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Orthotics

Posted by john h on 7/12/00 at 09:25 (023196)

all or nearly all of us spent all of our lives without orthotics. we developed PF for various reasons including over use, injury, poor fitting shoes, etc. our feet adjusted to our stride,weight, and whatever over time. i wonder why after developing pf we are put in orthotics which frequently change everthing about the way we have been walking for a lifetime. could we not, in many cases, aggregivate the situation. If we have been running to much we should stop running until the problem is resolved. If you have been wearing 5' high heels perhaps you need to go to flats. I can understand how orthotics can reduce the tension on the fascia and perhaps allow some healing but at the same time the fascia is probably losing some elasticity and other parts of the foot are being asked to readjust to the way you have walked for a lifetime. this is a very complicated subject with no definitive answer and pardon the pun but 'one size does not fit all'??

Re: Orthotics

JudyS on 7/12/00 at 09:50 (023200)

John, I couldn't agree more. I feel very strongly that using orthotics contributed, if not actually developing, my current problem with high-up arch, and top-of-foot, soreness - both of which never occured during the majority of the 2 years I've had this. In fact, I feel strongly that I was well on my way to healing with 'My Little Program', but then I started the orthotics. Now, having said all that, I think the justification for orthotics (which worked well for my husband) may be that a PF foot may indeed have a mechanical problem that develops because of the foot's structure......for instance flat feet or supapronation. Are orthotics not meant to correct those kinds of structural problems?

Re: Orthotics

Rock on 7/12/00 at 10:18 (023201)

John,

Good observations.

I have been wearing orthotics every day for the last 8 years. If you can get a pair that correct your excessive motion then they are worth getting the rest of your body adjusted to them. However, there are a lot of PODs and PTs that simply do not have the skills/knowledge to create those 'ideal' orthotics. I suspect it takes most of several tries before we can find the correct person to help us. That takes a lot of time, money and patience. Then because of soft tissue changes with time, we must get new orthotics (I am now at that stage in the process).

While I realize that a large percentage of 'members' of this board have extreme cases of chronic PF, there are many of us that suffer much less but still have something to share with the others. I have to disagree with your statement 'If we have been running to much we should stop running until the problem is resolved.' because it applies correctly only to low/medium mileage runners. Many high mileage (50-100 miles per week) runners get a case of PF and REDUCE run mileage greatly, get new orthotics, strength-train, cross-train and recover 100% from PF in less than 6 months.

Rock.


Re: Orthotics

cindyp on 7/12/00 at 11:40 (023204)

Well speaking from my experience. I went through a lot of stuff to get an orthotic for my neuroma. Does'nt seem to have helped much and am not able to run. Some days walking is an exercise. I am not a big believer in them because they haven't helped me. Maybe they have helped others. I have had mine for two months and not much difference.

Re: Orthotics

john h on 7/12/00 at 14:13 (023220)

rock: my statement about quiting running is meant for 'most' people. prior to my pf i ran 7 days a week 5-10 miles a day. i kept running until i cannot run a t all. the pf bug can bring down the toughest of the tough.

Re: Orthotics

john h on 7/12/00 at 14:17 (023222)

i am just speculating but i think one of the reasons that birks in particular sandals such as the airizona work for many of us is your foot is free to move around and accomodate itself. i have some birk shoes (baltimore) and although they have the same bed they hold your foot in a more confined position and do not work.. there is probably no scientific evidence to make a statement about the outcome of wearing orthotics.

Re: Orthotics

Kim B. on 7/12/00 at 15:50 (023229)

I am not a runner. I had started a walking program 3 months prior to the onset of this illness, but I don't think that was the culprit. The treadmill was super cushioned (allowing for my FM at the time).

I feel certian that it was the hard-ass ceramic tile floors that are all over this beautiful home we bought about 2 1/2 years ago. It's in the Kitchen, Formal Dining, Entry Way, Breakfast, Laundy and Powder rooms. It is everywhere! Plus, I used to go bearfoot all the time before I knew it could cause a problem. IF I had only known then, what I know now.

So, I don't get the birks or the hard orthotics approach. I think it was a hard surface that gave this illness to me, and so in my opinion, that is the last thing that can help me get rid of it. In my opinion it was the lack of shock absorbtion for my heels that gave it to me. I know that elderly people have less padding on their heels and they suffer because of it. Anyway, I can't help but wonder why some of you want to wear-out what little padding you have left. I have heard of hip and knee replacement surgeries, but not Heel Padding replacement. This precious padding is irreplaceable from what I've heard and read. That is why I plan to stick with my Teva and SAS shoes, and Sof Sole inserts.

BTW, my feet have settled down and are about 85% pain free for the past few days. However, I also have a summer cold/flu and am taking it pretty easy around here.

Judy, btw, I keep forgetting to tell you that at one point my pain had migrated to the top of my foot too, so I don't know if you can blame it on the orthotics. For a while, my pain moved around quite a bit. I don't use Custom Orthotics, but instead use soft replacement inserts. So I don't know if you can blame the hard orthotics for the top of foot pain. Just thought it might help you to know this.

Regards to all,



Re: Orthotics

Rick R on 7/14/00 at 06:29 (023306)

Kim,

I think at some point we just can't even think about going without heel padding. I believe, however, that the relationship between the plantar fascia length, flexibility, arch structure, arch support, and the activities that we do or don't do have more to do with the onset and 'cure' of PF. I would be very cautious with the treadmill despite the softness. They tend to flex the PF under stress which I think is a big bad no no until you get those babys stretched out and strengthened. I'm sure with you on the hard floor thing. I didn't take a shower for over a decade. Now that you have recovered from that frightening thought, let me assure you I took baths. I think favoring the poor sore heels can cause a multitude of other symptoms. From pain at the balls of the feet, top of the feet, ankles to knees hips back you name it.

See Ya,

Rick


Re: Orthotics

JudyS on 7/12/00 at 09:50 (023200)

John, I couldn't agree more. I feel very strongly that using orthotics contributed, if not actually developing, my current problem with high-up arch, and top-of-foot, soreness - both of which never occured during the majority of the 2 years I've had this. In fact, I feel strongly that I was well on my way to healing with 'My Little Program', but then I started the orthotics. Now, having said all that, I think the justification for orthotics (which worked well for my husband) may be that a PF foot may indeed have a mechanical problem that develops because of the foot's structure......for instance flat feet or supapronation. Are orthotics not meant to correct those kinds of structural problems?

Re: Orthotics

Rock on 7/12/00 at 10:18 (023201)

John,

Good observations.

I have been wearing orthotics every day for the last 8 years. If you can get a pair that correct your excessive motion then they are worth getting the rest of your body adjusted to them. However, there are a lot of PODs and PTs that simply do not have the skills/knowledge to create those 'ideal' orthotics. I suspect it takes most of several tries before we can find the correct person to help us. That takes a lot of time, money and patience. Then because of soft tissue changes with time, we must get new orthotics (I am now at that stage in the process).

While I realize that a large percentage of 'members' of this board have extreme cases of chronic PF, there are many of us that suffer much less but still have something to share with the others. I have to disagree with your statement 'If we have been running to much we should stop running until the problem is resolved.' because it applies correctly only to low/medium mileage runners. Many high mileage (50-100 miles per week) runners get a case of PF and REDUCE run mileage greatly, get new orthotics, strength-train, cross-train and recover 100% from PF in less than 6 months.

Rock.


Re: Orthotics

cindyp on 7/12/00 at 11:40 (023204)

Well speaking from my experience. I went through a lot of stuff to get an orthotic for my neuroma. Does'nt seem to have helped much and am not able to run. Some days walking is an exercise. I am not a big believer in them because they haven't helped me. Maybe they have helped others. I have had mine for two months and not much difference.

Re: Orthotics

john h on 7/12/00 at 14:13 (023220)

rock: my statement about quiting running is meant for 'most' people. prior to my pf i ran 7 days a week 5-10 miles a day. i kept running until i cannot run a t all. the pf bug can bring down the toughest of the tough.

Re: Orthotics

john h on 7/12/00 at 14:17 (023222)

i am just speculating but i think one of the reasons that birks in particular sandals such as the airizona work for many of us is your foot is free to move around and accomodate itself. i have some birk shoes (baltimore) and although they have the same bed they hold your foot in a more confined position and do not work.. there is probably no scientific evidence to make a statement about the outcome of wearing orthotics.

Re: Orthotics

Kim B. on 7/12/00 at 15:50 (023229)

I am not a runner. I had started a walking program 3 months prior to the onset of this illness, but I don't think that was the culprit. The treadmill was super cushioned (allowing for my FM at the time).

I feel certian that it was the hard-ass ceramic tile floors that are all over this beautiful home we bought about 2 1/2 years ago. It's in the Kitchen, Formal Dining, Entry Way, Breakfast, Laundy and Powder rooms. It is everywhere! Plus, I used to go bearfoot all the time before I knew it could cause a problem. IF I had only known then, what I know now.

So, I don't get the birks or the hard orthotics approach. I think it was a hard surface that gave this illness to me, and so in my opinion, that is the last thing that can help me get rid of it. In my opinion it was the lack of shock absorbtion for my heels that gave it to me. I know that elderly people have less padding on their heels and they suffer because of it. Anyway, I can't help but wonder why some of you want to wear-out what little padding you have left. I have heard of hip and knee replacement surgeries, but not Heel Padding replacement. This precious padding is irreplaceable from what I've heard and read. That is why I plan to stick with my Teva and SAS shoes, and Sof Sole inserts.

BTW, my feet have settled down and are about 85% pain free for the past few days. However, I also have a summer cold/flu and am taking it pretty easy around here.

Judy, btw, I keep forgetting to tell you that at one point my pain had migrated to the top of my foot too, so I don't know if you can blame it on the orthotics. For a while, my pain moved around quite a bit. I don't use Custom Orthotics, but instead use soft replacement inserts. So I don't know if you can blame the hard orthotics for the top of foot pain. Just thought it might help you to know this.

Regards to all,



Re: Orthotics

Rick R on 7/14/00 at 06:29 (023306)

Kim,

I think at some point we just can't even think about going without heel padding. I believe, however, that the relationship between the plantar fascia length, flexibility, arch structure, arch support, and the activities that we do or don't do have more to do with the onset and 'cure' of PF. I would be very cautious with the treadmill despite the softness. They tend to flex the PF under stress which I think is a big bad no no until you get those babys stretched out and strengthened. I'm sure with you on the hard floor thing. I didn't take a shower for over a decade. Now that you have recovered from that frightening thought, let me assure you I took baths. I think favoring the poor sore heels can cause a multitude of other symptoms. From pain at the balls of the feet, top of the feet, ankles to knees hips back you name it.

See Ya,

Rick