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New Calf Stretch is helping PF

Posted by Rock on 6/26/00 at 16:30 (022445)

Last week I was shown how to do calf stretches while not standing up. The method is called 'active isolated stretching'. Really this means pulling back real hard on the ball of the foot with one hand and use the other hand under the arch to prevent the Plantar Fascia from stretching and straining the attachment to the heel. So I started doing this stretch which is really hard to do because my arms are barelyt strong enough to work the calves.

Since I developed PF back in March, I have cut my run mileage from nearly 60 miles a week to about 30 miles a week and totally gave up on running up hills. Well Saturday night, my (ultra runner) wife said that I was a wimp and that she was going to 'drop me' on the Sunday trail run. Sunday, I decided to risk running the uphills with the aide of 0.75 inch heel lifts under the orthotics. I ran well and nearly pain free (well, some achilles) and was able to do this new kind of stretch at 7,8 and 14 miles and managed to stay at the front of the pack on a fast run in hot, humid Tennessee weather. Afterwards, I carefully stretched and iced and did the usual car/house/yard tasks, fearing that the PF would flare up on Monday (today) as my PF is usually the 'day after running type'. All day today I have been almost waiting for that buring pain at the base of my right heel. It did not occur. Here is list of things I have been doing in my war against my PF:

1. 0.75 inch heel lifts
2. active isolated stretching (calves, hamstrings, glutes, quads, groin, shins,...)
3. less rigid running shoes
4. fast flat running on soft surface (2 weekdays)
5. massage - by person of calves and Plantar Fascia
6. calf massage - by the 'stick'
7. ice,ice,ice
8. biking 160 miles / week (gradual warmups)
9. swimming 5 miles / week
10. foot strengthening exercises
11. Vitamin C / 1000mg three times a day

I hope some of this information is helpful.
Rock.
TN. USA.



Re: New Calf Stretch is helping PF

Nancy S. on 6/26/00 at 17:35 (022449)

Rock, what is calf massage by the 'stick'? Also, I was taking vit. c until I read of some study that alleged that vit. c supplements clog arteries and promote heart attacks. This was in the national news a few months ago. I feel a little bit of a sucker for stopping it based on this one study. Did you hear of it and have you heard anything further that makes you feel safe in continuing to take vit. c? Thanks. --Nancy

Re: New Calf Stretch is helping PF

john h on 6/26/00 at 18:30 (022451)

rock: from your workout schedule you must be like the real 'Rock' of WFL wrestling fame.

Re: New Calf Stretch is helping PF

Rock on 6/27/00 at 06:51 (022472)

Nancy,

Read about 'The Stick' at: http://www.thestick.com/thestick.hts

Since I am doing about 14 hours a week of aerobic activity, I will take my chances with the possibility that vitamin C will cause some artery problems.

Rock.


Re: New Calf Stretch is helping PF

Rock on 6/27/00 at 07:06 (022473)

John,

I am just one of those grey bearded skinny cyclist that you see biking down nearly empty roads.

Still, I am thankful that I am an ultra distance athlete because I have more 'reserve' to deal with this PF. What I mean is that while I may have reduced run mileage from 60 miles per week to 30 miles per week, at least I can have not 'lost' so much that walking is problem.

I am starting to understand how devastating a severe case of PF must be to non-atheletes. I also can see how PF can turn a low mileage runner into a non-runner.

It is such a shame that PF does not effect some big money group (like pro football players,...) because if it did there would be real medical cures instead of these useless pods.

Rock.


Re: New Calf Stretch is helping PF

john h on 6/27/00 at 09:58 (022482)

i think PF effects the athletes and non athletes equally. i never was a ultra athlete of any sort but i did run 7 days a week and played basketball at the health club 5 days a week and did all the weights,blah blah. I was addicted no doubt about it. when the pain of pf gets bad enough even the toughest of the tough will be forced to quit running and even walking. besides the physical pain not being able to do my addicted things presented me with emotional issues as it has with many of our board people. carefuly rock and pay attention to your pain because it sounds like you would go 'bongos' if you could not perform at your accustomed level.

Re: New Calf Stretch is helping PF

JudyS on 6/27/00 at 10:48 (022493)

I, too, consider myself an athlete but what I've discovered here is that PF is absolutely an equal-opportunity affliction. Looks to me as though perhaps half of the posters here are runners/exercisers - the other half seem to be folks who are forced to be on their feet all day - and in some cases not even that - the PF just came on through normal every-day activities. I should have STOPPED running and playing ball upon the initial pain two years ago. But, as these things go, I pushed through it and only made it chronic. Now I'm NOT running (except for a slow mile or two on vacation just to sooth my psychi), I'm barely playing ball and I just plain hurt just plain from trying to lead a 'normal' life. This is very humbling for those of us who may have our egos wrapped up in our athletic activities but the smartest thing to do is STOP those activities for as long as it takes. A poster here just the other day resumed running after several years of laying off due to PF. Bob has started, successfully, again after long-term, serious, rest. The point being that so many of us just want the ability to run our lives and households - much less run 30 to 60 miles a week. A dear friend of my is a world-class marathoner. He's 52, been running for 30 years and only just got a PF diagnosis. Will he stop running for awhile in spite of my, and his doctor's, advice? Nope.
Can those of us here really be generally described as 'Type A' personalities? I don't think so. I think that all we really want is to lead a NORMAL life. I know plenty of type A's and, after meeting BobG and NancyS, I'm very sure that at least 3 of us are relatively mellow folks!

Re: New Calf Stretch is helping PF

Nancy S. on 6/27/00 at 17:25 (022518)

Judy, ya, I think the term 'Type A' may be hard to pinpoint. I've always been very intense about my work, and a hard worker, but that doesn't necessarily categorize someone's whole personality. (I'm kind of relieved you included me in a more 'mellow' group in general -- Thank you for that, because I try all the time.)
You are an example of how hard these categorizations are to make fit -- obviously athletic in your interests, and very lively and quick and intelligent -- but also thoughtful and tolerant and open-minded. I guess PF can hit anyone but the most extreme and unreformed couch potato. And maybe I'm even wrong about that. . . .
Like Rock, I wish some monied group would take an interest. Seems like it must happen in time, because this seems to be afflicting more and more people in more and more walks of life.
--Nancy

Re: New Calf Stretch is helping PF

Nancy S. on 6/26/00 at 17:35 (022449)

Rock, what is calf massage by the 'stick'? Also, I was taking vit. c until I read of some study that alleged that vit. c supplements clog arteries and promote heart attacks. This was in the national news a few months ago. I feel a little bit of a sucker for stopping it based on this one study. Did you hear of it and have you heard anything further that makes you feel safe in continuing to take vit. c? Thanks. --Nancy

Re: New Calf Stretch is helping PF

john h on 6/26/00 at 18:30 (022451)

rock: from your workout schedule you must be like the real 'Rock' of WFL wrestling fame.

Re: New Calf Stretch is helping PF

Rock on 6/27/00 at 06:51 (022472)

Nancy,

Read about 'The Stick' at: http://www.thestick.com/thestick.hts

Since I am doing about 14 hours a week of aerobic activity, I will take my chances with the possibility that vitamin C will cause some artery problems.

Rock.


Re: New Calf Stretch is helping PF

Rock on 6/27/00 at 07:06 (022473)

John,

I am just one of those grey bearded skinny cyclist that you see biking down nearly empty roads.

Still, I am thankful that I am an ultra distance athlete because I have more 'reserve' to deal with this PF. What I mean is that while I may have reduced run mileage from 60 miles per week to 30 miles per week, at least I can have not 'lost' so much that walking is problem.

I am starting to understand how devastating a severe case of PF must be to non-atheletes. I also can see how PF can turn a low mileage runner into a non-runner.

It is such a shame that PF does not effect some big money group (like pro football players,...) because if it did there would be real medical cures instead of these useless pods.

Rock.


Re: New Calf Stretch is helping PF

john h on 6/27/00 at 09:58 (022482)

i think PF effects the athletes and non athletes equally. i never was a ultra athlete of any sort but i did run 7 days a week and played basketball at the health club 5 days a week and did all the weights,blah blah. I was addicted no doubt about it. when the pain of pf gets bad enough even the toughest of the tough will be forced to quit running and even walking. besides the physical pain not being able to do my addicted things presented me with emotional issues as it has with many of our board people. carefuly rock and pay attention to your pain because it sounds like you would go 'bongos' if you could not perform at your accustomed level.

Re: New Calf Stretch is helping PF

JudyS on 6/27/00 at 10:48 (022493)

I, too, consider myself an athlete but what I've discovered here is that PF is absolutely an equal-opportunity affliction. Looks to me as though perhaps half of the posters here are runners/exercisers - the other half seem to be folks who are forced to be on their feet all day - and in some cases not even that - the PF just came on through normal every-day activities. I should have STOPPED running and playing ball upon the initial pain two years ago. But, as these things go, I pushed through it and only made it chronic. Now I'm NOT running (except for a slow mile or two on vacation just to sooth my psychi), I'm barely playing ball and I just plain hurt just plain from trying to lead a 'normal' life. This is very humbling for those of us who may have our egos wrapped up in our athletic activities but the smartest thing to do is STOP those activities for as long as it takes. A poster here just the other day resumed running after several years of laying off due to PF. Bob has started, successfully, again after long-term, serious, rest. The point being that so many of us just want the ability to run our lives and households - much less run 30 to 60 miles a week. A dear friend of my is a world-class marathoner. He's 52, been running for 30 years and only just got a PF diagnosis. Will he stop running for awhile in spite of my, and his doctor's, advice? Nope.
Can those of us here really be generally described as 'Type A' personalities? I don't think so. I think that all we really want is to lead a NORMAL life. I know plenty of type A's and, after meeting BobG and NancyS, I'm very sure that at least 3 of us are relatively mellow folks!

Re: New Calf Stretch is helping PF

Nancy S. on 6/27/00 at 17:25 (022518)

Judy, ya, I think the term 'Type A' may be hard to pinpoint. I've always been very intense about my work, and a hard worker, but that doesn't necessarily categorize someone's whole personality. (I'm kind of relieved you included me in a more 'mellow' group in general -- Thank you for that, because I try all the time.)
You are an example of how hard these categorizations are to make fit -- obviously athletic in your interests, and very lively and quick and intelligent -- but also thoughtful and tolerant and open-minded. I guess PF can hit anyone but the most extreme and unreformed couch potato. And maybe I'm even wrong about that. . . .
Like Rock, I wish some monied group would take an interest. Seems like it must happen in time, because this seems to be afflicting more and more people in more and more walks of life.
--Nancy