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Weight Lifing question

Posted by Kimpy on 6/11/00 at 18:30 (021663)

Hello posters, I've never posted before, but I've been reading religiously and want to thank all of your for your support over the past months. I've had PF now for 1 1/2 years off and on doing all of the remedies from this board, birkies, massage, orthodics, ice, bromelain (thanks to Robin), etc. I get better, then it comes back and I never seem to get cured completely.

I've been going to the gym 3 to 5 days a week to try to stay in shape to swim and I've just recently discovered the weight room. Has anyone had any experience with the leg weight machines, in particular, the machine that works the hamstrings? (You lie on your stomach, place the 'weight bar thing' behind your angle and lift up bending your knee). This machine is for the hamstrings, but I'm wondering if this could be bad for someone with PF, putting strain on it, etc. Could it tighten up the achilles? Make things worse? Or am I nuts? Any thoughts?

Kimpy


Re: Weight Lifing question

john h on 6/11/00 at 20:05 (021664)

kimpy: i use most of the machines at my health club. obviously i do not do any free weights while standing (ouch). i do weight lying down and use the various leg and upper body machines. anything to keep the muscles in the upper and lower legs would seem advisable to me (my guess).

Re: Weight Lifing question

Kim B. on 6/11/00 at 20:06 (021665)

Welcome aboard Kimpy! I am clueless about the weightlifting topic. But I suppose 'moderation' in the beginning would be an important thing to keep in mind. You don't want to injure what is probably already a sensitive area.

While you wait for someone who actually knows something about it, try doing a search on 'leg lifts' or 'weight lifting'. And, hopefully, someone who knows more about it will be along to help you out soon. In the mean time, again, welcome.

Regards, Kim B.


Re: Weight Lifing question

alan k on 6/12/00 at 08:15 (021692)

In the acute initial stages I would actually recommend not doing that particular exercise, but since this has been going on for a while you can't avoid leg exercises because that would be extremely detrimental to your recovery rate.

The one thing to remember is muscle balance. Hamstring contractions lead to more tightness on the back side of the leg, which eventually translates down the calf, achilles, and pf: BUT only especially if you do not strengthen the opposing muscles, which would be the quads and psoas. Strengthening the quads and psoas will pull against the contraction in the hamstrings and balance it out: a benefit for both sides.

Go ahead with the hamstring exercise, but be even more dedicated to the quad exercises and psoas (leg lifts, V-situps). And most important, stretch those hammies (when warmed up) gently rigorously and often.

Go slow and get on-the-spot help if you can...

alan k


Re: Weight Lifing question

Kimpy on 6/12/00 at 10:08 (021701)

Thanks Alan and John, and thanks for the welcome Kim. I think I'm going to take it slow and be sure to stretch, maybe I'll lay off the machine. I was just experiencing a tightness in my achilles and bottom of my foot. I was wondering if it was related to that particular machine or the stationary bike in the gym as well. I think it's a combination of both. This is so discouraging! :(

Thanks for your quick responses!

Kimpy


Re: Weight Lifing question

Susan S on 6/12/00 at 12:29 (021708)

I do this machine 3 times a week. My trainer has PF and worked up my program for me. Make sure that your feet are flexed rather than pointed. This, along with the whole circuit, has helped me so far. Does your gym have a trainer that you can talk to about your feet? I make sure that they all know that I have this problem so perhaps they can stop me from a new injury. Good Luck!

Re: Weight Lifing question

Susan S on 6/12/00 at 12:31 (021709)

Are you using the upright stationary bike or the recumbent bike? If you are using the upright, try switching to the recumbent.

Re: Weight Lifing question

Kimpy on 6/12/00 at 12:53 (021711)

I guess maybe I should ask someone because I've taken it upon myself to do these machines and have watched others, etc. It's just a rec center, not a fancy gym so there's not many people to ask. They're not free weights, but the machines with the pressure, you just press a button and it gets heavier or lighter. As for that bike question, I have no idea what you mean by 'recumbant'?? With the bike I use, I sit just like I would on a regular bike. What is recumbant?? Thanks for all the help!

Re: Weight Lifing question

alan k on 6/12/00 at 13:21 (021715)

Perhaps it is related, then, for the reasons I explained. However, you might take heart in the fact that, if true, then there is great positive benefit to be had from strengthening the opposing muscle. Do the sitting quad machine that you lift by straightening your knee (some times the same machine as the ham one you use.), plus leg raises on a mat (on your back) and V-shaped sit-ups. You can't do too much strengthening of the front of the legs for pf (well, within reason).

alan k


Re: Weight Lifing question

Susan S on 6/12/00 at 15:45 (021721)

A recumbent bike is shaped differently than an upright bike. The seat is amost chair-like and your feet are out in front of you. It is much easier on your knees and back and hopefully your feet. Not to mention that the seat is much easier on YOUR seat!

Re: Weight Lifing question

JudyS on 6/13/00 at 02:05 (021745)

Hi Kimpy - I've done that very exercise you're talking about regularly for years. With PF I'm sure to try to keep the foot flexed while I do it but it doesn't seem to affect my PF at all. I think that, for me, working at strengthening related muscles really makes a difference. Good Luck!

Re: Weight Lifing question

john h on 6/11/00 at 20:05 (021664)

kimpy: i use most of the machines at my health club. obviously i do not do any free weights while standing (ouch). i do weight lying down and use the various leg and upper body machines. anything to keep the muscles in the upper and lower legs would seem advisable to me (my guess).

Re: Weight Lifing question

Kim B. on 6/11/00 at 20:06 (021665)

Welcome aboard Kimpy! I am clueless about the weightlifting topic. But I suppose 'moderation' in the beginning would be an important thing to keep in mind. You don't want to injure what is probably already a sensitive area.

While you wait for someone who actually knows something about it, try doing a search on 'leg lifts' or 'weight lifting'. And, hopefully, someone who knows more about it will be along to help you out soon. In the mean time, again, welcome.

Regards, Kim B.


Re: Weight Lifing question

alan k on 6/12/00 at 08:15 (021692)

In the acute initial stages I would actually recommend not doing that particular exercise, but since this has been going on for a while you can't avoid leg exercises because that would be extremely detrimental to your recovery rate.

The one thing to remember is muscle balance. Hamstring contractions lead to more tightness on the back side of the leg, which eventually translates down the calf, achilles, and pf: BUT only especially if you do not strengthen the opposing muscles, which would be the quads and psoas. Strengthening the quads and psoas will pull against the contraction in the hamstrings and balance it out: a benefit for both sides.

Go ahead with the hamstring exercise, but be even more dedicated to the quad exercises and psoas (leg lifts, V-situps). And most important, stretch those hammies (when warmed up) gently rigorously and often.

Go slow and get on-the-spot help if you can...

alan k


Re: Weight Lifing question

Kimpy on 6/12/00 at 10:08 (021701)

Thanks Alan and John, and thanks for the welcome Kim. I think I'm going to take it slow and be sure to stretch, maybe I'll lay off the machine. I was just experiencing a tightness in my achilles and bottom of my foot. I was wondering if it was related to that particular machine or the stationary bike in the gym as well. I think it's a combination of both. This is so discouraging! :(

Thanks for your quick responses!

Kimpy


Re: Weight Lifing question

Susan S on 6/12/00 at 12:29 (021708)

I do this machine 3 times a week. My trainer has PF and worked up my program for me. Make sure that your feet are flexed rather than pointed. This, along with the whole circuit, has helped me so far. Does your gym have a trainer that you can talk to about your feet? I make sure that they all know that I have this problem so perhaps they can stop me from a new injury. Good Luck!

Re: Weight Lifing question

Susan S on 6/12/00 at 12:31 (021709)

Are you using the upright stationary bike or the recumbent bike? If you are using the upright, try switching to the recumbent.

Re: Weight Lifing question

Kimpy on 6/12/00 at 12:53 (021711)

I guess maybe I should ask someone because I've taken it upon myself to do these machines and have watched others, etc. It's just a rec center, not a fancy gym so there's not many people to ask. They're not free weights, but the machines with the pressure, you just press a button and it gets heavier or lighter. As for that bike question, I have no idea what you mean by 'recumbant'?? With the bike I use, I sit just like I would on a regular bike. What is recumbant?? Thanks for all the help!

Re: Weight Lifing question

alan k on 6/12/00 at 13:21 (021715)

Perhaps it is related, then, for the reasons I explained. However, you might take heart in the fact that, if true, then there is great positive benefit to be had from strengthening the opposing muscle. Do the sitting quad machine that you lift by straightening your knee (some times the same machine as the ham one you use.), plus leg raises on a mat (on your back) and V-shaped sit-ups. You can't do too much strengthening of the front of the legs for pf (well, within reason).

alan k


Re: Weight Lifing question

Susan S on 6/12/00 at 15:45 (021721)

A recumbent bike is shaped differently than an upright bike. The seat is amost chair-like and your feet are out in front of you. It is much easier on your knees and back and hopefully your feet. Not to mention that the seat is much easier on YOUR seat!

Re: Weight Lifing question

JudyS on 6/13/00 at 02:05 (021745)

Hi Kimpy - I've done that very exercise you're talking about regularly for years. With PF I'm sure to try to keep the foot flexed while I do it but it doesn't seem to affect my PF at all. I think that, for me, working at strengthening related muscles really makes a difference. Good Luck!