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Re: Reply to Terry and Nancy

Posted by BarbS on 8/09/00 at 15:52 (024992)

I'll take yours and Nancy's advice and skip the shot. I have turned that option down twice before and am not afraid to state my feelings to my new dr. I haven't read anything good about the shots on this board anyway. My new doc is understanding and sympathetic to my problem. I'm sure he told me ice water first and then warm water but I will call him to make sure. I am getting deep tissue massage therapy from a licensed massage therapist. She is awesome and is working my entire legs and back. I had a major ski injury 10 years ago and damaged the area under my clavical and through to my shoulder blade. She pointed out that that shoulder blade is raised compared to the other and has suggested that this is the cause of my foot problems (walking differently, posture, etc.) She has also told me she knows a good acupuncturist that I am considering giving a try.

Thanks for your advice on the shots. It is MUCH appreciated.


Re: Reply to Terry and Nancy

Terry on 8/09/00 at 16:20 (024996)

Barb S., You are the one that posted that article from Men's Health awhile back, and it's been on my mind ever since. I would love to try deep tissue massage but not sure how to go about finding someone that is really good. I am glad it is working for you. I tried accupuncture, and I thought it was extremely painful and did not help. I know it helps a lot of people, so let us know how it goes for you. I think what I had was pseudo-accupuncture, not traditional Chinese, currents running between the needles. Terry

Re: Reply to Terry and Nancy

BarbS on 8/09/00 at 16:35 (024999)

Sorry, that wasn't me that posted the article. I know there is another Barbara on the board so maybe it was her. I have only been posting here a couple of weeks. Good to know your feelings about accupuncture. I like to know other people's feelings on such alternative procedures before trying them. I found my massage therapist by asking around. Turns out, one of my best friends used to work with this woman before she became an MT. If you work in an office, chances are you will find someone who has tried massage therapy. If not, you might ask your doctor to recommend one. Good luck. If I find the nerve to try accupuncture, I'll let you know about it.

Re: Reply to Terry and Nancy

john h on 8/09/00 at 18:52 (025011)

barb: i must step up to the plate in defense of shots. i went for 4 years refusing shots mainly because i was chicken. finally one day i was in a lot of pain and decided to try the shot. the pain was not very bad at all and my foot pain went away for 3 weeks. this provided me with some useful diagnostic information in that it is very likely that PF is my problem . some people have been cured by shots and probably a million or more are given each year. with that many shots being given there are going to be some problems as with any procedure. i think some doctors do overuse this procedure but it has a place in the treatment of PF in relieving pain and for diagnostic purposes.

Re: Reply to Terry and Nancy

Nancy S. on 8/09/00 at 19:14 (025013)

John, I think you make some good points, but I don't see the shot as a diagnostic tool -- at least not a reliable one. There has never been any question that I have PF, I had the shot, and it did zip for me -- literally, my painless time lasted until the anesthetic wore off (I think it was about 5 hours), and then it was back to square one.
Is the shot really used scientifically to diagnose? I've never heard that. --Nancy

Re: Reply to Terry and Nancy

john h on 8/09/00 at 22:09 (025037)

nancy: as you probably have guessed i am no doctor so any medical advice or judgements i toss out are not worth much. hopefully dr z might weigh in on this. my thinking is this and i posed it before. my feet hurt where the fascia attaches to the heel. could it be pf or tts. my doctor said he did not know that it could be either. if i get a shot into the spot that hurts and it quits hurting for three weeks is it not more likely that i have pf than tts? any referred pain from the tts would not be helped by the shot into the fascia or would it? i have read of a number of cases where people received the shot and the problem never returned and some who got relief for up to 6 months. i would not recomend or not recomend that someone get a shot. i would, as you have warn that there are some downsides but alas there are some positives also. LOL

Re: Reply to Terry and Nancy

Nancy S. on 8/10/00 at 06:09 (025057)

John, upsides and downsides to everything, aren't there. I guess that's what makes life interesting/puzzling -- and so hard sometimes too!
According to Wendy's TTS treatise, cortisone shots are sometimes used for TTS. But my impression is that the shot goes into a different area (the tarsal tunnel). If your shot went into The PF Spot and you felt better for 3 weeks, I would guess that it addressed your PF, which you probably (?) have. But I don't know that it would rule out TTS (?).
Yes, perhaps Dr. Z could weigh in here. (Dr. Z, you look exactly as I pictured you, mustache and all. I wish you'd be my uncle, except you might have to age quickly to accomplish that.)
--Nancy

Re: Reply to Terry and Nancy

john h on 8/10/00 at 10:54 (025078)

i do not think the shot ruled out tts i just made it more probable that i have pf. knowing what i now know about tts i probably would not have had the tts surgery although i do not think i am any worse from it. i have met people who have fallen from high places and fractured both heel bones and must have really put a hurt on the fascia and they have fully recovered. is it not amazing that many of us suffered no traumatic event and here we are years later hurting.

Re: Reply to Terry and Nancy

JudyS on 8/10/00 at 10:58 (025080)

John - I don't have TTS, but my husband did so I thought I'd share his experience a little bit. It started with classic PF which he eventually had surgery for - successfully. As soon as he was on his feet with normal activities, post-surgery, he developed TTS. His Pod did indeed give him a shot in the TTS inflammation area, not in the heel. For him the TTS was taken care of with orthotics. I would think that if you had the shot in the heel, it was for PF. I'm also under the impression that TTS does not present with the classic heel pain, rather with that tendon that runs up the inside/side of the foot from approximately the big toe, through the middle of the surface ankle-joint and up the inside of the lower leg. Least, that's the pain my hubby had! BTW - I agree totally with the 'distinguished look' thing re: your photo!

Re: Reply to Terry and Nancy

john h on 8/10/00 at 11:06 (025083)

i have the classic pf pain where the band of fascia from the great toe attaches to the heel. i asked the board certifed orthopedic foot and ankle surgeon if this pain could be caused pf tarsal tunnel entrapment and he said yes it could. he said the baxter nerve which is located in the same area could cause the pain. i never had burning pain in my toes or other odd pains which might indicate tarsal tunnel entrapment. my shot went directly into the areal of pain not the heel. just forward of the heel. tts seems like a very tricky diagnosis.

Re: Reply to Terry and Nancy

Terry on 8/09/00 at 16:20 (024996)

Barb S., You are the one that posted that article from Men's Health awhile back, and it's been on my mind ever since. I would love to try deep tissue massage but not sure how to go about finding someone that is really good. I am glad it is working for you. I tried accupuncture, and I thought it was extremely painful and did not help. I know it helps a lot of people, so let us know how it goes for you. I think what I had was pseudo-accupuncture, not traditional Chinese, currents running between the needles. Terry

Re: Reply to Terry and Nancy

BarbS on 8/09/00 at 16:35 (024999)

Sorry, that wasn't me that posted the article. I know there is another Barbara on the board so maybe it was her. I have only been posting here a couple of weeks. Good to know your feelings about accupuncture. I like to know other people's feelings on such alternative procedures before trying them. I found my massage therapist by asking around. Turns out, one of my best friends used to work with this woman before she became an MT. If you work in an office, chances are you will find someone who has tried massage therapy. If not, you might ask your doctor to recommend one. Good luck. If I find the nerve to try accupuncture, I'll let you know about it.

Re: Reply to Terry and Nancy

john h on 8/09/00 at 18:52 (025011)

barb: i must step up to the plate in defense of shots. i went for 4 years refusing shots mainly because i was chicken. finally one day i was in a lot of pain and decided to try the shot. the pain was not very bad at all and my foot pain went away for 3 weeks. this provided me with some useful diagnostic information in that it is very likely that PF is my problem . some people have been cured by shots and probably a million or more are given each year. with that many shots being given there are going to be some problems as with any procedure. i think some doctors do overuse this procedure but it has a place in the treatment of PF in relieving pain and for diagnostic purposes.

Re: Reply to Terry and Nancy

Nancy S. on 8/09/00 at 19:14 (025013)

John, I think you make some good points, but I don't see the shot as a diagnostic tool -- at least not a reliable one. There has never been any question that I have PF, I had the shot, and it did zip for me -- literally, my painless time lasted until the anesthetic wore off (I think it was about 5 hours), and then it was back to square one.
Is the shot really used scientifically to diagnose? I've never heard that. --Nancy

Re: Reply to Terry and Nancy

john h on 8/09/00 at 22:09 (025037)

nancy: as you probably have guessed i am no doctor so any medical advice or judgements i toss out are not worth much. hopefully dr z might weigh in on this. my thinking is this and i posed it before. my feet hurt where the fascia attaches to the heel. could it be pf or tts. my doctor said he did not know that it could be either. if i get a shot into the spot that hurts and it quits hurting for three weeks is it not more likely that i have pf than tts? any referred pain from the tts would not be helped by the shot into the fascia or would it? i have read of a number of cases where people received the shot and the problem never returned and some who got relief for up to 6 months. i would not recomend or not recomend that someone get a shot. i would, as you have warn that there are some downsides but alas there are some positives also. LOL

Re: Reply to Terry and Nancy

Nancy S. on 8/10/00 at 06:09 (025057)

John, upsides and downsides to everything, aren't there. I guess that's what makes life interesting/puzzling -- and so hard sometimes too!
According to Wendy's TTS treatise, cortisone shots are sometimes used for TTS. But my impression is that the shot goes into a different area (the tarsal tunnel). If your shot went into The PF Spot and you felt better for 3 weeks, I would guess that it addressed your PF, which you probably (?) have. But I don't know that it would rule out TTS (?).
Yes, perhaps Dr. Z could weigh in here. (Dr. Z, you look exactly as I pictured you, mustache and all. I wish you'd be my uncle, except you might have to age quickly to accomplish that.)
--Nancy

Re: Reply to Terry and Nancy

john h on 8/10/00 at 10:54 (025078)

i do not think the shot ruled out tts i just made it more probable that i have pf. knowing what i now know about tts i probably would not have had the tts surgery although i do not think i am any worse from it. i have met people who have fallen from high places and fractured both heel bones and must have really put a hurt on the fascia and they have fully recovered. is it not amazing that many of us suffered no traumatic event and here we are years later hurting.

Re: Reply to Terry and Nancy

JudyS on 8/10/00 at 10:58 (025080)

John - I don't have TTS, but my husband did so I thought I'd share his experience a little bit. It started with classic PF which he eventually had surgery for - successfully. As soon as he was on his feet with normal activities, post-surgery, he developed TTS. His Pod did indeed give him a shot in the TTS inflammation area, not in the heel. For him the TTS was taken care of with orthotics. I would think that if you had the shot in the heel, it was for PF. I'm also under the impression that TTS does not present with the classic heel pain, rather with that tendon that runs up the inside/side of the foot from approximately the big toe, through the middle of the surface ankle-joint and up the inside of the lower leg. Least, that's the pain my hubby had! BTW - I agree totally with the 'distinguished look' thing re: your photo!

Re: Reply to Terry and Nancy

john h on 8/10/00 at 11:06 (025083)

i have the classic pf pain where the band of fascia from the great toe attaches to the heel. i asked the board certifed orthopedic foot and ankle surgeon if this pain could be caused pf tarsal tunnel entrapment and he said yes it could. he said the baxter nerve which is located in the same area could cause the pain. i never had burning pain in my toes or other odd pains which might indicate tarsal tunnel entrapment. my shot went directly into the areal of pain not the heel. just forward of the heel. tts seems like a very tricky diagnosis.