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Question about Personal Foot Trainers by Mike Wilmot? Tried them?

Posted by April on 8/14/00 at 21:48 (025452)

Hi Folks:
I'm a recovered PF sufferer as I can now walk all day with no pain. However, I know I'm an accident waiting to happen. I can feel the tightness in my foot ready to rip with any movenment that slams my foot into the ground. I can't stand for this to happen again and am determined to work on myself till I can at least do a short dash. I am looking for solutions that will enable a 'complete' recovery. Has anyone every tried the Personal Foot Trainer by Mike Wilmot? It is featured under the product page at the top of this message board.

Re: Question about Personal Foot Trainers by Mike Wilmot? Tried them?

Nancy S. on 8/14/00 at 22:12 (025456)

April, the same question was posed by Pookie over the weekend (look down a bit for that thread). She got only a few replies, which were ambivalent. But earlier messages were posted that were more positive. Do a search at the top of this page on PFT or Personal Foot Trainer, and you'll find more reactions from people who have used them.
Nancy

Re: Pain or no pain

Bob G. on 8/14/00 at 23:56 (025458)

Hi April,

When I get the pain, I go back to the NightSplint. No pain.

What about you? Have you used it? BG


Re: Pain or no pain

April on 8/15/00 at 08:38 (025469)

BG, I haven't done anything except orthotics, easy stretching, ibprofen and avoidance.

Re: Question about Personal Foot Trainers by Mike Wilmot? Tried them?

T. Hurst on 8/15/00 at 08:49 (025472)

I tried them before I resorted to physical therapy and then epf surgery. I think, like all conservative trmts, it might have been effective earlier on in my pf problem. But, it should be used in combination with good orthodics and stiff shoes.

Re: Question about Personal Foot Trainers by Mike Wilmot? Tried them?

Mike W on 8/15/00 at 10:00 (025476)

Hello April,

Thank you for your interest in my Personal Foot Trainers.

My PFT's are designed to improve the strength and flexibility of every muscle in the foot and leg. I have yet to meet a person who has pf and has strong and flexible foot and leg muscles. The flexor and extensor digitorum and halcius longus muscles are by far the weakest lower leg muscles (the muscles and tendons that make the tip of your toes flex down and extend back up). If these and other muscles are neglected you place excessive stress on other tissues that may become stressed. Improving the strength and flexibility of these muscles is a very important part of the healing process that will compliment most pf treatments.

PFT's just like many of the self care products and treatments are intended for those people who are motivated and willing to take an active role in the healing process. Not everyone is willing or capable of this.


It is my experience that most people who have had results with my PFT's used have them consistently and the people who did not have results did not use them consistently or correctly.

Please do a word search on Mike W or PFT's and you will find more about PFT's. Regarding surveys, you should realise that everyone here has pf and that once a person is healed of PF they no longer visit this site very often.

I would be happy to send you a copy of my Plantar Fasciitis Booklet which explains my program in detail.

Prevention of pf is not talked about very much but by the number of posts that I have read regarding pf set backs, it is something that more people should think and do something about.


I hope you solve your pf forever.

Regards,

Mike Wilmot
Physical therapist, Principal Personal Foot Trainers, email (email removed)


Re: Question about Personal Foot Trainers by Mike Wilmot? Tried them?

JudyS on 8/15/00 at 10:14 (025477)

Hi April - I just read Mike W's post to you about his PFT's and I can confirm one thing for sure - all of my Physical Therapy right now is concentrated on strengthening the muscles that flex and point the toes - just as Mike has described. When I started this treatment a couple of weeks ago, I was shocked to find that I had no strength whatsoever in that area! This is easy to overlook because we concentrate so heavily on the PF itself. But, I'd developed a very poor PF-acommodating stride which created other problems. The thing that surprised me was the PT telling me that the weak 'toe' muscles could actually have been the 'egg before the PF chicken, or vice-versa!' That surprised me because I'd assumed that the PF came first. I did comment the other day about my experience with the PFT's but, in short, for me the jury's still out.

Re: To Mike..Question about Personal Foot Trainers by Mike Wilmot? Tried them?

Sue R on 8/15/00 at 10:56 (025483)

I've been examined by a Physical Therapist and she could find nothing wrong with my muscle strength or flexibility. Would this device benefit me?

Sue R


Re: Question about Personal Foot Trainers by Mike Wilmot? Tried them?

john a on 8/15/00 at 15:54 (025502)

You say that PFTs are designed to improve strength and flexibility in the foot and lower leg. How does one go about measuring or judging improvement in strength and flexibility? (other than by noticing that your PF is going away)

Re: Pain or no pain

Dr. Zuckerman on 8/15/00 at 19:28 (025520)

I have treated heel pain for over twenty years. The PFT has been a great benefit and addition to my war of heel pain. The patients proper use and desire to use the PFT is very important. The treatment of pf is very personal not every treatment works for everyone and not everyone is willing to try and put the time and effort into the treatment < I have patients that just want foot surgery. I have patients that just want steriod injections. I have patients that just want orthosis. The decision to do any treatment is based on an understanding betweeen the doctor and patient. The patient needs to know what will, can and won't happen with each treatment. PFT get my vote for the improvement of flexiblity and strength in the foot and leg. One of the things that I have learn is you can do the best ESWT and or foot surgery and without the PFT you will have long, delayed healing.

Re: Question about Personal Foot Trainers by Mike Wilmot? Tried them?

Pamela S on 8/16/00 at 19:52 (025603)

I would definitely suggest you try them in your situation. You'll probably find that they will 'stabilize' your feet. I use them twice a day (once before getting out of bed, once right before going to bed). I 're-discovered' some muscles when I first used them - mostly, the flexors. I also do some strengthening exercises (toe-walking with foot flexing). My PF is on the verge of gone - I stand all day at my job without problems; I simply have a little bit of irritation in certain situations, and I can now walk barefoot at home without pain (although I don't recommend it). I also have no morning pain, although I find the PFT's 'warm up' my feet in the a.m.

I think that strengthening, stretching and massage are good long-term maintenance techniques.


Re: Question about Personal Foot Trainers by Mike Wilmot? Tried them?

Nancy S. on 8/14/00 at 22:12 (025456)

April, the same question was posed by Pookie over the weekend (look down a bit for that thread). She got only a few replies, which were ambivalent. But earlier messages were posted that were more positive. Do a search at the top of this page on PFT or Personal Foot Trainer, and you'll find more reactions from people who have used them.
Nancy

Re: Pain or no pain

Bob G. on 8/14/00 at 23:56 (025458)

Hi April,

When I get the pain, I go back to the NightSplint. No pain.

What about you? Have you used it? BG


Re: Pain or no pain

April on 8/15/00 at 08:38 (025469)

BG, I haven't done anything except orthotics, easy stretching, ibprofen and avoidance.

Re: Question about Personal Foot Trainers by Mike Wilmot? Tried them?

T. Hurst on 8/15/00 at 08:49 (025472)

I tried them before I resorted to physical therapy and then epf surgery. I think, like all conservative trmts, it might have been effective earlier on in my pf problem. But, it should be used in combination with good orthodics and stiff shoes.

Re: Question about Personal Foot Trainers by Mike Wilmot? Tried them?

Mike W on 8/15/00 at 10:00 (025476)

Hello April,

Thank you for your interest in my Personal Foot Trainers.

My PFT's are designed to improve the strength and flexibility of every muscle in the foot and leg. I have yet to meet a person who has pf and has strong and flexible foot and leg muscles. The flexor and extensor digitorum and halcius longus muscles are by far the weakest lower leg muscles (the muscles and tendons that make the tip of your toes flex down and extend back up). If these and other muscles are neglected you place excessive stress on other tissues that may become stressed. Improving the strength and flexibility of these muscles is a very important part of the healing process that will compliment most pf treatments.

PFT's just like many of the self care products and treatments are intended for those people who are motivated and willing to take an active role in the healing process. Not everyone is willing or capable of this.


It is my experience that most people who have had results with my PFT's used have them consistently and the people who did not have results did not use them consistently or correctly.

Please do a word search on Mike W or PFT's and you will find more about PFT's. Regarding surveys, you should realise that everyone here has pf and that once a person is healed of PF they no longer visit this site very often.

I would be happy to send you a copy of my Plantar Fasciitis Booklet which explains my program in detail.

Prevention of pf is not talked about very much but by the number of posts that I have read regarding pf set backs, it is something that more people should think and do something about.


I hope you solve your pf forever.

Regards,

Mike Wilmot
Physical therapist, Principal Personal Foot Trainers, email (email removed)


Re: Question about Personal Foot Trainers by Mike Wilmot? Tried them?

JudyS on 8/15/00 at 10:14 (025477)

Hi April - I just read Mike W's post to you about his PFT's and I can confirm one thing for sure - all of my Physical Therapy right now is concentrated on strengthening the muscles that flex and point the toes - just as Mike has described. When I started this treatment a couple of weeks ago, I was shocked to find that I had no strength whatsoever in that area! This is easy to overlook because we concentrate so heavily on the PF itself. But, I'd developed a very poor PF-acommodating stride which created other problems. The thing that surprised me was the PT telling me that the weak 'toe' muscles could actually have been the 'egg before the PF chicken, or vice-versa!' That surprised me because I'd assumed that the PF came first. I did comment the other day about my experience with the PFT's but, in short, for me the jury's still out.

Re: To Mike..Question about Personal Foot Trainers by Mike Wilmot? Tried them?

Sue R on 8/15/00 at 10:56 (025483)

I've been examined by a Physical Therapist and she could find nothing wrong with my muscle strength or flexibility. Would this device benefit me?

Sue R


Re: Question about Personal Foot Trainers by Mike Wilmot? Tried them?

john a on 8/15/00 at 15:54 (025502)

You say that PFTs are designed to improve strength and flexibility in the foot and lower leg. How does one go about measuring or judging improvement in strength and flexibility? (other than by noticing that your PF is going away)

Re: Pain or no pain

Dr. Zuckerman on 8/15/00 at 19:28 (025520)

I have treated heel pain for over twenty years. The PFT has been a great benefit and addition to my war of heel pain. The patients proper use and desire to use the PFT is very important. The treatment of pf is very personal not every treatment works for everyone and not everyone is willing to try and put the time and effort into the treatment < I have patients that just want foot surgery. I have patients that just want steriod injections. I have patients that just want orthosis. The decision to do any treatment is based on an understanding betweeen the doctor and patient. The patient needs to know what will, can and won't happen with each treatment. PFT get my vote for the improvement of flexiblity and strength in the foot and leg. One of the things that I have learn is you can do the best ESWT and or foot surgery and without the PFT you will have long, delayed healing.

Re: Question about Personal Foot Trainers by Mike Wilmot? Tried them?

Pamela S on 8/16/00 at 19:52 (025603)

I would definitely suggest you try them in your situation. You'll probably find that they will 'stabilize' your feet. I use them twice a day (once before getting out of bed, once right before going to bed). I 're-discovered' some muscles when I first used them - mostly, the flexors. I also do some strengthening exercises (toe-walking with foot flexing). My PF is on the verge of gone - I stand all day at my job without problems; I simply have a little bit of irritation in certain situations, and I can now walk barefoot at home without pain (although I don't recommend it). I also have no morning pain, although I find the PFT's 'warm up' my feet in the a.m.

I think that strengthening, stretching and massage are good long-term maintenance techniques.