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Repost ; Question for Richard C.ped

Posted by AmyM on 8/02/00 at 13:39 (024451)

Dear Richard
I've tried various arch supports and heel lifts with no success. i have heel pain and achilles tendonitis secondary to a neurological condition that can't be fixed. I walk on the outside edge of my foot and arch supports tended to force me to walk on the outside ( lateral) edge even more.
Is it possible to get orthitics to help this? I also found that arch supports put allot more pressure on the ball of my foot.
Any comments would be greatly appreciated.
sincerely
Amy M



Re: Repost ; Question for Richard C.ped

Richard, C.Ped on 8/02/00 at 15:15 (024455)

Hi Amy,
I am sorry it has taken me so long to respond. I have had patients come to me with similar complaints, and yes, it is possible for orthotics to help. Per the physicians prescription, I have posted the orthotic to help the patient walk with a more neutral gait. Certain conditions, as always, apply. If you do not have a flexible ankle, you certainly do not want to be 'forced' into neutral.

The achilles tendonitis pain can usually be relieved by orthotics as well. Make sure your shoes have an achilles notch.

Why do you think the inserts hurt the ball of your foot? Were you given a 3/4 orthotic or full lenght? The orthotic material plays a factor, as well as how it was made.

I am a strong beliver in orthotic inserts. I was a skeptic (I hope that is spelled correctly) before I became certified. I have seen very positive results in using orthotics for foot pain. The key is to make sure the inserts are made correctly.

I hope this helps in some way. Let me know about your current orthotics.
Thanx!
Richard, C.Ped


Re: Repost ; Question for Richard C.ped

AmyM on 8/03/00 at 06:37 (024490)

Thanks for replying! I have good flexibility in my ankle, if anything my legs are a bit too flexible!! In one set of inserts there was 'hole' under the middle of the heel, I think this was supposed to relieve the tension on the achilles although i never noticed a difference. All the inserts I've been give have been 3/4 length. I have to admit that I've given up wearing them, they didn't help (believe me I tried I wore one set for a year and a half and didn't see an improvement.) Thanks for your comments.

AmyM
ps i've no idea why the type is so small!!


Re: Repost ; Question for Richard C.ped

Richard, C.Ped on 8/03/00 at 08:51 (024493)

Hi Amy,
When I make orthotics, there is a 'hole' in the heel. This tells me that the posting material is ground as flat as it can be. The 'hole' is the shell material which appears due to the fact that the heel is rounded.

I am glad you told me that your ankle is flexible. Ask your physician if your orthotics should be posted to accomodate your walking on the outside of your feet. If made correctly, and with a flexible ankle, your orthotics should help you walk with a more neutral gait.

I have become a fan of the full lengh orthotic. I have had people come back to me stating that the 3/4 did not see to provide comfort for their toes. I replaced their 3/4 with full length. They were very satisfied. If the orthotic is not made correctly, the 3/4 will tend to be uncomfortable at the ball of the foot.

I used to make the 3/4 because some shoes did not have enough room in the toe box to accomodate the insert and the toes. It would 'scrunch' their toes in the toe box. I have this material now that is pretty thin. I use this for men's and women's dress shoes. It is comfortable to wear because it allows room for the toes in the shoe. If someone has a prescription for depth shoes, I have no problem using the origional material.

Take the full lenght in consideration. Check with the company that made your 3/4 inserts. Let them know that it did not work out for you. If there is a 'ridge' on the inserts at the ball of your foot, ask them if they could grind it flat so it does not hurt you. If it does not have that ridge, ask them if they can replace the 3/4 with a full length. Different companies have different ethics. If I know that what I made for someone did not work, I will adjust it or replace it free of charge. Hey, the orthotic has to be correct to do its job. And it is my job to get it right.
Good luck! Let me know if you have any other questions.
Richard, C.Ped


Re: Repost ; Question for Richard C.ped

AmyM on 8/03/00 at 09:33 (024497)

THANKS!

Re: Repost ; Question for Richard C.ped

AmyM on 8/03/00 at 06:37 (024508)

Thanks for replying! I have good flexibility in my ankle, if anything my legs are a bit too flexible!! In one set of inserts there was 'hole' under the middle of the heel, I think this was supposed to relieve the tension on the achilles although i never noticed a difference. All the inserts I've been give have been 3/4 length. I have to admit that I've given up wearing them, they didn't help (believe me I tried I wore one set for a year and a half and didn't see an improvement.) Thanks for your comments.

AmyM
ps i've no idea why the type is so small!!


Re: Repost ; Question for Richard C.ped

Richard, C.Ped on 8/03/00 at 08:51 (024509)

Hi Amy,
When I make orthotics, there is a 'hole' in the heel. This tells me that the posting material is ground as flat as it can be. The 'hole' is the shell material which appears due to the fact that the heel is rounded.

I am glad you told me that your ankle is flexible. Ask your physician if your orthotics should be posted to accomodate your walking on the outside of your feet. If made correctly, and with a flexible ankle, your orthotics should help you walk with a more neutral gait.

I have become a fan of the full lengh orthotic. I have had people come back to me stating that the 3/4 did not see to provide comfort for their toes. I replaced their 3/4 with full length. They were very satisfied. If the orthotic is not made correctly, the 3/4 will tend to be uncomfortable at the ball of the foot.

I used to make the 3/4 because some shoes did not have enough room in the toe box to accomodate the insert and the toes. It would 'scrunch' their toes in the toe box. I have this material now that is pretty thin. I use this for men's and women's dress shoes. It is comfortable to wear because it allows room for the toes in the shoe. If someone has a prescription for depth shoes, I have no problem using the origional material.

Take the full lenght in consideration. Check with the company that made your 3/4 inserts. Let them know that it did not work out for you. If there is a 'ridge' on the inserts at the ball of your foot, ask them if they could grind it flat so it does not hurt you. If it does not have that ridge, ask them if they can replace the 3/4 with a full length. Different companies have different ethics. If I know that what I made for someone did not work, I will adjust it or replace it free of charge. Hey, the orthotic has to be correct to do its job. And it is my job to get it right.
Good luck! Let me know if you have any other questions.
Richard, C.Ped


Re: Repost ; Question for Richard C.ped

AmyM on 8/03/00 at 09:33 (024510)

THANKS!

Re: Repost ; Question for Richard C.ped - For Cycling ?

Rock on 8/03/00 at 13:29 (024511)

Richard,

I feel like my homemade orthotics that lack any forefoot posting allow a bit of tibal rotation that is starting to bother my knees (I have 15 degree varus forefeet and arches that flatten way to much) .

What kind of orthotics should I get made for cycling (road bike with 'Look' racing (clipless) style pedals) long distances ?

Thanks,
Rock.


Re: Repost ; Question for Richard C.ped - For Cycling ?

Mike, C.Ped on 8/04/00 at 13:29 (024512)

Hey Rock,
This is Mike, I work with Richard who is on vacation today. If you already determined that you have 15 degree forefoot varus, why not have your orthotic posted to bring your foot to subtalor neutral in normal gait? What is a homemade orthotic? Were they made by a Certified Pedorthist?

Thanks!
Mike, C.Ped


Re: Repost ; Question for Richard C.ped - For Cycling ?

JudyS on 8/04/00 at 20:23 (024513)

Hey Mike - thanks for 'sitting in'. I asked Richard this a while back but I don't recall a reply; just how does one know if one needs to go to a pedorthist to have their orthotics adjusted? PF can be so vague with different aches and pains coming and going, well, just how does one know if the orthotics are a or the problem?

Re: Repost ; Question for Richard C.ped

Richard, C.Ped on 8/02/00 at 15:15 (024455)

Hi Amy,
I am sorry it has taken me so long to respond. I have had patients come to me with similar complaints, and yes, it is possible for orthotics to help. Per the physicians prescription, I have posted the orthotic to help the patient walk with a more neutral gait. Certain conditions, as always, apply. If you do not have a flexible ankle, you certainly do not want to be 'forced' into neutral.

The achilles tendonitis pain can usually be relieved by orthotics as well. Make sure your shoes have an achilles notch.

Why do you think the inserts hurt the ball of your foot? Were you given a 3/4 orthotic or full lenght? The orthotic material plays a factor, as well as how it was made.

I am a strong beliver in orthotic inserts. I was a skeptic (I hope that is spelled correctly) before I became certified. I have seen very positive results in using orthotics for foot pain. The key is to make sure the inserts are made correctly.

I hope this helps in some way. Let me know about your current orthotics.
Thanx!
Richard, C.Ped


Re: Repost ; Question for Richard C.ped

AmyM on 8/03/00 at 06:37 (024490)

Thanks for replying! I have good flexibility in my ankle, if anything my legs are a bit too flexible!! In one set of inserts there was 'hole' under the middle of the heel, I think this was supposed to relieve the tension on the achilles although i never noticed a difference. All the inserts I've been give have been 3/4 length. I have to admit that I've given up wearing them, they didn't help (believe me I tried I wore one set for a year and a half and didn't see an improvement.) Thanks for your comments.

AmyM
ps i've no idea why the type is so small!!


Re: Repost ; Question for Richard C.ped

Richard, C.Ped on 8/03/00 at 08:51 (024493)

Hi Amy,
When I make orthotics, there is a 'hole' in the heel. This tells me that the posting material is ground as flat as it can be. The 'hole' is the shell material which appears due to the fact that the heel is rounded.

I am glad you told me that your ankle is flexible. Ask your physician if your orthotics should be posted to accomodate your walking on the outside of your feet. If made correctly, and with a flexible ankle, your orthotics should help you walk with a more neutral gait.

I have become a fan of the full lengh orthotic. I have had people come back to me stating that the 3/4 did not see to provide comfort for their toes. I replaced their 3/4 with full length. They were very satisfied. If the orthotic is not made correctly, the 3/4 will tend to be uncomfortable at the ball of the foot.

I used to make the 3/4 because some shoes did not have enough room in the toe box to accomodate the insert and the toes. It would 'scrunch' their toes in the toe box. I have this material now that is pretty thin. I use this for men's and women's dress shoes. It is comfortable to wear because it allows room for the toes in the shoe. If someone has a prescription for depth shoes, I have no problem using the origional material.

Take the full lenght in consideration. Check with the company that made your 3/4 inserts. Let them know that it did not work out for you. If there is a 'ridge' on the inserts at the ball of your foot, ask them if they could grind it flat so it does not hurt you. If it does not have that ridge, ask them if they can replace the 3/4 with a full length. Different companies have different ethics. If I know that what I made for someone did not work, I will adjust it or replace it free of charge. Hey, the orthotic has to be correct to do its job. And it is my job to get it right.
Good luck! Let me know if you have any other questions.
Richard, C.Ped


Re: Repost ; Question for Richard C.ped

AmyM on 8/03/00 at 09:33 (024497)

THANKS!

Re: Repost ; Question for Richard C.ped

AmyM on 8/03/00 at 06:37 (024508)

Thanks for replying! I have good flexibility in my ankle, if anything my legs are a bit too flexible!! In one set of inserts there was 'hole' under the middle of the heel, I think this was supposed to relieve the tension on the achilles although i never noticed a difference. All the inserts I've been give have been 3/4 length. I have to admit that I've given up wearing them, they didn't help (believe me I tried I wore one set for a year and a half and didn't see an improvement.) Thanks for your comments.

AmyM
ps i've no idea why the type is so small!!


Re: Repost ; Question for Richard C.ped

Richard, C.Ped on 8/03/00 at 08:51 (024509)

Hi Amy,
When I make orthotics, there is a 'hole' in the heel. This tells me that the posting material is ground as flat as it can be. The 'hole' is the shell material which appears due to the fact that the heel is rounded.

I am glad you told me that your ankle is flexible. Ask your physician if your orthotics should be posted to accomodate your walking on the outside of your feet. If made correctly, and with a flexible ankle, your orthotics should help you walk with a more neutral gait.

I have become a fan of the full lengh orthotic. I have had people come back to me stating that the 3/4 did not see to provide comfort for their toes. I replaced their 3/4 with full length. They were very satisfied. If the orthotic is not made correctly, the 3/4 will tend to be uncomfortable at the ball of the foot.

I used to make the 3/4 because some shoes did not have enough room in the toe box to accomodate the insert and the toes. It would 'scrunch' their toes in the toe box. I have this material now that is pretty thin. I use this for men's and women's dress shoes. It is comfortable to wear because it allows room for the toes in the shoe. If someone has a prescription for depth shoes, I have no problem using the origional material.

Take the full lenght in consideration. Check with the company that made your 3/4 inserts. Let them know that it did not work out for you. If there is a 'ridge' on the inserts at the ball of your foot, ask them if they could grind it flat so it does not hurt you. If it does not have that ridge, ask them if they can replace the 3/4 with a full length. Different companies have different ethics. If I know that what I made for someone did not work, I will adjust it or replace it free of charge. Hey, the orthotic has to be correct to do its job. And it is my job to get it right.
Good luck! Let me know if you have any other questions.
Richard, C.Ped


Re: Repost ; Question for Richard C.ped

AmyM on 8/03/00 at 09:33 (024510)

THANKS!

Re: Repost ; Question for Richard C.ped - For Cycling ?

Rock on 8/03/00 at 13:29 (024511)

Richard,

I feel like my homemade orthotics that lack any forefoot posting allow a bit of tibal rotation that is starting to bother my knees (I have 15 degree varus forefeet and arches that flatten way to much) .

What kind of orthotics should I get made for cycling (road bike with 'Look' racing (clipless) style pedals) long distances ?

Thanks,
Rock.


Re: Repost ; Question for Richard C.ped - For Cycling ?

Mike, C.Ped on 8/04/00 at 13:29 (024512)

Hey Rock,
This is Mike, I work with Richard who is on vacation today. If you already determined that you have 15 degree forefoot varus, why not have your orthotic posted to bring your foot to subtalor neutral in normal gait? What is a homemade orthotic? Were they made by a Certified Pedorthist?

Thanks!
Mike, C.Ped


Re: Repost ; Question for Richard C.ped - For Cycling ?

JudyS on 8/04/00 at 20:23 (024513)

Hey Mike - thanks for 'sitting in'. I asked Richard this a while back but I don't recall a reply; just how does one know if one needs to go to a pedorthist to have their orthotics adjusted? PF can be so vague with different aches and pains coming and going, well, just how does one know if the orthotics are a or the problem?