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Something to think about?

Posted by Elise M. on 5/30/00 at 18:26 (021082)

Hi all,
Even though I don't post much anymore, I still come here to see how others are doing. My PF has all but abated but I recently found out something that might be connected/might not be connected in MY case. When I moved to my new house in August ,my PF was not too bad, I was at least still able to walk. Then I moved here and then it got so much worse. My overall health declined also at this time, but I attributed it to the PF making me depressed and then thought the depression may have created my Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Well, we had our water tested (we have well water on our new property) and I HAD ARSENIC POISONING FROM THE WATER. We had asked the old owners about the water and they said they'd been drinking it for 12 years and never had any problem. Well, as a workaholic, I drink gallons of water during the day, and in short, I poisoned myself with each drink. They later admitted to not being big water drinkers so of course it didn't affect them. Since I stopped drinking the water, my IBS has left, my feet are painfree to the point of allowing me to walk two miles in 30 minutes again and I'm working out again daily in hopes of being able to start running again.
In closing, don't ever give up looking for the cause/source of your problem and don't give up hope. Like I said, I don't know if one thing had to do with the other but I'm not sure it's coincidence either. Feel better..........Elise

Re: Something to think about?

john h on 5/30/00 at 18:38 (021083)

hi elise: had my water tested by consumer reoports about 4 years ago for $10. all was well.

Re: Something to think about?

Nancy S. on 5/30/00 at 19:04 (021088)

Hi Elise, good to hear from you. What a scary but interesting tale. I'm so glad you had the water tested and that you're now doing so well. You sound great, in fact! I'm curious as to how much arsenic was found -- I mean, was it at a level where people in the know would expect big water drinkers to have physical problems? You must be so relieved. I truly am glad you're doing so much better -- my hearty congratulations to you. --Nancy

Re: Something to think about?

Kim B. on 5/30/00 at 22:33 (021093)

Hi Elise,

Thanks for thinking about us. I encourage you to stop by and post regarding your recovery from time to time. For those of us still affected, it is encouraging to hear that with time, and other preventive measures, this dreadful illness has been known to go away.

As for me, I drink bottled water because the water in Texas is dreadful anyway. So while I can't blame my PF on the water, I do believe that if something offends your system (bad water, bad foods, bad shoes, bad habits, etc..), your body will start to break down, and PF may be a symptom of a much bigger picture.

Best Regards,
Kim B.


Re: how do you test water?

alan k on 5/31/00 at 07:21 (021096)

I feel something is getting at me but I don't know what.

I don't know a thing about homes and stuff: how do you get your water tested?

alan k


Re: Something to think about?

ChrisO on 5/31/00 at 10:15 (021106)

Wow Elise - what a strange occurance! What prompted you to have the water tested and.....how did the arsenic get in to it?
I sure hope your new house is terrific for you in all other ways!

Re: Something to think about?

john h on 5/31/00 at 18:56 (021130)

with an estimated 6 million new cases of PF each year it is obvious most of these people find a cure. i wonder what the hard cases such as on this board have in common? is it really PF?

Re: Something to think about? Type A personalities?

Kim B. on 5/31/00 at 19:22 (021135)

Good question John, I wonder too. Are PFer's all Type A personalites? Do we all have some kind of muscle affliction? Bursitis? FM? Arthritis?

What could the common thread be?
I'm not a teacher
I''m not a runner, though this hit me soon after investing in a treadmill. May be coincidence.

There is probably a common link. What could the common thread be?

Regards, Kim B.



Re: A Common Thread

Bob G. on 5/31/00 at 20:16 (021137)

I may be a Type B, but at least I am a Bumble Bee (ie, Flight of the Bumble Bee).

A common thread? Yes, the PAIN we all share in common. But we each got there each in our own unique way. For me, it was years of barefoot running.

That's why what works for one PF Sufferer may not work for another. Hopefully, we each will find what works best.



Re: Something to think about? -- what we have in common

Nancy S. on 5/31/00 at 20:58 (021143)

You have me hearing Twilight Zone music, John.
But two things come to my mind:
(1) How many of us waited to seek treatment and kept walking, working, and running through the pain for weeks or months?
(2) How many of us received poor treatment and advice when we first saw a foot doc? To this day I wonder, if my pod had educated me the least little bit, whether PF would have been this little glitch that I put up with for a few months and would now be history.
--Nancy

Re: Something to think about? / Reply- long

Elise M. on 6/01/00 at 05:28 (021151)

Hi to all,
I found out about the arsenic poisoning on our local news. But when I got really sick in the beginning, being a nurse, I kept putting it off, thinking I had a stomach flu or something. Once it started lingering, I went to my Primary care physician. After months of meds with little effect, I decided this was something I was ingesting. I had to leave home for two weeks to do a favor for a family in our church (the wife needed to be treated at a hospital out of state and they needed a chauffeur, it was back in my old home state and I knew the hospital like the back of my hand, I'm out of work etc, so I was the most likely to help) The first week I was there, I still felt lousy, the second week I felt like my old self again. When I came back home, after the first week home, I felt lousy again. In the meantime, my husband sent a sample of our water to the state ( kit costs 42.00 ) and it came back that we had three times the acceptable amount of arsenic in it. Their recommendation (dah) was to stop drinking the water immediately. It takes about one week for the arsenic to get out of one's system ( it remains in the hair and nails for a long time ) Funny how your body will try to tell you something. I've always been a big water drinker but when we moved here, despite the fact that the water tasted wonderful, I found myself not wanting to drink as much. Arsenic is one of the hardest chemicals to remove from water and the water treatment units cost from $500.00- $3,000.00. For now, we're drinking bottled water and I'm back to flooding myself again. Arsenic was used in pesticides on farms back in the early century primarily for potato, blueberry and strawberry fields. It was banned in the 60's but has remained in the soil and probably leeched down into natural water supplies. It's also a natural by product of ledge ( a stone found buried way down in the earth) In installing our well, they had to go through ledge to hit water (our well is 200 feet down) In closing, pay attention to the feelings in your body. Try to listen to every message and don't negate an idea because it appears to be unrelated. You just never know......Feel better...........Elise
P.S. I ran last night for the first time, beginners running, run, stop, run, stop but it felt wonderful for the first time in a year. Today, feet feel good, chins are a little sore but I'll take this anyday.........:)

Re: Love The Typo!!

Susan S on 6/01/00 at 08:15 (021153)

I'm sure you meant 'shins' but the typo was a scream!!! Thanks for the laugh!!

Re: Love The Typo!!

wendyn on 6/01/00 at 08:29 (021154)

Wow - that caught my attention too. If your chins are sore from running it must have been quite a run. Either that or you're running with your face. Thanks Elise.


:)


Re: Something to think about? -- what we have in common

Sweetfeet on 6/01/00 at 08:39 (021156)

I agree with Nancy. I DID keep running even though I was in pain. I DID put off recovery for a long time from this 'behavior'. I WAS not educated at all by my podiatrist. The only education I received about this problem was from this wonderful site.

Re: how do you test water?

john h on 6/01/00 at 09:08 (021160)

alan: normally your city water department test the water on a daily basis and you get a report from them. you can also order a water test kit from Consumers Report. Send them the samples and they will send you back a complete report. Seems my cost was less than $20.

Re: Why don't the docs prescribe complete foot rest? (long)

Kim B. on 6/01/00 at 12:38 (021168)

I too walked through the pain alot in the begining.

When I finally saw a doctor about the PF, he diagnosed it, but didn't offer much education. In all fairness, it could have been because I mentioned that I was learning about it on the internet, so he didn't feel the need. HOWEVER, had HE stressed how important it was to stay off my feet, I would have taken that aspect seriously a whole lot sooner.

Maybe he thought if I hurt badly enough, I would have the good sense to get off of my feet, but I'm type A, plus with FM, I am pretty skilled at ignoring pain (until it has gone too far.)

Instead, my doc went about trying to find an anti-inflammatory medication that agreed with me. Why don't the docs order complete foot rest for those diagnosed with PF? Maybe they know that no matter how much you order someone to stay off their feet, for most people, with jobs and family responsibilities, it is nearly 'Mission Impossible', so why bother bringing it up? HOWEVER, for those armed with 'Doctor's Orders' to stay off the feet, (until it is either cured, passes or is surgically corrected,) would come better understanding and cooperation of employers, family and friends.

Why don't the docs prescribe complete foot rest for those with PF? They do it for other ailments, don't they? They do it for heart patients, to keep them from doing further damage, don't they? Maybe it's because PF isn't life threatening. It's only life ruinning.

I am not a doc, so I guess I have to give them the benefit of the doubt for now. There may be physical reasons that indicate that it is worse to stay completely off the feet. My doc once mentioned that the tissue around the spur would eventually callous and accomodate the spur. Maybe we have to keep moving for this to happen.

Maybe they hesitate to prescibe complete foot rest because they would have to answer to bosses and supervisors, and they know that if a PFer is told to stay off their feet completely, many people would have basis for a temporary disability claim. Maybe it's the 'keep the worker bees working at all cost' mentallity.

All I know it that this illness is not take seriosly enough except by those who live with a chronic case of it. Maybe docs base their advise on the gereral public, when they should take into consideration the type A personalities, who like the energizer bunny keep going and going and going.

Regards, Kim B.



Re: Love The Typo!!

Kim B. on 6/01/00 at 12:44 (021169)

Elise, don't let them mess with you, my chin gets sore after I run too! :-)Kim B.



Re: Why don't the docs prescribe complete foot rest? (long)

Nanafitz on 6/01/00 at 14:32 (021178)

Very good question! When I first developed pf 2 years ago, I was given cortisone shots for the acute pain which helped tremendously but not for long cuz often I went right from the office to work (as a nurse). So obviously I worked and walked through it also but was never told to rest or stay off my feet.(Somehow, I think I should have known better)....it is common sense, isn't it? I know I still don't want to give in to it. Thinking back, I wish I had been more aggressive with the first Podiatrist (he treated me for two years on the left heel....when it started in the right heel, I went to my 2nd Pod, then an Ortho, then a 3rd and 4th Pod). Anyway, I've gotten more info and help from this board than any of the above. But I do agree with the common link. Thanks for listening. Nanafitz

Re: So Kim B is Kim A?

Rick R on 6/01/00 at 15:21 (021180)

I would suspect we A's are less likely than others to stop and address pain issues, not to mention other issues.

Re: That's "Kim A+" Thank you! (eom :-)

Kim A+ on 6/01/00 at 21:37 (021194)

eom

Re: Why don't the docs prescribe complete foot rest? (long) / Reply

Elise M on 6/02/00 at 05:19 (021200)

Hi Nana,
I was told long ago that muscle atrophy sets in after 8 hours of immobility so unless it's absolutely necessary, complete rest is not a good idea. Besides the fact that it lends to other problems, as a nurse I'm sure you know them...venouss stasis, thrombosis etc, etc. To be able to find the balance between pain and ADL's, resting is essential for any injury. Alternate exercise is a great idea, I rode my bike when my feet were too sore to walk. I am one of the lucky ones with PF, I was unemployed for the year I had it. I had lots of time to read, learn, rest and repair. Feel better all.............Elise

Re: Something to think about?

john h on 5/30/00 at 18:38 (021083)

hi elise: had my water tested by consumer reoports about 4 years ago for $10. all was well.

Re: Something to think about?

Nancy S. on 5/30/00 at 19:04 (021088)

Hi Elise, good to hear from you. What a scary but interesting tale. I'm so glad you had the water tested and that you're now doing so well. You sound great, in fact! I'm curious as to how much arsenic was found -- I mean, was it at a level where people in the know would expect big water drinkers to have physical problems? You must be so relieved. I truly am glad you're doing so much better -- my hearty congratulations to you. --Nancy

Re: Something to think about?

Kim B. on 5/30/00 at 22:33 (021093)

Hi Elise,

Thanks for thinking about us. I encourage you to stop by and post regarding your recovery from time to time. For those of us still affected, it is encouraging to hear that with time, and other preventive measures, this dreadful illness has been known to go away.

As for me, I drink bottled water because the water in Texas is dreadful anyway. So while I can't blame my PF on the water, I do believe that if something offends your system (bad water, bad foods, bad shoes, bad habits, etc..), your body will start to break down, and PF may be a symptom of a much bigger picture.

Best Regards,
Kim B.


Re: how do you test water?

alan k on 5/31/00 at 07:21 (021096)

I feel something is getting at me but I don't know what.

I don't know a thing about homes and stuff: how do you get your water tested?

alan k


Re: Something to think about?

ChrisO on 5/31/00 at 10:15 (021106)

Wow Elise - what a strange occurance! What prompted you to have the water tested and.....how did the arsenic get in to it?
I sure hope your new house is terrific for you in all other ways!

Re: Something to think about?

john h on 5/31/00 at 18:56 (021130)

with an estimated 6 million new cases of PF each year it is obvious most of these people find a cure. i wonder what the hard cases such as on this board have in common? is it really PF?

Re: Something to think about? Type A personalities?

Kim B. on 5/31/00 at 19:22 (021135)

Good question John, I wonder too. Are PFer's all Type A personalites? Do we all have some kind of muscle affliction? Bursitis? FM? Arthritis?

What could the common thread be?
I'm not a teacher
I''m not a runner, though this hit me soon after investing in a treadmill. May be coincidence.

There is probably a common link. What could the common thread be?

Regards, Kim B.



Re: A Common Thread

Bob G. on 5/31/00 at 20:16 (021137)

I may be a Type B, but at least I am a Bumble Bee (ie, Flight of the Bumble Bee).

A common thread? Yes, the PAIN we all share in common. But we each got there each in our own unique way. For me, it was years of barefoot running.

That's why what works for one PF Sufferer may not work for another. Hopefully, we each will find what works best.



Re: Something to think about? -- what we have in common

Nancy S. on 5/31/00 at 20:58 (021143)

You have me hearing Twilight Zone music, John.
But two things come to my mind:
(1) How many of us waited to seek treatment and kept walking, working, and running through the pain for weeks or months?
(2) How many of us received poor treatment and advice when we first saw a foot doc? To this day I wonder, if my pod had educated me the least little bit, whether PF would have been this little glitch that I put up with for a few months and would now be history.
--Nancy

Re: Something to think about? / Reply- long

Elise M. on 6/01/00 at 05:28 (021151)

Hi to all,
I found out about the arsenic poisoning on our local news. But when I got really sick in the beginning, being a nurse, I kept putting it off, thinking I had a stomach flu or something. Once it started lingering, I went to my Primary care physician. After months of meds with little effect, I decided this was something I was ingesting. I had to leave home for two weeks to do a favor for a family in our church (the wife needed to be treated at a hospital out of state and they needed a chauffeur, it was back in my old home state and I knew the hospital like the back of my hand, I'm out of work etc, so I was the most likely to help) The first week I was there, I still felt lousy, the second week I felt like my old self again. When I came back home, after the first week home, I felt lousy again. In the meantime, my husband sent a sample of our water to the state ( kit costs 42.00 ) and it came back that we had three times the acceptable amount of arsenic in it. Their recommendation (dah) was to stop drinking the water immediately. It takes about one week for the arsenic to get out of one's system ( it remains in the hair and nails for a long time ) Funny how your body will try to tell you something. I've always been a big water drinker but when we moved here, despite the fact that the water tasted wonderful, I found myself not wanting to drink as much. Arsenic is one of the hardest chemicals to remove from water and the water treatment units cost from $500.00- $3,000.00. For now, we're drinking bottled water and I'm back to flooding myself again. Arsenic was used in pesticides on farms back in the early century primarily for potato, blueberry and strawberry fields. It was banned in the 60's but has remained in the soil and probably leeched down into natural water supplies. It's also a natural by product of ledge ( a stone found buried way down in the earth) In installing our well, they had to go through ledge to hit water (our well is 200 feet down) In closing, pay attention to the feelings in your body. Try to listen to every message and don't negate an idea because it appears to be unrelated. You just never know......Feel better...........Elise
P.S. I ran last night for the first time, beginners running, run, stop, run, stop but it felt wonderful for the first time in a year. Today, feet feel good, chins are a little sore but I'll take this anyday.........:)

Re: Love The Typo!!

Susan S on 6/01/00 at 08:15 (021153)

I'm sure you meant 'shins' but the typo was a scream!!! Thanks for the laugh!!

Re: Love The Typo!!

wendyn on 6/01/00 at 08:29 (021154)

Wow - that caught my attention too. If your chins are sore from running it must have been quite a run. Either that or you're running with your face. Thanks Elise.


:)


Re: Something to think about? -- what we have in common

Sweetfeet on 6/01/00 at 08:39 (021156)

I agree with Nancy. I DID keep running even though I was in pain. I DID put off recovery for a long time from this 'behavior'. I WAS not educated at all by my podiatrist. The only education I received about this problem was from this wonderful site.

Re: how do you test water?

john h on 6/01/00 at 09:08 (021160)

alan: normally your city water department test the water on a daily basis and you get a report from them. you can also order a water test kit from Consumers Report. Send them the samples and they will send you back a complete report. Seems my cost was less than $20.

Re: Why don't the docs prescribe complete foot rest? (long)

Kim B. on 6/01/00 at 12:38 (021168)

I too walked through the pain alot in the begining.

When I finally saw a doctor about the PF, he diagnosed it, but didn't offer much education. In all fairness, it could have been because I mentioned that I was learning about it on the internet, so he didn't feel the need. HOWEVER, had HE stressed how important it was to stay off my feet, I would have taken that aspect seriously a whole lot sooner.

Maybe he thought if I hurt badly enough, I would have the good sense to get off of my feet, but I'm type A, plus with FM, I am pretty skilled at ignoring pain (until it has gone too far.)

Instead, my doc went about trying to find an anti-inflammatory medication that agreed with me. Why don't the docs order complete foot rest for those diagnosed with PF? Maybe they know that no matter how much you order someone to stay off their feet, for most people, with jobs and family responsibilities, it is nearly 'Mission Impossible', so why bother bringing it up? HOWEVER, for those armed with 'Doctor's Orders' to stay off the feet, (until it is either cured, passes or is surgically corrected,) would come better understanding and cooperation of employers, family and friends.

Why don't the docs prescribe complete foot rest for those with PF? They do it for other ailments, don't they? They do it for heart patients, to keep them from doing further damage, don't they? Maybe it's because PF isn't life threatening. It's only life ruinning.

I am not a doc, so I guess I have to give them the benefit of the doubt for now. There may be physical reasons that indicate that it is worse to stay completely off the feet. My doc once mentioned that the tissue around the spur would eventually callous and accomodate the spur. Maybe we have to keep moving for this to happen.

Maybe they hesitate to prescibe complete foot rest because they would have to answer to bosses and supervisors, and they know that if a PFer is told to stay off their feet completely, many people would have basis for a temporary disability claim. Maybe it's the 'keep the worker bees working at all cost' mentallity.

All I know it that this illness is not take seriosly enough except by those who live with a chronic case of it. Maybe docs base their advise on the gereral public, when they should take into consideration the type A personalities, who like the energizer bunny keep going and going and going.

Regards, Kim B.



Re: Love The Typo!!

Kim B. on 6/01/00 at 12:44 (021169)

Elise, don't let them mess with you, my chin gets sore after I run too! :-)Kim B.



Re: Why don't the docs prescribe complete foot rest? (long)

Nanafitz on 6/01/00 at 14:32 (021178)

Very good question! When I first developed pf 2 years ago, I was given cortisone shots for the acute pain which helped tremendously but not for long cuz often I went right from the office to work (as a nurse). So obviously I worked and walked through it also but was never told to rest or stay off my feet.(Somehow, I think I should have known better)....it is common sense, isn't it? I know I still don't want to give in to it. Thinking back, I wish I had been more aggressive with the first Podiatrist (he treated me for two years on the left heel....when it started in the right heel, I went to my 2nd Pod, then an Ortho, then a 3rd and 4th Pod). Anyway, I've gotten more info and help from this board than any of the above. But I do agree with the common link. Thanks for listening. Nanafitz

Re: So Kim B is Kim A?

Rick R on 6/01/00 at 15:21 (021180)

I would suspect we A's are less likely than others to stop and address pain issues, not to mention other issues.

Re: That's "Kim A+" Thank you! (eom :-)

Kim A+ on 6/01/00 at 21:37 (021194)

eom

Re: Why don't the docs prescribe complete foot rest? (long) / Reply

Elise M on 6/02/00 at 05:19 (021200)

Hi Nana,
I was told long ago that muscle atrophy sets in after 8 hours of immobility so unless it's absolutely necessary, complete rest is not a good idea. Besides the fact that it lends to other problems, as a nurse I'm sure you know them...venouss stasis, thrombosis etc, etc. To be able to find the balance between pain and ADL's, resting is essential for any injury. Alternate exercise is a great idea, I rode my bike when my feet were too sore to walk. I am one of the lucky ones with PF, I was unemployed for the year I had it. I had lots of time to read, learn, rest and repair. Feel better all.............Elise