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I Challenge Everyone In Pain To Stop Sit Down and MASSAGE

Posted by Sweetfeet on 5/28/00 at 18:59 (021003)

Really, I am not kidding. Let's give the doctors (all sorts of them) a run for their 'orthotic money' hee hee! Let's do something active in the healing of our feet. It's easy to do and EXTREMELY rewarding. I am still without pain. I actually went dancing on Friday night! Today I just got back from a mile walk. When I returned, the first thing I did was sit down and massage. I truly believe this is the best thing we can do. Remember, I have done all kinds of things to help. I mean I was a good patient, listened really well--until I got to this site and started listening to you guys. It has changed my life. We all have the power--let's use it! MASSAGE, MASSAGE, MASSAGE! JUST DO IT. I PROMISE YOU IT WILL HELP.

Re: What do ya'll think?

Kim B. on 5/28/00 at 19:57 (021005)

Well, I try to massage my own feet, but like someone else here posted, my hands start hurting before long. What is the trick Sweetfeet? Can you describe how you are able to get results?

I have an electric foot massager but it can't do the deep kneeding that is needed. I pay a massage threapist to do it for me every couple of weeks, but it's too long between visits.

I've noticed that some people get good results with Mike W.'s PFT. Something else I've notice people are getting good results with, especially if it's done often enough, is the professional Rolfing/reflexology/foot massage. I've been thinking about what massage and the PFT have in common, and what comes to mind is that they both involve NON-WEIGHT BEARING movement of the feet and legs. I'm not saying they are the same by any means, one strengthens, one loosens, etc... But they both move the muscles in a non-weight bearing position. This common thread may be a link to what the cure for this ailment will be. Even night splits, which many people get good results from, are a non-weight bearing way of tending PF.

Another thing, it seems I have better foot days when I take the time to do yoga postures and stretches regularly. Many are sitting or floor postures. I seem to benefit alot from the ones that envolve stretching my low back, hips and periformis muscles. It's as if, releasing at the top has a 'trickle down' effect. I'm not sure what, if anything, to make of these observations. I'm just thinking out loud. What do ya'll make of it?

Regards, Kim B.


Re: What do ya'll think?

wendyn on 5/28/00 at 20:23 (021007)

Kim - I always improve with yoga stretches and massage. Both my back/legs and feet. I have no medical explanation other than the tight muscles must contribute to pain - and the stretching and massage relax them and improve circulation.

I would have never believed a year ago that my orthotics and the drugs would end up in the garbage and I'd be improving from acupuncture/yoga/massage. Still goes agains my rational side but I'm sticking with it anyway.


Re: What do ya'll think?

Beverly on 5/28/00 at 20:26 (021008)

Like Kim, I can't massage for long with my hand, but I have discovered something I think is just as good - a massage ball (has hard nodules... about the size of a golf ball). I do it off and on all day.
I think it does bring some relief although I would not go so far as to call massage a cure. I'm interested in knowing more from people who think yoga or pilates has helped them.
Beverly

Re: an explanation

alan k on 5/29/00 at 06:54 (021020)

Thai massage therapy and, now I am learning, some schools of chiropracters, explain this as micro-spasms or trigger points in the muscles which cause abnormal patterns of contraction that translate all the way down to the extremities.

If you take a belt, say, on one end and give it a shake, the force translates down the belt to the end, which snaps. The same with contractions in the musculature. Those that start at the lower back, hips, groin, translate tension down the legs and into the bottom of the feet and the calves, where there are many trigger points.

Yoga, Thai Massage, and non-weight bearing exercise can clear out those tension points, and that translates into less tension in the feet.

Working on your back, hips, and groin is an excellent way to treat pf, as many of us have attested to. It also improves your gait, which is a long term help. This explanation does not cover the nerve system and acupuncture meridians which are also cleared by these activities.

I also have been helped by massage, and now I am getting chiropractic care, just to see what they do with massage (not that surprising, but its covered by insurance so why not) and to get my back and neck cracked, which I have come to like and perhaps it will help too.


alan k


Re: I Challenge Everyone In Pain To Stop Sit Down and MASSAGE

Steve P on 5/29/00 at 12:29 (021030)

My PT recommends rolling a tennis ball around the floor with the foot. Provides a good massage to the bottom of the foot (arch in particular) & doesn't tire the hands. I do this several times a day for a few minutes. Of course, both feet can be done at the same time with 2 tennis balls.

Re: Thanks for the good info Alan and Steve. (eom)

Kim B. on 5/29/00 at 19:43 (021051)

end of message.

Re: I Challenge Everyone In Pain To Stop Sit Down and MASSAGE

Pauline on 5/29/00 at 19:49 (021052)

Massage is the only thing that really help get rid of my PF when it
began in 1993. I had it 2 years before I was given physical Therapy.
The physical therapist was from South Africa and treated many barefoot runners. She massaged both my feet for 14 weeks 3 times a
week and it finally went away. I have another flair up now. Its about 2 1/2 months old and the deep massage (this time its rolfing)
is what is helping it. After trying rolfing I have decided just
plain deep massage is the best. Rolfing seems to cause other tendons to become sensitive and I don't think that is necessary. So I think
your on the right track.



Re: I Challenge Everyone In Pain To Stop Sit Down and MASSAGE

Steve P on 5/30/00 at 15:17 (021079)

Pauline --- Did your PT from South Africa massage the whole foot, top & bottom, or just the sole? Did she massage primarily the arch, or the entire bottom area equally?
Thanks............Steve

Re: What do ya'll think?

Kim B. on 5/28/00 at 19:57 (021005)

Well, I try to massage my own feet, but like someone else here posted, my hands start hurting before long. What is the trick Sweetfeet? Can you describe how you are able to get results?

I have an electric foot massager but it can't do the deep kneeding that is needed. I pay a massage threapist to do it for me every couple of weeks, but it's too long between visits.

I've noticed that some people get good results with Mike W.'s PFT. Something else I've notice people are getting good results with, especially if it's done often enough, is the professional Rolfing/reflexology/foot massage. I've been thinking about what massage and the PFT have in common, and what comes to mind is that they both involve NON-WEIGHT BEARING movement of the feet and legs. I'm not saying they are the same by any means, one strengthens, one loosens, etc... But they both move the muscles in a non-weight bearing position. This common thread may be a link to what the cure for this ailment will be. Even night splits, which many people get good results from, are a non-weight bearing way of tending PF.

Another thing, it seems I have better foot days when I take the time to do yoga postures and stretches regularly. Many are sitting or floor postures. I seem to benefit alot from the ones that envolve stretching my low back, hips and periformis muscles. It's as if, releasing at the top has a 'trickle down' effect. I'm not sure what, if anything, to make of these observations. I'm just thinking out loud. What do ya'll make of it?

Regards, Kim B.


Re: What do ya'll think?

wendyn on 5/28/00 at 20:23 (021007)

Kim - I always improve with yoga stretches and massage. Both my back/legs and feet. I have no medical explanation other than the tight muscles must contribute to pain - and the stretching and massage relax them and improve circulation.

I would have never believed a year ago that my orthotics and the drugs would end up in the garbage and I'd be improving from acupuncture/yoga/massage. Still goes agains my rational side but I'm sticking with it anyway.


Re: What do ya'll think?

Beverly on 5/28/00 at 20:26 (021008)

Like Kim, I can't massage for long with my hand, but I have discovered something I think is just as good - a massage ball (has hard nodules... about the size of a golf ball). I do it off and on all day.
I think it does bring some relief although I would not go so far as to call massage a cure. I'm interested in knowing more from people who think yoga or pilates has helped them.
Beverly

Re: an explanation

alan k on 5/29/00 at 06:54 (021020)

Thai massage therapy and, now I am learning, some schools of chiropracters, explain this as micro-spasms or trigger points in the muscles which cause abnormal patterns of contraction that translate all the way down to the extremities.

If you take a belt, say, on one end and give it a shake, the force translates down the belt to the end, which snaps. The same with contractions in the musculature. Those that start at the lower back, hips, groin, translate tension down the legs and into the bottom of the feet and the calves, where there are many trigger points.

Yoga, Thai Massage, and non-weight bearing exercise can clear out those tension points, and that translates into less tension in the feet.

Working on your back, hips, and groin is an excellent way to treat pf, as many of us have attested to. It also improves your gait, which is a long term help. This explanation does not cover the nerve system and acupuncture meridians which are also cleared by these activities.

I also have been helped by massage, and now I am getting chiropractic care, just to see what they do with massage (not that surprising, but its covered by insurance so why not) and to get my back and neck cracked, which I have come to like and perhaps it will help too.


alan k


Re: I Challenge Everyone In Pain To Stop Sit Down and MASSAGE

Steve P on 5/29/00 at 12:29 (021030)

My PT recommends rolling a tennis ball around the floor with the foot. Provides a good massage to the bottom of the foot (arch in particular) & doesn't tire the hands. I do this several times a day for a few minutes. Of course, both feet can be done at the same time with 2 tennis balls.

Re: Thanks for the good info Alan and Steve. (eom)

Kim B. on 5/29/00 at 19:43 (021051)

end of message.

Re: I Challenge Everyone In Pain To Stop Sit Down and MASSAGE

Pauline on 5/29/00 at 19:49 (021052)

Massage is the only thing that really help get rid of my PF when it
began in 1993. I had it 2 years before I was given physical Therapy.
The physical therapist was from South Africa and treated many barefoot runners. She massaged both my feet for 14 weeks 3 times a
week and it finally went away. I have another flair up now. Its about 2 1/2 months old and the deep massage (this time its rolfing)
is what is helping it. After trying rolfing I have decided just
plain deep massage is the best. Rolfing seems to cause other tendons to become sensitive and I don't think that is necessary. So I think
your on the right track.



Re: I Challenge Everyone In Pain To Stop Sit Down and MASSAGE

Steve P on 5/30/00 at 15:17 (021079)

Pauline --- Did your PT from South Africa massage the whole foot, top & bottom, or just the sole? Did she massage primarily the arch, or the entire bottom area equally?
Thanks............Steve