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New Section for PF Book

Posted by Scott R on 5/29/00 at 14:55 (021036)

I'm working on a new section for the book. Please let me know if you see any errors in the following:

The plantar fascia is called the plantar aponeurosis by 12% of the web pages on the internet when heelspurs.com is not included in the searches. This may be appropriate because the plantar fascia is thicker than most fasciae (the 'e' indicates plural) and it is functioning as a tendon to connect muscles to the heel bone. A crude interpretation of Gray's Anatomy could claim fasciae are thin aponeuroses (plural for poneurosis) and that aponeuroses are ribbon-shaped tendons. All three are glistening white and very strong fibrous tissue. 'Fascia' comes from the Latin for 'band' or 'bandage'. Fasciae are divided into 'superficial fascia' and 'deep fascia'. Superficial fasciae are directly beneath the skin over almost the entire body and may contain fatty tissue. Deep fasciae cover bands of muscle and terminate into tendons. The dividing line between deep fasciae, superficial fasciae, tendons, and aponeuroses may not be clear. They may merge into each other. The plantar fascia may be considered both the deep and superficial fasciae in that area, but the literature generally regards only the deep fascia as the plantar fascia. The deep fascia probably endures most of the tension. Deep fascia appears to be more similar to aponeurosis than it is to superficial fascia. The plantar fascia (deep fascia) has 3 bands or sections: the medial (inside edge of the foot), central, and lateral (outside edge of the foot). These sections are based on which muscles they encapsulate. The medial band encapsulates the 'abductor hallucis' (abductor=pull out, hallucis=big toe), the central band encapsulates the 'flexor brevis digitorum' (flexor=pull in, brevis=short muscle, digitorum=toes), and the lateral band encapsulates the 'abductor minimi digiti' (minimi=smallest, digit=toe). The deep fascia of these three muscles merge where they connect to the heel. Because of the short distance between the muscles and the heel bone, the fasciae have not transformed into tendons as they would have in other areas. Some sources state heel spurs are not in the fascia, but deeper where the abductor hallucis attaches to the heel bone. I'm not aware of anything other than the fascia as being defined as what attaches this muscle to the heel, so these sources may be in error. The three bands of the fascia attach to a section of the heel that is 2/3' (17.4mm) wide3 from the medial to central area of the front part of the heel bone. An average fascia thickness of 4 mm gives between 1,000 and 10,000 pounds per square inch as a range of the tension experienced in the fascia and the heel where it attaches with each step during normal walking. For comparision, steel can endure roughly 50,000 pounds per square inch.


Re: New Section for PF Book

Bob Gayle on 5/29/00 at 19:08 (021047)

Hi, Scott!

I like it; a lot of research obviously went into this page. My only comment:

Minimi Digiti rhymes, but isn't it minimi digit? (to me, that's one of the pigs that went to the market).

Best, BG


Re: New Section for PF Book

Dr. Zuckerman on 5/29/00 at 20:21 (021056)

Can we make your book part of the podiatry school curriculum.???
There are facts in this section that we never learned in school.

Re: New Section for PF Book

wendyn on 5/29/00 at 20:44 (021061)

Very interesting Scott - makes for good reading and I don't see any glaring errors. I need steel feet I think. Do you have a link to somewhere that I can order them?

Re: New Section for PF Book

scott r on 5/29/00 at 21:32 (021064)

The only problem is that there could be a lot of it that is wrong. For example, the plantar aponeurosis may just be the central band of the plantar fasciitis which would mean a lot of it is wrong-headed.

Re: New Section for PF Book

Bob Gayle on 5/29/00 at 19:08 (021047)

Hi, Scott!

I like it; a lot of research obviously went into this page. My only comment:

Minimi Digiti rhymes, but isn't it minimi digit? (to me, that's one of the pigs that went to the market).

Best, BG


Re: New Section for PF Book

Dr. Zuckerman on 5/29/00 at 20:21 (021056)

Can we make your book part of the podiatry school curriculum.???
There are facts in this section that we never learned in school.

Re: New Section for PF Book

wendyn on 5/29/00 at 20:44 (021061)

Very interesting Scott - makes for good reading and I don't see any glaring errors. I need steel feet I think. Do you have a link to somewhere that I can order them?

Re: New Section for PF Book

scott r on 5/29/00 at 21:32 (021064)

The only problem is that there could be a lot of it that is wrong. For example, the plantar aponeurosis may just be the central band of the plantar fasciitis which would mean a lot of it is wrong-headed.