Home The Book Dr Articles Products Message Boards Journal Articles Search Our Surveys Surgery ESWT Dr Messages Find Good Drs video

How to stop this obsession

Posted by PaulS on 7/15/00 at 03:19 (023362)

As a PF/Achilles tendonitis sufferer of a year now, I know I'm just starting out in this game compared to some of you out there. My question is how to overcome the obsession with my physical condition that occupies every waking minute of my day, and deep into the night. I have spent countless hours pursuing all the possible treatments of my problems, and am totally confused by all the contradictory advice that I've been given by doctors or read on the Net. God knows how bored and boring I've become. I just want to stop thinking about it and stop wallowing in this dreadful self-pity at the sporting life I have lost. But how? The paradox of my question is that the people who have the answer are probably not visitors to this site. Nevertheless, any advice you have would be much apppreciated.

Re: How to stop this obsession

Nancy S. on 7/15/00 at 09:15 (023367)

Hi Paul, I can relate to what you wrote and imagine that many others here can too. When you're in pain and haven't yet found the right combination of treatments for you, it's a real rollercoaster and can at times really seem to take over everything. I've also found at times, when discouraged, that I get an 'invalid' status going mentally and fall into self-pity because of it.
Of course, you do have to stay mindful of your feet, and keep working on finding the right path for your healing. But the obsessive part is not good for long, and there are probably countless ways to fight that. Here are just a few:

1. Stay open to laughing at things that your usual self finds funny, and laugh heartily.
2. Try meditation, to learn to let useless thoughts go.
3. Listen to music that uplifts you (I find I forget to do this when discouragement sets in, think it won't help -- but it does!).
4. Explore other interests to get your mind off what you've (hopefully temporarily) lost.
5. When with other people, try hard to put your focus on them, listen to them, ask them questions -- to get your mind off yourself; this can be hard when dealing with chronic pain, but it's worth the effort.
6. Talk out your obsessiveness with a therapist; getting your grief out with someone can help you get tired of it and come to the desire to rebuild your life in perhaps new ways.
7. I have a friend who is a worrywart and finally decided to think of his thoughts as appearing on sort of a mental Rolodex, one thought per card. When he gets stuck on a useless worry, he says to himself, 'Next thought please,' and mentally flips to the next 'card.' He keeps going until he hits one that's constructive. It really helps him!
I do something similar: I think of my thoughts as white birds, and when one is bothering me and thinking about it any longer won't help me, I take the 'white bird' in my hands and send it into the sky and mentally watch it disappear over the horizon.
8. Laugh some more. There are so many delightful things in the world, despite this affliction.

AND, at a year, you have plenty of reason to hope and believe that your injuries will heal. A year is not that unusual. If you want to detail the treatments you've tried and give us a clearer idea of your history, people here may have further ideas for you.
Best of luck to you --Nancy S.


Re: How to stop this obsession

VickiJ on 7/15/00 at 09:30 (023369)

Interesting that I happened to check in with the board this morning to see your post at the top of the list...
I empathize completely...it is devastating to lose our active outdoor life to pf...I feel as tho I lost most of my true self by not being able to hike, run, or even walk. True depression set in for a long time.
I have thrown myself into gardening...which I could do only from my knees and butt for the first two years...but now I can spend a couple of hours per day on my feet before I have to go ice them, etc. And I can actually go grocery shopping, etc...tho I have no idea how long it will be before I can hike, etc again.

You have to find SOMETHING new to love and feel passion for...and, you have to overcome the depression...by commiserating here on this board or talking with a counselor or therapist, etc...but (and I know I'll make a lot of people angry here) you can't get bogged down here on the board...there is the danger of 'talking' yourself into a vicous circle of never 'moving on'. I check in from time to time to see if someone has come up with a 'miracle cure'...but I had to stop participating regularly here and begin to focus instead on a new life and not constantly focus on the losses...which is what I was begining to do.

If you haven't already, talk with Mike W about his Personal Foot Trainers to see if you can benefit from them. I think they are responsible for my slow progress back onto my feet (I'm a long time chronic sufferer)

Good Luck with your search for something that fills your heart like your old life used to...it's hard because we loved it so much...but ya gotta move on.

My apologies to those who may misinterpret the true heart what I've tried to communicate here...I'm not putting down the support everyone gets here...I just know that for me to get past the depression I could no longer come here everyday and participate in the discussion.


Re: How to stop this obsession

john h on 7/15/00 at 09:58 (023372)

paul: your question is like asking 'What is the meaning of live?'

Re: How to stop this obsession

john h on 7/15/00 at 10:03 (023373)

the one thing i do is i always have some new treatment in mind for the future if what i am doing is not working. my current future treatment i have in mind is either ossatron,orbasone, or sonnocur. so i try to always have some hopeful solution to hang on to.

Re: How to stop this obsession

wendyn on 7/15/00 at 10:12 (023374)

Very good advice Nancy and Vicki.

Paul, I know it's easy to get hung up on what you _cannot_ do any more. Make a real effort to find things you _can_ do.

I used to do aerobics up to 6 times a week, I ran, I walked, I biked...lots of cardio and very little weight training. With my foot problems the last 18 months, I've started spending a lot more time in the weight room. I cannot do any type of squats, lunges or leg weights - but I do a lot of upper body work for my arms, shoulders, back etc.

So, yes - I had to give something up...but I've switched my focus to something I'd neglected before.

I also spend a lot of time gardening, and puttering around quietly. I've always been a type a personality - and I've tried to enjoy the slower quieter pace of my new life.

Last week I sat on my porch and spent about 45 minutes watching the birds. I don't think I even noticed a bird before I really hurt my feet.

Consider talking to a therpaist if need be...this is a real loss that you're going through, and you'll go through all the normal processes of grieveing like anger, denial, sadness and so on.



Re: "Go around the corner"

Steve P on 7/15/00 at 10:21 (023376)

Paul --- I can fully, personally relate to your feelings. I also agree with the excellent advice given above by Nancy & Vicky. Now my input:

Many years ago I heard an excellent speaker discussing depression. He said that if anyone is depressed they should 'go around the corner' & find someone who needs their help....a neighbor, a friend, or simply less fortunate folks in the community. He said that helping others was the surest cure for depression. Recently, I have personally experienced the truth in those words.
There are many volunteer activities that one can do sitting down. Since getting PF, I have become a Project Literacy volunteer at my local library 3 times a week for 1 hour. It has been wonderful. It takes my mind off myself & actually makes my feet feel a bit better the rest of the day. It's more rewarding than I ever could have imagined & something I know I'll continue even after the PF is gone.
Paul, I don't mean to sound preachy. (Please forgive me if I do.) But I cannot stress this enough. If you're depressed, find people who need your help. There are many of them out there. Go around the corner.


Re: How to stop this obsession

Beverly on 7/15/00 at 10:29 (023379)

Paul,

I agree with Vicki and Nancy. It is important to find a new passion or at least a hobby. You might also consider asking your doctor for an anti-depressant. The newer ones have far fewer side effects, and if your insurance/finances will allow it, a therapist could be very helpful in helping you refocus your life and cope.

I am going to a therapist. I just started a few weeks ago. I am really getting alot out of it. It is helping my anxiety level.

Vicki has a valid point about not getting too hooked on the board. It is certainly something to be aware of. Yet, I think it is a catch -22 thing. The board offers support, information, and hope for many of us who feel alone. It eases this feeling of isolation.

One can get addicted to anything, and the internet certainly is a growing topic in addiction circles. However, I think for the average person, our frequency here runs a cycle. When I first got this and found the board, I surfed and posted alot. I asked tons of questions that people patiently answered. I learned so much more than I ever could have from my doctors. I had intelligent questions to ask. If not for the board, I would have never known which Birks to try first or how to go about getting fitted for them.

As my condition got worse, I often felt like this was the only place I could go that anyone really understood what was happening to me. Also, feeling like this would last 'forever,' it helped me to read about people who are getting better... especially the tough cases.

Now that four months have passed, and I have researched and researched..., I find myself naturally beginning to cut back on my board time. And it has occurred to me that this is something I need to do... not be too self-absorbed in this.

So I think for most of us, as we learn the 'ropes,' we naturally start to become bored with reading the same old thing over and over, and as we begin to understand our own condition better, this just makes posting and surfing a less important thing in our lives and less frequent.

And I think there is an evolution from asking upteen zillion questions to beginning to offer hope and support to newer people who find us.

Good Luck,
Beverly



Re: "Go around the corner" /Steve, great advice!

Beverly on 7/15/00 at 10:34 (023380)

Steve,

That is good advice. What a coincidence! I have prayed and given much thought to some community project I can do that takes me off my feet. I knew it needed to be something I was interested in and believed in.
I am going for the Literacy Tutoring Workshop at our local library next weekend. You are right. Helping someone else does take our minds off ourselves.

Beverly


Re: "Go around the corner" /Steve, great advice!

Steve P on 7/15/00 at 16:47 (023384)

Beverly --- I hope you like the literacy tutoring as much as I do. For me, these are the fastest hours of the week.
Good luck!

Re: How to stop this obsession

rekha.s on 7/16/00 at 19:04 (023403)

vickie, I too have gotten obsessed about gardening!.....I went through depression, and realized that while there are many things I now can't do, there are still things I can....gardening has taken my mind off my physical state!

Re: How to stop this obsession

Bob G. on 7/17/00 at 00:17 (023413)

Yes, Vickie, I know how depressing this can get. Sometimes it's good to just get away from it all. Sometimes it's just impossible to even check in. Those that I've met are so busy, as you must be, that we 'catch as catch can'.

I have found it helpful to have good books at the ready at all times. Though my feet cannot make it themselves, I hope to summit Mount Everst vicariously tonight.

Best wishes, BG


Re: How to stop this obsession

PaulS on 7/17/00 at 02:28 (023415)

Thanks for all of you taking the time to respond to my rather desperate plea. I had been lurking on this site for a long time and finally decided to post my question in the middle of a particularly gloomy sleepless night. Of course the dilemma is whether to try and push all this to the back of my mind and 'get a life' (which is rather difficult when you are reminded of your problem with every step you take), or whether to aggressively seek out all the possible ways to fight it. My inclination is to fight it all the way, but this is of course precisely what leads to the obsession. As a fanatic former cyclist I have been following the Tour de France and watching the amazing Lance Armstrong prove the powers of recovery of the human body and spirit. This gives me hope, but hope is a fragile thing when every apparent improvement one day is crushed by a new deterioration the next.

I need to take time out to think through the suggestions you have made and try to get some balance back in my life, neither giving up nor letting it be the only thing that matters. Thanks again.


Re: How to stop this obsession

Nancy S. on 7/17/00 at 07:16 (023416)

'Neither giving up nor letting it be the only thing that matters' -- nicely put, Paul, and I think that is the key. I will make a sign for myself based on your words, for those days when it's hard to see out. Thanks --Nancy

Re: How to stop this obsession

Steve P on 7/17/00 at 09:46 (023420)

Paul --- Thanks for getting back to us. Keep in mind that 90% of PF cases are successfully resolved without surgery. Even after a year, you stand a good chance of being among them. Please keep this in mind & please keep in touch!
BTW, I'm leaving for the pool now. I guarantee I won't think about PF while swimming! Best.........Steve

Re: How to stop this obsession

Rock on 7/17/00 at 10:00 (023422)

PaulS,

So how many miles a week are you swimming ?

Rock.


Re: How to stop this obsession

JudyS on 7/17/00 at 19:58 (023457)

Hi Paul - I especially like the idea of 'getting balance back in your life'. That's SO applicable for all of us. When we become overwhelmed with the notion that the PF will NEVER go away, it's really difficult to let the other things in our lives take their rightful places - i.e. - balance. So thanks for cranking us back in to that perspective!

Re: How to stop this obsession

Tracy H on 7/17/00 at 20:02 (023461)

Such a common topic, I'm not surprised! I'm fighting depression over my inability to play soccer, hike, and enjoy the outdoors. I was just on the verge of finally making the cut for semi-professional soccer, when my pf got so bad I had to quit. I then began watching my teams play & have now stopped because it depresses me too much. But it is not all bad. The distance from the sport has given me the opportunity to realize that it is 'just a game', not to be taken too seriously. Amazing to watch adults act like children over a game. I would have never had this opportunity to sit back and observe if I wasn't hurt. Of course, I'd rather be playing. I have gotten into other things, like cooking and reading (and dieting - a result of my newfound sedentary lifestyle). But without physical competition as part of my life, I remain unfulfilled. I have one last hope which keeps me going: surgery. For those that don't know me, I've tried most everything on this page and I'm glad I've done so. Most find relief somewhere along the line. If surgery fails, I will have to reexamine my life and what makes me happy. I just do the best I can day by day.

Re: How to stop this obsession

JudyS on 7/17/00 at 20:14 (023465)

Vicki - your point about the Board is right on. Isn't it strange that the Board is almost a contradiction to itself? I find myself staying away from it for more lengths of time in order to help relegate my PF to a lesser role in my life. Yet, I've found so many wonderful people here that I end up feeling like I'm snubbing a bunch of terrific friends! All your points here are perfect and I thank you for putting words to great positive thoughts.

Re: Great Thread, Thanks Paul and Gang.

Kim B. on 7/17/00 at 21:34 (023477)

Wow, There is so much truth and good information in this thread. Good Post Paul, I SO relate to what you and the others have posted.
:-)

Regards, Kim B.


Re: How to stop this obsession

Nancy S. on 7/15/00 at 09:15 (023367)

Hi Paul, I can relate to what you wrote and imagine that many others here can too. When you're in pain and haven't yet found the right combination of treatments for you, it's a real rollercoaster and can at times really seem to take over everything. I've also found at times, when discouraged, that I get an 'invalid' status going mentally and fall into self-pity because of it.
Of course, you do have to stay mindful of your feet, and keep working on finding the right path for your healing. But the obsessive part is not good for long, and there are probably countless ways to fight that. Here are just a few:

1. Stay open to laughing at things that your usual self finds funny, and laugh heartily.
2. Try meditation, to learn to let useless thoughts go.
3. Listen to music that uplifts you (I find I forget to do this when discouragement sets in, think it won't help -- but it does!).
4. Explore other interests to get your mind off what you've (hopefully temporarily) lost.
5. When with other people, try hard to put your focus on them, listen to them, ask them questions -- to get your mind off yourself; this can be hard when dealing with chronic pain, but it's worth the effort.
6. Talk out your obsessiveness with a therapist; getting your grief out with someone can help you get tired of it and come to the desire to rebuild your life in perhaps new ways.
7. I have a friend who is a worrywart and finally decided to think of his thoughts as appearing on sort of a mental Rolodex, one thought per card. When he gets stuck on a useless worry, he says to himself, 'Next thought please,' and mentally flips to the next 'card.' He keeps going until he hits one that's constructive. It really helps him!
I do something similar: I think of my thoughts as white birds, and when one is bothering me and thinking about it any longer won't help me, I take the 'white bird' in my hands and send it into the sky and mentally watch it disappear over the horizon.
8. Laugh some more. There are so many delightful things in the world, despite this affliction.

AND, at a year, you have plenty of reason to hope and believe that your injuries will heal. A year is not that unusual. If you want to detail the treatments you've tried and give us a clearer idea of your history, people here may have further ideas for you.
Best of luck to you --Nancy S.


Re: How to stop this obsession

VickiJ on 7/15/00 at 09:30 (023369)

Interesting that I happened to check in with the board this morning to see your post at the top of the list...
I empathize completely...it is devastating to lose our active outdoor life to pf...I feel as tho I lost most of my true self by not being able to hike, run, or even walk. True depression set in for a long time.
I have thrown myself into gardening...which I could do only from my knees and butt for the first two years...but now I can spend a couple of hours per day on my feet before I have to go ice them, etc. And I can actually go grocery shopping, etc...tho I have no idea how long it will be before I can hike, etc again.

You have to find SOMETHING new to love and feel passion for...and, you have to overcome the depression...by commiserating here on this board or talking with a counselor or therapist, etc...but (and I know I'll make a lot of people angry here) you can't get bogged down here on the board...there is the danger of 'talking' yourself into a vicous circle of never 'moving on'. I check in from time to time to see if someone has come up with a 'miracle cure'...but I had to stop participating regularly here and begin to focus instead on a new life and not constantly focus on the losses...which is what I was begining to do.

If you haven't already, talk with Mike W about his Personal Foot Trainers to see if you can benefit from them. I think they are responsible for my slow progress back onto my feet (I'm a long time chronic sufferer)

Good Luck with your search for something that fills your heart like your old life used to...it's hard because we loved it so much...but ya gotta move on.

My apologies to those who may misinterpret the true heart what I've tried to communicate here...I'm not putting down the support everyone gets here...I just know that for me to get past the depression I could no longer come here everyday and participate in the discussion.


Re: How to stop this obsession

john h on 7/15/00 at 09:58 (023372)

paul: your question is like asking 'What is the meaning of live?'

Re: How to stop this obsession

john h on 7/15/00 at 10:03 (023373)

the one thing i do is i always have some new treatment in mind for the future if what i am doing is not working. my current future treatment i have in mind is either ossatron,orbasone, or sonnocur. so i try to always have some hopeful solution to hang on to.

Re: How to stop this obsession

wendyn on 7/15/00 at 10:12 (023374)

Very good advice Nancy and Vicki.

Paul, I know it's easy to get hung up on what you _cannot_ do any more. Make a real effort to find things you _can_ do.

I used to do aerobics up to 6 times a week, I ran, I walked, I biked...lots of cardio and very little weight training. With my foot problems the last 18 months, I've started spending a lot more time in the weight room. I cannot do any type of squats, lunges or leg weights - but I do a lot of upper body work for my arms, shoulders, back etc.

So, yes - I had to give something up...but I've switched my focus to something I'd neglected before.

I also spend a lot of time gardening, and puttering around quietly. I've always been a type a personality - and I've tried to enjoy the slower quieter pace of my new life.

Last week I sat on my porch and spent about 45 minutes watching the birds. I don't think I even noticed a bird before I really hurt my feet.

Consider talking to a therpaist if need be...this is a real loss that you're going through, and you'll go through all the normal processes of grieveing like anger, denial, sadness and so on.



Re: "Go around the corner"

Steve P on 7/15/00 at 10:21 (023376)

Paul --- I can fully, personally relate to your feelings. I also agree with the excellent advice given above by Nancy & Vicky. Now my input:

Many years ago I heard an excellent speaker discussing depression. He said that if anyone is depressed they should 'go around the corner' & find someone who needs their help....a neighbor, a friend, or simply less fortunate folks in the community. He said that helping others was the surest cure for depression. Recently, I have personally experienced the truth in those words.
There are many volunteer activities that one can do sitting down. Since getting PF, I have become a Project Literacy volunteer at my local library 3 times a week for 1 hour. It has been wonderful. It takes my mind off myself & actually makes my feet feel a bit better the rest of the day. It's more rewarding than I ever could have imagined & something I know I'll continue even after the PF is gone.
Paul, I don't mean to sound preachy. (Please forgive me if I do.) But I cannot stress this enough. If you're depressed, find people who need your help. There are many of them out there. Go around the corner.


Re: How to stop this obsession

Beverly on 7/15/00 at 10:29 (023379)

Paul,

I agree with Vicki and Nancy. It is important to find a new passion or at least a hobby. You might also consider asking your doctor for an anti-depressant. The newer ones have far fewer side effects, and if your insurance/finances will allow it, a therapist could be very helpful in helping you refocus your life and cope.

I am going to a therapist. I just started a few weeks ago. I am really getting alot out of it. It is helping my anxiety level.

Vicki has a valid point about not getting too hooked on the board. It is certainly something to be aware of. Yet, I think it is a catch -22 thing. The board offers support, information, and hope for many of us who feel alone. It eases this feeling of isolation.

One can get addicted to anything, and the internet certainly is a growing topic in addiction circles. However, I think for the average person, our frequency here runs a cycle. When I first got this and found the board, I surfed and posted alot. I asked tons of questions that people patiently answered. I learned so much more than I ever could have from my doctors. I had intelligent questions to ask. If not for the board, I would have never known which Birks to try first or how to go about getting fitted for them.

As my condition got worse, I often felt like this was the only place I could go that anyone really understood what was happening to me. Also, feeling like this would last 'forever,' it helped me to read about people who are getting better... especially the tough cases.

Now that four months have passed, and I have researched and researched..., I find myself naturally beginning to cut back on my board time. And it has occurred to me that this is something I need to do... not be too self-absorbed in this.

So I think for most of us, as we learn the 'ropes,' we naturally start to become bored with reading the same old thing over and over, and as we begin to understand our own condition better, this just makes posting and surfing a less important thing in our lives and less frequent.

And I think there is an evolution from asking upteen zillion questions to beginning to offer hope and support to newer people who find us.

Good Luck,
Beverly



Re: "Go around the corner" /Steve, great advice!

Beverly on 7/15/00 at 10:34 (023380)

Steve,

That is good advice. What a coincidence! I have prayed and given much thought to some community project I can do that takes me off my feet. I knew it needed to be something I was interested in and believed in.
I am going for the Literacy Tutoring Workshop at our local library next weekend. You are right. Helping someone else does take our minds off ourselves.

Beverly


Re: "Go around the corner" /Steve, great advice!

Steve P on 7/15/00 at 16:47 (023384)

Beverly --- I hope you like the literacy tutoring as much as I do. For me, these are the fastest hours of the week.
Good luck!

Re: How to stop this obsession

rekha.s on 7/16/00 at 19:04 (023403)

vickie, I too have gotten obsessed about gardening!.....I went through depression, and realized that while there are many things I now can't do, there are still things I can....gardening has taken my mind off my physical state!

Re: How to stop this obsession

Bob G. on 7/17/00 at 00:17 (023413)

Yes, Vickie, I know how depressing this can get. Sometimes it's good to just get away from it all. Sometimes it's just impossible to even check in. Those that I've met are so busy, as you must be, that we 'catch as catch can'.

I have found it helpful to have good books at the ready at all times. Though my feet cannot make it themselves, I hope to summit Mount Everst vicariously tonight.

Best wishes, BG


Re: How to stop this obsession

PaulS on 7/17/00 at 02:28 (023415)

Thanks for all of you taking the time to respond to my rather desperate plea. I had been lurking on this site for a long time and finally decided to post my question in the middle of a particularly gloomy sleepless night. Of course the dilemma is whether to try and push all this to the back of my mind and 'get a life' (which is rather difficult when you are reminded of your problem with every step you take), or whether to aggressively seek out all the possible ways to fight it. My inclination is to fight it all the way, but this is of course precisely what leads to the obsession. As a fanatic former cyclist I have been following the Tour de France and watching the amazing Lance Armstrong prove the powers of recovery of the human body and spirit. This gives me hope, but hope is a fragile thing when every apparent improvement one day is crushed by a new deterioration the next.

I need to take time out to think through the suggestions you have made and try to get some balance back in my life, neither giving up nor letting it be the only thing that matters. Thanks again.


Re: How to stop this obsession

Nancy S. on 7/17/00 at 07:16 (023416)

'Neither giving up nor letting it be the only thing that matters' -- nicely put, Paul, and I think that is the key. I will make a sign for myself based on your words, for those days when it's hard to see out. Thanks --Nancy

Re: How to stop this obsession

Steve P on 7/17/00 at 09:46 (023420)

Paul --- Thanks for getting back to us. Keep in mind that 90% of PF cases are successfully resolved without surgery. Even after a year, you stand a good chance of being among them. Please keep this in mind & please keep in touch!
BTW, I'm leaving for the pool now. I guarantee I won't think about PF while swimming! Best.........Steve

Re: How to stop this obsession

Rock on 7/17/00 at 10:00 (023422)

PaulS,

So how many miles a week are you swimming ?

Rock.


Re: How to stop this obsession

JudyS on 7/17/00 at 19:58 (023457)

Hi Paul - I especially like the idea of 'getting balance back in your life'. That's SO applicable for all of us. When we become overwhelmed with the notion that the PF will NEVER go away, it's really difficult to let the other things in our lives take their rightful places - i.e. - balance. So thanks for cranking us back in to that perspective!

Re: How to stop this obsession

Tracy H on 7/17/00 at 20:02 (023461)

Such a common topic, I'm not surprised! I'm fighting depression over my inability to play soccer, hike, and enjoy the outdoors. I was just on the verge of finally making the cut for semi-professional soccer, when my pf got so bad I had to quit. I then began watching my teams play & have now stopped because it depresses me too much. But it is not all bad. The distance from the sport has given me the opportunity to realize that it is 'just a game', not to be taken too seriously. Amazing to watch adults act like children over a game. I would have never had this opportunity to sit back and observe if I wasn't hurt. Of course, I'd rather be playing. I have gotten into other things, like cooking and reading (and dieting - a result of my newfound sedentary lifestyle). But without physical competition as part of my life, I remain unfulfilled. I have one last hope which keeps me going: surgery. For those that don't know me, I've tried most everything on this page and I'm glad I've done so. Most find relief somewhere along the line. If surgery fails, I will have to reexamine my life and what makes me happy. I just do the best I can day by day.

Re: How to stop this obsession

JudyS on 7/17/00 at 20:14 (023465)

Vicki - your point about the Board is right on. Isn't it strange that the Board is almost a contradiction to itself? I find myself staying away from it for more lengths of time in order to help relegate my PF to a lesser role in my life. Yet, I've found so many wonderful people here that I end up feeling like I'm snubbing a bunch of terrific friends! All your points here are perfect and I thank you for putting words to great positive thoughts.

Re: Great Thread, Thanks Paul and Gang.

Kim B. on 7/17/00 at 21:34 (023477)

Wow, There is so much truth and good information in this thread. Good Post Paul, I SO relate to what you and the others have posted.
:-)

Regards, Kim B.