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pf and depression

Posted by suzi on 8/01/00 at 17:15 (024362)

do most of you agree that there is a direct correlation between pf and depression? perhaps Scott could devote a secion on this in his intro.

Re: pf and depression

john h on 8/01/00 at 18:36 (024373)

you bet there can be. pain and the inability to do the things you want to do can very much depress you.

Re: pf and depression

Dr. Zuckerman on 8/01/00 at 18:51 (024378)

Chronic pain will and can cause depression. i would like to have a doctor take about this. I will search the literature for any direct correlation between the two. I don't think that the depression is causing the pf but I do think that the pain is cauisng depression.

Re: pf and depression

Lori E. on 8/01/00 at 20:09 (024393)

I have been diagnosed with depression resulting from chronic pain. The treatment for the depression is pretty much the same no matter how you got it, but it seems the insurance companies are a bit more understanding than if it was not caused by chronic pain.
I saw a councelor who specialized in chronic pain and depression, and a psychiatrist who prescribed Serzone for me. The Paxil prescribed by an internist caused me to loose sleep and then reinforced the whole cycle of pain from lack of sleep. So I finally got a referal to a specialist in chronic pain.
I developed my depression after having PF for about 5 months. I have now had PF for a year and I am about 50% better on the pain scale, but I am still struggling with the depression. As my PF has been healing, I have been very frustrated with how slowly it has come along, and that probably hasn't helped much either. It is also hard for your friends and family understand unless they have had something like this, so it isolates us, I think. Thanks Scott for this board!
I would recommend anyone who is experiencing symptoms of depression to see a therapist/coucelor/psychiatrist who specializes in chronic pain. (You can check out depression info on the Mayo health oasis site, they have info on chronic pain there too.) Specialists in chronic pain know better what your particular needs are(sleep for one thing,) and are able to give you help in learning the skills to cope with something like PF that takes a long time to heal. Any extra info you have on this Dr. Z, would help too!

Re: pf and depression

Beverly on 8/02/00 at 01:10 (024417)

I have battled depression with PF. I've mentioned it here several times. It took me several months to decide to go for counseling. I am now in my fifth week of counseling, and I can say that I feel much less gloomy. I have been offered anti-depressants, given a script for Celexa, and if I feel I need it, I'll take it. For the moment, I'm trying the cognitive/behavioral approach. I'm also using light trance work/guided imagery.

Reading books related to going throught difficult times has helped me. I've also read quite a few books on chronic pain. I just bought 'Finding a Joyful Life in the Heart of Pain: A Meditative Approach to Living with Physical, Emotional, or Spiritual Suffering,' by Darlene Cohen. (She suffers from Rheumatoid Arthritis.) The title caught my eye, because I feel like my PF has affected me on all three of those levels. The author has a background in Zen.

Best of luck coping with your depression,
Beverly


Re: pf and depression

alan k on 8/02/00 at 11:09 (024439)

There is definitely a relation, or vicious cycle, and you need to find a way through it. The pain and loss can cause depression, but the depression also slows down healing. If you can find treatment or your own way out of it, your healing will speed up remarkably. People already mentioned most of the treatment options, i.e. therapy and meds. The other obvious one is vigorous exercise. This raises energy and spirits. You can also try SAMe which is a supplement that goes for a dollar a pill at walmart, or $3 a day (other brands more expensive). I would try the best treatment you can get, not only to feel better but because treating depression is one of the best ways to attack the plantar fasciitis. Think of it as physical therapy, rather than treatment for psychological weakness or something.


alan k


Re: pf and depression

Suzi D on 8/02/00 at 12:47 (024445)

This board has helped me with my depression. I'm usually Suzi Sunshine, the girl everyone wants to smack because she's so happy all the time. But, this pf really had gotten me very depressed. I just couldn't be myself, couldn't do normal stuff. No taking summer night walks with my love. No walking my dog and best friend Annie. No dancing around the house to classic rock. No strolling around my new town to find all the neat little shops and eating places. Gosh. I'm making myself depressed again! 8) My cane, my husband, this board, resting, reading good books, listening to good music, thinking happy thoughts. They have helped me considerably with my mind and my foot. Hang in there and make sure you go to a doctor if you think you're somewhere you can't get out of without help. It's a pain in the foot! Feet From Hell. A new club for us to form.
pf'ly yours,
suzi d

Re: pf and depression

Steve P on 8/02/00 at 16:34 (024462)

I consider the fact that I am taking an anti-depressant to be a KEY part of my recovery program!

Re: pf and depression

rekha.s on 8/03/00 at 00:51 (024488)

I too have battled depression this past year..in jan and feb I went through severe depression to a point I have never felt before..and nobody could understand why I was making this fuss over painful feet????...I had just gotten out of my cast and had injured my knee...which just set me off..I have been seeing a psychiatrist and taking the anti depressant effexor and elavil.... and have started smoking again...

Plantar fasciitis has definitely been the reason for my depression...I was always on the go....can't sit down for a minute...it takes a lot of adjusting to not being able to do all those things I loved to do....just to give you an idea there is a test called esr (erythrocyte sedimentation rate) which measures inflammation rate...normal range is 10-20 my esr rate is 86 due to all the inflammtion in my feet and knee...at one point the dr thought I had lupus or rheumatoid arthritis...

having chronic pain is hard to deal with...depression and chronic pain go hand in hand...


Re: pf and depression

rekha.s on 8/03/00 at 00:51 (024500)

I too have battled depression this past year..in jan and feb I went through severe depression to a point I have never felt before..and nobody could understand why I was making this fuss over painful feet????...I had just gotten out of my cast and had injured my knee...which just set me off..I have been seeing a psychiatrist and taking the anti depressant effexor and elavil.... and have started smoking again...

Plantar fasciitis has definitely been the reason for my depression...I was always on the go....can't sit down for a minute...it takes a lot of adjusting to not being able to do all those things I loved to do....just to give you an idea there is a test called esr (erythrocyte sedimentation rate) which measures inflammation rate...normal range is 10-20 my esr rate is 86 due to all the inflammtion in my feet and knee...at one point the dr thought I had lupus or rheumatoid arthritis...

having chronic pain is hard to deal with...depression and chronic pain go hand in hand...


Re: pf and depression

john h on 8/01/00 at 18:36 (024373)

you bet there can be. pain and the inability to do the things you want to do can very much depress you.

Re: pf and depression

Dr. Zuckerman on 8/01/00 at 18:51 (024378)

Chronic pain will and can cause depression. i would like to have a doctor take about this. I will search the literature for any direct correlation between the two. I don't think that the depression is causing the pf but I do think that the pain is cauisng depression.

Re: pf and depression

Lori E. on 8/01/00 at 20:09 (024393)

I have been diagnosed with depression resulting from chronic pain. The treatment for the depression is pretty much the same no matter how you got it, but it seems the insurance companies are a bit more understanding than if it was not caused by chronic pain.
I saw a councelor who specialized in chronic pain and depression, and a psychiatrist who prescribed Serzone for me. The Paxil prescribed by an internist caused me to loose sleep and then reinforced the whole cycle of pain from lack of sleep. So I finally got a referal to a specialist in chronic pain.
I developed my depression after having PF for about 5 months. I have now had PF for a year and I am about 50% better on the pain scale, but I am still struggling with the depression. As my PF has been healing, I have been very frustrated with how slowly it has come along, and that probably hasn't helped much either. It is also hard for your friends and family understand unless they have had something like this, so it isolates us, I think. Thanks Scott for this board!
I would recommend anyone who is experiencing symptoms of depression to see a therapist/coucelor/psychiatrist who specializes in chronic pain. (You can check out depression info on the Mayo health oasis site, they have info on chronic pain there too.) Specialists in chronic pain know better what your particular needs are(sleep for one thing,) and are able to give you help in learning the skills to cope with something like PF that takes a long time to heal. Any extra info you have on this Dr. Z, would help too!

Re: pf and depression

Beverly on 8/02/00 at 01:10 (024417)

I have battled depression with PF. I've mentioned it here several times. It took me several months to decide to go for counseling. I am now in my fifth week of counseling, and I can say that I feel much less gloomy. I have been offered anti-depressants, given a script for Celexa, and if I feel I need it, I'll take it. For the moment, I'm trying the cognitive/behavioral approach. I'm also using light trance work/guided imagery.

Reading books related to going throught difficult times has helped me. I've also read quite a few books on chronic pain. I just bought 'Finding a Joyful Life in the Heart of Pain: A Meditative Approach to Living with Physical, Emotional, or Spiritual Suffering,' by Darlene Cohen. (She suffers from Rheumatoid Arthritis.) The title caught my eye, because I feel like my PF has affected me on all three of those levels. The author has a background in Zen.

Best of luck coping with your depression,
Beverly


Re: pf and depression

alan k on 8/02/00 at 11:09 (024439)

There is definitely a relation, or vicious cycle, and you need to find a way through it. The pain and loss can cause depression, but the depression also slows down healing. If you can find treatment or your own way out of it, your healing will speed up remarkably. People already mentioned most of the treatment options, i.e. therapy and meds. The other obvious one is vigorous exercise. This raises energy and spirits. You can also try SAMe which is a supplement that goes for a dollar a pill at walmart, or $3 a day (other brands more expensive). I would try the best treatment you can get, not only to feel better but because treating depression is one of the best ways to attack the plantar fasciitis. Think of it as physical therapy, rather than treatment for psychological weakness or something.


alan k


Re: pf and depression

Suzi D on 8/02/00 at 12:47 (024445)

This board has helped me with my depression. I'm usually Suzi Sunshine, the girl everyone wants to smack because she's so happy all the time. But, this pf really had gotten me very depressed. I just couldn't be myself, couldn't do normal stuff. No taking summer night walks with my love. No walking my dog and best friend Annie. No dancing around the house to classic rock. No strolling around my new town to find all the neat little shops and eating places. Gosh. I'm making myself depressed again! 8) My cane, my husband, this board, resting, reading good books, listening to good music, thinking happy thoughts. They have helped me considerably with my mind and my foot. Hang in there and make sure you go to a doctor if you think you're somewhere you can't get out of without help. It's a pain in the foot! Feet From Hell. A new club for us to form.
pf'ly yours,
suzi d

Re: pf and depression

Steve P on 8/02/00 at 16:34 (024462)

I consider the fact that I am taking an anti-depressant to be a KEY part of my recovery program!

Re: pf and depression

rekha.s on 8/03/00 at 00:51 (024488)

I too have battled depression this past year..in jan and feb I went through severe depression to a point I have never felt before..and nobody could understand why I was making this fuss over painful feet????...I had just gotten out of my cast and had injured my knee...which just set me off..I have been seeing a psychiatrist and taking the anti depressant effexor and elavil.... and have started smoking again...

Plantar fasciitis has definitely been the reason for my depression...I was always on the go....can't sit down for a minute...it takes a lot of adjusting to not being able to do all those things I loved to do....just to give you an idea there is a test called esr (erythrocyte sedimentation rate) which measures inflammation rate...normal range is 10-20 my esr rate is 86 due to all the inflammtion in my feet and knee...at one point the dr thought I had lupus or rheumatoid arthritis...

having chronic pain is hard to deal with...depression and chronic pain go hand in hand...


Re: pf and depression

rekha.s on 8/03/00 at 00:51 (024500)

I too have battled depression this past year..in jan and feb I went through severe depression to a point I have never felt before..and nobody could understand why I was making this fuss over painful feet????...I had just gotten out of my cast and had injured my knee...which just set me off..I have been seeing a psychiatrist and taking the anti depressant effexor and elavil.... and have started smoking again...

Plantar fasciitis has definitely been the reason for my depression...I was always on the go....can't sit down for a minute...it takes a lot of adjusting to not being able to do all those things I loved to do....just to give you an idea there is a test called esr (erythrocyte sedimentation rate) which measures inflammation rate...normal range is 10-20 my esr rate is 86 due to all the inflammtion in my feet and knee...at one point the dr thought I had lupus or rheumatoid arthritis...

having chronic pain is hard to deal with...depression and chronic pain go hand in hand...