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To Dr. Biehler---Why so long?

Posted by Pauline on 7/09/00 at 18:57 (023085)

Dr. Biehler,
What is causing the inflammation in our feet and why does it takes so long for the body to reabsorb what ever is causing it?
I don't really feel fluid in my feet, I just feel a thickness in
the tissue under the arch. I know it is called inflammation but
why isn't is just reabsorbed quickly like a bruise.

Also in an answer to Beverly's posting you were discussing stretching and said somethng about ' 15 degree relationship to the leg for the
body to pass over it.' You lost me, what specific stretch were you
describing and how do I use it?


Re: To Dr. Biehler---Why so long?

Dr. Biehler on 7/10/00 at 18:39 (023115)

Pauline, When the body has a inury it sends lots of fluid and blood to the area to protect and try to heal the injury. This is the inflamation and can be seen or felt after the initial injury. If there is repeated injury the area can become quite inflamed we refer to this as ' tendonitis' and we think of the fascia in that way. After a period of time, if the healing has not taken place, you get a noinflamatory process we call 'tendonosis'.This takes a lot longer to heal. The repeated assults to the area can build up a bone spur after a period of time. The 15 degrees I mentioned concerns the range of motion in the ankle. When a person is standing upright, the foot is at a 90 degree angle to the leg. When walking, the leg rocks forward over the foot and the foot is finally lifted as the body moves forward.Before this foot is lifted the angle between he top of the foot and leg has decreesed by 15 degrees ( caused by the leg rocking over the foot ).If there is not that 15 degrees of room for the rocking motion, the body has to compensate in other joints or try to lift the heel when it is still bearing weight. This puts excess tension on the achilles, plantar fascia,and can cause all types of problems. The streching exercises that most people are given for pf are to help get that 15 degrees back. The night spint is a passive exercise for this,helps keep the fasia streched out and hopfully reduces the edema that builds up around the injurred fascia durring the night. If the patient has the full range of motion, then I feel the streching only helps in collagen production which could help the heeling bu is not being used to help prevent further injury, which why streching is usually perscribed. Dr. Biehler

Re: To Dr. Biehler---Why so long?

Dr. Biehler on 7/10/00 at 18:39 (023115)

Pauline, When the body has a inury it sends lots of fluid and blood to the area to protect and try to heal the injury. This is the inflamation and can be seen or felt after the initial injury. If there is repeated injury the area can become quite inflamed we refer to this as ' tendonitis' and we think of the fascia in that way. After a period of time, if the healing has not taken place, you get a noinflamatory process we call 'tendonosis'.This takes a lot longer to heal. The repeated assults to the area can build up a bone spur after a period of time. The 15 degrees I mentioned concerns the range of motion in the ankle. When a person is standing upright, the foot is at a 90 degree angle to the leg. When walking, the leg rocks forward over the foot and the foot is finally lifted as the body moves forward.Before this foot is lifted the angle between he top of the foot and leg has decreesed by 15 degrees ( caused by the leg rocking over the foot ).If there is not that 15 degrees of room for the rocking motion, the body has to compensate in other joints or try to lift the heel when it is still bearing weight. This puts excess tension on the achilles, plantar fascia,and can cause all types of problems. The streching exercises that most people are given for pf are to help get that 15 degrees back. The night spint is a passive exercise for this,helps keep the fasia streched out and hopfully reduces the edema that builds up around the injurred fascia durring the night. If the patient has the full range of motion, then I feel the streching only helps in collagen production which could help the heeling bu is not being used to help prevent further injury, which why streching is usually perscribed. Dr. Biehler