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yoga and plantar fasciitis

Posted by nana k on 9/08/00 at 20:10 (027627)

is it possible to get plantar fasciitis from practicing yoga? it is the only thing I have done differently this past year besides move into a house with tile floors and stairs.

Re: yoga and plantar fasciitis

Dr. Biehler on 9/09/00 at 07:39 (027683)

I don't think yoga is the problem. Tile floors has long been known to bring on heel pain problems. After th e age of 40 the fat pad under the heel starts to thin out reducinging the cushioning. This coupled with walking on a hard floor is all that is needed.

Re: yoga and plantar fasciitis

Kim B. on 9/09/00 at 11:22 (027699)

nana, I bet it's the tile floors. That is what I believe to be the biggest contributor to my case. Yoga actually helps me. Stretching, circulation, etc. I take it easy, often wear shoes during yoga and nix any that are foot weight bearing. there are a lot of floor postuers you can still take place in. Good Luck.

Kim B.

Re: yoga and plantar fasciitis

alan k on 9/09/00 at 15:10 (027730)

It is certainly possible to develop pf while practicing yoga. Both my wife and I are long term yoga practitioners and developed pf, without any slacking, rapid increase, or irregularities in our practice.

Dr. Biehler is right that tile floors are probably a major culprit, but it could be a combination of many things. Yoga is not a likely primary cause, and pf is not at all a common ailment among yoga practitioners.

However, it is possible that bare feet on a hard floor practicing yoga, at the time you were developing pf, contributed to the situation. In the acute stage, rest, icing, and non-wieght bearing stretching and exercise is very important. Of course, most of us (including me) don't catch things so early on, so we persist in our ordinary routines.

Take a one-two week break from yoga class, and rest and ice your feet, and add very gentle non-weightbearing stretching and strengthening as is comfortable.

Ultimately, though, yoga is going to speed the healing, but you may need to avoid balance postures, hold standing postures briefly, wear sneakers or sandals for standing postures, and possibly also avoid 'downward dog' if you cannot easily keep your heels on the floor during it.

We are back to yoga and loving it. Yoga integrates strength and flexibility throughout your entire body, thus speeding healing by getting the whole musculature, circulatory system, and neuro-muscular connections involved, unlike our tendency to focus narrowly only on the feet when addressing pf, whether with foot exercises and stretching or foot surgery. Actually our feet do not normally work in isolation but in integration with the entire body, so a whole-body approach to healing pf is the fastest and longest-lasting method.

I hope to have new pictures and information about yoga and massage for plantar fasciitis up on our Thai Massage Yoga website soon.
http://www.acutai.com

If you have any more questions about yoga and pf there is a lot more to say and I don't mind going into more detail here on the message board.


yours,

alan k

http://www.acutai.com


.

Re: yoga and plantar fasciitis

Dr. Biehler on 9/09/00 at 07:39 (027683)

I don't think yoga is the problem. Tile floors has long been known to bring on heel pain problems. After th e age of 40 the fat pad under the heel starts to thin out reducinging the cushioning. This coupled with walking on a hard floor is all that is needed.

Re: yoga and plantar fasciitis

Kim B. on 9/09/00 at 11:22 (027699)

nana, I bet it's the tile floors. That is what I believe to be the biggest contributor to my case. Yoga actually helps me. Stretching, circulation, etc. I take it easy, often wear shoes during yoga and nix any that are foot weight bearing. there are a lot of floor postuers you can still take place in. Good Luck.

Kim B.

Re: yoga and plantar fasciitis

alan k on 9/09/00 at 15:10 (027730)

It is certainly possible to develop pf while practicing yoga. Both my wife and I are long term yoga practitioners and developed pf, without any slacking, rapid increase, or irregularities in our practice.

Dr. Biehler is right that tile floors are probably a major culprit, but it could be a combination of many things. Yoga is not a likely primary cause, and pf is not at all a common ailment among yoga practitioners.

However, it is possible that bare feet on a hard floor practicing yoga, at the time you were developing pf, contributed to the situation. In the acute stage, rest, icing, and non-wieght bearing stretching and exercise is very important. Of course, most of us (including me) don't catch things so early on, so we persist in our ordinary routines.

Take a one-two week break from yoga class, and rest and ice your feet, and add very gentle non-weightbearing stretching and strengthening as is comfortable.

Ultimately, though, yoga is going to speed the healing, but you may need to avoid balance postures, hold standing postures briefly, wear sneakers or sandals for standing postures, and possibly also avoid 'downward dog' if you cannot easily keep your heels on the floor during it.

We are back to yoga and loving it. Yoga integrates strength and flexibility throughout your entire body, thus speeding healing by getting the whole musculature, circulatory system, and neuro-muscular connections involved, unlike our tendency to focus narrowly only on the feet when addressing pf, whether with foot exercises and stretching or foot surgery. Actually our feet do not normally work in isolation but in integration with the entire body, so a whole-body approach to healing pf is the fastest and longest-lasting method.

I hope to have new pictures and information about yoga and massage for plantar fasciitis up on our Thai Massage Yoga website soon.
http://www.acutai.com

If you have any more questions about yoga and pf there is a lot more to say and I don't mind going into more detail here on the message board.


yours,

alan k

http://www.acutai.com


.