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an interesting theory - Part II

Posted by Rock on 8/11/00 at 09:50 (025217)

I got busy at work yesterday and missed out on the thread 'an interesting theory'. Since this board's theads seem to die after one day, I thought I would add a few words (opinion) on this topic.

1. I agree that a single activity or a short (up to a few days) series of activies results in people getting PF and/or AT. Call this population #1.

While the PF/AT will hurt some in normal daily activities, you are not really making the PF/AT worse. However, cutting back on your daily activities will most likey make the PF/AT worse due to loss of circulation, strength and flexibility. The key solution to getting well for this group is to keep activity levels high, while avoiding further injury (swim, bike, seated weight training,...). Of course, the very worst thing to do is to repeat the single activity or a short series of activies that started the PF/AT.

2. The other population develops PF/AT due to long term (months on end) daily living. Call this population #2. I have the idea that is population is the minority, but I could be wrong.

I hope this helps in some way.
Rock.


Re: an interesting theory.........To Barbara

Beverly on 8/10/00 at 20:58 (025162)

Barbara,

You have really been through the mill! I am not familiar with that particular antibiotic. It would be interesting to know if it is in the same family with Floxin. If you find out, let me know.

The book I read about Floxin, called 'Bitter Pills' was hair raising.
The author's wife took Floxin for a simple bladdar infection, and she has had lasting nurological effects. the author is an investigative journalist, and he has uncovered some pretty spooky stuff about Floxin.

He says that whenever possible, ask your doctor if one of the older/tried and true antiobiotics will work instead.

Beverly


Re: an interesting theory - Part II

Beverly on 8/11/00 at 11:44 (025230)

Rock,

I really disagree. A high level of activity may be working for you, and if it is, more power to you. But for most of us with PF, rest has restorative benefits. Now, I agree that too much rest leads to atrophy.
But 'relative rest' as my sports med doc calls it is very important.

We all have different ideas of what rest or relative rest is.

If I tried to do a fraction of what you do, I'd be in the hospital.

But I am doing more stretching, strengthening, and I am looking forward to when my PT says I can begin the pool therapy. I also just ordered the Personal Foot Trainer. I am even more eager when the PT says I can begin biking. But I'm not there yet.

So, I think we can keep the feet from going into atrophy and still rest. I stretch and do the other PT exercises, but I also walk smart.
I don't walk anymore than I have to. Just running the errands of life,
is giving my feet more than enough walking.

But this is just my opinion.

Beverly


Re: an interesting theory - Part II

john h on 8/11/00 at 12:03 (025234)

rock: i sometimes also wonder if by going inactive when we get pf that we might not make it worse in the long run. years ago you would stay in the hospital in be for a week after many surgeries. now they have your butt up the next and walking for the same surgery even though it may be very painful. circus athletes are noted for taping up severe sprains and strains and going on with the show and found they get faster healing than jumping in the bed. however, if you have a pain level of 8-10 in your feet it will be hard to convince yourself to not get off your feet. there are of course injuries as a torn calf, pulled hamstring, or sever achilles tendonitis where the standard medical treatment is rest. i do not think we know enough about pf to say with scientific certainity that total rest is the best answer for a long term cure.

Re: Me too Bev

Kim B. on 8/11/00 at 14:34 (025253)

I just ordered the PFT too. It should be here anyday. We'll have to see who gets well first, huh? Remember, don't overdo! :-) Kim B.

Re: an interesting theory - Part II

Dr. Zuckerman on 8/11/00 at 15:51 (025261)

YOu are both right. Every patient with pf needs a specific treatment plan for them. No single or multiple treatment will be right for every patient. You must try to individulize the treatment program. Some of the treatments will be the same for everyone and some will be different. Rock is right that you want to do some activites but avoidthe ones that cause the pf to hurt or get worse. Biking, swimming , upper body training is great. Walking running is bad for pf.

Re: an interesting theory - Part II

JudyS on 8/11/00 at 18:41 (025275)

Maybe the best lesson we learn here, over time, is; moderation in all?

Re: an interesting theory.........To Barbara

Beverly on 8/10/00 at 20:58 (025162)

Barbara,

You have really been through the mill! I am not familiar with that particular antibiotic. It would be interesting to know if it is in the same family with Floxin. If you find out, let me know.

The book I read about Floxin, called 'Bitter Pills' was hair raising.
The author's wife took Floxin for a simple bladdar infection, and she has had lasting nurological effects. the author is an investigative journalist, and he has uncovered some pretty spooky stuff about Floxin.

He says that whenever possible, ask your doctor if one of the older/tried and true antiobiotics will work instead.

Beverly


Re: an interesting theory - Part II

Beverly on 8/11/00 at 11:44 (025230)

Rock,

I really disagree. A high level of activity may be working for you, and if it is, more power to you. But for most of us with PF, rest has restorative benefits. Now, I agree that too much rest leads to atrophy.
But 'relative rest' as my sports med doc calls it is very important.

We all have different ideas of what rest or relative rest is.

If I tried to do a fraction of what you do, I'd be in the hospital.

But I am doing more stretching, strengthening, and I am looking forward to when my PT says I can begin the pool therapy. I also just ordered the Personal Foot Trainer. I am even more eager when the PT says I can begin biking. But I'm not there yet.

So, I think we can keep the feet from going into atrophy and still rest. I stretch and do the other PT exercises, but I also walk smart.
I don't walk anymore than I have to. Just running the errands of life,
is giving my feet more than enough walking.

But this is just my opinion.

Beverly


Re: an interesting theory - Part II

john h on 8/11/00 at 12:03 (025234)

rock: i sometimes also wonder if by going inactive when we get pf that we might not make it worse in the long run. years ago you would stay in the hospital in be for a week after many surgeries. now they have your butt up the next and walking for the same surgery even though it may be very painful. circus athletes are noted for taping up severe sprains and strains and going on with the show and found they get faster healing than jumping in the bed. however, if you have a pain level of 8-10 in your feet it will be hard to convince yourself to not get off your feet. there are of course injuries as a torn calf, pulled hamstring, or sever achilles tendonitis where the standard medical treatment is rest. i do not think we know enough about pf to say with scientific certainity that total rest is the best answer for a long term cure.

Re: Me too Bev

Kim B. on 8/11/00 at 14:34 (025253)

I just ordered the PFT too. It should be here anyday. We'll have to see who gets well first, huh? Remember, don't overdo! :-) Kim B.

Re: an interesting theory - Part II

Dr. Zuckerman on 8/11/00 at 15:51 (025261)

YOu are both right. Every patient with pf needs a specific treatment plan for them. No single or multiple treatment will be right for every patient. You must try to individulize the treatment program. Some of the treatments will be the same for everyone and some will be different. Rock is right that you want to do some activites but avoidthe ones that cause the pf to hurt or get worse. Biking, swimming , upper body training is great. Walking running is bad for pf.

Re: an interesting theory - Part II

JudyS on 8/11/00 at 18:41 (025275)

Maybe the best lesson we learn here, over time, is; moderation in all?