring people on this board so many have helped me.We are very good listeners also.I have has PF for almost a year and I also got TTS due to the PF ,I have been off work for 8 months now,I am a bartender and their is no way I could do my job at this point.I am getting better I am in a hard cast for the second time I will wear this one for 5 weeks.It has helped so much with the pain.

Have your kids help you and some times you just have to make easy things for dinner.I have two daughters ,it is still hard for them to understand what is going on with my feet.One of my daugthers is in first grade so I can understand how hard it must be for you to teach I don't think you can sit down to much.

Also read Scotts PF book at the top of this page,I found so many good things there .Also ask us what ever you need to know I know someone will have the answer for you.Try to rest as much as you can....Ice is also good.

My very best to you.......Again welcome......Laurie R


Re: just found out

Nancy S. on 5/23/00 at 18:19 (020737)

Hi Sue -- I know it must sound ludicrous when a doctor tells you to stay off your feet, but how I wish mine had told me that! He didn't bother to mention that, nor a host of other things that probably would have helped. As a result, I just continued trying to walk through the pain and trying to be stoical about it, even as it got worse and worse and my ability to work dwindled to near zero over the course of eight months. Then I found this board.
Steve and Laurie are right (not to mention Scott in his PF Book): Rest is important (I think crucial), because your feet are injured and every day that you use them too much and feel pain causes reinjury. So the healing process can't begin. A major rest for your feet would probably help -- it has helped many people on this board -- but if you simply can't do that, please be sure not to underestimate the importance of the smaller, daily ways to rest your feet, such as the things Steve and Laurie mentioned. As another example, which others here have already heard (and made some good jokes about!), I used to clean up the cat litter box by squatting down on my toes -- ouch, I could feel the fascia tear, but I thought Well, I HAVE to do this! But it finally dawned on me, duh, that I could do it by sitting down on the floor totally and leaving my feet out of the procedure. These little saving-feet-from-pain compromises can add up and speed your recovery.
The majority of people who get PF recover with conservative treatment, especially if you're catching it early. Some of us have a harder time, and that is mostly who you'll find on this board. But there are also success stories here -- For example, do a search above on Robin B. and Bob G.
Top quality shoes with excellent arch support are important, as is never going barefoot. Also, did your doctor mention the night splint?
I hope the shot helps you. It's a pretty controversial topic, and appears not to help many, so don't be discouraged if you get only temporary relief from it. If you read Scott's PF Book and read through this message board, you'll find many other options that may be more helpful. Best of luck to you, Sue. --Nancy S.
Any calf-stretching exercises?

Re: just found out

Bob G. on 5/23/00 at 18:45 (020739)

Hi, Sue! Welcome aboard. There is much information here for you to sort through as you search to find the right combination of remedies that work for you. The first step towards recovery is REST. Don't continue doing the things that injure. And be patient. Think long-term.

I am icing right now after a good jog on the beach. It took me ten months of rest to get into pain-free recovery.

Best wishes for your recovery!


Re: just found out

Beverly on 5/23/00 at 19:38 (020741)

Hi Sue!

Welcome to the Board. It is a challenge to stay off one's feet, but I have found that to help me more than anything else. One of the teachers on the board spends most of her teaching time in a chair with wheels. I work at home on my computer, and in that sense I'm lucky, but I too have found scooting around my home office on the chair with wheels to be helpful.

I've learned to make other changes. I never thought I'd ride the handicap cart at the grocery store, but on bad days I do, and it allows me to shop without added injury.

Everyone has different feet and so we all different opinions about shoes and inserts, but my experience is that the green Superfeet inserts are the best ready made ones. I found mine at an athletic shoe store. (I now have custom orthodics.)

I have had this for two months. Rest has helped me more than anything.
I also have found using a massage ball (looks like a golf ball, hard, has nodules) very helpful. I have two of them... one by my bed for first thing in the morning and one by my recliner. I've seen them in health food stores as well as athletic stores. (Some people just use a plain hard ball, but I think the little massage bumps make a difference.) It is helpful to do some kind of a.m. ... first thing out of bed massage, because it helps reduce morning pain.

I use ice packs. Don't get up until your foot has warmed back up. Some nights I just put them on at night. Other times I'll do am and pm.

Not going barefooted is critical... not even for a little while. I keep shower shoes by my bathtub. One day around the house barefooted can ruin weeks of recovery.

Some people like Birks. I personally like Ecco Shoes because they are not as hard as Birks. The pods like Birks, Eccos, Mephisto, and in some cases Teva sandals. Most of the time I stay in my good running shoes. Mine are Aasics. Other good brands are: New Balance and Brooks. My pod says staying with a consistant heel height helps.
Running shoes are better than walking shoes because of the extra support and heel height. But realize we all have different opinions about shoes, because we have different feet. One thing to stay away from are shoes that are real flat.

This takes alot of patience. If I could redo anything, I would have taken it easy when I first started feeling better. The mistake I made was getting excited about feeling better and then overdoing it... sent me way, way backwards.

Some people like stretching ... some don't. I have not decided how I feel about that yet.

Best of luck,
Beverly


Re: just found out

Pat M on 5/23/00 at 20:17 (020745)

Hi Sue,
Guess what? I am one of those rolling teachers. I actually went to Walmart and bought me a nice rolling chair. I don't keep it behind my desk. It stays out in the classroom where there is plenty of room to roll. I don't actually use the chair to roll around, I found that to be a little painful, but it so easy to take it anywhere I need to be in the classroom. My kids love to make sure that my chair is where it is supposed to be for me. (I teach second grade.)

I have found, that when I am able to sit more, it is not as bad at the end of the day. I have found the people on this board to be very helpful. I am pretty new here, too. I went to my first POD visit knowing more(I'm sure) than the doctor did. I did let him give me that shot, though. I thought it might help. Don't be upset if it doesn't work. My relief lasted about 24 hrs. :-(

Listen to these guys. They've been there and have the experience. When they say that not all things work for all people, it's true. I just starting out on this journey. Hope it's a short one, but if not, I know that I have support.
Feel better soon, Pat M


Re: just found out

Angie on 5/23/00 at 21:40 (020746)

Sue- Hi. Welcome to the board. I too have PF in both feet. 8 months now. I also have a type A personality. Always on the run-always busy. I wish I had stayed off my feet when this first occured. But as soon as I felt better -I would go back to my old routine again- and the pain always came back. I have been good the last week (honestly the first week since this all began that I have been faithful to taking it easy). I have to honestly say I feel really good. The trick is gonna be for me to stay resting as much as possible. Just sit whenever you can do it. Not complete rest but your lifestyle will have to change for awhile.